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  • 1. Lunch Diary Study December 2010Image: http://find.myrecipes.com/recipes/recipefinder.
  • 2. Agenda • Background and methodology • Key findings • What do we eat for lunch? • Where do we eat our lunch? • Where do we source our lunch? • What do we spend on lunch? • DemographicsImage: http://www.mygreenaustralia.com/2010/08/meat-free-mid-week-soup-roundup/
  • 3. Background and Methodology Background • We are looking to explore possible opportunities for expanding the proposition of wet soup as a “year round” credible lunch option. • The objectives of the research are to: – Determine the current top lunch options for Australians – Identify top 10 lunch options by demographics in the warmer vs cooler months of the year – Establish if there is an opportunity to own the lunch occasion more overtly, particularly counter - seasonal Methodology • Online survey conducted in two waves: - Summer (Nov 2010) and Winter (April/ May 2011) • Sample of n=1,400 (200 per day) • 50/50 Male/Female (with 50/50 – working / non working women) • Survey infield 23-29 November 2010Image: http://www.lookandtaste.com/go/our-recipes/?category=9
  • 4. Key findings Key findings • Based on total lunch items consumed among 1,400 Australians in the last week of Spring, it appears that soup does not strongly feature as a popular lunch choice. Less than 3% of total people consumed soup for lunch across the week. • More popular items include sandwiches/ rolls, salads and fruit - all items that are easy to prepare and are readily available to purchase ready made in supermarkets or from food outlets. Interesting, the majority of reported lunch choices appear to be relatively healthy options • Across all lunch occasions throughout the week, among all demographics, at least 70% of lunchtime meals are eaten at home or at work. For most people, wet soup would be a viable lunch alternative within these two venues • In total, across any given week, around six in ten people either buy ingredients to make their own lunch, buy lunch items with their general grocery shopping, or visit a supermarket to purchase lunch items for that day. All of these people represent possible soup consumers who have an opportunity to purchase wet soup from a supermarket as a lunch option • Overall, six in ten people spend $5 or less on their lunch on average across both weekends and weekdays, while nine in ten spend no more than $10 on their lunch on average. Wet soup is a viable lunch option in terms of budget parameters. • While not specifically explored in the research, it appears that the main barrier to soup consumption throughout the warmer months may be driven by more of a mindset limitation, and less visibility of soup as a credible option during warmer seasonsImage: http://www.lookandtaste.com/go/our-recipes/?category=9
  • 5. Agenda • Background and methodology • Key findings • What do we eat for lunch? • Where do we eat our lunch? • Where do we source our lunch? • What do we spend on lunch? • DemographicsImage: http://www.mygreenaustralia.com/2010/08/meat-free-mid-week-soup-roundup/
  • 6. Top 15 Lunch items Lunch item Number (n) Percent 1. Sandwich/ roll with meat + cheese or salad 240 17% 2. Salad (alone or with chicken/ steak/ fish) 183 13% 3. Fruit/ fruit salad * 173 12% 4. Sandwich/roll with meat ( eg ham, chicken) / tuna 133 10% 5. Steak/ chicken schnitzel/ BBQ/ roast # 120 9% 6. Sandwich without meat (eg salad, cheese, vegemite) 119 9% 7. Chinese/ Thai/ stirfry/ noodles 86 8% 8. Toast with topping/ bread 85 6% 9. Quiche/ omelette/ eggs/ rice 75 5% 10. Fries/ hot chips/ wedges 71 5% 11. Pasta/ risotto 70 5% 12. Yoghurt/ ice cream 67 5% 13. Tuna/ fish/ seafood 66 5% 14. Sweets/ pastries (eg cookies/ slice/ cakes) 65 5% 15. Fast food (eg meat pie/ hot dog/ kebabs) 61 4% * 31% of fruit eaters also ate a sandwich, # 30% of meat eaters also consumed vegetables with their mealBase: Total sample (n=1,400) Q: What did you have for lunch yesterday? ( note multiple responses)
  • 7. Observations of top lunch options The top summer lunch options among Australians share a number of common attributes. In particular, lunch items such as sandwiches, salads and fruit are: • reasonably healthy food choices • quick and easy to prepare • commonly available food options – whether they are prepared at home or purchased from a food outlet • can be consumed cold, although warm food is not necessarily a barrier for summer lunch choices – a number of people chose toasted sandwiches and the majority of meat dishes were consumed warm However, in terms of developing soup as a credible “out of season” food choice, the need to heat the soup prior to consumption, and the lack of availability via food courts/ food outlets in summer means soup is perhaps not top of mind.Image: http://blog.guifx.com/2009/05/28/touchscreen-microwave//
