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  • Beautiful presentation, has brought tears to my eyes. To repeat your Brancusi quote: “Don’t look for mysteries; I bring you pure joy.” I thank you,
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The First Cry The First Cry Presentation Transcript

  • Art Gallery of Ontario The First Cry by Constantin Brancusi 2010 © Alex Dragomirescu
  • The First Cry Study for the Sculpture "The First Step" , c. 1913 The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Crayon on paper 82.1 x 38.0 cm “ In 1913, Brancusi created his first wood sculpture, The First Step ” Ruhrberg, Art of the 20 th Century, Vol. II, Köln, 1998
  • The First Cry Study for "The First Step" , c. 1913 The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Washington D.C. Pencil on paper 74.3 x 32.0 cm “ The axial rounding of the body, the egg-shaped head, the triangular mouth drawn upwards, and the sharply undercut eyebrows would appear to be based on a Bambara figure in the Mus ée de L’Homme ” Ruhrberg, Art of the 20 th Century, Vol. II, Köln, 1998
  • The First Cry Study for "The First Step" , 1913 The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Washington D.C. Pencil on paper 73.6 x 31.8 cm
  • The First Cry Brancusi sculpture exhibition in New York March-April 1914, at "291" (gallery) Photograph by Alfred Stieglitz, 1916
  • The First Cry “ In 1914, Brancusi destroyed the body, leaving only the head intact with the title The First Cry ” Ruhrberg, Art of the 20 th Century, Vol. II, Köln, 1998
  • The First Cry The First Cry , 1914 Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO), Toronto Polished bronze 19.5 x 24.5 cm “ A bronze version translated the African influence into the harder medium of brightly polished metal and pared the form down to that of the primordial egg , which was to remain the symbolic basic figure of Brancusi’s sculptural art from then on. ” Ruhrberg, Art of the 20 th Century, Vol. II, Köln, 1998
  • The First Cry The First Cry 1914 Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO), Toronto Polished bronze 19.5 x 24.5 cm Inscriptions: signed on proper right side of head: C. Brancusi Purchased with assistance from the Volunteer Committee Fund in 1981
  • The First Cry The First Cry , 1914 Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO), Toronto Polished bronze 19.5 x 24.5 cm “ Among the sculptures, you'll find two beauties: Picasso's Poupée and Brancusi's First Cry.” Frommer's Review about AGO in The New York Times
  • The First Cry The First Cry 1914
  • The First Cry Atelier Brancusi, Centre Pompidou, Paris
  • The First Cry The First Cry Atelier Brancusi, Centre Pompidou, Paris
  • The First Cry Reclining Head (Study for “The First Cry”) , 1915 Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C. Gouache and pencil on paper 38.1 x 51.4 cm
  • The First Cry The First Cry , 1917 Private collection, Switzerland Cement 17.0 x 25.8 x 18.0 cm
  • The First Cry The First Cry , 1917 Private collection, Switzerland Cement 17.0 x 25.8 x 18.0 cm
  • The First Cry View of the Artist’s Studio, 1918 Museum of Modern Art, New York Gouache and pencil on board, 32.8 x 41.1 cm
  • The First Cry The Studio, 1924 The Art Institute of Chicago Pen and black ink on tan wove tracing paper, laid down on cream wove card, 35.4 x 43.0 cm
  • The First Cry La Fontaine de Narcisse 1920s – 1930s Gelatin silver print 34.3 x 21.6 cm “ Haeckel’s biogenetic theory of the correlation between the first step or first cry of a child and alleged early tribal history proved an invariably fruitful comparison in the field of sculpture . ” Ruhrberg, Art of the 20 th Century, Vol. II, Köln, 1998
  • The First Cry The Beginning
  • The First Cry Beginning of the World 1920 Dallas Museum of Art Marble, nickel silver, and stone 76.2 x 50.8 x 50.8 cm
  • The First Cry Beginning of the World 1920 Dallas Museum of Art
  • The First Cry Beginning of the World, 1924 Kröller-Müller Museum Bronze 76.2 x 50.8 x 50.8 cm
