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  • Direct and Indirect Attack Mop-up/Overhaul Exposures Structural and wild land fires
  • Most situations now days are class A situations. Unless there is an significant amount of fuel, in depth (over 1”) Putting Class A foam on tires, in a wet state can allow the water to cool because of its ability to stick to the tires. Exposure Protection: Class A foam is excellent for exposure protect. The foam will keep the water on a structure where the water would run off.
  • The focus of this presentation is Class A Ordinary Combustibles and some on Class B flammable and combustible liquids. We will compare the differences in the two foams. 2
  • “We’re going to use foam now instead of water.” Foam is water. Most application rates are.3 to .5% leaving 99.5% water Better Cooling: Class A foam will increase the surface area of water. The result is that the water can turn to stream quicker resulting in quicker cooling. Less Rekindles: Class A foam is excellent for mop up applications because it improves penetration into the crevices of the fuel. The results are a reduction in rekindles. Reduced water damage: Because the foam knocks the fire down with less water and is more effective at mop up the water damage is substantial reduced to the structure. 2-3 times faster knockdown than water: The surface area of water is increased when it becomes foam. All of the water is on the outside of the water bubble, which increases the surface area. The water will turn to stream easier with the increase in surface area. One advantage, the increased steam conversion has to watched for one “disadvantage”... More steam. When you use foam, you will make more steam. Be prepared, and allow for the steam to escape.
  • Class A foam is very good at making bubbles at very low percentages. Class A foam is carbon attractive. It makes the water stick to charred carbon based fuels Class A foam is a wetting agent, that reduces the surface tension that exists in water. This surface tension allows water to sit on surfaces and not soak in. Foam helps to increase the surface area of a gallon of water, is how you absorb more BTUs. A bubble will turn to steam much quicker than a droplet of water. This steam production is what makes foam capable of knocking fires down very quickly. During over-haul and mop-up type operations, the foam is effectively used as a wetting agent that has low surface tension that can soak in fast, and stay attached to the surfaces, because of the carbon affinity, or attractiveness of the soapy water. Exposure Protection: Class A foam is excellent for exposure protect. The foam will keep the water on a structure were the water would run off. The fact that Class A is used at such low percentages, is what makes it affordable to use on a regular basis.
  • Strong degreaser- over time it can dry the oil out of leather boots/gloves or leather on turn out gear, if not washed off after each use. CONS – Raw concentrates will work on packing and seals. Understanding the use of Class A foam on a Class B fire, It will mix with over time Could have re-ignition A foam does not have that high burn back resistance
  • Accuracy in foam proportioning is important. If your proportioner is off by 30%, just remember that 1/10 of 1% is equal to a gallon of concentrate per 1,000 gallons of water. Four types of foam. Foam Solution - Wet water, no real foam bubbles. Wet Foam - Frothy wet foam, a little foam bubble structure, a very quick drain time. USE- overhaul or mop-up. Fluid Foam - a higher bubble producer, slower drain time. USE - initial attack on most fires. Dry Foam - very high bubble producer, very slow drain time. USE- to cover and protect, exposure protection.
  • REMOVING FUELS – If we take a quantity of water and cause it to spread over and also penetrate the surface of the fuel plus stay there for some extended period of time, have we not made the fuel wet and thus removed it from availability for combustion? The answer is again, yes. INTERRUPTION OF THE CHEMICAL CHAIN REACTION – This is the hardest one to understand but, the easiest to see (the visual effect of foam) NO SMOKE. The hydrocarbon molecule is a chain molecule and it fractures many times in the combustion process into fragments or free radicals. These fragments are actively seeking others to recombine with just to fracture again (the chain reaction). The foam molecule actively seeks out the available fragments containing the carbon atom and bonds with them in a permanent bond thus removing it from the chain reaction.
  • Class A: High infinity for carbon, readily bonds with carbon to wet the fuel causing extinguishment and/or preventing or limiting ignition. Class B: Does not like carbon. Does not react with the fuel, permitting the foam blanket to stay on top of the fuel surface for extended period. Emulsifiers: React with fuel to limit vapor release. Used at high rates, 3% to 6% or higher.
