• Like
  • Save
4 How to Prepare for an Inclusive Future: Identifying Enablers for Upcoming Interaction Technologies
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

4 How to Prepare for an Inclusive Future: Identifying Enablers for Upcoming Interaction Technologies

on

  • 1,834 views

Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have the potential of facilitating the lives of most users, including elderly and disabled people. There is, however, a number of frequently-observed ...

Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have the potential of facilitating the lives of most users, including elderly and disabled people. There is, however, a number of frequently-observed obstacles to the accessibility of ICT devices and services. Experience consistently shows that user-interface innovations for consumer products are being researched and developed without taking into account the needs of people with mild or severe impairments such as elderly people. Many companies do not see a business case in offering barrier-free products. This situation is not helped by the fact that product and service developers can be unaware of the requirements of customers with impairments and therefore lack the insight into appropriate design solutions that may not be very demanding in terms of R&D and production costs. For most user-interface design challenges a number of different solutions exist today that are particularly suitable for different user groups. Successful user-interface design encompasses the selection and combination of those user-interface modalities with the goal of supporting the most diverse user community possible. One obvious solution has traditionally been to offer personalisation features to be employed by the users to adapt the user interface to their specific requirements. For example, most mobile phones allow the selection of individual ringer tones and display backgrounds to adapt frequency range and visual contrast to the user’s needs. Some manufacturers offer user profiles for specific user groups such as senior citizens that affect a number of device settings. There are, however, limits to the extent to which personalisation of this type increases accessibility. ETSI, the European Telecommunications Standards Institute, has established a Specialist Task Force (STF) 377 on “Inclusive eServices for all: Optimizing the accessibility and use of upcoming user interaction technology”1 . The aim of this working group is to systematically evaluate ongoing and forthcoming interaction technologies to sketch a 10-year roadmap of foreseen technological enablers. Without such early involvement into the research and development, there is a risk that large groups in quickly aging societies will be left behind, not participating from the anticipated technology progress. This paper presents the STF’s motivation and approach on forecasting, analysing and structuring future interaction-technology developments as well as first results of the expected access techniques foreseen for these novel systems.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,834
Views on SlideShare
1,827
Embed Views
7

Actions

Likes
3
Downloads
52
Comments
0

2 Embeds 7

http://www.slideshare.net 6
http://blackboard.carlow.edu 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    4 How to Prepare for an Inclusive Future: Identifying Enablers for Upcoming Interaction Technologies 4 How to Prepare for an Inclusive Future: Identifying Enablers for Upcoming Interaction Technologies Presentation Transcript

