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  • 1. Content
  • 2. A VISION premier university inCALABARZON, offering academicprograms and related servicesdesigned to respond to therequirements of the Philippines andthe . globaleconomy, particularly, Asiancountries Table of Title M G O contents
  • 3. The University shall primarily provideadvancededucation, professional, technological andvocational instruction inagriculture, fisheries, forestry, science, engineering, industrial technologies, teachereducation, medicine, law, arts andsciences, information technology and otherrelated fields. It shall also undertake researchand extension services, and provide aprogressive leadership in its areas ofspecialization. V G O
  • 4. In pursuit of the collegevision/mission the College of Education iscommitted to develop the full potentialsof the individuals and equip them withknowledge, skills and attitudes in TeacherEducation allied fields to effectivelyrespond to the increasingdemands, challenges and opportunities ofchanging time for global competitiveness. Back V M O
  • 5. Produce graduates who can demonstrate and practice theprofessional and ethical requirements for the Bachelor ofSecondary Education such as:1. To serve as positive and powerful role models in the pursuit oflearning thereby maintaining high regards to professional growth.2. Focus on the significance of providing wholesome and desirablelearning environment.3. Facilitate learning process in diverse types of learners.4. Use varied learning approaches and activities, instructionalmaterials and learning resources.5. Use assessment data, plan and revise teaching-learning plans.6. Direct and strengthen the links between school and communityactivities.7. Conduct research and development in Teacher Education andother related activities. Foreword V M G
  • 6. GENERAL OBJECTIVES This module was meant to classify in the study of physical education.Every individual differs from each other. Most of us differ in our skills in thedifferent sports. This module contains and tackles every essential aspect concerningBadminton. It may help to develop the knowledge and skills of the students indifferent sports. This module becomes the wall that separates us from our loved ones.We have missed wonderful Christmas holiday. However, this was not allwasted when we came out with a masterpiece that we would treasure a lot. The development of skills and abilities in Badminton is mainly thefocal point in this module. Aside from this the students would also learn howto play the game. Every chapter has focus objectives and questions. The questions inevery lessons and chapters would set as a guide for them to not just read thebook but also to understand it.
  • 7. The student researchers had expanded the ideas and information intergraded in this module. We made the statements simple and valid so that the students can easily understand our main point of view. We also provide activities in this module that will enhance and test what you have learned as you go along in this book. The activities injected in this module have the ability to explore the broad imagination of the students and awaken the sleeping abilities of the students in this sport. Each chapter and lesson has main objectives to develop the students.[ Chapter 1 consists of 2 lessons devoted to the history of Badminton. In this chapter the students are being introduced in the sport in such manner that they would develop their appreciative ability in the legacy of table tennis in the whole world. Students are expected to know what table tennis really is all about.
  • 8. Chapter 2 dwells on the equipments used intable tennis. In this chapter, the students areintroduced to the different equipment. Students arelikely to know the importance of the differentequipment in playing this sport. Chapter 3 is concerned with playing the tabletennis, its basic techniques and types of gameplayed. The reader would therefore developpsychomotor skills in performing different activitiesin this chapter. Chapter 4 focuses in the roles of the officials ina badminton game. The reader would also developpsychomotor skills in performing the different handsignals of the umpires and different task of otherofficial would more likely to be discussed.
  • 9. Chapter 5 deviates on the world’s mostfamous badminton players. Students woulddevelop their appreciative skills and mayalso be inspired to pursue a career in thissport. At the end of this book the students arenow ready to impart the knowledge theyhave learned they absorbed from thismodule. The students are able to obtain themastery in playing this sport. The Authors
  • 10. When we started doing something like this module, itnever crosses our mind that this one would be a very difficulttask. Why? It’s because when we think of students who has adeep thirst for knowledge all the worries and difficulties are sweptaway. We felt that even if I were too young, we know that we canmake an educational tool. We are only 2nd year Bachelor ofSecondary Education students and we have a doubt that we canmake one. But when we see students who are who are too muchirritated of searching in the libraries without finding any completereference, our determination gets stronger and intense. As welook our self again we always kept in our mind that everything ispossible, that we
  • 11. are bigger and stronger than all the difficultiesand those we might encounter in making thismodule. The students are the main reason why wechoose to make an educational tool like this.Whenever we visit libraries, one thing that we reallyobserve was they lack references in the curriculumof MAPEH. Although there are some references inMAPEH but most libraries lacks references onMAPEH. That’s why we do this educational tool not onlyfor the purpose of creating an educationalreference but also to spread this book in a broadnumbers of effective consumers. This referencewas not just a simple compilation of facts abouttable tennis but also this module was made tocomplement the ever changing needs of the
  • 12. The real aim of this module is to developstudent who has full potentials in tabletennis. Skilled players sometimes lack withthe real knowledge of badminton. We believethat skilled players should also not only beefficient in skills but also a player must begood on understanding facts ad informationregarding the game of table tennis. After reading the 5 chapters of thismodule the students are expected to be ableto:
  • 13.  appreciate and understand the history of badminton;  recognize the different badminton tools, equipments and playing area;  use properly the different badminton equipments;  understand the different types of game in badminton;  perform the different skills in a badminton racquet;  learn how to officiate a badminton game;  interpolate rules and regulations of badminton;  learn the duties and responsibilities of the officials;  perform the different hand signals in a badminton game;  appreciate the world’s most famous badminton players.  recognize some famous badminton players in the world.If the following objective has been achieved, then we can generalize that the students have really learned a lot from this educational tool.We are hoping that this simple educational tool would really help a lot in the development of the students learning.
  • 14. TABLE OF CONTENTSVMGO sGENERAL OBJECTIVESINTRODUCTIONTABLE OF CONTENTSFOREWORDACKNOWLEDGEMENTCHAPTER 1 Lesson 1.1 Badminton Lesson 1.2 History of Badminton Chapter TestCHAPTER 2. Lesson 2.1 The Racket Lesson 2.2 The Shuttlecock Lesson 2.3 The Net and the Post
  • 15. Lesson 2.4 The Court Chapter TestCHAPTER 3. Lesson 3.1 Singles Lesson 3.2 Doubles Lesson 3.3 Mixed Doubles Lesson 3.4 Racquet Skills Basic Technique Chapter TestCHAPTER 4. Lesson 4.1 Sports Officiating Lesson 4.2 Basic Rules in Badminton Lesson 4.3 Duties and Responsibilities of the Officials Chapter Test
  • 16. CHAPTER 5. Lesson 5.1 Famous Female Players Lesson. 5.2 Famous Male Players Chapter TestGLOSSARYBIBLIOGRAPHY
  • 17. The students are provided with guidanceand assistance of selected faculty members ofthe college through the selection, productionand utilization of appropriate technologytools in developing technology based teachersupport materials. Through the role andfunctions of computers especially theinternet, the student researchers and theadvisers are able to design and developvarious types of alternative delivery systems.These kinds of activities offer a remarkablelearning experience for the educationstudents as future mentors especially in thepreparation of instructional materials. Back Next
  • 18. The output of the group’s effort may serve asan educational research of the institution in providingeffective and quality education. The lessons andevaluations presented in this module may alsofunction as a supplementary reference for secondaryteachers and students. FOR-IAN V. SANDOVAL Computer Instructor/ Adviser/Dean CAS Prof. LYDIA R. CHAVEZ Dean, College of Education Back Preface
  • 19. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The creation of a project like this is not an easy task. Full force,determination, time, encouragement, support, assistance and understandingfrom others are very essential. We wish to thank Dr. Corazon San Agustin, our professor in EducationTechnology 4A, for teaching us how are we going to start this educationaltool. Also, we would like to thank Mr. For-Ian Sandoval, our professor inEducational Technology 4B, for teaching us strategies and techniques tomake this educational tool more attractive to those who might be able to readthis book.
  • 20. To the Dean of the College of Education, Mrs. Lydia De Chavez, wewould like to extend our heartfelt appreciation for the support you’veshared to us and for your hard work for this department. To the authors of the books that we’ve used to add additional factsand information to our educational tool. We share our victory with you aswe finish this module. We also want to give thanks to all of our friends for the supportmentally, emotionally and by all means that they help us in making thismodule. Most of all, we thank our family for their consideration andunderstanding. They are always there to be our inspiration and for givingus what we need in terms of supporting us financially. And finally, we thank God, our creator and the source of ourknowledge and understanding. Because of Him, we we’re able to comeout with this wonderful educational tool. Thank you!
  • 21. Getting to Know What Badminton isChapter Objectives:After studying this chapter, the students are expected to be able to: define what Badminton is;recall, understand and appreciate the history of Badminton;discuss the important details about Badminton;play the game properly.
  • 22. LESSON 1.1 BadmintonObjectives: After studying this lesson, the students are expected to be able to: define what Badminton is;appreciate the importance of Badminton;discuss the important details about Badminton.