  • Most fuel storage facilities, airports, and refineries forbid the use of Class A or dual purpose foams. Note also that dual purpose foams have not been certified to be used on alcohol fuel. The only foams that have worked well on alcohol is the AR-AFFF or ATC foams. It is very important to do your homework in purchasing Most often the good ones do not cost much more or any more than weaker foams.
  • U.S. Forest Service is the only independent testing lab for Class”A” Foam
  • Since first due engines respond to buildings and MVAs more than anything else, L.A. County has standardized on Class A foam on all engines.
  • This is simply some Class A and ATC Class B concentrate that go together. The A sets the B off
  • Even mixing Class B Foam from different manufactures can Gel. Should always use the same foam and never mix A with B foam of any kind, this causes a polymerization reaction. Approved class A concentrates should not gel, but might want to test the two before mixing in the same tank.
  • Low expansion combination nozzle (impact foam) This is the type we will use for structural firefighter because of the reach Low expansion with the combination nozzle/smooth bore will have the same reach as water Low expansion foam tube, will loose 10%-15% of the stream reach
  • We are not going to give you a full working knowledge of all the systems on the market, but will show a few and give you a vague idea of how they work.
  • This is the inexpensive way to make foam on a trial basis. Also can be used in an emergency situation. However, this is not good practice for everyday operations because of the problems that are associated with batch mixing
  • You would know starting out how much water was in the tank. But as the water starts to bubble, you will be guessing at how much foam to dump in the tank.
  • When you open the tank to pump valve, it will cause foaming in the tank
  • Manual tend to all be eductor type with constant flow class B systems
  • These are the Cadillac units, These systems are designed to run class “A” foam. But some can run class “B” foam if spec’d the right way.
  • This is a Scotty system on the grass truck at the Ohio Fire Academy, (around the pump) (wildland use)
  • This is suitable for big Class B Foam Engines Small wildland class A engine Not for class A structural use
  • Note, the water is being drawn off the discharge side and back around through an eductor (venturi) then back into the water stream on the suction (vacuum) side of the pump. When the system is charged, foam is available at all discharges. Remember the foam is being run true the pump, this requires the pump to be flushed after each use.
  • A water flow in a conduit passes through a device that has a wheel in in the waterway. The wheel spins in proportion to the water velocity. The wheel sends an electric signal to a processor. The processor then controls the speed of an electric concentrate pump that pumps concentrate into the water stream. The stream is then divided into individual conduits by a manifold.
  • Exposure protection Structural thermal insulation
  • Impact is made on impact with a combination nozzle (straight stream) or solid bore. (floor/wall/ceiling) Aspirated nozzle will have a way to add air at the nozzle. CAFS is foam with the concentrate/air/water all being added at the truck.
  • Air aspirated nozzle are required by N.F.P.A. for fuel fires
  • The advantage? Aspirated foam makes a thicker blanket that will smother the fuel vapors faster/longer
  • The disadvantage? Lack of reach makes it difficult to actually get the foam on the fuel
  • This is a perfect medium expansion stream (round column of bubbles) Good for 3 dimensional fires (car/pallets/tires/debris in a structure)
  • Large fuel spills/warehouses/airport hangers
  • The average first due engine doesn’t respond to Class B incidents very often. MVAs with fuel spills aren’t really that much of a Class B hazard. Rubber tires and plastic interiors aren’t Class B either. In fact, Class foam is proven to be a better agent for rubber and plastic fires then Class B foam.
  • Look at the pavement and area around the truck. The fire area was larger, but the spill has either burned off or has been suppressed. The ground fire is gone. The actual square footage of fire is fairly low.
  • Know what you’re doing. Size it up and make sure Plan A is going to work.
  • Look at the grass in front of the fire. The ground fire is gone. The actual square footage of fire is fairly low.
  • Know what you’re doing. Size it up and make sure Plan A is going to work.