    • HOW TO PREPARE FOR AN INCLUSIVE FUTURE Optimizing the accessibility and use of upcoming user interaction technologies ETSI STF 377 Matthias Schneider Michael Pluke Erik Zetterström © ETSI 2010. All rights reserved Helge Hüttenrauch Alejandro Rodriguez-Ascaso Martin Böcker FOSS-AMA Satellite event
      • Many consumer products employ interaction technologies that offer advantages as well as disadvantages to the users, including those with disabilities.
      • However, a number of widely successful consumer products have been introduced ignoring the needs of elderly and/or disabled people.
      • In the best case, solutions for lowering barriers are introduced time after the service/product is available.
      Rationale of STF 377
    • Evolving Interaction Technologies
      • eAccessibility has faced challenges as new interaction paradigms emerged (e.g. Command Line Intrerfaces, WIMP, Virtual Reality, Gesture Recognition, etc.)
    • Emerging eServices
      • New eServices emerge, based on new interaction technologies and aiming to support a better quality of life.
      • Will this services be accessible to all people, regardless their functional diversity?
      AppleInsider
      • The increasing number of recent innovations in user-interaction technologies accentuates this problem further.
      • Some of them offer no obvious or easy access to novel products for disabled users - even by assistive technologies.
      • STF 377 develops a roadmap of interaction technologies, which:
        • identifies potential accessibility gaps;
        • offers solutions to be implemented - ideally before mass market introduction of products.
      Rationale of STF 377
    • Aims of the project
      • Research, study, and evaluate services (main focus on communications) available in the near future and the interaction technologies enabling them
      • Develop an Interaction Technologies Roadmap for the next ten years
      • Identify areas in those technologies that potentially present obstacles to elderly and/or people with impairments making use of them
      • Identify preventive measures that will avert exclusion
    • Nature of the Project
      • The results of the project will primarily give technical guidance to developers of services and devices.
      • The projects contributes to the efforts of the European Commission to establish an inclusive society.
      • Recommendations will be published as ETSI documents, but publications in other forums will be very important.
    • Deliverables
      • A Technical Report (TR) that documents:
        • the analysis of forthcoming e Services and of the UI technologies enabling them.
      • An ETSI Guide (EG) that contains:
        • the Interaction Technology Roadmap,
        • accessibility problems identified, and the
        • proposed solutions for rectifying those problems,
        • the impact these may have on service design.
    • Work stages
      • Analysis of forthcoming services ;
      • Analysis of likely service interaction profiles for each service category ;
      • Analysis of forthcoming interaction technologies (technology roadmap with a scope of ten years) ;
      • Matching of service interaction profiles and interaction technologies roadmap ;
      • Design-for-All provision for new interaction technologies
    • Work stage 1: Analysis of forthcoming services
      • The analysis of existing and forthcoming services led to the selection and definition of the services covered by this document. One criterion was the extent to which a service is likely to affect older and disabled citizens and consumers.
      • The approach employed in the EG can be extended to any other service.
    • Established/Emerging eServices (I) eService Definition eGovernment eGovernment services include authentication services, electronic application for id-cards, passports, driver’s licenses etc., remote payment of supplies like energy and water, as well as eTax services that include the electronic filing of tax forms, electronic payment of taxes, and communication with tax offices. eHealth eHealth services are, among others telecare services, remote health monitoring, access to patient data, remote diagnosis and electronic prescription services. Social services delivered through electronic means Social services delivered through electronic means comprise remote supervision of people in need, ICT-supported caretaking (incl. robotics applications), social communities, electronic support for old people in need, messaging services, sharing services for pictures, video and music, ICT supported access to personalized human assistance.
    • Established/Emerging eServices (II) Home automation services supply services, energy management, light and entertainment management in the house, remote building control. Home automation services eBanking requires secure transmission and transaction services, remote authentication services as well as data- and secure information delivery to customers (e.g. for bank statements). eBanking eService Definition Electronic Purchasing Electronic Purchasing services include and require electronic payment, authentication services, information and database search, and secure transactional communication, electronic travel booking and management, download of electronic content (music, video) and applications (APP stores). Information services Incl news, sports results, information retrieval
    • Established/Emerging eServices (III) eLearning services comprise, among others, remote access to school and university databases, virtual classrooms and remote teaching, remote access to museums. eLearning Mobile office applications include remote access to office data, CSCW environments, electronic publishing services, remote translation services, messaging services, remote conference services, mobile email access, remote storage of personal data, etc. Mobile office applications eGames and Entertainment comprise all sorts of interactive games played with remote partners of communication networks, delivery of information and entertainment content to customers, electronic pets, eSex services, and remote support and monitoring of activities like exercising. eGames and Entertainment eService Definition
    • Work stage 2: Analysis of likely service interaction profiles for each service category
      • The services within the scope of the present document (result of task 1) were analysed in terms of their component services (i.e. the service components they employ and the interaction modalities involved in using those components).
    • Work stage 2: Service components
    • Work stage 2: service interaction profiles (I) X X X X X X X E-mail exchange X X Collaborative editing X X X X Video conferencing X X X X X Voice conferencing X X X X Telepresence X X Push to talk X X X X X X Text telephony X X X X Instant messaging / chat X X X X X X X X Total conversation X X X X X X X X X Video conversation X X X X X X X X X Voice conversation eGames Mobile Office eLearning Infomration Services Electronic Purchasing eBanking Home Automation Social Service EHealth eGovern