  • 8. Top Lunch items Top Ten Lunch Choices Males Working females Non-working females 1. Sandwich - combination 18% 1. Salad 16% 1. Fruit/ fruit salad 18% 2. Sandwich - meat 12% 2. Sandwich - combination 15% 2. Sandwich - combination 17% 3. Salad 11% 3. Fruit/ fruit salad 14% 3. Salad 15% 4. Sandwich- non meat 9% 4. Chicken/ steak/ schnitzel 8% 4. Sandwich – non meat 10% 5. Steak/ schnitzel/chicken 9% 5. Chinese/ stirfry/noodles 8% 5. Toast with topping 9% 6. Fruit/ fruit salad 9% 6. Pasta 7% 6. Steak/ schnitzel/ chicken 9% 7. Fries/ chips/ wedges 6% 7. Quiche/ eggs/ dips 7% 7. Sandwich – meat/ fish 7% 8. Fast food – pie, hotdog 6% 8. Sandwich – non meat 7% 8. Sweets/ pastries 7% 9. Chinese/ Thai 6% 9. Yoghurt/ ice cream 6% 9. Quiche/ eggs/ dips 7% 10. Fast food burgers 5% 10. Sandwich – meat/fish 6% 10. Fish/ tuna 6% 10. Yoghurt/ ice cream 6% In comparing men with women, men are more likely to consume meat/ fish sandwiches or rolls (eg roast beef, chicken, ham, sausage) and fast food options such as hot chips and hotdogs. By comparison, women in general are more likely to consume salads, fruit, quiches/ egg products and yoghurts. In comparing working vs non working women, those who work full time are more likely to eat stirfry and pasta meals which may be more accessible to them, while non working women are more likely to each pantry staples such as tuna and toast.Base: Total sample (n=1,400) Q: What did you have for lunch yesterday? ( note multiple responses)
  • 9. Top Lunch items Top Ten Lunch Choices Males Weekdays Weekends 1. Sandwich - combination 18% 1. Sandwich - combination 18% 1. Sandwich - combination 16% 2. Sandwich - meat 12% 2. Fruit/ fruit salad 14% 2. Steak/ schnitzel/ chicken 14% 3. Salad 11% 3. Salad 13% 3. Salad 13% 4. Sandwich- non meat 9% 4. Sandwich – non meat 10% 4. Fruit/ fruit salad 10% 5. Steak/ schnitzel/chicken 9% 5. Sandwich – meat/ fish 10% 5. Sandwich – meat/ fish 10% 6. Fruit/ fruit salad 9% 6. Steak/ schnitzel/ chicken 7% 6. Toast w topping/ bread 10% 7. Fries/ chips/ wedges 6% 7. Chinese/ stirfry/ noodles 6% 7. Quiche/ eggs/ dips 7% 8. Fast food – pie, hotdog 6% 8. Yoghurt/ ice cream 5% 8. Fries/ chips/ wedges 7% 9. Chinese/ Thai 6% 9. Pasta/ risotto 5% 9. Sweets/ pastries 6% 10. Fast food burgers 5% 10. Toast w topping/ bread 5% 10. Chinese/ stirfry/ noodles 6% 10. Sandwich – no meat 6% 10. Vegetables 6% In comparing weekday and weekend lunches, it appears that hot lunches comprising steak/ schnitzel/ chicken and vegetables are more likely to be consumed on weekends. In addition, weekend lunches are more likely to include items such as quiche/ eggs as people choose “brunch” options for a more leisurely meal option.Base: Total sample (n=1,400) Image: http://www.dietriffic.com/2009/02/10/18-healthy-lunch-ideas/ Q: What did you have for lunch yesterday? ( note multiple responses)
  • 10. Soup consumption So, how many people ate soup for lunch in the last week of Spring? n=37 people representing 2.6% of total adults Note: this includes Asian soups such as MisoImage: http://www.cookinglight.com/food/in-season/winter-power-foods-00400000002978/
  • 11. Profile of soup consumers Although based on a small sample size, it appears that those who choose soup as a lunch option are more likely to be: Female (index = 113) Mid 20s – 30s (index = 135) or Older – 55 years + (index = 151) Home duties (index = 133) Retired (index = 158)Base: Soup consumers (n=37) Q: What did you have for lunch yesterday? ( note multiple responses)
  • 12. Agenda • Background and methodology • Key findings • What do we eat for lunch? • Where do we eat our lunch? • Where do we source our lunch? • What do we spend on lunch? • DemographicsImage: http://www.mygreenaustralia.com/2010/08/meat-free-mid-week-soup-roundup/
  • 13. Lunch venue Across an entire week, it Lunch venue on weekdays vs weekends is perhaps not surprising 100% 4% that almost eight in ten 5% 1% 7% 2% 3% people aged over 18 years 3% 1% 4% 3% 3% eat their lunch either at 11% 6% home or at their place of 11% 80% work. 12% 7% On weekdays, a higher 30% 60% 39% proportion of people eat lunch at work, while on weekends more than three in five people 40% prepare their midday meal at home. 62% 47% 20% 42% Interestingly, eating lunch at restaurants/ cafes/ food courts is relatively consistent across the 0% week. Total Weekday Weekend At home At work Restaurant/ café/ food court Friend/ familys Travelling Outside OtherBase: Total sample (n=1,400) Q: Where were you when you had lunch?
