Humanities hme nto 12 13

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  • Alex: Today you will create an IN to record information during the training. Later you can use it as visual model to help your students get started.
  • Alex: You will have time during Academy to create these, so skip a page for now…
  • Alex: For young students it might be helpful to provide copies of the table of contents to glue in.Creating a class journal to model the process of journaling using a Big Book or a chart tablet.Students contribute by finding pictures and telling you what to record.Blank big books are available at www.abcstuff.com for $1.39 each***** give them the Brain puzzle
  • Alex: Continue this activity by having participants draw arrows crossing the center line in the page to the other side. Discuss how the left brain controls the right side of the body and the right brain controls the left side of the body. This crosses the midline of the brain for eye hand coordination, fine motor skills, large motor skills.Now create a t-chart of the type of information that goes on each side.OUTPUT Brainstorming   Mind maps   Concept Maps   Venn Diagrams   Pictures   Drawings   Diagrams   Writing Prompts   Flow Charts   Lab & Self Reflections   Poems   Songs   WorksheetsINPUTClass notesDiscussion notesReading notesHandouts with new informationCreate a linguistic and non-linguistic representation to help you remember the left and right side orientation of the journal.
  • Alex: Hand out copy of the MISD Literary Philosophy; jigsaw read. Let them know how it was before: HO – top down, various teachers finally, HO asked teachers from engineering & humanities to help create – everyone’s input. Come up with a motion to illustrate your content using the assigned phrases.
  • Pam: Hand out copy of Standards and review HME standards created by PLC. Let them know how it was before: HO – top down, various teachers then PLC – everyone’s input – teacher created bc teacher know content, research, etc.Reflect and journal on left side the positives of having literacy standards.
  • Pam: BREAK!
  • Alex:Make tri-fold yellow pencil. Mini-lessonProcedures – teach planning & prewriting strategies (brainstorming, making lists, outlining & graphic organizers)Process – Writing is a process – they need to go through the process (discuss wheel)Craft – what are you working on: leads, organization,word choice, snorkeling vs divingConvention – c.u.p.s. – capitalization, usage, punctuation, spelling (easiest in younger grades)elem ->inter->middle->high editing (making correct – more concrete) -> revising (making better – more abstract)Writing TimeStudents – writing, conferringTeachers – status of the class, conferring, small group re-teach***Make writing a regular part of class, Model your own writing, Illustrate ways writing is useful in the content and to their future, Opportunities for choice*** Use rubrics to assess (whether it is an analytic scale, happy faces, etc, or STAAR rubric)Sharing TimeFormal Writing (Public Writing): Essays, Research Projects, Other assigned writing taken through a process Informal Writing (Writing to Learn): Journals or Learning Logs, admit/exit slips, notetaking, quickwrites or quick response, etc.**** conference, conference, conference & model, model, model using TEK vocabulary…STAAR assessments are more like conferring questions on MC testsReflect and journal ideas for Writer’s Workshop for the first week of school.
  • Vocabulary: BIG!!!! Word choice is crucial, voiceOrganization: Model be reading & writing – problem/solution, cause/effect, How-toContent – RAFT on next slideSelf-regulating: Daily 5… crucial to independent writers/readers creates thinkers in middle/upper gradesBrainstorm at your table and list some solutions to the writing challenges on the left side
  • •Role: In developing the final product, what role will the students need to “take on”? Writer? Character (in the text)? Artist? Politician? Scientist? •Audience: Who should the students consider as the audience for the product? Other students? Parents? Local community? School board? Other characters in the text?•Format: What is the best product that will demonstrate the students’ in-depth understanding of their interactions with the text? A writing task? Art work? Action plan? Project?•Topic: This is the when, who, or what that will be the focus/subject of the final product. Will it take place in the same time period as the novel? Who will be the main focus of the product? What event will constitute the centerpiece of the action?
  • •Role: In developing the final product, what role will the students need to “take on”? Writer? Character (in the text)? Artist? Politician? Scientist? •Audience: Who should the students consider as the audience for the product? Other students? Parents? Local community? School board? Other characters in the text?•Format: What is the best product that will demonstrate the students’ in-depth understanding of their interactions with the text? A writing task? Art work? Action plan? Project?•Topic: This is the when, who, or what that will be the focus/subject of the final product. Will it take place in the same time period as the novel? Who will be the main focus of the product? What event will constitute the centerpiece of the action?
  • •Role: In developing the final product, what role will the students need to “take on”? Writer? Character (in the text)? Artist? Politician? Scientist? •Audience: Who should the students consider as the audience for the product? Other students? Parents? Local community? School board? Other characters in the text?•Format: What is the best product that will demonstrate the students’ in-depth understanding of their interactions with the text? A writing task? Art work? Action plan? Project?•Topic: This is the when, who, or what that will be the focus/subject of the final product. Will it take place in the same time period as the novel? Who will be the main focus of the product? What event will constitute the centerpiece of the action?