Foam Use Class PP Foam Use Class PP Presentation Transcript

  • 7TH ANNUAL ARKANSAS FIRE BOAT SCHOOL FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, JUNE 4TH AND 5TH, 2010 SPILLWAY LAUNCHING RAMP/IRON MOUNTAIN RESORT DEGRAY LAKE, ARKANSAS
  • Instructors
    • Michael Ayers Pierce MFG. Senior Fire Protection Specalist
    • Paul Gaines Regional Manager Elkhart Brass
  •  
      • Class A combustibles: Wood, paper, tires, piles of mulch/brush, bales of hay/straw/cotton, car fires
      • Effective in initial attack, overhaul, mop-up and exposure protection
      • Does NOT affect water application rates or manpower requirements
      • 98% of the fires we face are considered Class A fires,
      • so for most departments, it just makes sense to use Class A
    • Is a surfactant-treated water that acts as a wet water solution unfoamed and has the ability to be turned into foam.
  • C A B D Flammable Liquids Gasoline Acetone Kerosene Ordinary Combustibles Wood Cloth Paper Wool Energized Electrical Equipment Transformers Computers Electric Ovens Combustible Metals Magnesium Titanium Zirconium Sodium Potassium
    • Faster Knockdown With Less Chance of Fire Rekindling
    • Reduction of Water Damage and Better Preservation of Evidence
    • Improved Efficiency of Water Saves Money Due to Fewer Trips by Tenders…(Fuel, wear and tear, manpower, less time on scene, etc.)
    • Simply put…It makes water Better
    • Class A foam
      • Wood, paper, tires, any Class A combustible
      • Effective in initial attack, overhaul, mop-up and exposure protection
      • Does NOT affect application rates or manpower requirements
    • Class B foam
      • Liquid Hydrocarbons and polar solvents
    • Emulsifier / Spill response agent
      • Vapor suppression and hydrocarbon recovery
    • Gel
      • Exposure protection (wildland)
      • Good at wetting and cooling fuels.
      • Suppress flammable vapors.
      • Reduce smoke emission.
      • Reflect away radiant heat.
      • Insulate against radiant and convective heat.
      • Hold water on surfaces.
      • Durability (hold water on surfaces).
      • Biodegrade easily.
      • Low mixing ratio (0.1% to 1.0%).
    • PRO’S
    • Improved wetting/cooling and heat absorption
    • Suppression of flammable vapors
    • Reduction in smoke
    • Biodegradable( conditional )
    • Opaque surface reflects heat (exposure protection)
    • Ability to hold water on any surface
    • Durability & controlled drain time
    • Mix rates .1%-1%
    • CON’S
    • Degreaser
    • Conditional use for class B fires
  • A measure of the durability and viscosity of foam Foam Solution Wet Foam Fluid Foam Dry Foam 0.1%-1% 0.2% 0.5% 1.0%
  • Class A foam attack - 125 gpm at 0.5%
  • NOTE: Lack of smoke; ability of Class A foam to bond with carbon
    • 1890’s brick schoolhouse
      • 4 miles outside of town
      • No hydrants
    • First pumper on scene
      • 6 minute response
      • 750 gallons of water
      • FoamPro 2001
    • Initial attack
      • 2-1/2” line
      • 328 gpm
      • 0.5% Class A foam
    • Knockdown
      • 6 seconds
      • 33 gallons of water
      • 0.17 gallons of Class A foam concentrate
    • Water:
    • 750 gpm supplied by:
      • Two 2-1/2”
      • Two 1-3/4”
    • No effect
    • Class A foam:
    • 60 gpm @ 0.5%
    • Medium expansion
    • 20 minute knockdown
    Tire Fire Plain Water Tire Fire Class A Foam
  •  
    • Class A Foam
    • Carbon-attractive so that material is prone to migrate toward the fuel.
    • Low water surface tension to promote spreading.
    • Low water surface tension to promote wetting
    • High detergency to emulsify oils & waxes to allow wetting.
    • High foamability
    • High degradability in the environment.
    • Class B Foam
    • Carbon-shedding so that the foam tends to stay away from the fuel.
    • Low water surface tension to promote spreading and allow a film of solution to form over fuel.
    • Low detergency to resist fuel pickup.
    • High foamability.
    • Moderate degradability in the environment.