  • 14. Lunch venue Lunch venue by workers and age 100% 3% 5% 4% 3% 4% 3% 6% 2% 1% 7% 2% 1% 2% 3% 4% 2% 2% 3% 2% 2% 1% 1% 3% 2% 3% Again, as expected, full 4% 5% 11% 2% 13% 13% 8% time workers are 80% 10% 14% 12% significantly more likely 9% 16% to eat lunch across the week at their place of 60% 30% 34% 30% 40% work, while the majority 48% of non-full time workers eat their lunch at home. 40% 67% 63% Among different age 46% 46% 42% groups, those aged over 20% 36% 29% 55 years are more likely to eat lunch at home and are less likely to eat 0% Full time Non full time 18-24 yrs 25-34 yrs 35-44 yrs 45-54 yrs 55 yrs or older at restaurants/ cafes or worker worker food courts. At home At work Restaurant/ café/ food court Friend/ familys Travelling Outside OtherBase: Total sample (n=1,400) Q: Where were you when you had lunch?
  • 15. Lunch venue Lunch venue by gender Male Female In-market = 66% of respondents Across a general week, there appears to be vey little difference between 2% 5% 2% 4% males and females in 3% 3% 2% terms of the venues 3% where lunch is 11% consumed. 11% 47% 47% 29% 31% Restaurant/ Friend/ Home Work Outside Travelling Other café/ food court relativesBase: Total sample (n=1,400) Q: Where were you when you had lunch?
  • 16. Lunch venue Lunch venue for soup consumers Among the small sample of people who consumed soup for lunch, almost half ate In-market = 66% of respondents their soup in the workplace, while more 13% than one third consumed their soup at home. The remainder purchased their soup at a restaurant, café or food court. 49% 38% This highlights a slightly more limited range of soup eating locations compared with other Note: very small lunch options which can sample size be more easily consumed outside/ while travelling . Restaurant/ Friend/ Home Work Outside Travelling Other café/ food court relativesBase: Soup consumers (n=37) Q: Where were you when you had lunch?
  • 17. Lunch venue: Key outtakeOpportunity/ Potential market size:• Across all lunch occasions throughout the week, among all demographics, at least 70% of lunchtime meals are eaten at home or at work• For most people, wet soup would be a viable lunch alternative within these two venuesMarket size limitation:• Around one in five lunchtime meals are consumed in venues where wet soup may not be practical (eg while travelling, outside) or not always readily available, particularly during summer months (eg restaurant/ food court)
  • 18. Agenda • Background and methodology • Key findings • What do we eat for lunch? • Where do we eat our lunch? • Where do we source our lunch? • What do we spend on lunch? • DemographicsImage: http://www.mygreenaustralia.com/2010/08/meat-free-mid-week-soup-roundup/
  • 19. Lunch source Lunch source weekdays vs weekends Across the full week, 100% around one in three 12% 11% 15% people reported 2% 2% 3% purchasing ingredients 80% 10% 10% 11% from a supermarket to make their lunch. While 16% 16% 13% one quarter included 60% lunch items in their general weekly grocery 24% 24% 23% shopping, almost one in 40% five bought takeaway for lunch across the week. 20% 36% 36% 36% Interestingly, the source for lunch items is reasonably consistent 0% across weekdays and Total Weekday Weekend weekends. M ade it Weekly shop Takeaway/ fast food Restaurant/ café/ food court Supermarket that day OtherBase: Total sample (n=1,400) Q: Which best describes your lunch?