  • The First Cry Beginning of the World, 1924 Bronze
  • The First Cry Beginning of the World c. 1924 Musée National d’Art Moderne, Paris Bronze 28.6 x 19.1 x 17.2 cm
  • The First Cry Sculpture for the Blind [I] c.1920 Philadelphia Museum of Art Veined marble 17.0 x 29.0 x 18.1 cm
  • The First Cry Sculpture for the Blind [I] c.1920 Philadelphia Museum of Art Veined marble 17.0 x 29.0 x 18.1 cm
  • The First Cry Sculpture for the Blind (Beginning of the World) “… the ovoid form melts beyond all physiognomic connection with the cosmic egg of which the Upanishadi speaks.” Ruhrberg, Art of the 20 th Century, Vol. II, Köln, 1998
  • The First Cry Sculpture for the Blind , 1926 New York Public Library Digital Gallery Photograph
  • The First Cry Newborn [I] 1915 Philadelphia Museum of Art White marble 14.6 x 21.0 x 14.9 cm
  • The First Cry Newborn [I] 1915 Philadelphia Museum of Art White marble 14.6 x 21.0 x 14.9 cm
  • The First Cry Newborn [I] , 1915
  • The First Cry Newborn [I] 1920 (close to the marble of 1915) Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), New York Bronze 14.6 x 21.0 x 14.6 cm
  • The First Cry Newborn [I] , 1920 Museum of Modern Art, New York Bronze 14.6 x 21.0 x 14.6 cm
  • The First Cry Newborn [II] , 1920 Centre Pompidou, Paris
  • The First Cry The Newborn [II] 1923 - 1925 Centre Pompidou, Paris Polished bronze 25.0 x 50.0 cm
  • The First Cry Eve [II] and the Newborn [II] c. 1920 Centre Pompidou, Paris Photograph - gelatin silver print 9.0 x 12.9 cm
  • The First Cry Sleeping Child and the Newborn [II] c. 1923 Photographs
  • The First Cry Torso of a Young Girl 1922 Harvard Art Museum/Fogg Museum, Boston Onyx 33.02 x 22.86 cm
  • The First Cry Torso of a Young Girl [II] c. 1923 Philadelphia Museum of Art White marble 34.9 x 24.8 x 15.2 cm Limestone block base
  • The First Cry “ By 1909, Brancusi found his most important archetypal form, the elongated sphere. It was not the definitive and unchangeable ideal of the sphere, but the moving and changeable ovoid – Goethe’s vitally developing form, Ezra Pound’s general key to form, not only Brancusi’s, but form as such.” Ruhrberg, Art of the 20 th Century, Vol. II, Köln, 1998
  • The First Cry Atelier Brancusi Centre Pompidou, Paris “ Organic forms were simplified so as to represent primary forms in allusion to the origins of life”. United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)
  • The First Cry The Myth
  • The First Cry Prometheus 1911 Philadelphia Museum of Art White marble 13.7 x 17.8 x 13.7 cm
  • The First Cry Prometheus Kettle's Yard House, Cambridge, England Cement cast after the marble original (1911) 13.7 x 17.8 x 13.6 cm
  • The First Cry Prometheus Kettle's Yard House, Cambridge, England Cement cast after the marble original (1911) 13.7 x 17.8 x 13.6 cm
  • The First Cry Prometheus 1911 Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C. Bronze 13.5 x 17.2 x 13.7 cm
  • The First Cry Sleeping Muse [I] 1909-1910 Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C. Marble 13.1 x 36.7 x 28.9 cm
  • The First Cry Sleeping Muse [I] 1910 Centre Pompidou, Paris Bronze 25.0 x 16.0 x 18.0 cm
  • The First Cry Sleeping Muse [I] 1910 Centre Pompidou, Paris Bronze 25.0 x 16.0 x 18.0 cm
  • The First Cry Sleeping Muse 1910 Dallas Museum of Art Photograph - gelatin silver print 16.51 x 21.91 cm
  • The First Cry Sleeping Muse New York Public Library Digital Gallery Photograph
  • The First Cry Sleeping Muse c. 1912 Photograph 17.2 x 23.5 cm
  • The First Cry Sleeping Muse 1910 The Art Institute of Chicago Bronze 16.1 x 27.7 x 19.3 cm
  • The First Cry Sleeping Muse 1910 The Art Institute of Chicago Bronze 16.1 x 27.7 x 19.3 cm
  • The First Cry Sleeping Muse 1910 The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Alfred Stieglitz Collection, 1949 Bronze 17.1 x 24.1 x 15.2 cm
  • The First Cry Sleeping Muse 1910 The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Bronze 17.1 x 24.1 x 15.2 cm