  • •Role: In developing the final product, what role will the students need to “take on”? Writer? Character (in the text)? Artist? Politician? Scientist? •Audience: Who should the students consider as the audience for the product? Other students? Parents? Local community? School board? Other characters in the text?•Format: What is the best product that will demonstrate the students’ in-depth understanding of their interactions with the text? A writing task? Art work? Action plan? Project?•Topic: This is the when, who, or what that will be the focus/subject of the final product. Will it take place in the same time period as the novel? Who will be the main focus of the product? What event will constitute the centerpiece of the action?
  • Talk about structure of Daily Five-show I-chart examplesMake 5 layered flip book. Need three pieces of paper and stapler. MarkersReference p. 11 of The Daily Five by Boushey & MoserSelf – p. 47 read the pictures, words & retell a previously read book… modeling behavior, working up to staminaRead to – p. 59 volume, level of attention, motivation, fluency, rate, word attack skills, love of reading. Watch short video clip on Read to Self.Listen to – p. 75 helps us be better readers, helps us learn/understand new words, inflection/voice, fun. Watch short video clip on Listen to Reading.Writing – p. 80 choice, various genres, audience, help to become better readers/writers, the purpose (why we care) of reading & writing, fluency, stamina. Watch short video clip of Work on Writing.Word Study – p. 85 – experiment with new words, spelling patterns, adding knowledge. Watch short video clip on Word Study.Create a non-linguistic representation for each component of Daily 5
  • Take notes on 4 square in notebook. Watch CAFÉ video showing mini lesson adding strategy to the CAFÉ board. Talk about structure of Daily Five/CAFÉ -show I-chart examples & create icons for CAFÉ on left
  • Pass out handout to glue into notebook. Hand out systemic graphic and handout.Three fold book. One piece of paper, split in three, Label Word study at bottom, what, when whyGo over word study and then reflect on how to integrate.
  • Pam-go over the listed assessments, then talk about informal assessments, such as conferencing, running records, fluency checks, etc.
  • Hand out systemic graphic and handout.Three fold book. One piece of paper, split in three, Label Word study at bottom, what, when why
  • Humanities hme nto 12 13

    1. 1. Melissa ISDHumanities New Teacher Orientation 2012
    2. 2. Agenda August 9 8:30 – 3:30 McKillop Elementary8:00 – 11:30: Humanities with Pam & Alex - Library11:30 – 12:30: Lunch12:30 – 3:30: Engineering with Alissa – Science Lab
    3. 3. “Language arts and reading teachersneed content-area teachers to showstudents how to read and write like ascientist, historian, or mathematician. Allteachers in all subject areas share theresponsibility for literacy development.Today, more and more content-areateachers recognize this responsibility andare incorporating content literacy into theirteaching through a variety of instructionalstrategies.”Richard Vacca, Author of Content Area Reading: Literacy andLearning Across the Curriculum
    4. 4. Interactive NotebooksToday, we will be making InteractiveNotebooks (INs) that you will be carryingwith you all year for Staff Development.Samples
    5. 5. Interactive NotebooksKey Ideas• Interactive journaling will make adifference!• Students are actively engaged in thinkingand communicating.• Students feel “ownership” because theyare creating meaningful knowledge forthemselves.• There’s no “right” or “wrong” way.• Modify to find ways that work best for youand your students.
    6. 6. Why Interactive Notebooks Engage Students•Students use both their visual and linguisticintelligences•Note taking becomes an active process•Notebooks help students to systematicallyorganize as they learn•Notebooks become a portfolio on individuallearning
    7. 7. The first page The back of the first pageyou create is create and Author’sa title page (like Biography page.a book). Youdecide the title Include:for your IN. •Name •Birthday •Hobbies Draw, write, or use photos to describe yourself on this page.
    8. 8. Reserve 5 or more pages after the title pagefor a Table of Contents (like a book)
    9. 9. Table of Contents Entry Title Assignment # Entry Title Assignment #Hemisphere 1S Hemisphere 1TConclusion Specialization Turn to your Table of Contents (TOC), and record your first entry title as IN Representation in the far left column as assignment # 1S. In the right side column record the entry title as IN Notes as assignment # 1T.
    10. 10. How Interactive Notebooks Differfrom Other Journals•INs have a “left-side, right-side” orientation tohelp students record, organize, and processnew information. This takes advantage of theway each hemisphere of the brain works!Much of the classroom and homework can bedone in the interactive notebook.•INs are not used just as a storehouse ofinformation. The students are expected tocontinually reflect and show evidence of thisreflection through “left hand” assignments.• On the Right hand page of your journal, fold yourpaper in half (red line to red line). Create a T-Chartto record the characteristics of left brain and rightbrain thinkers.
