T15 Kato

369 views

Published on

Professional Development for Learning Advisors: Facilitating the intentional reflective dialogue (Talk T15)

Presenter: Satoko Kato, Kanda Institute of Foreign Languages, Japan

This presentation reports on a study which explored how “intentional reflective dialogue” with an interlocutor can deepen Learning Advisors’ (LAs’) reflective learning in terms of their professional development. As one of the key roles of LAs in self-directed language learning is to activate learners’ reflective learning processes, it is worthwhile for LAs to experience reflective learning process themselves as a part of their professional development program. Eight LAs, with experience ranging from one to three years, participated in this study. Each had two interviews with the interlocutor (the presenter). Although most of the LAs usually reflect on themselves and have conversations about advising with colleagues, the reflective dialogue which was intentionally structured for training purpose resulted in LAs being engaged in a different type of self-reflective approach. The results of the study and the future possibility for developing an on-going LA training program will be discussed in the presentation.

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
369
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
29
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Idea of “ Control ” “ I had to do a complete 180 degree turn with respect to my thinking on the idea of ‘ control ’ . Dealing with uncertainty “ Every session starts with the advisor as much in the dark as the advisee and in some cases even more so. ” “ the biggest departure from the traditional classroom experience is that going into the advising session you are literally flying by the seat of your pants. ” Adjusting expectations “ I expected learners would come to me with specific language problems and ask for advice on how to fix them. In fact they may not even know what their problems are. ” (Crowe, 2006)
  • Recorded interviews (16 sessions) One session (40-70 minutes) Analyzed by focusing on the followings: Reflecting on oneself as an LA Repeated words Answers for the fixed questions Outcome of the interview: Future vision/goals Feedback on having intentional reflective dialogue Advising skills used by the interviewer Self-reflective journal The researcher kept a journal through out the research to reflect on herself as an interviewer. Overall imp ression What went well/ not-so-well? and why? Why not? Critical moment in the interview How can I become better in guiding LAs to deeper reflection?
  • Feedback from LAs Degree of reflection “ I do internally reflect often but not nearly to the same degree (as done in reflective dialogue). ” “ I usually reflect on advising sessions by myself but not on I myself as an LA. Through this dialogue, I could see my vision of advising. ” “ I often reflect on and talk about my advising sessions with my colleagues. But I realized doing this kind of semi-formal session (intentional dialogue) will bring me to deeper level of reflection that I can ’ t usually reach. ” New perspectives I came to certain understandings I would not have ordinarily been able to come to. I find myself thinking about advising a lot … having a lot of internal dialogues with myself about and advising but it is really different when talking to someone else. It helps unravel ideas as well as introduce new perspectives. It helped me understand how students may view dialogue in advising we have with them. ” I could see about myself as an LA more clearly by talking about myself and getting feedbakc from you. Self-reflection (by the researcher)
  • You will face yourself as an LA critically. You will envision yourself more. Your existing values might be challenged. You might have some emotional flows and may have to deal with it.
  • In fact… The author had to be able to use a variety of combinations of skills used in advising. -Interviewing professionals who already have reflection skills and trying to make them go deeper requires intensive focus. Usually I had to use most of the skills in one session. Whereas, it is not always the case with student advising. Had to focus on “overviewing”. (Not just focusing on one session, one students but yourself as an LA). Had to challenge their existing value which sometimes requires you to deal with the emotional flow of the interviewee.
  • T15 Kato

