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Using the Internet as a Reliable Resource<br />Alana Elkins<br />via Alan C. November<br />
REAL<br />R- Read the URL<br /> A- Ask about the author<br />E - Examine the content<br />L - Links<br />
How to Read a URL<br />Example: http://www.moma.org<br />Domain name = moma.org (moma =Museum of Modern Art) (location 184...
Read cont. <br />- it can provide information or clues about the site, such as the publisher (location 372-76) <br />look ...
Examining the Content<br />Just because a site looks important does not mean that it is<br />Ask  yourself:<br />Is the in...
Ask About the Author and Owner<br />Before using a website as a source, check for the following:<br />Is the author’s name...
Links<br />Forward and Back Links <br />forward link = name given to your link from your website to a page on someone else...
Useful Tips<br />.gov - only government officials can purchase this site, one of the most trustworthy<br />Search Tip: put...
Notes<br />(1)  A description of the context in which you plan to use this artifact (be specific and clear)
<br />For this...
Notes cont.<br />(3)  A brief summary of why you decided to leave out certain content 
<br />Most of the content that I ch...
Notes cont. <br />and to look for a website that is creidble add "+" to it with the extention .gov and you will get result...
Citation<br />November, A. (2008). Web literacy for educators [Kindle]. <br />
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Using the internet as a reliable resource

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Transcript of "Using the internet as a reliable resource"

  1. 1. Using the Internet as a Reliable Resource<br />Alana Elkins<br />via Alan C. November<br />
  2. 2. REAL<br />R- Read the URL<br /> A- Ask about the author<br />E - Examine the content<br />L - Links<br />
  3. 3. How to Read a URL<br />Example: http://www.moma.org<br />Domain name = moma.org (moma =Museum of Modern Art) (location 184-87)<br />Extension = .org (organization) <br />anyone with a credit card can order a .org extension (location187-90)<br />http://www.moma.org/education<br />to go deeper into the site or to visit a page within the site (/) represents another level of the site, like a folder in a folder. (location187-90)<br />No spaces in URLs & slashes are always forward (/) (location 190-93)<br />Use more than one search engine and look past the first result (location 312-15)<br />
  4. 4. Read cont. <br />- it can provide information or clues about the site, such as the publisher (location 372-76) <br />look for recognition of domain name, the extension in the domain name (location 381-84) <br />extensions= <br />.com for commercial<br />.edu for education, <br />.gov for government agency, .org for organization, <br />.ac for education outside the US, <br />.k12 for most schools in the US, <br />.net for networks, <br />.mil for military (location 385-85) <br />figure out if you are on a personal page (~, %, & members/users give it away) (locations 387-90) check for author information, no author? try to figure out <br />
  5. 5. Examining the Content<br />Just because a site looks important does not mean that it is<br />Ask yourself:<br />Is the information on this site useful for my topic?<br />Do they give me links to other sites and do they work?<br />When was the last time this site was updated?<br />Based on prior knowledge from the subject, does this information look accurate?<br />(location 416-19)<br />
  6. 6. Ask About the Author and Owner<br />Before using a website as a source, check for the following:<br />Is the author’s name listed?<br />Is there contact information for the author?<br />Is biographical information about the author listed?<br />Does the information on the site make the author seem knowledgeable about the topic?<br />(location440-42 & 442-45)<br />
  7. 7. Links<br />Forward and Back Links <br />forward link = name given to your link from your website to a page on someone else's website<br />back link is the name given to a link from someone else's website to your website.  <br />This can help students check for biased, false or quality information (location 544-48) <br />
  8. 8. Useful Tips<br />.gov - only government officials can purchase this site, one of the most trustworthy<br />Search Tip: put keywords or phrases in quotes and to look for a website that is credible add "+" to it with the extension .gov and you will get results with your keyword or phrase linked with .gov websites. (location 669-72)<br />The tilde (~) character is all the punctuation one needs to know that a website is expressing personal opinion, not official documents in a website. (location 111-16)<br />Top search results are often the top search result because they have purchased that specific key phrase that is being searched. “Global Warming” for example is owned by the American Petrolium Institute so that their website shows up at the top of our results . (location 124-28)<br />
  9. 9. Notes<br />(1)  A description of the context in which you plan to use this artifact (be specific and clear)