  • The First Cry Sleeping Muse, 1910
  • The First Cry Sleeping Muse, 1910 The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
  • The First Cry Sleeping Muse, 1910 The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
  • The First Cry Sleeping Muse, 1910 The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
  • The First Cry Sleeping Muse [II] 1917 Marble 18.5 x 29.5 cm
  • The First Cry Sleeping Muse [II] 1917 Kunstmuseum Winterthur, Zürich, Switzerland Polished bronze
  • The First Cry Sleeping Muse c. 1920 Centre Pompidou, Paris Photograph - gelatin silver print 23.8 x 29.5 cm
  • The First Cry Sleeping Muse [II] c. 1925 Kunstmuseum Winterthur, Zürich, Switzerland Polished bronze This sculpture was exhibited in the Karlsruhe, Germany exhibition of 2009 - 2010
  • The First Cry Sleeping Muse [II] 1926 Private collection St. Louis Polished bronze 16.5 x 19.1 x 29.2 cm
  • The First Cry Sleeping Muse [II] 1909 - 1926 Private collection, Germany Polished bronze 17.8 x 17.1 x 30.5 cm
  • The First Cry A Muse 1912 Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York White Marble, 45.0 x 23.0 x 17.0 cm This sculpture was exhibited in the influential Armory Show of 1913.
  • The First Cry A Muse 1912 White Marble This sculpture was exhibited in the Tate Modern, London 2004
  • The First Cry A Muse 1917 Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas Polished brass with limestone base, 49.2 x 29.7 x 24. 5 cm
  • The First Cry A Muse 1918 Portland Art Museum, Oregon Bronze 49.5 x 25.4 x 12.7 cm Stone base 29.2 x 25.4 x 22.9 cm
  • The First Cry Leda c. 1920 The Art Institute of Chicago Marble 55.9 x 66.0 x 21.6 cm Concrete base 66.0 x 121.9 cm
  • The First Cry Leda c. 1922 Campagne Première, Berlin Photograph - Vintage gelatin silver print, 18.0 x 23.6 cm
  • The First Cry Leda 1926 Centre Pompidou, Paris Polished bronze, 54.0 x 71.3 x 23.9 cm
  • The First Cry Danaïde 1913 Philadelphia Museum of Art Bronze, 27.6 x 17.8 x 21.0 cm Base, 40.3 x 17.8 x 21.0 cm
  • The First Cry Danaïde 1913 Kunstmuseum Winterthur, Zürich, Switzerland Bronze
  • The First Cry Danaïde 1913 Kunstmuseum Winterthur, Switzerland Bronze
  • The First Cry Study of Danaïde of 1913 1920s Gelatin silver print 22.9 x 17.4 cm
  • The First Cry Danaïde c. 1918 Tate Gallery, London Bronze with Brown Patina & Gold Leaf 27.9 x 17.1 x 21.0 cm On a limestone base
  • The First Cry Danaïde , c. 1918 Tate Gallery, London Bronze with Brown Patina & Gold Leaf 27.9 x 17.1 x 21.0 cm
  • The First Cry Danaïde c. 1918 Tate Gallery, London Bronze with Brown Patina & Gold Leaf 27.9 x 17.1 x 21.0 cm On a limestone base
  • The First Cry Danaïde 1919 - 1920
  • The First Cry The Women
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [I] 1912 Philadelphia Museum of Art White marble 44.4 x 21.0 x 31.4 cm Limestone block 15.2 x 16.2 x 17.8 cm
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [I] 1912 Philadelphia Museum of Art
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [I] 1912 Philadelphia Museum of Art
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [I] 1912 Philadelphia Museum of Art
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [I] 1912 - 1913 Centre Pompidou, Paris Marble
  • The First Cry Torso of a Young Girl 1922 Philadelphia Museum of Art Onyx 34.9 x 17.1 cm
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [I] 1913 (after the marble of 1912) Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), New York Bronze with black patina 43.8 x 21.5 x 31.7 cm Limestone base 14.6 x 15.6 x 18.7 cm
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [I] 1913 Museum of Modern Art, New York
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [I] 1913 Museum of Modern Art, New York
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [I] 1913 Museum of Modern Art, New York
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [II] 1920 Museu de Arte Moderna, Rio de Janeiro Bronze, 43.4 x 19.0 x 26.5 cm