  • 23. Badminton is a racquet sport played by either twoopposing players (singles) or two opposing pairs(doubles), who take positions on opposite halves of arectangular court that is divided by a net. Players scorepoints by striking a shuttlecock with their racquet so thatit passes over the net and lands in their opponents half ofthe court. A rally ends once the shuttlecock has struck theground, and each side may only strike the shuttlecockonce before it passes over the net. The shuttlecock (or shuttle) is a feathered projectilewhose unique aerodynamic properties cause it to flydifferently from the balls used in most racquet sports; inparticular, the feathers create much higher drag, causingthe shuttlecock to decelerate more rapidly than a ball.Shuttlecocks have a much higher top speed, whencompared to other racquet sports. Because shuttlecockflight is affected by wind, competitive badminton is playedindoors. Badminton is also played outdoors as a casualrecreational activity, often as a garden or beach game.
  • 24. Since 2009, badminton has been anOlympic sport with five events: mens andwomens singles, mens and womensdoubles, and mixed doubles, in which eachpair consists of a man and a woman. At highlevels of play, the sport demands excellentfitness: players require aerobicstamina, agility, strength, speed andprecision. It is also a technicalsport, requiring good motor coordination andthe development of sophisticated racquet mo
  • 25. History of Badminton LESSON 1.2Objectives: After studying this lesson, the students are expected to be ableto: define what Badminton is; appreciate the importance of Badminton; discuss the important details about Badminton.
  • 26. Badminton was invented long ago; aform of sport played in ancient Greece andEgypt. Badminton came from a child’s gamecalled battledore and shuttlecock, in whichtwo players hit a feathered shuttlecock backand forth with tiny rackets. The game wascalled “POONA” in India during the 18thCentury; British Army Officers stationedthere took the Indian version back toEngland in the 1860’s. The army menintroduced the game to the friends, but thenew sport was definitely launched there at aparty given in Gloucestershire. During thattime, the game had no name, but it was
  • 27. Badminton was invented long ago; a form of sportplayed in ancient Greece and Egypt. Badminton camefrom a child’s game called battledore andshuttlecock, in which two players hit a featheredshuttlecock back and forth with tiny rackets. Thegame was called “POONA” in India during the 18thCentury; British Army Officers stationed there tookthe Indian version back to England in the 1860’s. Thearmy men introduced the game to the friends, but thenew sport was definitely launched there at a partygiven in Gloucestershire. During that time, the gamehad no name, but it was referred to as “The Game ofBadminton” and, Badminton became its official name.
  • 28. Until 1887 the sport was played in England under the rules that prevailed in India. They were, from the English viewpoint, somewhat contradictory and confusing. Since a small army of badminton players had been recruited, a group formed itself into the Bath Badminton Club, standardized the rules, and made the game applicable to English ideas and the basic regulations: drawn up in 1887, still guide the sport. In 1895, the Badminton Association (of England) was formed to tale over the authority of the Bath Badminton Club, and the new group made rules, which now govern the game throughout the world. The International Badminton Federation (IBF) (now known asBadminton World Federation) was established in 1934 withCanada, Denmark, England, France, Ireland, NewZealand, Scotland and Wales as its founding members. Indiajoined as an affiliate in 1936. The BWF now governs internationalbadminton and develops the sport globally.
  • 29. Chapter Test Name: _______________________ Date: ____________ Yr. / Section: ______________ Teacher: _____________ Score: ____________Test IA. True or False. Write  if the statement is TRUE and  if the statement is FALSE. 1. Badminton is a racquet sport played by either two opposingplayers or two opposing pairs. 2. A player scores points by kicking the shuttlecock. 3. A women’s singles played to 15 points. 4. Badminton game is played in a rectangular court. 5. A rally ends when the shuttlecock has stuck the ground.B. Identification. Identify the answer in the following questions. Write your answer on thespace given ___________ 1. Who was the group who took over the authority of BathBadminton Club? ___________ 2. A child’s game where badminton came. ___________ 3. The term used by the Indian in Badminton. ___________ 4. A form of sport played in ancient Greece and Egypt. ___________ 5. When was the India joined as an affiliate of IBF.
  • 30. B. Briefly explain the history of Badminton through a “FLOW CHART”.___________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ Good Luck!!!
  • 31. Chapter 2 Facilities and EquipmentsChapter Objectives:After studying this chapter, the students are expected to be able to:•identify the different facilities and equipments in Badminton;•appreciate the uses of the different equipments in Badminton;•give importance to all the facilities and equipments in Badminton;•use the equipments properly.
  • 32. LESSON 2.1 The RacketObjectives: After studying this lesson, the students are expected to be able to: define what racquet is; appreciate the importance of racquets in Badminton game; use the racquets properly in playing Badminton.
  • 33. Badminton racquets are light, with top qualityracquets weighing between 79 and 95 grams including thestrings. They are composed of many different materialsranging from the carbon fiber composite (graphitereinforced plastic) to solid steel, which may be augmentedby a variety of materials. The racquet shall be a frame notexceeding 680 mm in overall length and 230 mm inoverall width consisting of the main parts described in thefigure 2.1A.Components of the Badminton RacquetHandle is the part of the racquet intended to be gripped bya player.Stringed area is the part of the racquet with which it isintended that a player hits the shuttle.Head bounds the stringed area.Throat (if present) connects the shaft to the head.
  • 34. Figure . Image showing the parts of a Badminton racket
  • 35. LESSON 2.2 The ShuttlecockObjectives: After studying this lesson, the students are expected to beable to: define what shuttlecock is; differentiate shuttlecock with feathers and shuttlecock with plastic skirt; appreciate the uses of shuttlecock in the Badminton game; use the shuttlecock properly in the Badminton match.
  • 36. A shuttlecock is a high-drag projectile used in the game ofbadminton. It has an open conical shape: the cone is formedfrom sixteen overlapping goose feathers embedded into arounded cork base. The cork is covered with thin leather. The shuttlecocks shape makes it extremely aerodynamicallystable. Regardless of initial orientation, it will turn to fly corkfirst, and remain in the cork-first orientation. The name shuttlecock is frequently shortened to shuttle.The "shuttle" part of the name was probably derived from itsback-and-forth motion during the game, resembling the shuttleof a loom; the "cock" part of the name was probably derived fromthe resemblance of the feathers to those on a cockerel.
  • 37. The feathers are brittle; shuttlecocks breakeasily and often need to be replaced severaltimes during a game. For this reason, syntheticshuttlecocks have been developed that replacethe feathers with a plastic skirt. Players oftenrefer to synthetic shuttlecocks as plastics andfeathered shuttlecocks as feathers. The cost of good quality feathers is similar tothat of good quality plastics, but plastics are farmore durable, typically lasting many matcheswithout any impairment to their flight. For thisreason, many clubs prefer to play with plastics.
  • 38. The playing characteristics of plastics andfeathers are substantially different. Plastics flymore slowly on initial impact, but slow downless towards the end of their flight. Feathershuttles may come off the strings at speedsin excess of 320 km/h (200 mph) but slowdown faster as they drop. For this reason, thefeather shuttle makes the game seemfaster, but also allows more time to playstrokes.
  • 39. Most experienced and skillful players greatlyprefer feathers, and serious tournaments orleagues are always played using feathershuttlecocks. Experienced players generallyprefer the "feel" of feathered shuttlecocks, andassert that they are better able to control theflight of feathers than of plastics. Because feathershuttles fly more quickly off the racquet face theyalso tend to cause less shoulder impact andinjury. In Asia, where feather shuttlecocks aremore affordable than in Europe and NorthAmerica, plastic shuttlecocks are hardly used atall. All senior international tournaments use onlyfeather shuttlecocks of the highest quality (kingsof the court).
  • 40. Figure 2 . Feathered Shuttlecock Figure 3. SyntheticShuttlecock
  • 41. LESSON 2.3 The Net and the PostObjectives:After studying this lesson, the students are expected to be able to: define what net and posts are; appreciate the importance of net and posts in the Badminton game; place the net and posts properly for the Badminton match.
  • 42. A badminton court is a rectangularspace, 44 feet long X 17 feet wide for asingles match and 44 feet long X 20 feetwide for a double’s match. It is normallymade out of wood or composite flooringsurface. The idea is for it to be smooth andleveled. A minimum of 6.5 feet of clearspace on all four sides is required. The court is divided into two halves by anet. The next obvious question is- howhigh is badminton net? The net is supposedto be 5 feet 1 inch on the edges and 5 feetin the centre. The poles that support the netare planted outside the double’s line even
  • 43. Badminton nets are now available in a range ofmaterials, from polyethylene, to nylon, to vinyl. Thebasic criterion when picking up a net should be tocheck for durability and strength. The net should be made of fine natural cord orartificial fiber of a dark color of eventhickness, minimum being 15mm and maximum20mm. The first thing to be taken care of whensetting up the court is to check how high is thebadminton net. Also ensure that the net is properly extendedbetween the poles. The depth of the net should be2 feet 6 inches. The net should be edged with75mm white tape doubled and supported by a cordor cable that is stretched over the posts.