  • 20. Lunch source Lunch source by workers and age Across a full week, 100% 11% 9% 11% 11% purchasing ingredients 13% 14% 14% 2% to make lunch appears 2% 3% 2% 3% 10% 3% 2% to be the most popular 80% 12% 8% 11% 11% 7% 11% source of lunch items 10% 9% among both full time 23% 17% 12% 21% 21% workers and non 60% workers, and among all 28% age groups. 28% 17% 23% 25% 20% 21% 40% However, full time workers and younger people are more likely 20% 38% 39% 38% to purchase takeaway 33% 33% 35% 36% food while older people and non full time workers are more likely 0% to include lunch items in Full time Non full time 18-24 yrs 25-34 yrs 35-44 yrs 45-54 yrs 55 yrs or older their weekly grocery worker worker shopping. M ade it Weekly shop Takeaway/ fast food Restaurant/ café/ food court Supermarket that day OtherBase: Total sample (n=1,400) Q: Which best describes your lunch?
  • 21. Lunch source Lunch source by gender Male Female In-market = 66% of respondents Across the week, the source of lunch food is again quite similar 12% 13% between males and females. Males are only 2% 2% slightly more likely to 10% purchase takeaway/ 37% 11% 35% fast food while females are slightly more likely to include their lunch 17% 14% food as part of their 22% 25% weekly supermarket shopping. Made it Weekly shop Takeaway/ fast Restaurant/ Supermarket Other food café/ food that day courtBase: Total sample (n=1,400) Q: Which best describes your lunch?
  • 22. Lunch source Lunch source for soup consumers Interestingly, among the In-market = 66% of respondents small sample of soup consumers, more than 16% one in three indicated that they had purchased ingredients to make the 5% soup themselves. 38% By comparison, a similar proportion indicated that they purchased 41% pre-packaged soup from the supermarket. Note: very small sample size Made it Weekly shop Takeaway/ fast Restaurant/ Supermarket Other food café/ food that day courtBase: Soup consumers (n=37) Q: Which best describes your lunch?
  • 23. Lunch source: Key outtakeOpportunity/ Potential market size:• In total, across any given week, around six in ten people either buy ingredients to make their own lunch, buy lunch items with their general grocery shopping, or visit a supermarket to purchase lunch items for that day• All of these people represent possible soup consumers who have an opportunity to purchase wet soup from a supermarket as a lunch optionMarket size limitation:• Again during summer, the remaining consumers who purchase their lunch at restaurants/ food courts, those who buy takeaway and those who skip lunch have less exposure to soup as a lunchtime choice
  • 24. Agenda • Background and methodology • Key findings • What do we eat for lunch? • Where do we eat our lunch? • Where do we source our lunch? • What do we spend on lunch? • DemographicsImage: http://www.mygreenaustralia.com/2010/08/meat-free-mid-week-soup-roundup/
  • 25. Lunch budget Lunch budget weekdays vs weekends 100% 2% 1% 1% 4% 1% 2% 2% 2% Across both weekdays 7% 6% 4% and weekends, the 8% majority of people aged 80% 26% 28% over 18 years spend no 22% more than $5 on lunch on average across the 60% week. However, on 40% weekends, a slightly 62% 62% 60% higher proportion spend more than $15 on lunch 20% compared with weekdays (10% compared with 4%). 0% Total Weekday Weekend $5 or under $6-$10 $11-$15 $16-$20 $21-$25 $26 or moreBase: Total sample (n=1,400) Q: How much did your lunch cost?
  • 26. Lunch budget Lunch budget by workers and age 100% 3% 1% 1% 1% 2% 4% 3% 1% 2% 1% 1% 1% 2% 2% 1% 0% 3% 3% 2% Again, it is perhaps not 2% 5% 2% 5% 4% 8% 10% 8% 8% surprising to see that 18% average lunch budgets 80% 21% are higher among full 25% 27% 31% 32% time workers compared 36% with non full time 60% workers, with 45% spending more than $5 on lunch across the 40% 74% week compared with 70% 61% 62% 30% of non full time 55% 54% 49% workers. 20% Among different age 0% groups, the average Full time Non full time 18-24 yrs 25-34 yrs 35-44 yrs 45-54 yrs 55 yrs or older amount spend on lunch worker worker appears to decrease with age. $5 or under $6-$10 $11-$15 $16-$20 $21-$25 $26 or moreBase: Total sample (n=1,400) Q: How much did your lunch cost?
  • 27. Lunch budget Lunch budget by gender Male Female In-market = 66% of respondents In terms of lunch budget across a full week, males and female again display 1%2% 1% 2% 3% 2% similar behaviour. 7% 6% Females are only slightly more likely than males 25% to spend $5 or less on 28% 59% average for their lunch. 64% $5 or under $6-$10 $11-$15 $16-$20 $21-$25 $26 or moreBase: Total sample (n=1,400) Q: How much did your lunch cost?