    • REMOVING FUELS
    • Good wetting agent (penetrating fuel with water)
    • Ability to hold water on any surface
    • INTERRUPTION OF CHEMICAL CHAIN REACTION
    • Suppression of flammable vapors
    • Reduction of smoke
  • Foam Bubble Class A Class B Emulsifiers Carbon-loving Good Spreading Excellent wetting Carbon-shedding Excellent spreading Poor wetting Designed to react with the fuel source
  • When plain water is applied to fuel, surface tension causes water to bead up …
  • Add Class A foam to plain water… solution spreads and penetrates the fuel…
  • … moisture content of the fuel increases and chance of rekindle is reduced.
  •  
  • 5.3.4.1.1 Wetting agent solutions at the concentractions specified by the manufacturer shall be evaluated to, and comply with, the requirements of UL711 for Class A fires utilizing a 3A wood crib. 5.3.4.1.2 The test shall be conducted utilizing a 9.5 L (2.5 gal) listed 2A rated water extinguisher. U.L. 711 is the portable extinguisher test series. A 2.5 gallon extinguisher can never get more than a 2A rating with plain water. When a wetting agent or Class A foam is added to the water then the extinguisher is more effective. The 3A test fire is larger than the 2A and is two (2) two times the amount of fire loading, in general, as the 2A fire loading. When an agent in an extinguisher passes the test cycle, then the agent is rated by U.L. as better than plain water.
    • U.L. 162 test
    • A test for class B foams
    • 50 sq. Ft. Pan with 8” of freeboard
    • N-heptane fuel
    • 2” of fuel on top of water
    • 1 minute preburn
    • 2 gpm application rate
    • Time allowed to extinguish – 3 minutes
    • Secure time – 9 minutes
    • Re-ignition – try twice
    • Burn back test - yes
    • NFPA 18 Test
    • A test for wetting agent / foams
    • 50 sq. ft. pan with 8” of freeboard
    • N-heptane fuel
    • 2” of fuel on top of water
    • 1 minute preburn
    • 10 gpm application rate
    • Time allowed to extinguish – no time, don’t overflow pan
    • Secure time - not tested
    • Re-ignition – not tested
    • Burn back test - no
    The 162 test is obviously much more demanding
    • Upon testing and approval to the 162 standard, a foam can have a UL label on the container and the good ones do.
    • There isn’t a UL standard assigned to the NFPA 18. However, companies pay UL to perform the NFPA 18 test. Then the company puts a UL label on the container. You have to read carefully to see what UL tested the foam for, 162 or NFPA 18…….
    • Only independent testing lab that tests
    • Class “A” Foam
    • For the best results, you should use approved products
  •  
  • http://www.fs.fed.us/ rm/fire/download/chemical/qpl_current.pdf
  • Many Fire Departments Are Carrying Only Class A Or Universal Foams
    • Those departments include Los Angeles County (Class A).
    • Such departments have performed tests and conducted exercises that have determined their policies. These departments have not abandoned Class B foam. They have re-assigned how the Class B foam is carried and stationed.
    2. These departments carry Class A foam on the first due engines and carry Class B foam on target hazard vehicles. The target hazard vehicles are stationed in areas where the Class B hazard is the highest.
  • Choosing A Foam, Or Foams
    • Determine the foam generating capacity to be required of first due engines, special hazard engines, and special hazard units (foam trailers, foam tenders, etc.
    • Determine the type and amount of foam concentrates required to implement the program(s)
    • Upon implementation of a program: CONDUCT TESTS to determine if the program is adequate to meet the needs.
    • Adequately evaluate the hazards present, past, current, and future.
  • Other Considerations
    • $$$ Per Gallon vs. Application Rate: Lower Cost per Gallon of Concentrate Does Not Always Equate to Lower Operating Costs
    • 1% foam does not cost six times as much as 6% foam. 3% does not cost 1/3 of what a 1% foam costs.
    • DO THE MATH……..DO THE HOMEWORK
    • A Class A foam, in order to work properly, needs to be attractive to carbon based fuels and a good emulsifier.
    • A Class B foam shouldn’t be fuel attractive or necessarily an emulsifier.