  • 44. LESSON 2.4 The CourtObjectives: After studying this lesson, the students are expected tobe able to: identify the proper measurement of the Badminton court ; appreciate the importance of the court to the Badminton game; and use the court properly in the Badminton match.
  • 45. The overall dimension of a badminton court is 20 feet by 44 feet. The lines along these measurements mark the sidelines for doubles play and long service lines for singles play.The Net Line The net line marks the middle of the court where the net is placed, creating a 22 feet by 20 feet area on each side of the net.Short Service Line The short service line is marked 6 feet 6 inches (some are marked 7 feet) from the center line. The area inside the short service line is also called the Non Volley Zone.Center Line The center line is the line that divides the court from the Short Service Line to the Back Boundary Line. This delineates the Left from Right Service
  • 46. Side Line for Singles Play The singles side line is marked 1 1/2 feet from the edge of the outer boundary (doubles side line) Back Boundary Line and Long Service Line for Singles The back boundary line is the same for singles and doubles play it is the outermost back line on the court. Long Service Line for Doubles The long service line for Doubles is marked 2 1/2 feet inside the Back Boundary Line.
  • 47. Chapter TestName: _______________________ Date: ____________Yr. / Section: ______________ Teacher: ___________ Score: ____________Test IA. Identify the following. Choose your answer in the box below.__________ 1. It is a high-drag projectile which has an open conical shape used in the game of badminton.__________ 2. Its overall dimension is 20 feet by 44 feet.__________ 3. Part of the racquet intended to be gripped by a player.__________ 4. It is the line that divides the court from the Short Service Line to the Back Boundary Line.__________ 5. It connects the shaft to the head.__________ 6. Which Badminton equipment is weighing between 79 and 95 grams?__________ 7. It is the middle of the court where the net is placed.__________ 8. The long service line for Doubles is marked ______ feet inside the Back Boundary Line.__________ 9-10. The net should be ________ on the edges and _____ in the center. Shuttlecock 2½ Court Racquet
  • 48. B. Name the parts 1. Badminton Racquet 2. Badminton Court
  • 49. Chapter 3 Let’s Play Badminton!Chapter Objectives:After studying this chapter, the students are expected to be able to: identify all the badminton skills; select what skills are more effective or fitted to them; show interest in doing the skills; and participate actively in playing the game.
  • 50. LESSON 3.1 SinglesObjectives:After studying this lesson, the students are expected to be ableto: explain what singles is; show sportsmanship while playing singles; and play skillfully the singles.
  • 51. The singles court is narrower than the doubles court, butthe same length, serve in the single and double back box isout. Since one person needs to cover the entire court, singlestactics are based on forcing the opponent to move as muchas possible; this means that singles strokes are normallydirected to the corners of the court. Players exploit the lengthof the court by combining lifts and clears with drop shots andnet shots. Smashing is less prominent in singles than indoubles because players are rarely in the ideal position toexecute a smash, and smashing often leaves the smashervulnerable if the smash is returned. In singles, players will often start the rally with aforehand high serve. Low serves are also usedfrequently, either forehand or backhand. Flick serves are lesscommon, and drive serves are rare. At high levels of play, singles demands extraordinaryfitness. Singles is a game of patient positionalmaneuvering, unlike the all-out aggression of doubles
  • 52. A left-handed player has a natural advantageagainst a right-handed player. This is because thereare more right-handed players in the world (you arenot used to playing them). When you play asouthpaw, the forehand and backhand arereversed, so that a shot to your right of the court (thebackhand of right-handed players) will result in avery powerful smash against you. Because ofthis, left-handed players tend to have more shotsdirected to their forehand, and consequently theirbackhand is not properly trained. Therefore, the mainweakness of a southpaw is his backhand. Knowingthis, a left-handed player should try to direct most ofhis shots to the left side of the court.
  • 53. That is because even though it is the forehand ofa right-handed person, the return of that shot willalso be on your forehand (it is much harder toperform a cross-court shot than a parallel shot). Thatwill ensure that you can keep smashing. It is said thatleft-handers have better smashes. It is partly truebecause of the rare angles that a left-hander iscapable of producing (a parallel smash on the leftside of the court, rather than a slightly angledshot), and also because the feathers on theshuttlecock are placed in a way that favors a left-handed shot (the shuttlecock will have more speedwhen sliced with a left-handed personsforehand, thus producing a much more powerfulsmash). Though, a left-handed player himself will beconfused when playing a fellow counterpart.
  • 54. LESSON 3.2 DoublesObjectives:After studying this lesson, the students are expected to beable to: explain what doubles is; show sportsmanship while playing doubles; and play skillfully the doubles.
  • 55. Both pairs will try to gain and maintain theattack, smashing downwards when possible. Wheneverpossible, a pair will adopt an ideal attacking formationwith one player hitting down from the rearcourt, and hispartner in the midcourt intercepting all smash returnsexcept the lift. If the rearcourt attacker plays adropshot, his partner will move into the forecourt tothreaten the net reply. If a pair cannot hit downwards, theywill use flat strokes in an attempt to gain the attack. If apair is forced to lift or clear the shuttlecock, then theymust defend: they will adopt a side-by-side position in therear midcourt, to cover the full width of their court againstthe opponents smashes. In doubles, players generallysmash to the middle ground between two players in orderto take advantage of confusion and clashes.
  • 56. At high levels of play, the backhand serve hasbecome popular to the extent that forehandserves almost never appear in professionalgames. The straight low serve is used mostfrequently, in an attempt to prevent theopponents gaining the attack immediately. Flickserves are used to prevent the opponent fromanticipating the low serve and attacking itdecisively. At high levels of play, doubles rallies areextremely fast. Mens doubles is the mostaggressive form of badminton, with a highproportion of powerful jump smashes.
  • 57. Left handed/Right handed doubles pair The LH/RH doubles pair is very common at advanced levelsof play. That is because they have a distinct advantage over aRH/RH or LH/LH pair. The most notable advantage is that neitherside of the court is a weak side. This makes it so that theopposing team has to use more time to think of which side is thebackhand and send it there, because against a normal RH/RHpair, you would usually almost always send it to your right sideof the court, whilst against a LH/RH pair the weak side changesduring the rally. Another advantage is also in the smash of a left-handed player. The feathers of a shuttlecock are placed to have anatural spin, so when slightly slicing the shuttlecock with a left-handed shot, you counter that natural spin which creates dragand produce a faster smash. The same effect goes when a right-handed player slices the shot with his backhand. A very goodexample of this is Tan Boon Heong, a left-handed player whoholds the world record with a (421 km/h) smash.
  • 58. LESSON 3.3 Mixed DoublesObjectives:After studying this lesson, the students are expected to beable to: explain what mixed doubles is; show sportsmanship while playing mixed doubles; and play skillfully the mixed doubles.
  • 59. If do not have trouble with boy - girlrelationships, mixed doubles is the mostchallenging of the three doubles played inbadminton. It combines the power and ability tocover a significant amount of court for theman, and the finesse and touch of a woman. Mixed doubles is sometimes referred to as"singles with interference." This is because of theimpression that the woman cannot compete inthe back court or on even terms with the man.The man controls the play so that most of thebirds are returned in his direction. The woman isallowed an occasional shot at the net just to sayshe is playing the game.
  • 60. In basic mixed doubles, the man will coverthe majority of the shots in the back court whilethe woman will cut off any weak shot at the net.In some cases, the woman may be stronger thanthe man and will cover more of the court. Inother cases, both may be of equal skills and willplay regular doubles with each sharing their timein the back court. For this article, however, theman is assumed to be of superior strength andpower and the pair will use the traditional "frontand back" formation. Of course, the ultimateobject of each individual in the pair is to realizetheir strengths and weaknesses and maximizetheir abilities to produce a winning game.
  • 61. The front and back system in mixed doubles isthe basic style of attack with the woman ready to hitdown all shuttles at the front of the court and herpartner ready to smash from the back. As the womanis closer to the net and has less time to react to theopponents shots, her basic area of responsibility is infront of the service line. She must be careful not toreach behind her for shots that she may lift to theopponents. She must hold her racket up at alltimes, ready to make short jabs (not a full swing) onshots close to the net. The man must have finesseand strength to return shots that can not be smashedby the opponents. Both partners must avoid lifting orclearing to the back at all costs, since this front andback formation is very vulnerable to drop shots andsmashes, directed down the line or cross-court.
  • 62. In this formation, the woman should neverlook around to see what her partner is doing; sheshould constantly watch the movements of theopponents. This will tell her from what directionof their court to expect their return and also giveher a good idea what type of return theopponents will make. Both partners must beadept at setting up the opponents so that one ofthe partners can obtain a kill. In preparation for amatch, a pair must first plan an overall strategyon the strengths and weaknesses of anopponents game. They must find the answer toany shot the opponents may try - often whatworks for the opponents also works against themas well. Brains, tactics, and the ability to playconsistently (that is, NO UNFORCED ERRORS)often become the winning ingredients.