    1. 1. Professional Development for Learning Advisors: Facilitating the intentional reflective dialogue Satoko Kato Learning Advisor Kanda Institute of Foreign Languages (KIFL) [email_address]
    2. 2. KIFL VISTA/KALL VISTA <ul><li>KIFL VISTA </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Kanda Institute of Foreign Languages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Established in 1963 (Two-year vocational/language school) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Number of students: 1600+ </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>VISTA (Self-access learning center) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Established in 2009 (Independent Learning Center, 1995) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>KALL VISTA </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Kanda Adult Language Learning in VISTA </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Started in November 2011: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Providing language learning services for adult language learners. </li></ul></ul></ul>
    3. 3. VISTA Learning Center
    4. 4. Learning Advising Service <ul><li>Advising Service for students </li></ul><ul><ul><li>45 minutes one-to-one session </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>500 sessions/year </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Japanese/English </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Open: Monday-Friday </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>10:00-19:00 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Independent Learning Course </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>SAIL program </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Advising Service for adult language learners </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Open: Sat u rday </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>13:00-16:00 </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. How do we become a Learning Advisor? Transforming from a teacher to an LA <ul><li>Idea of “Control” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ I had to do a complete 180 degree turn with respect to my thinking on the idea of ‘control’ “. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Dealing with uncertainty </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ The biggest departure from the traditional classroom experience is that going into the advising session you are literally flying by the seat of your pants.” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Adjusting expectations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ I expected learners would come to me with specific language problems and ask for advice on how to fix them. In fact they may not even know what their problems are.”    (Crowe, 2006) </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. Initial training to become an LA <ul><li>Introduction to the new profession </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Orientations/Presentations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Self-directed learning and advising </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>History and background of the center </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Learning materials/resources, learning strategies to recommend </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Readings, Discussions, Role plays, Practice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Introduction to advising </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Discourse in advising, advising skills </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Listen to other advisors’ sessions </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Practice advising (oral/written) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Self-reflection </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Record sessions </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Listen to the recordings </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reflect on yourself </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Get feedback from senior advisor </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>Skill-based Practice Basic knowledge +
    7. 7. On-going training <ul><li>Workshops (skill-based) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Kelly ’ s (1996) macro & micro skills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Peer-advising </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Introducing skills from other professional field (counseling, coaching, teaching, etc.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>e.g. Kato & Sugawara (2008) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Discussion forum (concept-based) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To raise awareness of the essential topics in advising. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“ What is the definition of Language Learning Advising in our context? ” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“ What do we need to learn to work effectively as an LA? ” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Both skill-based and philosophical themes about advising need to be covered. </li></ul>Philosophical background Advanced skills & knowledge +
    8. 8. <ul><li>After a few years of training and having experience in actual advising </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Training completed? No more? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Do we have a full package of knowledge & skills? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>LAs with more than one year experience </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Probably have established one ’ s preferred way of advising. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Unlikely to challenge oneself and try different advising styles. </li></ul></ul></ul>Stagnation and fossilization start…
    9. 9. How can we keep growing as an LA? <ul><li>LAs ’ roles? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Activating learners ’ reflective processes through an “ intentional ” one-to-one dialogue. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The question is … . </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Are we good at reflecting on ourselves?? ” </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. The major theoretical roots of reflection <ul><li>Dewey (1938) </li></ul><ul><li>Habermas (1974) </li></ul><ul><li>Kolb (1984) </li></ul><ul><li>Schon (1991) </li></ul><ul><li>Boyd and Fales (1983) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Reflection is the process of internal examination to explore issues and concerns which are triggered by experience that may bring about conceptual changes in perspective.” </li></ul></ul>
    11. 11. Types of reflection: Self-reflection <ul><li>Effective; may offer opportunities for deep learning (may or may not be shared with others). </li></ul><ul><li>Not enough to promote transformatory learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Limited to the insights of individuals. </li></ul><ul><li>Looking critically at oneself is difficult. </li></ul>
    12. 12. Types of reflection: Reflective dialogue with others <ul><li>Learning becomes not merely an individualistic process. </li></ul><ul><li>Offers possibility to reconsider assumptions and beliefs which will lead to transformation. </li></ul><ul><li> Existing values are challenged. </li></ul><ul><li>Can take learning one step further. </li></ul>
    13. 13. Focusing on “ intentional” reflective dialogue <ul><li>Blockbank, McGill & Beech (2002) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>… an intentional dialogue is different from an ordinary dialogue in a way that dialogue does occur naturally between people, but for effective reflective learning, intentional dialogue is necessary. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>… reflection-with-others, or dialogue, offers the power of challenge and different perspective to the learner, and ultimately the potential for double-loop learning. </li></ul></ul>
    14. 14. Research questions <ul><li>Does intentional reflective dialogue deepen LAs ’ reflection and enhance their professional development? </li></ul><ul><li>Does intentional reflective dialogue have an influence on LAs ’ perceptions of their current and future advising practices? </li></ul>
    15. 15. The study <ul><li>Participants: 8 Learning Advisors with one to three years of experience. </li></ul><ul><li>Two interviews with each LA </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1st interview: Reflect on oneself as an LA, talk about future vision, make an action plan to grow as an LA. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2nd interview: Reflect on the past months to see their improvement. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Tools </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fixed questions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wheel of Learning Advising </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Wheel of Language Learning (Kato & Sugawara, 2008) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Advising in Language Learning: Dialogue, Tools and Context </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>(Edited by Mynard & Carson, 2011) </li></ul></ul></ul>
