Student voice, intermediary genres, and social bookmarking <br />WDHE conference, June 2010Florence Dujardin & Kirstie Edw...
Overview<br />Context: pilot use of social bookmarking in an online Master’s course<br />Social media and social bookmarki...
Context <br />MA in Professional Communication<br />Online course<br />Student profile:<br />mature learners – ‘digital im...
What is social media?<br />And should we care?<br />(Suter, Alexander, and Kaplan 2005)<br />
What is social bookmarking?<br />Mason & Rennie (2008):<br />store internet resources online (not your PC)<br />organise t...
An example: Delicious<br />
Which application?<br />Many different applications: Delicious, Connotea, CiteULike, Zotero, Diigo, etc. <br />Why Diigo? ...
Diigo task<br />Preparing for the end-of-module essay<br />Increase ‘criticality’ (Ridley 2004) towards readings<br />Draf...
Research questions<br />Literature<br />Social bookmarking seems to help students engage with the literature<br />Evidence...
Methodology<br />Case study - loop 1 of a wider action research project on using social media with e-learners<br />15 Diig...
Students’ bookmarking skills<br />“I had not heard of social bookmarking before the diigo task. I had heard of Delicious b...
Summary of Diigo contributions<br />
What happened?<br />
Student perspectives on texts<br />
Characteristics of posts<br />
Student views (end of week 1)<br />Students felt well prepared<br />Some technical glitches<br />Can’t link PDF files<br /...
Thoughts in reading peers’ posts?<br />Useful to gain other perspectives<br />Comments helped form opinions on what I have...
Student views (exit)<br />Helpful for writing your essay? (mixed)<br />I didn’t use the comments I or others made<br />Int...
Repeat the Diigo task? Yes (phew)<br />Certainly good to repeat the task… better to have it assessed<br />A good way to ex...
Summary<br />Reasonably positive feedback about the social bookmarking task and its assessment<br />An informal learning s...
Impact on marks?<br /><ul><li>In 2009-10
Range: 50 – 94 %
Average: 65 %</li></ul>In 2008-9<br />Range: 39 – 61 % <br />Average: 42 %<br />
Action points<br />Repeat but embed in a core module<br />Start early the module (Webb 2009)<br />Support students before ...
To conclude<br />Interesting experiment with social bookmarking (Diigo)<br />Reasonably positive student feedback<br />Ref...
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Student voice and social bookmarking

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Summary of a pilot study about Diigo social bookmarking (WDHE 2010 paper)

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Student voice and social bookmarking