  • Well….for one thing, at the concentrate level, Class A foam and Class B AR AFFF don’t like each other……
    • Result of mixed foam (in strainer)
  •  
  •  
    • Two basic types
    • Manual
    • Automatic
    • Placing a pre-measured amount of foam concentrate into a tank of known volume.
  •  
    • Foaming in tank
    • Pump priming difficulties
    • Water refill difficulties
    • Cleansing of lubricant
    • Use of excessive foam concentrates
    • Foam solution degradation
  • EDUCTOR A mixing system that uses water pressure to draw foam concentrate into the water stream for mixing.
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    • EJECTOR SYSTEM
    • A mixing system the injects foam concentrate into the water stream, is sometimes called an injector system
  •  
      • A system situated at the pump that draws concentrate into the water system
      • Works by drawing concentrate by venturi action utilizing pump pressure and vacuum with a venturi to draw concentrate into the water stream.
  •  
  • Around the Pump Proportioner
  •  
  • Do NOT Recirc water when foam system is on
  • Set and monitor water flow rate and adjust metering valve accordingly
  • Water Tank Foam Tank Flow Meter Water Pump
  •  
    • Surface- ( Impact )
    • Nozzle- ( air aspirated foam )
    • Pump- Compressed air foam ( CAFS )
    • All Nozzles will work with Class A Foam Depending on the Application.
  •  
  • Combination Nozzle
  • Non-Aspirated
  • Automatic Nozzles with Foam Tube
  • Low Expansion
  • Medium Expansion
  •  
  • High Expansion
  • Ground Monitor
  • CLASS B FOAMS
    • APPLICATION RATE EXAMPLES
  • So, What Happens When Class A Foam Is Used on Class B Fuels ?
    • Often times, it works.
    The Outcome is wholly determined by the situation.
  • Mechanism of Foams on a Liquid Class A Class B
    • Carbon-shedding
    • Excellent spreading
    • Might form a film to speed foam spreading
    • Will either float or sink to bottom
    • Carbon-attractive
    • Good Spreading
    • Will begin to emulsify some fuel and sink to bottom
    Alcohol Resistant Class B
    • Carbon-shedding
    • Excellent spreading
    • Forms a polymer film between fuel and bubbles
    • Will either float or sink to bottom
  • A Class B foam must form a cohesive barrier over the surface of the liquid that is impermeable to product vapors A layer of foam over the liquid surface is usually a cohesive barrier. A film is often not a vapor barrier
  • The Most Critical Aspects of Class B Foam Application Are….
    • The Application Rate.
            • The application rate is the amount foam solution, expressed in GPM, that will be needed to achieve extinguishment.
    • The Extinguishment Time.
            • The extinguishment time is the amount time, expressed in minutes, that will be needed to achieve extinguishment.
    • The Concentrate Consumption Rate.
            • The concentrate consumption rate is computed in gallons by multiplying the application rate by the percentage.
  • The Most Critical Aspects of Class B Foam Application Are….
    • The Concentrate Consumption Total.
            • The concentrate consumption rate is computed in gallons by multiplying the application rate by the percentage, and then by the application time.
    Concentrate Consumption Rate & Concentrate Consumption Total Are Critical In Determining A Department’s Ability To Handle A Class B Incident
  • AREA x RATE = GPM of Solution 2000 .10 200 gpm GPM x %CON. = GPM of Concentrate 200 .03 6 gpm GPM x %Water = GPM of Water 200 .97 194 gpm GPM x TIME = TOTAL GAL CONC. 6 15 90 gal GPM x TIME = TOTAL GAL WATER 194 15 2910 gal Ignited Fuel Spill: Gasoline Application Example 3% Concentrate 50’ 40’
  • What Are The Main Logistics Issues On This Fire?
    • #1 is making sure that a foam concentrate flow of 6 gpm is achievable. That is not possible with a single FoamPro 2002 or Hale 5.0, regardless of what is done. If there are two of them, then it is possible.
    • #2 is having a total of 90 gallons of concentrate available within a 15 to 30 minute time frame. The 90 gallons is the total needed. The attack can commence when there is enough concentrate available to do the original suppression.
    • If the proper application rate for the fuel is reached, the attack should take no more than 3 to 5 minutes to reach extinguishment or fire control. 20 to 30 gallons of concentrate will be needed. However that amount of concentrate leaves no reserve.
