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95 theses VERTSOL
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95 theses VERTSOL

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  • 1. VERTSOL: 95 Theses Cluetrain Manifesto Submitted by: Adrian DM. Malaborbor BS-IS / OOB Submitted to: Sir Paul Pajo
  • 2. 1.) Markets are Conversations.
    • Customer Demand
    • Price Conscious
    • Loyalty of the customers
    • Competition
    • Priorities of the firm
    • Understanding and Good relationship with your customer.
  • 3. 2.) Markets consist of human beings, not demographic sectors .
    • Customer satisfaction
    • Product choices
    • Needs and Wants
    • Quality / Performance
    • All of the above factor(age distinction)
  • 4. 3.) Conversations among human beings sound human. They are conducted in a human voice.
    • Human curiosity
    • Pretender, Truth or Lies
    • Human Awareness
    • Way of communicating / conversation
    • Business matters
    • How to speak very effective
  • 5. 4.) Whether delivering information, opinions, perspectives, dissenting arguments or humorous asides, the human voice is typically open, natural, uncontrived .
    • How important it is to speak / voice out
    • Human relationship
    • How powerful a voice
    • Words and meaning
  • 6. 5.) People recognize each other as such from the sound of this voice .
    • Good conversation
    • Human approach to business
    • Getting their momentum of interest
    • Convincing power
  • 7. 6.) The Internet is enabling conversations among human beings that were simply not possible in the era of mass media.
    • Outstanding innovation in terms of communicating
    • Internet source power
    • Other activities
    • Common types of Online Communicating
      • Chat
      • E-mail
  • 8. 7.) Hyperlinks subvert hierarchy.
    • How hyperlinks does things
    • How it threatens the firm
    • Its junk side!
    • Its effective help from users
    • How it breaks rules
  • 9. 8.) In both inter networked markets and among intra networked employees, people are speaking to each other in a powerful new way.
    • Difference of the two
    • Their speaking medium
    • How they communicate
  • 10. 9.) These networked conversations are enabling powerful new forms of social organization and knowledge exchange to emerge.
    • How networked conversation evolve
    • How they connect to each other
    • Who uses?
    • Its importance to the firm
  • 11. 10.) As a result, markets are getting smarter, more informed, more organized. Participation in a networked market changes people fundamentally.
    • Markets gets to be more smarter, informed and organized
    • How it impacts or changes our lives
    • How we use it
    • Benefits we can get
  • 12. 11.) People in networked markets have figured out that they get far better information and support from one another than from vendors. So much for corporate rhetoric about adding value to commoditize products.
    • Networked markets advantage
    • How it works to our environment
  • 13. 12.) There are no secrets. The networked market knows more than companies do about their own products. And whether the news is good or bad, they tell everyone.
    • The internet influence
    • How it affect to us
    • Its purpose
  • 14. 13.) What's happening to markets is also happening among employees. A metaphysical construct called "The Company" is the only thing standing between the two.
    • The companionship of markets among employees
    • Their difference and similarity
  • 15. 14.) Corporations do not speak in the same voice as these new networked conversations. To their intended online audiences, companies sound hollow, flat, and literally inhuman.
    • How corporations communicate
    • Difference of corporation to networked conversations
  • 16. 15.) In just a few more years, the current homogenized "voice" of business—the sound of mission statements and brochures—will seem as contrived and artificial as the language of the 18th century French court.
    • Know the use your voice.
    • Don’t just be a prisoner of the networked, they are the one that should be imprison by us.
    • Give way to the new environment, but don’t just trash what is old.
    • Make it happen, don’t think it’s artificial.
  • 17. 16.) Already, companies that speak in the language of the pitch, the dog-and-pony show, are no longer speaking to anyone.
    • Know your limitations.
    • Always keep your put on the ground.
    • Never ignore somebody because you’re already marked in the industry.
  • 18. 17.) Companies that assume online markets are the same markets that used to watch their ads on television are kidding themselves.
    • Networked markets and the natural markets are not similar.
    • The conversation are difference
  • 19. 18.) Companies that don't realize their markets are now networked person-to-person, getting smarter as a result and deeply joined in conversation are missing their best opportunity.
    • Most people are inclined with the new technology on hand.
    • Conversations now are networked-by-networked
    • Opportunity for the company to hooked-up with others.
  • 20. 19.) Companies can now communicate with their markets directly. If they blow it, it could be their last chance.
    • The conversation are easier than ever.
    • Direct communication to the firm.
    • Don’t miss the right time to upgrade.
  • 21. 20.) Companies need to realize their markets are often laughing. At them.
    • It is time to renovate.
    • Start the new settings.
    • Change the old / manual way of doing works.
  • 22. 21.) Companies need to lighten up and take themselves less seriously. They need to get a sense of humor.
    • Put a path / track on your work.
    • Have the goal on your visual.
    • Don’t rush things, focus and understand.
  • 23. 22.) Getting a sense of humour does not mean putting some jokes on the corporate web site. Rather, it requires big values, a little humility, straight talk, and a genuine point of view.
    • Always give sense on everything you say.
    • Be concise and direct to the point.
    • There is no room for stupidity in the corporate market.
  • 24. 23.) Companies attempting to "position" themselves need to take a position. Optimally, it should relate to something their market actually cares about.
    • Before a company get to position themselves, they should know first what their market really cares about.
    • They should relate to something.
  • 25. 24.) Bombastic boast—"We are positioned to become the preeminent provider of XYZ"—do not constitute a position.
    • Do not constitute a position, just do your best.
    • It’s not bad to visualized being preeminent at times, but you should first do something to create something.
  • 26. 25.) Companies need to come down from their Ivory Towers and talk to the people with whom they hope to create relationships.
    • Companies treat the people whom they have relationship with as King or Queen.
    • You should value the people and your market.
  • 27. 26.) Public Relations does not relate to the public. Companies are deeply afraid of their markets.
    • Companies are afraid of their market.
    • The markets are the BOSS!
  • 28. 27.) By speaking in language that is distant, uninviting, arrogant, they build walls to keep markets at bay.
    • Being arrogant wont give you anything, instead, it will take you everything!
    • You should show / give care to your market
  • 29. 28.) Most marketing programs are based on the fear that the market might see what's really going on inside the company.
    • Markets get to know what’s behind of everything in the company.
    • It gives hint to the market how everything works in the company.
  • 30. To be continue. . .