    11. 11. Table of Contents Entry Title Assignment # Entry Title Assignment #Hemisphere 1S Hemisphere 1TConclusion SpecializationIN Representation 2S IN Notes 2T
    12. 12. Literacy Philosophy• Reading and Writing Sittin’ in a Tree• May the Process be with You• SuperModels – Work It• Have it Your Way• Assess to Progress• Media Matters
    13. 13. Table of Contents Entry Title Assignment # Entry Title Assignment #Hemisphere 1S Hemisphere 1TConclusion SpecializationIN Representation 2S IN Notes 2TPhilosophy 3S Literacy Philosophy 3Ticons/phrases
    14. 14. • K-4 – Agreements – Writer’s Workshop – Reader’s Workshop – Word Study Workshop – Projects• 5-6 – Above plus – Integration of Social Studies
    15. 15. Table of Contents Entry Title Assignment # Entry Title Assignment #Hemisphere 1S Hemisphere 1TConclusion SpecializationIN Representation 2S IN Notes 2TPhilosophy icons 3S Literacy Philosophy 3TStandards 4S Literacy Standards 4TReflection
    16. 16. Writing “Writing helps students get more actively engaged in subject matter, understand information and concepts more deeply, make connections and raise questions more fluently, remember ideas longer, and apply learning in new situations. If we say that reading helps us take in knowledge, with writing, we make it our own.” Harvey Daniels & Steven Zemelman, Content-Area Writing: Every Teacher’s Guide
    17. 17. Writer’s Workshop• Mini-lesson – Procedures – Process – Craft – Convention• Writing Time – Students – writing, conferring – Teachers – status of the class, conferring, small group re-teach• Sharing Time – Informal – Formal (publishing)
    18. 18. Table of Contents Entry Title Assignment # Entry Title Assignment #Hemisphere 1S Hemisphere 1TConclusion SpecializationIN Representation 2S IN Notes 2TPhilosophy icons 3S Literacy Philosophy 3TStandards 4S Literacy Standards 4TReflectionWriter’s Workshop : 5S Writer’s Workshop 5T1st week ideas
    19. 19. Writing Challenges in the Content Areas• Writing in the content areas is about writing to learn the content or writing to develop thinking.• It can also be about learning to write the genre of the content.• Challenges – Limited vocabulary – Lack of organizational strategies – Lack of experience with content writing – Lack of self-regulation or self-monitoring
    20. 20. Table of Contents Entry Title Assignment # Entry Title Assignment #Hemisphere 1S Hemisphere 1TConclusion SpecializationIN Representation 2S IN Notes 2TPhilosophy icons 3S Literacy Philosophy 3TStandards 4S Literacy Standards 4TReflectionWriter’s Workshop : 5S Writer’s Workshop 5T1st week ideasSolutions to 6S Writing Challenges 6TChallenges in Content Area
    21. 21. Writing in Content Areas R.A.F.T. Role: In developing the final product, what role will the students need to “take on”? Writer? Character (in the text)?Topic: This is the when, who, or what that will be the focus/subject of the final product.Will it take placePolitician? Scientist? Artist? in the same time period as the novel? Who will be the main focus of theproduct? What event will constitute the centerpiece of the action?
    22. 22. Writing in Content Areas R.A.F.T. Audience: Who should the Role: In developing the final students consider as the product, what role will the audience for the product? Other students need to “take on”? students? Parents? Local Writer? Character (in the text)?Topic: This is the when, who, or what that will becommunity? School board? product. the focus/subject of the finalWill it take placePolitician? Scientist? Artist? in the same time period as the novel? Who will be the main focus of the Other characters in the text?product? What event will constitute the centerpiece of the action?
    23. 23. Writing in Content Areas R.A.F.T. Audience: Who should the Role: In developing the final students consider as the product, what role will the audience for the product? Other students need to “take on”? students? Parents? Local Writer? Character (in the text)?Topic: This is the when, who, or what that will becommunity? School board? product. the focus/subject of the finalWill it take placePolitician? Scientist? Artist? in the same time period as the novel? Who will be the main focus of the Other characters in the text?product? What event will constitute the centerpiece of the action? Format: What is the best product that will demonstrate the students’ in-depth understanding of their interactions with the text? A writing task? Art work? Action plan? Project?
    24. 24. Writing in Content Areas R.A.F.T. Audience: Who should the Role: In developing the final students consider as the product, what role will the audience for the product? Other students need to “take on”? students? Parents? Local Writer? Character (in the text)?Topic: This is the when, who, or what that will becommunity? School board? product. the focus/subject of the finalWill it take placePolitician? Scientist? Artist? in the same time period as the novel? Who will be the main focus of the Other characters in the text?product? What event will constitute the centerpiece of the action? Format: What is the best product Topic: This is the when, who, or that will demonstrate the what that will be the students’ in-depth understanding focus/subject of the final product. of their interactions with the text? Will it take place in the same time A writing task? Art work? Action period as the novel? Who will be plan? Project? the main focus of the product? What event will constitute the centerpiece of the action?