    16. 16. Wheel of Learning Advising (WLA) Adapted from Kato & Sugawara (2008) Student talk Did you give enough space and time to students to explore and talk about themselves? 5 5 10 10 Active Listening skills Questioning skills Could you have asked questions that helped students to explore themselves more? Advisor talk -Guiding, modeling, supporting -Linking, connecting, -Informing, giving options, etc. Student progress in autonomous language learning. Learner satisfaction (Your perception of whether learners’ expectations were achieved in the session.)
    17. 17. Data collection/Analysis <ul><li>Recorded interviews (16 sessions) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>One session (40-70 minutes) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>13.5 hours in total </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Questionnaire </li></ul><ul><li>Self-reflective journal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The researcher kept a journal throughout the research to reflect on herself as an interviewer. </li></ul></ul>
    18. 18. Interview framework <ul><li>Ask LA to complete the Wheel of LA </li></ul><ul><li>Ask LA to explain his/her wheel </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Not just focusing on particular session but “yourself” as an LA. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ask fixed questions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What is your ideal advisor? Where are you at now? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>If the wheel is giving you a message, what would it be? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Find the “ hidden ” issues, challenge the existing values. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Future vision & planning </li></ul><ul><li>Accountability </li></ul><ul><li>Reflecting on the session together. </li></ul>
    19. 19. <ul><li>Degree of reflection </li></ul><ul><li>More awareness rising through the dialogue. </li></ul><ul><li>Semi-structured (not fully casual) sessions brought LAs to the level that cannot be usually reached by self-reflection. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ I often reflect on and talk about my advising sessions with my colleagues. But I realized doing this kind of semi-formal session (intentional dialogue) will bring me to a deeper level of reflection that I can ’ t usually reach. ” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Self-reflection vs. reflecting with others. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Intentional reflective dialogue offers challenges and different perspectives. </li></ul></ul>Research Question 1: Degree of Reflection?
    20. 20. <ul><li>New perspectives </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ I could see about myself as an LA more clearly by talking about myself and getting feedback from you. ” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ I came to certain understandings I would not have ordinarily been able to come to. I have a lot of internal dialogues with myself about advising but it is really different when talking to someone else. It helps unravel ideas as well as introduce new perspectives. ” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ It helped me understand how students may view dialogue in advising we have with them. ” </li></ul></ul>
    21. 21. Research Question 2: Influence on the current and future advising practices? <ul><li>Skill focused goals (more likely with 1 st year LAs) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Active Listening, Questioning, waiting time, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Clearer vision of now & future? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Who I am as an LA ” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Focusing on the career path </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“ This is my second year as an LA and I would like to learn more about ……” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“ I am thinking about taking courses from other fields (life coaching) to become a better advisor. ” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Future training demands </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“ I would like to keep discussing one-to-one like this so that I can become more aware of where I am at now as an LA. ” </li></ul></ul></ul>
    22. 22. Other Findings 1 <ul><li>1 st Interview </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Wheel of Learning Advising </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Effectively used in not making the sessions too casual </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fixed questions were helpful in finding LAs’ values and issues. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ What is your ideal learning advising? ” “ Where are you at now? ” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rapport building </li></ul></ul><ul><li>2 nd Interview (After 2-3 months) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Usually, LAs tend not to remember much about the first session. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Importance of reminding </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>More intense talk with a stronger rapport </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lots of sharing and knowledge transfer happened </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>WLA was not necessary </li></ul></ul></ul>Positive feedback from LAs
    23. 23. Other Findings 2 From the self-reflective journal written by the author <ul><li>Importance of making it “ Intentional ” </li></ul><ul><li>To make it “ intentional ”… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Structured </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ensure that issues of the interviewee is contained. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>May use the whole set of advising skills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Not be instructive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Trust and rapport building is important </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>No blame approach vs. discussion? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Sharing experience/discussion </li></ul></ul></ul>
    24. 24. Other Findings 3 : Skill-based <ul><li>Building rapport (power balance) </li></ul><ul><li>Active listening (verbal, non-verbal) </li></ul><ul><li>Restating/Mirroring (verbal, non-verbal) </li></ul><ul><li>Questioning </li></ul><ul><li>Empathizing </li></ul><ul><li>Summarizing </li></ul><ul><li>Challenging (What if…? What would you do differently? What other ways … .? </li></ul><ul><li>Reflecting </li></ul><ul><li>Goal-setting </li></ul><ul><li>Giving feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Asking for accountability </li></ul><ul><li>A whole set of advising skills we need. </li></ul>
    25. 25. Unexpected Findings <ul><li>Original purpose of the study </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Help LAs reflect deeper on themselves as part of their professional development. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Not just focusing on a particular session to reflect on, but to have an overview of oneself as an LA. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>In fact … </li></ul><ul><ul><li>It was the interviewer (the researcher) who received a very intensive training by interviewing 8 LAs. </li></ul></ul>
    26. 26. Suggestions for the Future On-going Training <ul><li>One-to-one Intentional Reflective Dialogue </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(Pair up LAs  Interview each other) </li></ul></ul>Existing on-going training Skill-based & concept-based workshops <ul><ul><li>Self-reflection (written/oral) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Informal (casual) discussions </li></ul></ul>+
    27. 27. Future Research: Scaffolding <ul><li>Provide skill-based training (especially for novice LAs) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To be able to conduct interviews </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Restating, Listening, Questioning, Summarizing, etc. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Guidelines for self-reflection </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Create a guideline for “ Intentional Reflective Dialogue ” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Procedures, tools and interview questions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Feedback forum </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide opportunities for LAs to share their thoughts and experiences. </li></ul></ul>
    28. 28. Publication PR English Language Learning Planner 『英語学習手帳』 ( forthcoming fall 2012 ) Daily Planner + Strategies Booklet + Website <ul><li>It is not just a calendar-based planner. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Guides learners through an in-depth self-reflective process for a duration of 12 months. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>An additional booklet comes along with the planner. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Introduces learning strategies according to a variety of learning goals. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>It is supported by a website. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Downloadable goal-setting materials, task lists, study log </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>sheets, etc. Tools for self-analysis are available. </li></ul></ul>

    ×