  • 63. In mixed doubles, both pairs try tomaintain an attacking formation with thewoman at the front and the man at the back.This is because the male players aresubstantially stronger, and can thereforeproduce smashes that are more powerful. Asa result, mixed doubles requires greatertactical awareness and subtler positional play.Clever opponents will try to reverse the idealposition, by forcing the woman towards theback or the man towards the front. In orderto protect against this danger, mixed playersmust be careful and systematic in their shotselection.
  • 64. At high levels of play, the formations willgenerally be more flexible: the top womenplayers are capable of playing powerfullyfrom the rear court, and will happily do so ifrequired. When the opportunityarises, however, the pair will switch back tothe standard mixed attacking position, withthe woman in front.
  • 65. Racquet Skills Basic Technique LESSON 3.4Objectives:After studying this lesson, the students are expected to beable to: determine the different racquet skills; show sportsmanship while playing a game; and use the different racquet skills in playing Badminton.
  • 66. SERVEPosition yourself so your side is to the net.Your non-dominant side is closest to the net.Hold the shuttle (non dominant hand) just below shoulder height.Your dominant arm extended back (holding racket) with weight on the back foot.Drop shuttle.Shift weight forward, and swing racket downward and forward.Keep wrist your wrist in a cocked position until the shuttle is contacted.Continue to move your body forward.Racket should contact the shuttle at a low level below knee.Follow-through with a strong wrist snaps upon contact.Quickly assume a ready position to return the shot from your opponent.
  • 67. Backhand Serve Forehand Serve
  • 68. BACKHAND The stroke used to return ballshit to the left of a right-handedplayer and to the right of a left-handed player.
  • 69. FOREHAND The stroke used to return a ball hit to the right of a right-handed player and to the left of a left-handed player.
  • 70. DRIVES This is a quick hit with not much arc. It is like a "line drive" in baseball. The racket contacts the shuttle in a straight up and down position so the flight is straight. Lead the movement with the elbow. Hit the shuttle with the wrist cocked.
  • 71. DROP SHOTS/BLOCKS The shuttle is hit so it gently drops just over the net and lands in the front of the opponent’s court. The block is used as quick reflex action to a drive or smash. Just get your racket in front of the oncoming shuttle and try to return the shuttle just above the net.
  • 72. CLEARS A shot hit deep to the opponents back to boundary line.The high clear is a defensive shot, while the flatter attacking clear is used offensively.UnderhandSame motion as the serve.OverheadAnticipate; take the racket into the back scratching position, with weight on the back foot.Hit the shuttle with a fully extended arm swing.Snap the wrist to increase the strength of the shot.The face of the racket is open so that the shuttle will return with a deep and long arch.Continue the transfer of weight forward with a smooth follow- through.
  • 73. SMASHES The motion is the same as the overhead clear except the face of the racket is closed and the shuttle is usually hit when the shuttle is in front of the body. Hard-hit overhead shot that forces the shuttle sharply downward. Badminton’s primary attacking stroke.
  • 74. FLICK A quick wrist-and-forearm rotation used to surprise an opponent by changing an apparently soft shot into a faster passing shot.HAIRPIN NET SHOT A shot made from below and very close to the net and causing the shuttle to rise, just clear the net, then drop sharply down the other side so that the flight of the shuttlecock resembles the shape of a hairpin.
  • 75. HALFCOURT SHOT A shot hit low and to midcourt, used effectively in doubles play against the up-and- back formation.KILL A fast downward shot that cannot be returned.RALLY A sequence of one or more strokes starting with the service, until the shuttle ceases to be in play.STROKE A forward movement of the player’s racket.
  • 76. Chapter TestName: _______________________ Date: ____________Yr. / Section: ______________ Teacher: _____________ Score: ____________Test IA. Supply the missing words.1. The __________ court is narrower than the __________ court, but the samelength, serve in the single and double back box is out. Since one person needs to coverthe entire __________, singles tactics are based on forcing the opponent to move asmuch as possible; this means that singles __________ are normally directed to thecorners of the court. Players exploit the length of the court by combining __________and __________ with drop __________ and net shots. 8. ________ is less prominent insingles than in doubles because players are rarely in the ideal position to execute a__________ and smashing often leaves the __________ vulnerable if the smash isreturned.2. In __________, both pairs try to maintain an attacking formation with the__________ at the front and the _________ at the back. This is because the male__________ are substantially stronger, and can therefore produce __________ that aremore powerful. As a result, mixed doubles requires greater tactical awareness andsubtler positional play. __________ opponents will try to reverse the ideal position, byforcing the woman towards the __________ or the man towards the __________. In orderto protect against this danger, mixed players must be __________ and __________ intheir shot selection.
  • 77. Test IIMultiple Choice. Choose the answer in the bubble on the next page. Write your answer in thespace given.1. This is a quick hit with not such mark. ____________2. The shuttle is hit so it gently drops just over the net and lands in the front of the opponent’scourt. ____________3. The motion is the same as the overhead clear. ____________4. Same motion as the serve. ____________5. The block is used as quick reflex action to a drive or smash. ____________6. A fast downward shot that cannot be returned. ____________7. This is the forward movement of the player’s racket. ____________8. A shot made from below and very close to the net and causing the shuttle to rise. ____________9. A quick wrist-and-forearm rotation. ____________10. Stroke used to return a ball hit to the right of a right-handed player and to the left of a left-handed player. ____________
  • 78. Drives Kill Rally Hairpin net shot Flick Smash Underhand Stroke Backhand Drop Shots/ Blocks Test III Actual Activity 1. Organize a badminton game for a singles match. Follow the rules in playing singles. 2. After having singles match, try to have the game for doubles and mixed doubles. Test theability of each and everyone in playing badminton. Good Luck!!!
  • 79. Chapter 4 Officiating a Badminton GameChapter Objectives:After studying this chapter, the students are expected to be able to: define what officiating is; explain the duties of the officials and the rules involved in playing a badminton game; demonstrate the hand signals used in officiating a badminton game; accept every decision of the officials and give respect to them; officiate a badminton game properly.
  • 80. Sports Officiating LESSON 4.1Objectives:After studying this lesson, the students are expected tobe able to: define sports officiating; to know the qualities of good official; and explain the duties and responsibilities of the officials of the game.
  • 81. Sports officiating are one of the hardest jobs in the field of sports. It is said to be very sensitive task during the competition. This is deals mainly with the proper conduct of the game.a. Types of Officiating Decision on every action. A decision is made on every action that takes place.Example: table tennis, badminton Discriminating judgment. The decisions made will depend upon the situation created by players and the rule that will allow the official to exercise prudent judgment.
  • 82. b. Bases of Good Sports OfficiatingKnowledge. The official should have enough knowledge about the proper interpretation of the sports officiating. He/she needs to master the duties and responsibilities and mechanics of how to officiate the game.Ability. It is not easy to officiate so the official competence and talent for the task.Experience. “Experience is the best teacher”.The knowledge and skill learned by actual involvement with facts and events a considerable period of time.Preparation. It is the readiness before the game start.
  • 83. c. Qualities of an Official An official should be knowledgeable when it comes in field of sports especially in his responsibilities and duties. Official must be physically fit. A physically fit official is always alert, in the right place all the time, maintains good judgment, teams up well with the other officials and never fails on his duties. He can make a good performance when his physical condition is good. Always in concentration. The attention of an official should always in the system or flow of the game. Presence of mind is important. An official should have self-confident. Firm trust to his ability is one of the good qualities of an official.Courage. The readiness of an official to face and endure the difficulty of his duties and responsibilities.Decisiveness. An official should know how to decide about the system of the game.Objectivity. As an official, he should have a goal or objective that he needs to reach. It is to do his tasks properly until the game ends.
  • 84. Basic Rules in Badminton LESSON 4.2Objectives:After studying this lesson, the students are expected to be able to: enumerate the basic rules and regulation of badminton; follow the rules properly; and apply the rules in playing badminton.
  • 85. Just like other sports, badminton has its own rules and regulations. It is important to the players to know first the rules and regulations of the game. In this lesson, you will learn the proper rules and regulations of badmintonTOSS Before play commences, a toss shall be conducted and the side winning the toss shall exercise the choice in either of the following: to serve or receive first; to start play at one end of the court or the other. The side losing the toss shall then exercise the remaining choice.
  • 86. A match shall consist of the best of three games, unless otherwise arranged A game shall be won by the side which first scores 21 points, except if thescore becomes 20-all and if the score becomes 29-all. The side winning a rally shall add a point to its score. A side shall win arally, if the opposing side commits a "fault" or the shuttle ceases to be in playbecause it touches the surface of the court inside the opponents court. If the score becomes 20-all, the side which gains a two point lead first, shallwin that game. If the score becomes 29-all, the side scoring the 30th point shall win thatgame. The side winning a game shall serve first in the next game.
  • 87. Players shall change ends: at the end of the first game; at the end of the second game, if there is to be a third game; and in the third game when a side first scores 11 points. If the ends are not changed, it shall be done so as soon as the mistake is discovered and when the shuttle is not in play. The existing score shall stand.