    • Don’t attack until it is assured that the proper amount of concentrate to both extinguish and hold is available.
  • How Big Is The Actual Fire?
    • The original fire, inclusive of the spill may have been 2000 sq. ft.
    • Now it is smaller. The tank is only about 400 sq. ft.
    • BUT it is full depth of heated fuel. Only a good foam will work, but a relatively small, well placed stream will do the job.
    • The biggest mistake made is to get too close with the nozzle and to continually agitate the fuel. The fire will not stop all the way until the agitation stops.
    • Find a “REAL” foam nozzle to finish off the fire, not a fog nozzle with no aspiration.
    50’ 8’
    • After the ground spill is out of the way the fire isn’t very big and a large foam flow isn’t required. Hitting what you are aiming at is of the utmost importance, however.
    • When people can do that, a fire like this can be done on a 30 gallon foam tank and people have done it.
    • However, when they got it wrong, the 30 gallon tank was just enough to screw things up royally.
  • AREA x RATE = GPM of Solution 2000 .10 200 gpm GPM x %CON. = GPM of Concentrate 200 .01 2 gpm GPM x %Water = GPM of Water 200 .99 198 gpm GPM x TIME = TOTAL GAL CONC. 2 15 30 gal GPM x TIME = TOTAL GAL WATER 198 15 2970 gal Ignited Fuel Spill: Gasoline Application Example 1% A 1% Hydrocarbon Foam Is Much More Efficient In Terms Of Storage And Handling 50’ 40’
  • What Are The Main Logistics Issues On This Fire?
    • #1 is making sure that a foam concentrate flow of 2 gpm is achievable. That is achievable with any of the automated proportioners except the FoamPro 1600s.
    • #2 is having a total of 30 gallons of concentrate available within a 15 to 30 minute time frame. The 30 gallons is the total needed. The attack can commence when there is enough concentrate available to do the original suppression.
    • If the proper application rate for the fuel is reached, the attack should take no more than 3 to 5 minutes to reach extinguishment or fire control. 5 to 10 gallons of concentrate will be needed. However that amount of concentrate leaves no reserve.
    • Don’t attack until it is assured that the proper amount of concentrate to both extinguish and hold is available. With today’s foam tanks there should be enough
  • How Big Is The Actual Fire?
    • The original fire, inclusive of the spill may have been 2000 sq. ft.
    • Now it is smaller. The tank is only about 400 sq. ft.
    • BUT it is full depth of heated fuel. Only a good foam will work, but a relatively small, well placed stream will do the job.
    • The biggest mistake made is to get too close with the nozzle and to continually agitate the fuel. The fire will not stop all the way until the agitation stops.
    • Find a “REAL” foam nozzle to finish off the fire, not a fog nozzle with no aspiration. Add the foam tube that all the manufacturers offer
    50’ 8’
    • After the ground spill is out of the way the fire isn’t very big and a large foam flow isn’t required. Hitting what you are aiming at is of the utmost importance, however.
    • When people can do that, a fire like this can be done on 10 gallons of 1% foam and people have done it.
    • However, when they got it wrong, the 10 gallons was just enough to screw things up royally and keep the fire going.
  • AREA x RATE = GPM of Solution 2000 .20 400 gpm GPM x %CON. = GPM of Concentrate 400 .06 24 gpm GPM x %Water = GPM of Water 400 .94 376 gpm GPM x TIME = TOTAL GAL CONC. 24 15 360 gal GPM x TIME = TOTAL GAL WATER 376 15 5640 gal Ignited Fuel Spill: Ethanol Application Example 6% 50’ 40’ A 6% Alcohol foam will make this fire a logistics issue. Where is 360 gallons of foam going to come from?
  • What Are The Main Logistics Issues On This Fire?
    • #1 is making sure that a foam concentrate flow of 24 gpm is achievable. That is not possible with a single Husky 12, FoamPro 2002 or Hale 5.0, regardless of what is done. If there are two Husky 12s then it is possible. A single Husky 30 will be fine for this fire
    • #2 is having a total of 360 gallons of concentrate available within a 15 to 30 minute time frame. The 360 gallons is the total needed. The attack can commence when there is enough concentrate available to do the original suppression.