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [II] 1925 Yale University Art Gallery, The Katharine Ordway Collection , New Haven, Connecticut Polished brass
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [II] 1925 Yale University Art Gallery, The Katharine Ordway Collection , New Haven, Connecticut Polished brass
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [II] 1925 Yale University Art Gallery, The Katharine Ordway Collection , New Haven, Connecticut Polished brass
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [II] 1920 - 1925 Polished bronze
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [II] 1920 Polished bronze
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [II] 1920 - 1925 Polished bronze c. 43 cm tall
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [II] 1920 - 1925 Polished bronze c. 43 cm tall
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [II] 1920 - 1925 Polished bronze
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [II] 1912 - 1913 Centre Pompidou, Paris Marble
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [II] 1912 - 1913 Centre Pompidou, Paris
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [II] 1919 Private collection
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [II] 1919 Exhibited at Guggenheim Museum Published in LIFE magazine January 1955
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [II] c. 1922 Vintage silver print 23.0 x 17.1 cm
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [II] marble of 1919 c. 1920 Jason McCoy, Inc., New York Gelatin silver print 23.3 x 17.2 cm
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [III] 1931 Philadelphia Museum of Art White marble 43.3 x 19.0 x 26.6 cm Limestone and oak four-part base
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [III] 1931 Photograph
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [III] 1933 Private collection Saint Louis, Missouri Polished bronze, stone, wood
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [III] 1933 Private collection Saint Louis, Missouri Polished bronze, stone, wood
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany [III] 1933 Sculpture at Carré d'Art de Nimes Polished bronze
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany , 1931
  • The First Cry Mademoiselle Pogany
  • The First Cry “ Hungarian painter Margit Pogany was his very, very famous love. As he loved to entertain many high society women in Paris, they found their way to his studio in 1920s and 30s. Léonie Ricou, Mme Eugène Meyer Jr., Baroness Renée Irana Frachon, Nancy Cunard and Peggy Guggenheim. English concert pianist Vera Moore was a very influential woman for him - not as well known as all the other women in his life but definitely a special woman …” Source: http://tavarua-thetraveler.blogspot.com/2009_05_01_archive.html
  • The First Cry The Artist
  • The First Cry "My life was a succession of miracles“ Constantin Brancusi
  • The First Cry “ Why write [on my art]? Why not just show the photographs?” Constantin Brancusi
  • The First Cry The Studio 1927 Jason McCoy, Inc., New York Vintage silver print
  • The First Cry “ I have grinded the matter to find the continuous line. And when I realized I could not find it, I stopped, as if an unseen someone had seen me and slapped my hands." Constantin Brancusi
  • The First Cry “ Don’t look for mysteries; I bring you pure joy." Constantin Brancusi
  • The First Cry “ Il y a des imbéciles qui définissent mon œuvre comme abstraite, pourtant ce qu'ils qualifient d'abstrait est ce qu'il y a de plus réaliste, ce qui est réel n'est pas l'apparence mais l'idée, l'essence des choses." Constantin Brancusi
  • The First Cry “ There hasn't been any art yet. Art is just beginning.” Constantin Brancusi
  • The First Cry Brancusi’s Studio The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Photograph taken in 1920 by Edward Steichen Steichen and Brancusi, who met at Rodin's studio, became lifelong friends.