  • 88. In a correct service: neither side shall cause undue delay to the delivery of the service once the server and the receiver are ready for the service. On completion of the backward movement of servers racket head, any delay in the start of the service, shall be considered to be an undue delay; the server and the receiver shall stand within diagonally opposite service courts without touching the boundary lines of these service courts; some part of both feet of the server and the receiver shall remain in contact with the surface of the court in a stationary position from the start of the service until the service is delivered ; the servers racket shall initially hit the base of the shuttle; the whole shuttle shall be below the servers waist at the instant of being hit by the servers racket. The waist shall be considered to be an imaginary line round the body, level with the lowest part of the servers bottom rib; the shaft of the servers racket at the instant of hitting the shuttle shall be pointing in a downward direction; the movement of the servers racket shall continue forwards from the start of the service until the service is delivered ;
  • 89. the flight of the shuttle shall be upwards from the servers racket to pass over the net so that, if not intercepted, it shall land in the receivers service court (i.e. on or within the boundary lines); and in attempting to serve, the server shall not miss the shuttle.Once the players are ready for the service, the first forward movement of the servers racket head shall be the start of the service.Once started, the service is delivered when the shuttle is hit by the servers racket or, in attempting to serve, the server misses the shuttle.The server shall not serve before the receiver is ready. However, the receiver shall be considered to have been ready if a return of the service is attempted.In doubles, during the delivery of service, the partners may take up any positions within their respective courts, which do not insight the opposing server or receiver.
  • 90. SINGLESServing and receiving courts The players shall serve from, and receive in, their respective right service courts when the server has not scored or has scored an even number of points in that game. The players shall serve from, and receive in, their respective left service courts when the server has scored an odd number of points in that game. Order of play and position on court In a rally, the shuttle may be hit by the server and the receiver alternately, from any position on that players side of the net, until the shuttle ceases to be in play.Scoring and servingIf the server wins a rally, the server shall score a point. The server shall then serve again from the alternate service court. If the receiver wins a rally, the receiver shall score a point. The receiver shall then become the new server.
  • 91. DOUBLESServing and receiving courts A player of the serving side shall serve from the right service court when the serving side has not scored or has scored an even number of points in that game. A player of the serving side shall serve from the left service court when the serving side has scored an odd number of points in that game. The player of the receiving side who served last shall stay in the same service court from where he served last. The reverse pattern shall apply to the receivers partner. The player of the receiving side standing in the diagonally opposite service court to the server shall be the receiver.
  • 92. The players shall not change their respective service courts until they win a point when their side is serving. Service in any turn of serving shall be delivered from the service court corresponding to the serving sides score, except as provided in service court errors.Order of play and position on court after the service is returned, in a rally, the shuttle may be hit by either player of the serving side and either player of the receiving side alternately, from any position on that players side of the net, until the shuttle ceases to be in play.Scoring and servingIf the serving side wins a rally, the serving side shall score a point. The server shall then serve again from the alternate service court.If the receiving side wins a rally, the receiving side shall score a point. The receiving side shall then become the new serving side.
  • 93. Sequence of serving In any game, the right to serve shall pass consecutively:from the initial server who started the game from the right service courtto the partner of the initial receiver, the service shall be delivered from the left service court.to the partner of the initial serverto the initial receiver,to the initial server and so on.No player shall serve or receive out of turn, or receive two consecutive services in the same game, except as provided in law of service court errors.Either player of the winning side may serve first in the next game, and either player of the losing side may receive first in the next game.
  • 94. SERVICE COURT ERRORSA service court error has been made when a player: has served or received out of turn; or has served or received from the wrong service court;If a service court error is discovered, the error shall be corrected and the existing score shall stand.
  • 95. FAULTSIt shall be a "fault": if a service is not correct; if, in service, the shuttle: is caught on the net and remains suspended on its top; after passing over the net, is caught in the net; or is hit by the receivers partner;if in play, the shuttle:
  • 96. lands outside the boundaries of the court (i.e. not on or within the boundary lines);passes through or under the net;fails to pass over the net;touches the ceiling or side walls;touches the person or dress of a player;touches any other object or person outside the court; (Where necessary on account of the structure of the building, the local badminton authority may, subject to the right of veto of its Member Association, make bye-laws dealing with cases in which a shuttle touches an obstruction).is caught and held on the racket and then slung during the execution of a stroke;is hit twice in succession by the same player. However, a shuttle hitting the head and the stringed area of the racket in one stroke shall not be a "fault";is hit by a player and the players partner successively; ortouches a players racket and does not travel towards the opponents court;
  • 97. if, in play, a player:touches the net or its supports with racket, person or dress;invades an opponents court over the net with racket or person except that the striker may follow the shuttle over the net with the racket in the course of a stroke after the initial point of contact with the shuttle is on the strikers side of the net;invades an opponents court under the net with racket or person such that an opponent is obstructed or distracted; orobstructs an opponent, i.e. prevents an opponent from making a legal stroke where the shuttle is followed over the net;deliberately distracts an opponent by any action such as shouting or making gestures;if a player is guilty of flagrant, repeated or persistent offences under the law of continuous play, misconduct and penalties.
  • 98. LETS"Let" shall be called by the umpire, or by a player (if there is no umpire), to halt play.It shall be a "let”, if: the server serves before the receiver is ready; during service, the receiver and the server are both faulted; after the service is returned, the shuttle is: caught on the net and remains suspended on its top, or after passing over the net is caught in the net;during play, the shuttle disintegrates and the base completely separates from the rest of the shuttle;in the opinion of the umpire, play is disrupted or a player of the opposing side is distracted by a coach;
  • 99. any unforeseen or accidental situation has occurred.When a "let" occurs, play since the last service shall not count and the player who served last shall serve again,.
  • 100. SHUTTLE NOT IN PLAYA shuttle is not in play when:it strikes the net or post and starts to fall towards the surface of the court on the strikers side of the net;it hits the surface of the court; ora "fault" or a "let" has occurred.
  • 101. CONTINUOUS PLAY, MISCONDUCT & PENALTIESPlay shall be continuous from the first service until the match is concluded, except as allowed in Laws interval and suspension of play.Intervals: not exceeding 60 seconds during each game when the leading score reaches 11 points; and not exceeding 120 seconds between the first and second game, and between the second and third game shall be allowed in all matches.Suspension of play When necessitated by circumstances not within the control of the players, the umpire may suspend play for such a period as the umpire may consider necessary. Under special circumstances the Referee may instruct the umpire to suspend play. If play is suspended, the existing score shall stand and play shall be resumed from that point.
  • 102. Delay in play Under no circumstances shall play be delayed to enable a player to recover strength or wind or to receive advice. The umpire shall be the sole judge of any delay in play.Advice and leaving the court Only when the shuttle is not in play, shall a player be permitted to receive advice during a match. No player shall leave the court during a match without the umpires permission, except during the intervals.
  • 103. A player shall not: deliberately cause delay in, or suspension of, play; deliberately modify or damage the shuttle in order to change its speed or its flight; behave in an offensive manner; or be guilty of misconduct not otherwise covered by the Laws of Badminton.Administration of breachThe umpire shall administer any breach of Law in delay in play, in advice and leaving the court, or in player shall not by: issuing a warning to the offending side; faulting the offending side, if previously warned. Two such faults by a side shall be considered to be a persistent offence; or in cases of flagrant offence, persistent offences, the umpire shall fault the offending side and report the offending side immediately to the Referee, who shall have the power to disqualify the offending side from the match.
  • 104. LESSON 4.3 Duties and Responsibilities of the OfficialsObjectives:After studying this lesson, the students are expected to be able to: identify who are the officials involved in officiating a badminton match; give respect to the officials of the game; perform the duties of the officials; and act as the officials of the badminton match.
  • 105. In any sports, there must be officials who willofficiate the game. In order to have a satisfyinggame, the officials must be good in all aspects ofbeing officials. Without effective officials the gamecould not played well. Good officiating brings all thebest playing ability of each player, while poorofficiating may ruin the game. But good officials arenot easily made. They are result of many years ofstudy, practice and experiences gained throughactual officiating. The primary job of the officials is to ensure thatthe game progresses according to the rules. Theymust be committed to fulfill the followingresponsibilities:
  • 106. See that the game proceeds within thecontext of the rules of the game. Interfere as little as possible, neverseeking to become the focus of the attention. Set and maintain an atmosphere for theenjoyment of the game. Show concern for the players. The officials must ensure the outcomes ofthe game are dependent on the skills andtactics of the players. Good officials makeeverybody happy and contented.
  • 107. Officials and their Duties in a Badminton MatchThe referee is in overall charge of the tournament or event of which a match forms a part.The umpire reports to act under the authority of the referee or is responsible to the officials in the absence of the referee.Before the match:Secures the score sheet from the head referee.Sees that all materials needed for scoring are in order.Inspects the posts, net and court.Sees to it that the service judge and linesmen are doing their taskMake sure that plenty of new shuttlecocks are at hand.Reports to the head referee the break of the rules.