    25. 25. Writing in Content AreasR.A.F.T. Role Audience Format Topic •writer •self •journal •issue relevant to •artist •peer group •editorial the text or time • character •government •brochure/booklet period •scientist •parents •interview •topic of personal • adventurer •fictional •video interest or • inventor character(s) •song lyric concern for the • juror •committee •cartoon role or audience • judge •jury •game •topic related to • historian •judge •primary an essential • reporter •activists document question •rebel •immortality •critique •therapist •animals or object •biographical •journalist sketch •newspaper article
    26. 26. Table of Contents Entry Title Assignment # Entry Title Assignment #Hemisphere 1S Hemisphere 1TConclusion SpecializationIN Representation 2S IN Notes 2TPhilosophy icons 3S Literacy Philosophy 3TStandards 4S Literacy Standards 4TReflectionWriter’s Workshop : 5S Writer’s Workshop 5T1st week ideasSolutions to 6S Writing Challenges 6TChallenges in Content AreaR.A.F.T. brainstorm 7S R.A.F.T. notes 7Tfor content areas
    27. 27. Reading Workshop: Daily 5• A structure to teach independence and foster literacy development: – K-3 Daily 5: Students immersed in literacy through the five components • Read to Self • Read to Someone • Listen to Reading • Work on Writing • Word Study
    28. 28. Table of Contents Entry Title Assignment # Entry Title Assignment #Daily 5 symbols 8S Daily 5 flip book 8T
    29. 29. Reading Workshop: CAFÉ– Whole Group mini-lesson-strategies added to CAFÉ board– CAFÉ structure – • Student – Working on one of the 5 Daily Five task – Conferring with teacher – Working in small group • Teacher – working with small group or individual conference
    30. 30. Table of Contents Entry Title Assignment # Entry Title Assignment #Daily 5 flip book 8S Daily 5 8TCAFÉ icons 8T CAFE 9T
    31. 31. Word Study• What do we study? – Word features – Content Words – High frequency words – Student generated word lists• When do we study? – Daily mini-lesson – Daily 5 Component – Reading/Writing mini-lessons or guided lessons – Content lessons• Context is everything!• Regarding spelling, remember – There is no “silver bullet” program that will magically cause our students to spell everything correctly. – Spelling is a developmental process; it’s okay for kids to have different words. – We’re teaching how to be a better speller, writer, and reader, not teaching spelling words.
    32. 32. Table of Contents Entry Title Assignment # Entry Title Assignment #Daily 5 flip book 8S Daily 5 8TCAFÉ icons 9S CAFE 9TWord Study 10S Word Study 10TReflection
    33. 33. Assessments• K-2: ISIP(Istation Indicators of Progress)• K-6: Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment• District Assessments/Benchmarks• K-8 Writing Samples (BOY, MOY, EOY)• STAAR – Grades 3-9 Reading – Grades 4 & 7 Writing – Grades 9-12 EOC
    34. 34. Table of Contents Entry Title Assignment # Entry Title Assignment #Daily 5 flip book 8S Daily 5 8TCAFÉ icons 9S CAFE 9TWord Study 10S Word Study 10TReflectionReflection of day 11S Picture  11T
    35. 35. Reflection1. Reflect & journal about one thing you will use & how you will use it2. Reflect on one thing we talked about today that you still wonder about
    36. 36. Resources• Akhavan, Nancy. The Content-Rich Reading and Writing Workshop: A Time-Saving Approach for Making the Most of Your Literacy Block.• Allen, Janet. Tools for Teaching Content Literacy.• Beers, Kylene. When Kids Can’t Read What Teachers can Do: A Guide for Teachers 6-12.• Burke, Jim. Illuminating Texts: How to Teach Students to Read the World.• Burke, Jim. Reading Reminders: Tools, Tips, and Techniques.• Burke, Jim. Tools for Thought: Graphic Organizers for Your Classroom.• Daniels, Harvey and Stephanie Harvey. Comprehension and Collaboration.• Daniels, Harvey. Content-Area Writing: Every Teachers Guide.• Daniels, Harvey. Subjects Matter: Every Teachers Guide to Content-Area Reading.• Fisher, Douglas. Reading for Information in Elementary School: Content Literacy Strategies to Build Comprehension.• Miller, Debbie. Reading with Meaning.• Morris, Alana. Vocabulary Unplugged.• Tovani, Chris. I Read It, But I Don’t Get It: Comprehension Strategies for Adolescent Readers.• Wormeli, Rick. Summarization in Any Subject: 50 Techniques to Improve Student Learning.

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