36 a joint force position measurement system for accessibility quantification
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36 a joint force position measurement system for accessibility quantification

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Project number: 224348...

Project number: 224348
Project acronym: AEGIS
Project title: Open Accessibility Everywhere: Groundwork, Infrastructure, Standards
Starting date: 1 September 2008
Duration: 48 Months
AEGIS is an Integrated Project (IP) within the ICT programme of FP7

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36 a joint force position measurement system for accessibility quantification 36 a joint force position measurement system for accessibility quantification Presentation Transcript

  • A JOINT FORCE-POSITION MEASUREMENT SYSTEMFOR ACCESSIBILITY QUANTIFICATIONM. Kirchner, M. Confalonieri, A. Paludet, F. Degasperi, M. Da Lio, M. De CeccoUniversity of Trento, DIMS - Department of Mechanical and Structural Engineering –via Mesiano 77, 38100 Trento, Italy.mauro.dalio@unitn.it, mariolino.dececco@unitn.it Matteo Kirchner Michele Confalonieri Alberto Paludet Filippo Degasperi Mauro Da Lio Mariolino De Cecco11-12/01/2010 Kick-off meeting Brussels, Belgium
  • INTRODUCTION A large variety of motor disabilities have neuromuscular or cardiovascular cause. These ultimately happen as reduced ability to control movements. From the functional point of view, several limitations can be observed, ranging from muscle tone functions to control of voluntary movements (such as bradikinesia, akinesia, apraxia, etc.), to involuntary movements (such as tremors, tics, etc.),2 to loss of sensations related to muscles and movements. AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • INTRODUCTION These ultimately cause problems in interacting with products, services and environments encountered in all aspects of daily life. Those systems, intended for the consumer market and the workplace, should be designed to be accessible for all people including those with special requirements,3 such as older persons and persons with disabilities. AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • INTRODUCTION – Clinical scales To assess human functions, a large number of clinical scales exist, specific for each disease: the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale, or the Gross Motion Function Measure for Cerebral Palsy, etc. However, clinical scales rely on the expertise of examiners, are disease related. For these reasons, several attempts have been made to use objective indicators that can be derived from measurements. Computerized assessment tools have been4 proposed in several types of motor disabilities. AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • INTRODUCTION – Computerized tests We may classify basically four types of tests, depending on the type of task that is measured: 1) Point-to-point aiming tests, which assess movement time, reaction, time, dwelling time and accuracy of target achievement; 2) Continuous tracking tests, which assess motion jerkiness and tracking errors (both lateral and longitudinal deviations); 3) Hold tests, in which the ability to reject perturbance forces is assessed;5 4) Force control tests, which measure the ability to achieve and control forces. AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • INTRODUCTION - Standards On the side of standards, ISO/IEC Guide 71 introduces the concept that taking care of the needs of older persons and persons with disabilities is fundamental in developing relevant International Standards for products and services design. Technical report ISO/TR 22411:2008 presents ergonomics data and guidelines for applying ISO/IEC Guide 71. It provides ergonomics data and knowledge about human abilities like sensory, physical and cognitive, as well as6 guidance on the accessible design of products, services and environments. AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • INTRODUCTION - Standards In this framework it is possible to find data about hand/finger dexterity. Two subcategories that regard the interaction with a 2D interface are listed. One is “Data on hand steadiness”, the other “Grip strength”. Data about hand steadiness is defined as the minimum hole diameter of a plate through which a person can pass a pencil or needle without touching the edge. Grip strength data are given only for maximal-effort7 contraction in clench grip that uses all fingers wrapped around the controlled object. AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • TOUCH INTERACTION Touch sensing interfaces have rapidly grown in the last decade and several new features have been added and are going to appear The 3M MicroTouch™ Capacitive TouchSense® System (MCT System) provides tactile feedback effects for on-screen, video buttons so users actually "feel"8 like they are depressing mechanical buttons. AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • TOUCH INTERACTION Magic Trackpad form Apple is aMulti-Touch trackpad designed to work with the Mac Desktop computers click scroll swipe rotate9 AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • TOUCH INTERACTION Korea - Advanced Institute of Science and Technology Similar sliding gestures may have different meanings when they are performed with changing force intensity. Touch screens, however, fail to properly distinguish those intensities due to their inability to sense variable pressures. For the above reason they developed a touch screen10 enabled by distinguishing normal and tangential forces that allows new possibilities for gesture recognition on a touch screen. AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • Standards – deficiencies in providing indications for interaction dexterity At least data about the following are lacking: - path/trajectory following (with finger, mouse, etc) - the ability to achieve and control different level of forces - position/force coordination issues Furthermore hand steadiness is covered only for a very peculiar task11 The above are addressed by the “Force Panel” and the specific tests developed AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • FORCE PANEL – The instrument  The instrument is composed of the following:  an LCD  a resistive touch panel  three force transducers  an embedded control system  an interface with a PC12 AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • Point to point motion task Measures the following: • Reaction time • Movement time • Path deviation in point to point motion • Dwelling Percentage Time in Target13 AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • Subject 1: mild hemiparesis [mm]14 [mm] AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • Subject 3: severe hemiparesis [mm] not enough force15 [mm] AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • Subject 1: mild hemiparesis Subject 3: severe hemiparesis Time outside M ov e me nt Re action Path de v iation Subject 1 targe t [ms] Time [ms] Time [ms] [mm] target 1 0 1375 327 2.8 target 2 0 1484 405 6.3 target 3 0 1343 406 4.9 target 4 0 1405 312 8.9 target 5 250 1202 297 2.3 target 6 0 1375 343 4.1 target 7 0 1266 280 4.3 Time outside M ov e me nt Re action Path de v iation Subject 3 targe t [ms] Time [ms] Time [ms] [mm] target 1 983 1546 31 2.6 target 2 0 2638 31 2.516 target 3 0 2185 546 7.0 target 4 452 2295 515 5.8 target 5 110 2466 343 5.1 target 6 31 3496 63 5.9 target 7 702 2373 874 17.1 AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • Continuous tracking tasks Measures the following: • Percentage time in target • Deviation to path • Deviation to trajectory17 AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • Subject 1: mild hemiparesis Subject 3: severe hemiparesis Mean target to finger Percentage of RMS deviation to (trajectory) deviation time outside18 Subject path [mm] [mm] the target [%] 1 10.9 2.2 9 3 26.0 4.2 36 AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • FORCE PANEL – HUMAN’S TRANSFER FUNCTION19 AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • Transfer functions have been used to model how human beings control several types of plants, for example the lane keeping task in automobiles (Kondo-like models) or route keeping in aircraft. The transfer function used is the following: 1 i   Z 1 H      e D  i 1 i   P    i 2 1 2i / N      N  Vertical line Finger horizontal H   20 horizontal trajectory position AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • Measured quantities: tau: delay, corresponding to the reaction time H(w): frequency transfer function in trajectory following rms: root mean square error of the steady state reached with respect to the reference (an estimate21 of the reached accuracy) AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • Example of an estimated transfer function22 AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • Some shots of real and simulated data with the estimated model23 AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • To simulate the lane following for a bike rider game (in this way the game accessibility can be evaluated)24 AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • Position-Force tracking tasks Measures the following: • Position MSE • Force MSE25 AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • Example of measurements26 AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011
  • Thanks for your attention! AEGIS Conference Brussels 28-30 November 2011