  • 108. At the beginning of and during the game: Make sure that the tossing of the coin is properly done. Implements the rules without objection among the players. Decides on objections and protests before the service. Informs the players, as well as the spectators, about the progress of the game. Places or removes officials upon consolation with the head referee. Tolerates by the decision of the service judge and linesmen. Receives from the head referee the appeals and protests by either player or team.The service judges are normally appointed by the referee but can be removed by the umpire in consultation with the referee.The official’s decision is final on all points of fact for which that official is responsible.
  • 109. Functions of every judges:1 line judge would watch the whole of the far side line, from either position 3 or 8. This line judge should be careful to not call the back line, as this could be construed as being "unfair" since the opposite back line is not being called.2 line judges would usually watch both side lines, from position 1 or 10 and from position 3 or 8. Umpires will often get these line judges to also watch the back lines on each side and the back service line for doubles.3 line judges would watch the far side line, from either position 3 or 8, and the two back lines, from positions 4 and 7.4 line judges would watch both side lines, from position 1 or 10 and from position 3 or 8, and the two back lines, from positions 4 and 7.5 line judges (unusual) would watch both side lines, from position 1 or 10 and from position 3 or 8, and the two back lines, from positions 4 and 7, as well as the centre service lines, from position 2 or 9.
  • 110. 6 line judges would watch both side lines, from position1, 3, 8 and 10, and the two back lines, from positions 4 and 7.Note that the side line judges now only have to watch the line upto the net post. 7 line judges (unusual) would watch both side lines, fromposition 1, 3, 8 and and 10, and the two back lines, frompositions 4 and 7, as well as the centre service lines, fromposition 2 or 9. Note that the side line judges now only have towatch the line up to the net post, but the centre line judge has towatch both centre lines, on the close and far sides of the net. 8 line judges would watch both side lines, from position1, 3, 8 and 10, and the two back lines, from positions 4 and 7, aswell as the centre service lines, from positions 2 and 9. Note that the side line judges now only have to watch theline up to the net post, and each centre service line judge onlyhas to watch the service line closest to them. 10 line judges watch all lines from positions 1 through 10.
  • 111. Linesmen decide whether the shuttle fell inside oroutside the court. If the shuttle lands out, no matterhow far, the linemen should call “out” promptly inclear voice, loud enough to be heard by the playersand spectators and at the same time signal byextending both arms horizontally so that the umpirecan see clearly. Of the shuttle lands in, the linemanshall say nothing but point to the line with the righthand. The scorer records the points scored by eachplayer and certifies the winner or loser of the game.
  • 112. For the referee: The referee uses hand signals to help fencers understand the phrasing. This is particularly important in international competitions when language can be a barrier.
  • 113. On GuardThe referee will make this signal to call you into your on guard position. Remember this is an order from the ref not a suggestion - failure to come on guard is an offence.
  • 114. ReadyThe referee makes this signal to check both fencers are ready to begin. If you are not ready lift your hand and call halt.
  • 115. Play/FenceThe referee brings his hands together signaling you to start fencing.
  • 116. Halt!Immediately stop fencing, failure to obey is an offence. The referee will usually hold up his right hand for this signal unless the halt has been caused by something specifically to do with the left hand fencer e.g. unsafe weapon.
  • 117. Attack from my left/right This signal demonstrates which fencer initially attacks. If the left hand is raised the fencer to the referees left is considered the attacker if the right hand is raised the right fencer is considered the attacker.
  • 118. HitsUsed to show which fencer hits. If the left hand is raised it shows the left fencer has been hit by the right and the opposite if the right is raised.
  • 119. Point awarded to my left/rightThe referee signals to whom he is awarding the point if the left hand is raised the point goes to the fencer on his left and vice- versa. In Epée if both hands are raised it means both fencers receive a point.
  • 120. TogetherThis signal shows that both attacks started simultaneously.
  • 121. Off target/non-validThis signal indicates that the touch from the fencers has hit non-valid target and so doesnt score a point.
  • 122. ParriedThis hand signal is used when a fencer successfully parries an attack. If the left hand is up the left hand fencer has performed the parry and vice- versa.
  • 123. Point in-lineThe referee here indicates that one of the fencers established point in-line against his/her opponent. If the left arm is raised it shows that the fencer to the referees right took point in-line and vice-versa.
  • 124. Fails/MissThis signal shows that the action of one of the fencers has failed to hit either on or off target. If the left hand is raised it shows that the fencer on the right has missed and vice- versa.
  • 125. If the shuttle lands out, no matter how far, call "Out" promptly in a clear voice, loud enough to be heard by the players and the spectators and, at the same time, signal by extending both arms horizontally so that the umpire can see clearly.
  • 126. Notes: As in the diagram, the palms of the hands are facing the court, so that the thumb is uppermost. Hold the signal momentarily and make eye contact with the umpire, who should acknowledge your call. The call should, in particular, be loud enough to be heard by the umpire.
  • 127. When the Shuttle is “In”If the shuttle lands in, say nothing, but point to the line with your right hand.
  • 128. Notes:There is no call.As in the diagram, the fingers are held together with the palm facing the floor. Lean forward slightly when making the call and (preferably) use your right hand. Do not use both hands to make this signal.Hold the signal momentarily and make eye contact with the umpire who should acknowledge your call.Any shuttle touching the line on its initial contact with the floor is "IN".Most of the weight of a shuttle is in its base, and when it is smashed or falls, it will almost always land base first. In the case of a smash, of course, the side of the shuttle and feathers will make almost instantaneous contact with the floor. It is the moment of first contact, however, which is "initial", and which must be called or signaled.
  • 129. When the Line Judge is UnsightedIf unsighted, inform the umpire immediately by holding your hands to cover your eyes.
  • 130. Notes:There is no call. As in the diagram, raise both hands to cover the eyes. Do not cross your arms/hands over. The signal is NOT to be used to avoid making a difficult decision! If a line judge is truly unsighted, (e.g. a players feet obscure the line and the shuttle at the crucial moment) and cannot make a decision, this signal is used, and the umpire either makes the decision, or plays a "Let".
  • 131. Calls at line intersectionsRemember: A line judge calls a landed shuttle ONLY in relation to the line(s) assigned.In the following example, line judge 3 (LJ3) is calling the side line and line judge 4 (LJ4) is calling the back line for a doubles match.
  • 132.  Line Judge 3 Line Judge 4 Signals/Calls for Shuttle W IN IN Signals/Calls for Shuttle X IN OUT Signals/Calls for Shuttle Y OUT OUT Signals/Calls for Shuttle Z OUT IN
  • 133. Notes: The umpire needs only one "Out" call to determine that the shuttle is out. For shuttles "X" and "Z" there would be one "Out" call. For shuttle "Y" there would be two "Out" calls. For shuttle "W", there are no "Out" calls, so the shuttle is in. Line judge 3 would call/signal shuttle "X" as "In" (relevant only to the sideline), while line judge 4 would signal shuttle "Z" as "In" (relevant only to the back line). The same principle applies where any two lines of the court intercept.
  • 134. Position of Line Judges Where practical, it is recommended thatthe line judges’ positions be 2.5 to 3.5meters from the court boundaries and, in anyarrangement, the line judges’ positions beprotected from encroachment by any outsideinfluence, e.g. by photographers.
  • 135. Notes: Positions 1, 2, 3 and 8, 9, 10 call the lines only as far as the net. Positions 4, 5, 6 and 7 call the full width of the court. Positions 4 and 7 will, in the case of doubles only, call the inside line for receiving the serve and the base line for the rest of the rally. Positions 2 and 9 must continually be alert as to which side is being served to. Positions 1, 3, 8 and 10 will reposition to the inside line for singles. Should circumstances require it (e.g. an advertising A frame may need to be forward for television viewing purposes), positions 2 and 9 may be further from the court boundary, as their line to call is shorter.
  • 136. Chapter TestName: _______________________ Date: ____________Yr. / Section: ______________ Teacher:_____________ Score: ____________Test IA. TRUE or FALSE. Write “C” if the statement is true and “A” if it is false. Writeyour answer on the given space.1. It shall be a “fault” if a service is correct. ______2. A shuttle is not in play when it hits the surface of the court. ______3. “Let” shall be called by the umpire. ______4. The side losing the toss shall serve or receive first. ______5. The side winning game shall serve first in the next game. ______B. Fill in the blanks.1. The __________ records the points scored by each player and certify thewinner and the loser of the game.2. The __________ are normally appointed by the referee but can be removedby the umpire in consultation with the referee.3. ____________ decides whether the shuttle fell inside or outside the court.
  • 137. 4. The ____________ must be hit below the server’s hand, andserver must have part of both feet stationary in contact with the ground. 5. ____________ would watch the far side line, from eitherposition 3 or 8, and the two back lines, from positions 4 and 7. Test II A. Enumeration. Give the following: 1-2. Types of Officiating __________________ __________________ 3-6. Bases of Good Officiating __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ 7-10. Some of the Qualities of an Official __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________
  • 138. B. Identify the following hand signals.1. ____________________2. ____________________3. ____________________4. ____________________5. ____________________
  • 139. Test IIIActual ActivityOrganize a Badminton match. Assign who will be the officials and the players of the game. Follow the proper rulesin playing and officiating the Badminton.