<br />For this artifact, I plan showing it to my ninth grade students on the basic and important information they need to know when conduction a research paper. I teach 9th grade English and most students have never done a research project before, and if they have they have just been told to go and find things on the internet. I would like to give them more insight as to why it is important to get correct, credible information from the internet. I myself told my students two months ago that everything credible could be found on a .org, .edu, or .gov, but I now know that that is not correct information. I want my students to be able to get accurate information from web sites and to be educated in finding credible resources. <br />(2)   A brief summary of how you determined which content to include in your artifact (be explicit and reference the November book)
<br />The content that I chose to include from November’s book, was the most basic, how-to information . I chose mostly information that would be best in giving my students a crash course in being able to tell what websites are credible and how to determine if they are or are not. Specifically, information about domain names, symbols that like the tilde (~) and percent sign (%) that tell you whether or not personal information has been added to that webpage, and how to read a URL, along with getting the REAL information from websites. <br />
  10. 10. Notes cont.<br />(3)  A brief summary of why you decided to leave out certain content 
<br />Most of the content that I chose not to include from November’s book was the personal stories/testimonies and the step-by-step how-to activities. I chose to leave this out because I want to create a PowerPoint presentation that my students won’t get lost in an abundance of information. <br />(4)   A brief summary of how this presentation fits within the broader context of your work
<br />As an English teacher, I want my students to be able to write analytical essays and use sources outside of our classroom content. Therefore, if my students know how to correctly find information on the internet and know how to make sure that the information they are finding is reliable, then I feel as though they are learning more. I would also like to be able to share this information with my colleagues because they also conduct research projects and analytical essays and this information could also be beneficial to them. <br />
  11. 11. Notes cont. <br />and to look for a website that is creidble add "+" to it with the extention .gov and you will get results with your keyword or phrase linked with .gov websites. (location 669-72) (5)   The notes you took on the things you learned/already knew while reading the November book (this may be in bulleted list form)<br />The tilde (~) character is all the punctuation one needs to know that a website is expressing personal opinion, not official documents in a website. (location 111-16)<br />Top search results are often the top search result because they have purchased that specific key phrase that is being searched. “Global Warming” for example is owned by the American Petrolium Institute so that their website shows up at the top of our results . (location 124-28)<br />How to read a URL:<br />Example: http://www.moma.org<br />Domain name = moma.org<br />moma =museum of Modern Art (location 184-87)<br />.org= organization (anyone with a credit card can order a .org extension) (location187-90)<br />http://www.moma.org/education - to go deeper into the site or to visit a page within the site (/) represents another level of the site, like a folder in a folder. (location187-90)<br />No spaces in URLs & slashes are always forward (/) (location 190-93)<br />Use more than one search engine and look past the first result (location 312-15)<br />Acronym: REAL (location 366-69)<br />R- Read the URL - it can provide information or clues about the site, the publisher (location 372-76) - look for recognition of domain name, the extension in the domain name (location 381-84) extensions= .com for commercial, .edu for education, .gov for government agency, .org for organization, .ac for education outside the US, .k12 for most schools in the US, .net for networks, .mil for military (location 385-85) figure out if you are on a personal page (~, %, & members/users give it away) (locations 387-90) check for author information, no author? try to figure out <br />E - Examine the content<br />Links - Forward and Back Links (forward link = name given to your link from your website to a page on someone else's website, back link is the name given to a link from someone else's website to your website).  This can help students check for biased, false or qulaity information (location 544-48) <br />.gov - only government officials can purchase this site, one of the most trustworthy<br />Search Tip: put keywords or phrases in quotes <br />
  12. 12. Citation<br />November, A. (2008). Web literacy for educators [Kindle]. <br />
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