  • 28. Lunch budget Lunch budget for soup consumers Among the small sample In-market = 66% of respondents soup consumers, the soup was eaten as a 11% main meal option rather than an entrée option. As a result, almost 16% three-quarters of those who consumed soup for lunch spent no more 73% than $5 on their meal, with almost nine in ten spending no more than $10 on their meal. Note: very small sample size $5 or under $6-$10 $11-$15 $16-$20 $21-$25 $26 or moreBase: Soup consumers (n=37) Q: How much did your lunch cost?
  • 29. Lunch budget: Key outtakeOpportunity/ Potential market size:• Overall, six in ten people spend $5 or less on their lunch on average across both weekends and weekdays, while nine in ten spend no more than $10 on their lunch on average.• Wet soup is a viable lunch option in terms of budget parameters. While microwave and tinned soups fall into the $5 or under budget category, fresh or pre-packaged soups are generally likely to fall into the under $10 budget category• In addition, most of those people who consumed soup as their lunchtime meal indicated that it was their main food item rather than an entrée, ensuring that the cost of a wet soup lunch remains within average lunch cost range
  • 30. Agenda • Background and methodology • Key findings • What do we eat for lunch? • Where do we eat our lunch? • Where do we source our lunch? • What do we spend on lunch? • DemographicsImage: http://www.mygreenaustralia.com/2010/08/meat-free-mid-week-soup-roundup/
  • 31. Demographics Gender Age Location 8% 5% 9% 25% 9% 23% 24% 50% 50% 8% 9% 20% 11% 20% 23% 6% 18-24 25-34 yrs Sydney Other NSW Melbourne Male Female 35-44 yrs 45- 54 yrs Other VIC Brisbane Other QLD 55 yrs + SA WA ACT/ TASImage: http://www.mygreenaustralia.com/2010/08/meat-free-mid-week-soup-roundup/
  • 32. Demographics Work Status Lifestage 2% 12% 5% 14% 3% 5% 5% 35% 10% 52% 9% 17% 31% Working FT Working PT Home duties Student Alone Sharing Unemp/ Vol work Retired With parents With partner Other Partner + kids Kids no partnerImage: http://www.mygreenaustralia.com/2010/08/meat-free-mid-week-soup-roundup/
  • 33. Appendix: Soup consumptionWhat did you have for lunch yesterday? Soup: n=37• Heinz Chicken and sweet corn soup.• Egg and lettuce sandwich, a Laksa cuppa soup and a homemade iced coffee• Cracker biscuits topped with tuna and a cup of pea & ham soup.• Chicken and vegetable soup and toast• Chicken meatballs with tomato soup + vanilla cupcake• Croissants and cold vegetable soup• Combination wan ton soup• Thai style seafood and vegetable soup and a Thai Chinese kale with shrimp salad• Pepper Beef Soup and Pita Bread.• Pumpkin Soup with bread and an apple• Vegetable soup with two slices of whole grain bread• Instant miso soup and home-made sushi• Cup a Soup and 2 slices of bread• Soup• Lentil soup• Beef soup with potato• Handmade fishball noodles soup• Crackers and cup a soup fruit rollup tub peaches cheese slices• Gatorade and miso soup
  • 34. Appendix: Soup consumptionWhat did you have for lunch yesterday?• Chinese Chilli noodle soup and green tea• Cream of chicken cup of soup• Cup a soup, yogurt, banana• Thai Soup and rice• Continental vegetable Soup and bread• Vegetable soup, one slice of toast, fruit (apple, orange, kiwi fruit, orange, blueberries)...shared on a plate with family.• Home made minestrone soup, followed by two home made honey, soy and garlic chicken drumsticks accompanied by a mixed green salad, plus a tall glass of iced water.• Thai Clear Soup with Noodles• Broccoli soup with goats cheese, low fat berry yoghurt - 100g, nectarine• Pork and Chicken Noodle Soup• Apple and cup of soup• Chicken and vegetable soup• 1 boiled egg a cup of chicken noodle soup• Pea and ham soup with toast, plus coffee and grapes• Chicken Noodle soup, 2 slices white bread toasted, 4 strawberries and half a mango.• Fried rice with a tomato soup• Three cuskits with cheese slice an apple and a cup of soup.• Two slices of bread butter and vegemite with a chicken noodle cup of soup followed by a slice of rockmelon
  • 35. Lunch Diary Study December 2010Image: http://find.myrecipes.com/recipes/recipefinder.