  • 140. Chapter 5 Famous Badminton PlayersChapter Objectives:After studying this chapter, the students are expected to be able to: enumerate the famous male and female Badminton players; appreciate the hard works of all the Badminton players ; and play skillfully like those famous players.
  • 141. LESSON 5.1 Famous Female PlayersObjectives: After studying this lesson, the students are expected to beable to: recognize the famous female players; appreciate the hard works of those famous female players; and play skillfully like those famous female players.
  • 142. Lin Zhu Lin Zhu is a woman with the height of 5’7” and who was born on the 29th day of October 1984. Zhu holds the Thailand (2006, 2007), Indonesia (2006, 2008), and Malaysia (2007) Opens. Her greatest accomplishment has to be the 2007 BWF World Championship. Due to Chinas dominance on the world badminton stage, Lin was not selected to compete at the 2008 Summer Olympics; however she does hold a spot on Chinas World Champion Uber Cup Team, 2008 LI NING China Open Super Series and Yonex Sunrise Hong Kong Super Series semi-finalist, 2009 Yonex German Open Grand Prix runner- up.
  • 143. Saina Nehwal Saina Nehwal was born on the 17th day of March 1990 in Hisar, Haryana, India. Saina was the first Indian woman to win the world Junior Championships, and she is currently the reining under-19 champion. She won the 2007 and 2008 Indian National Badminton Championships and the 2008 Chinese Taipei Open. She was also the first Indian woman to reach the quarter-finals at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. 2009 should be an exciting year for her, being named The Most Promising Player of 2008.
  • 144. 2009 Malaysia Super Series, WILSON SwissOpen Super Series and India Open quarter-finalist. After a spectaular undefeated outingat the Sudirman cup she has moved up 3spots and seventh is her highest careerranking. She became the 2009 IndonesianOpen Champion and 2009 WorldChampionships quarter-finalist.
  • 145. Lan Lu Lan is the 2004 Polish Open Champion, and the 2006 Korean Open Champion. In 2007 she captured the Denmark Super Series and won a Bronze medal at the World Championships in Kuala Lumpur. She reached her current third World Ranking at the end of 2007, although she did hold the number 2 spot in the spring of 08. At the All-England Championships in 2008, she lost a very close final to Tine Rasmussen of Denmark, the current number one player. And at the 2008 Beijing Olympics she lost in the semi-final, and was then edged out of a bronze medal to finish fourth. She was a semi-finalist 2008 Denmark Super Series and French Super Series, a 2009 YONEX All England Super Series quarter-finalist and 2009 WILSON Swiss Open Super Series and Indonesian Open semi-finalist. Also, she was a 2009 World Champion and China Masters Super Series semi-finalist.
  • 146. Yanjiao Jiang Jiang is a left-handed badminton player whohas been described as an extremely talenteddefensive player. She has had a successful twoyears recently: 2008 Badminton Asia Champion andChina Open Super Series Champion, 2009 YONEXAll England Super Series semi-finalist, 2009WILSON Swiss Open Super Series runner-up and2009 Asian Badminton Championship quarter-finalist.
  • 147. Xie Xingfang Xie Xingfang was born on January 8, 1981 at Guangzhou, Guangdong ProvinceIt. It was 2004 when Xie first caused the badminton world to take notice. In 2005 and 2006 she won the Womens Singles Badminton World Championships, and in 2007 she captured the All-England Super Series, German Open, and Korean Open Super Series tournaments. A highlight of her career was winning a silver at the Beijing Summer Olympics in 2008. Not a technically sound player, Xies strengths are her consistency and court sense. 2008 Yonex Sunrise Hong Kong Super Series Champion, 2009 Malaysia Super Series & Korea Super Series semi-finalist. She has been ranked as high as fourth in this year. 2009 Singapore Open runner-up. 2009 Indonesian Open semi-finalist. 2009 World Championships runner-up.
  • 148. Chen Wang Chen Wang was from Shanghai, China and was born on the 21st of June 1976. At the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens Chen made it the quarter finals before losing to Zhang Ning of China. In 2006 she won gold at the Asian games in womens singles and won the silver medal at the 2007 World Championships. At the 2008 Beijing Olympics she was seeded fourth, but lost to Saina Nehwal of India 19-21, 21-11, 11-21 in the third round. She is 2008 Yonex Sunrise Hong Kong Super Series Champion and 2009 Malaysia Super Series and Korea Super Series semi-finalist.
  • 149. Zhang Ning Zhang Ning was born on 19 May 1975 in Jinzhou , Liaoning province, a female badminton player from the Peoples Republic of China . She won the Olympic gold medal for womens singles in both 2004 and 2008. Zhang has played badminton on the world scene since the mid 1990s and has been particularly successful since 2002 while in her late twenties and early thirties, relatively late for singles at the highest level, and especially for top players in the Chinese system who are developed very early. She was the only player of either sex to have won consecutive Olympic singles gold medals.. She first represented China in Uber Cup (womens world team championship) competition in 1994 and last represented it in 2006. The time span of her service is the longest of any Chinese player though she was not always chosen to play in each of the biennial editions of this tournament.
  • 150. LESSON 5.2 Famous Male PlayersObjectives: After studying this lesson, the students are expected to beable to: recognize the famous male players; appreciate the hard works of those famous male players; and play skillfully like those famous male players.
  • 151. Lee Chong Wei Lee Chong Wei was from Malaysia, born on the 21st of October 1082 in George Town, Penang (Malaysia). Lee was a silver medalist at the 2008 Beijing OlyLee Chong Wei Photompics, and a bronze medalist at the 2005 World Championships in Anaheim. Lee started off this year with his fifth Malaysian Open final title. He has been dubbed a national hero and was named Malaysias 2008 Male Olympian. Achievements: 2009 Korea Super Series & YONEX All England Super Series runner-up to Lin Dan, 2009 Swiss Open and Indonesian Open champion, 2009 World Championships quarter- finalist, 2009 Macau Open champion, China Master Super Series semi-finalist.
  • 152. Choong Hann Wong Coong Hann Wong was born on the 17th day of February 1977 at Kuala Lumpur.Wong. He is a left-handed shuttler whose career began in 1991 at the Malaysian Open. His forst tournament victory came in 1997 at the Dutch Open. In 2003 Wong was the World Championship runner-up. At the 2004 summer olympics Wong defeated Przemysław Wacha of Poland in the first round, before losing in the round of 16 to Taufik Hidayat of Indonesia. In 2006 at the
  • 153. Thomas Cup Choong suffered a seriousachilles tendon injury and was out for 6 months.When he returned in 2006 he had very littlepositive results. At the 2008 olympics hedefeated the reigning olympic champion TaufikHidayat, but was unable to move on past theround of 16. His recent accomplishmentsinclude: 2008 VIII Italian Internationalchampion, 2009 Yonex German Open Grand Prixquarter-finalist, 2009 Macau Open runner-up toLee Chong Wei, 2009 Taiwan Open runner-up toNguyen Tien Minh.
  • 154. Taufik Hidayat Taufik Hidayat was born on August 10, 1981 at Bandung, Jawa Barat, Indonesia. Taufiks backhand smash has been recorded at over 200km/h, and his forehand jump smash is an even more intimidating 305 km/h; which is a world record. He has won the Indonesian Open six times, was the gold medal winner at the 2004 Athens Olympics, which saw him defeat Peter Gade in the semis to reach the final. At the IBF World Championships in 2005, Hidayat beat then number one ranked Lin Dan 15-3,15-7 in straight sets. Achievements: 2008 Yonex Sunrise Hong Kong Super Series & 2009 YONEX All England Super Series semi- finalist, 2009 WILSON Swiss Open Super Series quarter-finalist & 2009 India Open Champion, 2009 Indonesian Open runner-up, 2009 World Championships semi-finalist, 2009 Macau Open & Taiwan Open semi- finalist, 2009 Japan Open runner-up.
  • 155. Peter Hoeg Gade Peter Hoeg Gade is a 6 ft. man who was born on December 14, 1976. Peter has been the Danish National Champion in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006 and 2007. In 1999 he won the All-England Championship and holds four European Championship titles. He held the World Number one ranking from 1998-2001. He has been described as a deceptive player with smooth footwork and an ability to maintain constant pressure. Achievements: 2009 Malaysia Super Series semi-finalist, 2009 Korean Open Champion, and YONEX All England Super Series quarter-finalist, 2009 World Championships quarter- finalist, China Masters Super Series quarter-finalist.