  1. 1. Student voice, intermediary genres, and social bookmarking <br />WDHE conference, June 2010Florence Dujardin & Kirstie EdwardsSheffield Hallam University<br />
  2. 2. Overview<br />Context: pilot use of social bookmarking in an online Master’s course<br />Social media and social bookmarking<br />Methodology: action research<br />Findings: cautiously positive<br />Discussion: value of social bookmarking<br />Action points<br />
  3. 3. Context <br />MA in Professional Communication<br />Online course<br />Student profile:<br />mature learners – ‘digital immigrants’ (Prensky 2001)<br />communication professionals – what counts as knowledge in their practice and how they present it differs from the practices of Communication Studies (notably reading and writing practices)<br />
  4. 4. What is social media?<br />And should we care?<br />(Suter, Alexander, and Kaplan 2005)<br />
  5. 5. What is social bookmarking?<br />Mason & Rennie (2008):<br />store internet resources online (not your PC)<br />organise them using user-defined tags<br />share them with people (or not)<br />comment on them (or not)<br />The ‘ecology’ view of social media:<br />practices: reading, note-taking, ‘talk about texts’<br />value: ‘criticality’<br />people: students, tutor (and External Examiner)<br />
  6. 6. An example: Delicious<br />
  7. 7. Which application?<br />Many different applications: Delicious, Connotea, CiteULike, Zotero, Diigo, etc. <br />Why Diigo? It is designed for education: <br />privacy (group accessible by invitation only)<br />threaded discussion about bookmarks<br />‘topic’ facility<br />extract entries made by individual students<br />
  8. 8. Diigo task<br />Preparing for the end-of-module essay<br />Increase ‘criticality’ (Ridley 2004) towards readings<br />Drafting ideas and develop a personal stance<br />Share notes and get comments from peers<br />Letting off steam about the literature<br />Assessed (up to 10% of module mark)<br />Content: minimum of 5 texts (up to 2%)<br />Sociability: minimum of 5 comments on peers’ work (up to 2%)<br />Quality: Summary and value of each text (up to 6%)<br />
  9. 9. Research questions<br />Literature<br />Social bookmarking seems to help students engage with the literature<br />Evidence is mostly about undergraduates doing campus-based courses – using Delicious<br />What uses and benefits for an online MA?<br />offer a type of informal learning with peers?<br />support appropriation of disciplinary knowledge?<br />enable a pedagogy inspired by ‘Academic Literacies’ (Lea, Street, Lillis, Ivanič, Barton)<br />
  10. 10. Methodology<br />Case study - loop 1 of a wider action research project on using social media with e-learners<br />15 Diigo ‘contributors’: <br />8 women<br />7 men (incl. 1 late contributor and a non-contributor)<br />Online methods <br />Questionnaire to find out about social media skills<br />Interviews to capture experiences<br />Observation / content analysis<br />
  11. 11. Students’ bookmarking skills<br />“I had not heard of social bookmarking before the diigo task. I had heard of Delicious but did not know what it was used for.”<br />Only 3 students out of 12 use social bookmarking.<br />
  12. 12. Summary of Diigo contributions<br />
  13. 13.
  14. 14. What happened?<br />
  15. 15. Student perspectives on texts<br />
  16. 16.
  17. 17. Characteristics of posts<br />
  18. 18. Student views (end of week 1)<br />Students felt well prepared<br />Some technical glitches<br />Can’t link PDF files<br />Problems with password-protected articles accessed via university library<br />What does it feel to share?<br />in the beginning I was worried<br />I find it a bit strange<br />I feel fairly comfortable<br />a feeling of pressure as though I am in competition<br />
  19. 19. Thoughts in reading peers’ posts?<br />Useful to gain other perspectives<br />Comments helped form opinions on what I have read<br />“I was going to reject Harrison’s model but after reading peer comments I read it again and thought I could use it”<br />The level of discusses [sic] stayed superficial<br />It helped me assuage my fears<br />A useful task?<br />Interesting to get to know a social bookmarking tool<br />Useful, especially when readings are consistently tagged<br />It’s prompted me to think deeper about the texts<br />
  20. 20. Student views (exit)<br />Helpful for writing your essay? (mixed)<br />I didn’t use the comments I or others made<br />Interesting but I had already done a lot of reading<br />It enable to read in a structured way and also to record my thoughts<br />It focused my mind and sharing info enriched the learning process<br />Reassurance that my ideas were on the right track<br />Links with other pieces of research<br />
  21. 21. Repeat the Diigo task? Yes (phew)<br />Certainly good to repeat the task… better to have it assessed<br />A good way to expose people to this sort of facility<br />I must admit, I’m enjoying it. In fact, it’s sort of addictive<br />It gives me a sense of achievement<br />We didn’t all use Diigo to its full potential<br />
  22. 22. Summary<br />Reasonably positive feedback about the social bookmarking task and its assessment<br />An informal learning space (a strong ‘social presence’: supportive, sharing)<br />Some appropriation of academic texts(some ‘cognitive presence’: connections with practice and evaluation)<br />Superficial (‘satisficing’: shorter comments, more descriptive – esp. male students)<br />
  23. 23. Impact on marks?<br /><ul><li>In 2009-10
  24. 24. Range: 50 – 94 %
  25. 25. Average: 65 %</li></ul>In 2008-9<br />Range: 39 – 61 % <br />Average: 42 %<br />
  26. 26. Action points<br />Repeat but embed in a core module<br />Start early the module (Webb 2009)<br />Support students before and during the task<br />not just technical aspects<br />encourage and support criticality more actively (e.g. through the ‘topic’ facility)<br />Encourage and support social tagging<br />Link to employability (and widening participation)<br />
  27. 27. To conclude<br />Interesting experiment with social bookmarking (Diigo)<br />Reasonably positive student feedback<br />Refinements needed<br />Worth revisiting (loop 2)<br />Potential to help mature e-learners to develop a personal stance towards academic literature<br />
  28. 28. Thank you for listening<br />
  29. 29. References <br />Beaumont, C. (2010) Using Open Online Resources to Enhance Social Learning. Brighton: HEA Art Design Media Subject Centre. Available at <http://www.adm.heacademy.ac.uk/resources/case-studies/using-open-online-resources-to-enhance-social-learning>. [Last accessed February 2010]<br />Garrison, D. R. and Anderson, T. (2003) E-learning in the 21st Century: A Framework for Research and Practice. London: RoutledgeFalmer.<br />Hammond, T., Hannay, T., Lund, B. and Scott, J. (2005) 'Social bookmarking tools (I): a general review '. D-Lib Magazine. 11 (4). Available at <http://dlib.org/dlib/april05/hammond/04hammond.html>. [Last accessed January 2010]<br />Lomas, C. P. (2005) Things You Should Know About Social Bookmarking. Boulder, CO: Educause. Available at <http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ELI7001.pdf>. [Last accessed January 2010]<br />Lund, B., Hammond, T., Flack, M. and Hannay, T. (2005) 'Social bookmarking tools (II): a case study - Connotea '. D-Lib Magazine. 11 (4). Available at <http://dlib.org/dlib/april05/lund/04lund.html>. [Last accessed January 2010]<br />Mason, R. and Rennie, F. (2008) E-learning and Social Networking Handbook: Resources for Higher Education. Abingdon: Routledge.<br />Prensky, M. (2001) 'Digital natives, digital immigrants - Part I'. On the Horizon,9 (5): 1-6.<br />Ridley, D. (2004) 'Puzzling experiences in Higher Education: critical moments for conversation'. Studies in Higher Education, 29 (1): 92-107. <br />Stolley, K. (2009 ) 'Integrating social media into existing work environments: the case of Delicious'. Journal of Business and Technical Communication 23 (3): 350-371.<br />Suter, V., Alexander, B. and Kaplan, P. (2005a) 'Social software and the future of conferences - right now'. Educause Review, 40 (1): 46-59<br />The New Media Consortium and Educause Learning Initiative (2007) 2007 Horizon Report. Austin, TX: The New Media Consortium. http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/CSD4781.pdf<br />Tinker, A., Byrne, G. and Cattermole, C. (2009) 'Creating learning communities: three open source tools'. 6th LDHEN Symposium. Bournemouth University, April 2009. <br />Webb, E. (2009) 'Engaging students with engaging tools'. EDUCAUSE Quarterly. 32 (4). Available at <http://www.educause.edu/EDUCAUSE%2BQuarterly/EDUCAUSEQuarterlyMagazineVolum/EngagingStudentswithEngagingTo/192954>. [Last accessed February 2010]<br />

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