    • Work stage 2: service interaction profiles (II) X X X X X X X Location-related X X X X X X X Presence/context X X X X X X X X Identification-related X X X X Interactive digital broadcast X X X X X X Application/data upload/download X X X X X File sharing X X X X X X X X Form filling X X X X X X X Information browsing X X X X X X Multimedia messaging X X X X X X X X X X Text messaging eGames Mobile Office eLearning Infomration Electronic Purchasing eBanking Home Automation Social Service EHealth eGovern
    • Work stage 2: service interaction profiles Interaction Modality Definition Input Haptic / tactile /kinesthetic Acutation / sensation of touch and/or movement Audio Sounds generation and utterances Visual Visual presence / optical signal generation Place / location Interaction based on place / location Biometric signals Generation and use of biometric signals Smell Ability to produce smell Mediated Everything a human can use as input modalities with the help of different systems Output Touch / movement Sensation of touch and/or movement Audio Perceptions of sound and utterances Visual Visual presence / optical signal perception Biometric Perception and use of biometric signals Smell Ability to smell Taste Ability to taste Mediated Everything a human can perceive based on other (technical) systems
    • Work stage 3: Analysis of forthcoming interaction technologies (technology roadmap, scope of ten years)
      • A roadmap of forthcoming interaction technologies has been developed. During this step relevant interaction technologies for the services defined in step 1 were identified.
      • For this purpose, a conceptual framework has been developed in order to clarify the technologies in focus (i.e. interaction components as opposed to functional components of the communications device).
    • Interaction style profiles Overall approach
    • Scenario: UI in Smart Home
      • User
        • Intention: to support user/home communication about healthy diet, wellness management, security, energy management
      • e-Services components
        • Voice/video conversation
        • Text/Multimedia messaging
        • Identification-related
        • Presence/context
        • Location-related
      • Interaction Technologies
        • E.g. speech dialogues management (recognition+synthesis)
        • E.g. displays in everyday objects (e.g. augmented reality in user’s glasses)
    • Established/Emerging Technologies
      • Level 1: Component Type - e.g. User Interaction Components
      • Level 2: Interaction Technology Category - e.g. Touch and gesture input: Haptic output
      • Level 3: Interaction Technology Sub-category - e.g. Touch input
      • Level 4: User Interaction Technology - e.g. Touch display with programmable elevated regions
    • Interaction style profiles Overall approach
    • Interaction style profiles Overall approach
    • A sample interaction technology roadmap
    • Work stage 5: Design-for-All provision for new Interaction Technologies (I)
      • Each interaction technology has been assessed against a set of generic user requirements on accessibility to ICT:
        • ISO TR 29138-1: 2009. Information technology — Accessibility considerations for people with disabilities — Part 1: User needs summary
        • ETSI EG 202 116 (2002). Human Factors (HF); Guidelines for ICT products and services; "Design for All“
        • ISO/TR 22411:2008 Ergonomics data and guidelines for the application of ISO/IEC Guide 71 to products and services to address the needs of older persons and persons with disabilities
    • Accessibility requirements ISO/IEC TR 29138-1
    • Work stage 5: Design-for-All provision for new interaction technologies (I)
      • Accessibility of emerging interaction techniques may still remain unaddressed by available standards on generic accessibility to ICT. Additional that have been used include:
        • Accessibility standards which are specific to such modality or interaction technology,
          • e.g. ISO/FDIS 9241-920 Ergonomics of human-system interaction — Part 920:Guidance on tactile and haptic interaction .
        • A literature review of scientific evidence on modality/technology specific ergonomics.
          • e.g. Papers on Ergonomics of Visual Augmented Reality
    • Accessibility requirements and potential solutions in Visual Augmented Reality
      • To perceive foreground visual information in the presence of background. Changing backgrounds are inherent to augmented reality.
        • Robust mechanisms should ensure that foreground visual information is perceivable to users.
      • Text should be readable with reduced visual acuity.
        • To achieve this, ensure that the algorithms for text presentations are robust to ensure that text is readable with reduced visual acuity.
      • Visual information should also be available in auditory and tactile form.
      • Rendering should be configurable in a way that all the information generated is perceived by users who see with only one eye.
    • Virtual augmented reality Gabbard, J.L. Swan, J.E. Hix, D. Si-Jung Kim Fitch, G. (2007) Active Text Drawing Styles for Outdoor Augmented Reality: A User-Based Study and Design Implications. Proceedings of the Virtual Reality Conference, 2007. VR '07
    • Accessibility requirements and potential solutions in Visual Augmented Reality
      • Renderings should disambiguate information about distance or position (eliminate depth ambiguity).
        • This can be achieved by using the appropriate clues (e.g., motion parallax, size-constancy/scaling, transparency, occlusion, binocular clues, etc.).
      • Users should be able to select perceptual cues.
        • Specific perceptual cues (e.g., motion parallax, binocular clues, or size-constancy/scaling) should be selected if displays are operating in an environment of a limited range of depths/distances, or according to user accessibility needs.
      • Information should be displayed in order to be accommodated to human visual sensitivity.
        • To achieve this, unneeded AR motion (e.g., the slowly moving self-organization of rendered AR tags) should be removed.
    • Virtual augmented reality Furmanski C, Azuma R, Daily M Augmented-reality visualizations guided by cognition: Perceptual heuristics for combining visible and obscured information Proceedings of the International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality (ISMAR’02)
    • Example of Analysis and Recommendation
    • Example of Analysis and Recommendation
    • Status / next steps / schedule
      • To have a review meeting with the Reference Group: June in Stockholm
      • To finalise Service Interaction Profiles
      • To roll out interaction technologies (fill data base) and define Design-for-All provisions
      • To disseminate the results
    • Inclusive eServices for all Thank you very much http://portal.etsi.org/stfs/STF_HomePages/STF377/STF377.asp Matthias Schneider Michael Pluke Erik Zetterström © ETSI 2010. All rights reserved Helge Hüttenrauch Alejandro Rodriguez-Ascaso Martin Böcker