    • If the proper application rate for the fuel is reached, the attack should take no more than 3 to 5 minutes to reach extinguishment or fire control. 80 to 120 gallons of concentrate will be needed. However that amount of concentrate leaves no reserve.
    • Don’t attack until it is assured that the proper amount of concentrate to both extinguish and hold is going to be available.
    • A proportioner that can draft is paramount in this situation.
  • AREA x RATE = GPM of Solution 2000 .20 400 gpm GPM x %CON. = GPM of Concentrate 400 .03 12 gpm GPM x %Water = GPM of Water 400 .97 388 gpm GPM x TIME = TOTAL GAL CONC. 12 15 180 gal GPM x TIME = TOTAL GAL WATER 376 15 5640 gal Ignited Fuel Spill: Methanol Application Example 3% A 3% Alcohol Foam Is Efficient In Terms Of Storage and Handling As Compared To 6% Alcohol Foam. Large Amounts Of Concentrate Are Still Required 50’ 40’
  • What Are The Main Logistics Issues On This Fire?
    • #1 is making sure that a foam concentrate flow of 12 gpm is achievable. That is not possible with a single FoamPro 2002 or Hale 5.0, regardless of what is done. A single Husky 12 will be fine for this fire
    • #2 is having a total of 180 gallons of concentrate available within a 15 to 30 minute time frame. The 180 gallons is the total needed. The attack can commence when there is enough concentrate available to do the original suppression.
    • If the proper application rate for the fuel is reached, the attack should take no more than 3 to 5 minutes to reach extinguishment or fire control. 40 to 60 gallons of concentrate will be needed. However that amount of concentrate leaves no reserve.
    • Don’t attack until it is assured that the proper amount of concentrate to both extinguish and hold is going to be available.
    • A proportioner that can draft is paramount in this situation.
  • Motor Fuel Is The Most Prevalent Hazard
    • BLENDED GASOLINE
      • A polar solvent is blended with a hydrocarbon
      • Process performed at the refinery level and at tank terminals
    • RESULTS
      • A slightly polar hydrocarbon with high vapor pressure and certain degree of a lowered surface tension and water miscibility
    • MATERIALS USED IN BLENDING
      • METHANOL
      • ETHANOL
    • DIFFERENT BLENDS AVAILABLE
      • Blends can contain from 7% TO 20% (varies by region and weather)
  • You can make a difference Get back to the basics! National Fallen Firefighters Foundation Life Safety Initiatives 2004
  • Duty and responsibility -- Make EVERY DAY a TRAINING DAY….so that… EVERYONE GOES HOME! Firefighter Life Safety Initiatives
    • Drive with care – everyone wears a seatbelt…. EVERYONE!
        • Safe speed --- always under control
        • Stop at red lights… STOP!
        • Remain seated and belted while in motion
        • Protect the roadway/scene
    Public Safety is our Duty Firefighter Safety is our Responsibility EVERYONE GOES HOME !
    • The right FIREFIGHTING Strategy - Offensive or Defensive?
        • SIZE-UP & Evaluate risks before attacking…
        • Do not risk a firefighter’s LIFE to save property
        • Closely monitor changing conditions
    Public Safety is our Duty Firefighter Safety is our Responsibility EVERYONE GOES HOME !
    • Stay together so WE don’t get lost
      • Accountability and crew integrity are essential…
      • Stay oriented --- always know the way out
      • Predict and manage your air supply
      • Communicate with your crew & command
    Public Safety is our Duty Firefighter Safety is our Responsibility EVERYONE GOES HOME !
  • Public Safety is our Duty Firefighter Safety is our Responsibility EVERYONE GOES HOME !
    • Focus on “FIREFIGHTING FIT” and remember REHAB at the scene!
        • Regular medical examinations
        • Physical fitness program
        • Monitored rehab after strenuous activity
        • Eat Smart
    • PLEASE ASK ANY AND ALL QUESTIONS !
    • We want you to leave the Class with all the information you need to operate at a Fire Scene with confidence.