  • The First Cry When he was asked how to interpret his art of women, he advised: " Look at my sculptures until you see them. Those nearest to God have seen them only. Then we can interpret them." Constantin Brancusi
  • The First Cry Brancusi’s studio, Paris: Constantin Brancusi, Tristan Tzara, unidentified woman, Mina Loy, Jane Heap, Margaret Anderson by Loreto Martin
  • The First Cry “ World, I am sorry for you, you do not know these four people.” Ezra Pound “ Consciousness is a congenital hallucination.” Duchamp, Brancusi, Tzara, Man Ray - 1921
  • The First Cry “ Constantin Brancusi was a master of modern sculpture. His works stand at the very heart of modern art. He opened modern sculpture to new styles and is considered one of the most important sculptors of the twentieth century.” United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)
  • The First Cry Brancusi (1996) by Cornel Mihalache after the short documentary The Sculptor (1994) Press on the photo
  • The First Cry Brancusi on-line: Brancusi at the Art Institute of Chicago Brancusi at the Dallas Museum of Art Brancusi at the Detroit Institute of Arts Brancusi at the Guggenheim Museum, New York Brancusi at the Smithsonian Institution’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington DC Brancusi at the Kettle’s Yard Gallery, Cambridge, England Brancusi at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Brancusi at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas Brancusi at the Museum of Modern Art, New York Brancusi at he National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. Brancusi at the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra
  • The First Cry Brancusi on-line : Brancusi at the Norton Simon Museum, Pasadena, California Brancusi at the Centre Pompidou, Paris Brancusi at the Kroller-Muller Museum, The Netherlands Brancusi at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art Brancusi at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts Brancusi at the Museu de Arte Moderna, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Brancusi at the Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas, Texas Brancusi at the National Museum of Art, Bucharest, Romania Sculptural ensemble in Târgu Jiu Brancusi at the Philadelphia Museum of Art Brancusi at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, Saint Louis, Missouri Brancusi at the Tate Gallery, London UK
  • The First Cry
    • References:
    • Ruhrberg, Art of the 20 th Century, Vol. II Sculpture by Manfred Schneckenburger, Köln (1998)
    • Jones, Jonathan, “Carving A Way to Haven”, The Guardian (2004) http://www.guardian.co.uk/culture/2004/jan/03/1
    • Brady, Ronald H., “Perception: Connections Between Art and Science” (2002) http://www.natureinstitute.org/txt/rb/art/perception.htm
    • Lam, Samuel M., “Simplicity is Complexity Itself” (2002) http://drsamlamart.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/brancusi.pdf
    • Miller, Sanda, “Brancusi’s Women”, Apollo Magazine (2007) http://www.apollo-magazine.com/issue/march-2007/66335/brancusis-women.thtml
    • Brain-Juice, “Beginning of the World”, 20 th Century Biographies http://www.brain-juice.com/cgi-bin/show_wok.cgi?p_id=108&w_id=302
    2010 © Alex Dragomirescu
  • The First Cry Portrait of Constantin Brancusi (1876-1957) Photograph taken in 1922 by Edward Steichen at Voulangis, Seine-et-Marne, France
  • The First Cry Young Bird, Paris, detail , 1928 Museum of Modern Art, New York Bronze 40.5 x 21.0 x 30.4 cm From the 1920s to the 1940s Brancusi was preoccupied by the theme of a bird in flight. The "Bird in Space" is the first in a series of seven sculptures carved from marble and nine cast in bronze, all of which were painstakingly smoothed and polished. To Be Continued…