  • 156. Lin Dan Lin Dan also known as “Super Dan” was on the 14th day of October 1983 in Longyan, Fujian Province. Lin earned his reputation as being one of the most dominate players in mens badminton singles by winning 9 top titles between 2002-2004. In the 2008 Beijing Olympics he won gold, and the gold at the 2006 and 2007 World Championships. He is a left-handed player who can cover the court quickly, and his peak physical condition allows him to deliver smashes from almost impossible angles. He won the All-England Super Series, and was runner-up at the Swiss Open to Lei Chong Wei, 2009 Indonesian Open quarter-finalist, 2009 World Champion. China Masters Super Series champion.
  • 157. Tien Minh NguyenTien Minh Nguyen was born on February 17, 1983 .Tien is a right handed badminton player who competes for Vietnam. He has played since the age of 10, and decided to become a professional badminton player in 2001. Nguyen has showed tremendous success depite relying on his families financial contributions, and training in less then ideal conditions. He does not receive the priveleges of other top athletes in other countries, such as elite coaching, diet plans, and injury care etc. Nguyen has been the national champion for mens Singles in 2002, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008. He was the 2008 Vietnam Open champion, and won a bronze medal at the 2008 Taiwan Open. He has also been voted and awarded by the press as the Distinctive Athlete of Ho Chi Minh City in 2004 and voted and named by the press as one of the Distinctive Athletes of Vietnam in 2004, 2007, and 2008, this is his highest ranking ever. And became a finalist in 2009 Japan Open semi-final.
  • 158. David Freeman The greatest American player ever developed is David G. Freeman of Pasadena, Calif. He dominated the sport from 1939 until the national championships were abandoned because of the war after 1942. He is one of those players who have so many incredible stories associated with his career in badminton. He is considered to be a magician in the court because he can drive the shuttlecock at any designated spot and make a bulls-eye. Not only this, but he is said to be the greatest retriever that badminton has ever produced.
  • 159. Chapter TestName: _______________________ Date: ____________Yr. / Section: ______________ Teacher: _____________ Score: ____________Test IFill in the blanks with the player being described in the statement below.1. __________ dominated the sport from 1939 until the national championships wereabandoned because of the war after 1942. 2. _____________has played since the age of 10, and decided to become a professionalbadminton player in 2001. 3. __________ has been the Danish National Champion in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003,2005, 2006 and 2007. 4. __________ was also known as “Super Dan” was on the 14th day of October 1983in Longyan, Fujian Province. 5. __________ was born on August 10, 1981 at Bandung, Jawa Barat, Indonesia.Taufiks backhand smash has been recorded at over 200km/h, and his forehand jumpsmash is an even more intimidating 305 km/h; which is a world record. 6. _____________ was a silver medalist at the 2008 Beijing OlyLee Chong WeiPhotompics, and a bronze medalist at the 2005 World Championships in Anaheim. 7. _____________ is a left-handed shuttler whose career began in 1991 at the MalaysianOpen. 8. _____________holds the Thailand (2006, 2007), Indonesia (2006, 2008), and Malaysia(2007) Opens. Her greatest accomplishment has to be the 2007 BWF WorldChampionship.
  • 160. 9. _____________ reached her current third World Ranking at the end of 2007, although she did hold thenumber 2 spot in the spring of 08.10. __________ was the first Indian woman to win the world Junior Championships, and she is currently thereining under-19 champion.B. True or False. Write T if the statement is true and F if the statement is false._____ 1. David Freeman is considered to be a magician in the court because he can drive the shuttlecockat any designated spot and make a bulls-eye._____2. Peter Hoeg Gade is a 6 ft. man who was born on December 25, 1976._____ 3. Coong Hann Wong is a right-handed shuttler whose career began in 1991 at the Malaysian Open._____4. . Lin earned his reputation as being one of the most dominate players in mens badminton doubles bywinning 9 top titles between 2002-2004._____5. Tien Minh Nguyen was the 2008 Vietnam Open champion, and won a bronze medal at the 2008Taiwan Open._____6. Lee Chong Wei has been dubbed a national hero and was named Malaysias 2008 Male Olympian._____7. Zhang Ning first represented China in Uber Cup competition in 1994 and last represented it in2006._____8. Chen Wang is 2009 Yonex Sunrise Hong Kong Super Series Champion and 2009 Malaysia SuperSeries and Korea Super Series semi-finalist._____9. Lin Dan won the All-England Super Series, and was runner-up at the Swiss Open to Lei Chong Wei,2009 Indonesian Open quarter-finalist, 2010 World Champion_____10. Lin Zhuhold a spot on Chinas World Champion Uber Cup Team, 2008 LI NING China Open SuperSeries and Yonex Sunrise Hong Kong Super Series semi-finalist, 2009 Yonex German Open Grand Prix runner-up.
  • 161. Test 2 Choose the player you admire the most between the male and female famous player.Make a 250 words narrative statement. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________.
  • 162. GLOSSARYAttacking clear - an offensive stroke hit deep into the opponents court.Backcourt - back third of the court, in the area of the back boundary lines.Backhand - the stroke used to return balls hit to the left of a right-handed player and to the right of a left-handed player.Base position - the location in the centre of the court to which a singles player tries to return after each shot; also called "centre position".Baseline - the back boundary line at each end of the court, parallel to the net.Carry - an illegal stroke in which the shuttle is not hit, but caught and held on the racket before being released; also called a "sling" or "throw".Centre line - a line perpendicular to the net that separates the left and right service courts.Clear - a shot hit deep into the opponents court.Doubles - a game where a team of two players play against another team of two.Doubles sideline - the side boundary of a doubles court.Drive - a fast and low shot that makes a horizontal flight over the net.Drop shot - a shot hit softly and with finesse to fall rapidly and close to the net in the opponents court.Fault - a violation of the playing rules.Feint - any deceptive movement that disconcerts an opponent before or during the serve; also called a "balk".Flick - a quick wrist-and-forearm rotation used to surprise an opponent by changing an apparently soft shot into a faster passing shot.
  • 163. Forehand - the stroke used to return a ball hit to the right of a right-handed player and to the left of a left-handed player.Game - the part of a set completed when one player or side has scored enough points to win a single contest.Hairpin net shot - a shot made from below and very close to the net and causing the shuttle to rise, just clear the net, and then drop sharply down the other side so that the flight of the shuttlecock resembles the shape of a hairpin.Halfcourt shot - a shot hit low and to midcourt, used effectively in doubles play against the up-and-back formation.High clear - a defensive shot hit deep into the opponents court.Kill - a fast downward shot that cannot be returned.Let - a minor violation of the rules allowing a rally to be replayed.Long Service Line - in singles, the back boundary line. In doubles a line 2-1/2 feet inside the back boundary line. The serve may not go past this line.Match - the basic contest in Badminton between opposing sides each of one or two players.Player - any person playing Badminton.Receiving side - the side opposing the serving side.Rally - a sequence of one or more strokes starting with the service, until the shuttle ceases to be in play.Stroke - a forward movement of the player’s racket.Singles - a match where there is one player on each of the opposing sides.Serving side - the side having the right to serve.
  • 164. BIBLIOGRAPHYReferences:Caubayan,Ricardo R., Music,Arts, Physical Education and HealthFourth Year Philippine Copyright, 2005Dizon,Evelyn C. Music,Arts, Physical Education and HealthThird Year Philippine Copyright, 2004Luna Lillian N., MAPEH III Philippine Copyright, 2004Guillain, Jean-Yves (2004-09-02). Badminton: An Illustrated History. Publibook. p. 47. ISBN 2748305728.Connors, M; Dupuis, D. L.; Morgan, B. (1991). The Olympics Factbook: A Spectators Guide to the Winter and Summer Games. Michigan: Visible Ink Press. p. 195. ISBN 0810394170.
  • 165. Online Resources: IMAGE # URL 1 2 http://www.photogallery.sandesh.com/cms/uploadimages/Badminton/16082009_203949859. jpg 3 http://images.beijing2008.cn/20080623/Img214416406.jpg 4 http://www.myviewsandreviews.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/saina-nehwal.jpg 5 http://www.badmintondaily.com/yanjiao-jiang-player-biography 6 http://www.lifeofguangzhou.com/node_10/node_32/node_555/img/2008/02/29/1204268815 34834_2.jpg 7 http://www.badminton.de/uploads/pics/04ABC-WangChen_0144__1_.JPG 8 http://www.olympic.org.my/web/sportpeople/carlsberg/images/carlsberg_lee_chong_wei.jpg 9 http://www.tribuneindia.com/2000/20000513/1216b.gif 10 http://www.lgassociations.info/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/taufik-hidayat.jpg 11 http://www.watchbadminton.com/images/player/Peter-Hoeg-GADE.jpg 12 http://photos-p.friendster.com/photos/21/82/4732812/1_809771875l.jpg 13 http://doanhnhansaigon.vn/files/articles/2010/1042179/nguyen-tien-minh-large.jpg 14 http://i284.photobucket.com/albums/ll6/usabadminton/walk%20of%20fame/dave_freeman.j pg 15 http://www.horyee.com/hp-content/uploads/2010/08/111.jpg 16 http://mechanodynamics.com/abstract-blue-background.jpg

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