Patterns - More than Mere Stencils

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This presentation is an introduction to patterns for software development using Sparx Systems Enterprise Architect. The presentation starts with GoF design patterns and then moves to up to business architecture patterns.

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  • Patterns are general solutions to problems
  • Patterns - More than Mere Stencils

    1. 1. Patterns<br />More than Mere Stencils<br />
    2. 2. Stencils<br />
    3. 3. What is a pattern?<br />
    4. 4. We use patterns to do repeatable work quickly and easily.<br />
    5. 5. Important Elements of Patterns:<br />Context<br />
    6. 6. Important Elements of Patterns:<br />They apply at many levels<br />
    7. 7. Important Elements of Patterns:<br />Domain Specific Languages<br />
    8. 8. Important Elements of Patterns:<br />Patterns are a two way street<br />
    9. 9. “Drawings help people to work out intricate relationships between parts.”<br /> - Christopher Alexander <br />
    10. 10. What’s Our Game Plan?<br />
    11. 11. Behavioural PatternsThese design patterns are all about class objects’ communication. Behavioural patterns are those patterns that are most specifically concerned with communication between objects.<br />Creational PatternsThese design patterns are all about class instantiation. These patterns can be further divided into class-creation patterns and object-creational patterns. While class-creation patterns use inheritance effectively in the instantiation process, object-creation patterns use delegation effectively to get the job done.<br />Structural Patterns<br />These design patterns are all about class and object composition. Structural class-creation patterns use inheritance to compose interfaces. Structural object-patterns define ways to compose objects to obtain new functionality.<br />
    12. 12. Use in Enterprise Architect<br />3<br />1<br />2<br />
    13. 13. State Pattern<br />An object-oriented state machine<br />
    14. 14. State Pattern<br />An object-oriented state machine<br />
    15. 15. Architectural Patterns<br />Model-View-Controller<br />
    16. 16. Architectural Patterns<br />Application of Model-View-Controller<br />
    17. 17. Architectural Patterns<br />Let’s compose the Model-View-Controller<br />
    18. 18. Adding Patterns to EA<br />Bring up the Resources window: View -> More Project Tools -> Project Resources<br />Then…<br />
    19. 19. Till this point we’ve been down in the weeds and seeds<br />
    20. 20. “Patterns are a starting point, not a destination”<br />- Martin Fowler<br />
    21. 21. Analysis Level Patterns<br />http://martinfowler.com/apsupp/accounting.pdf<br />Accounting - Posting<br />
    22. 22. Analysis Level Patterns<br />
    23. 23. Workflow Pattern Categories<br />Workflow Pattern Categories<br />1. Control<br />2. Resource<br />3. Data<br />4. Exception Handling<br />
    24. 24.
    25. 25. Workflow Pattern Example<br />Simple Merge<br />
    26. 26. Analysis Level Patterns<br />Program Management Patterns<br />
    27. 27. Australian Government Use of Patterns<br />
    28. 28.
    29. 29.
    30. 30.
    31. 31.
    32. 32. Brokered Authentication Pattern<br />
    33. 33.
    34. 34.
    35. 35. An example of a business model from Tom Graves (see http://weblog.tomgraves.org)<br />
    36. 36.
    37. 37. Mapping Osterwalder’s Business Model Canvas to Archimate<br />
    38. 38. Not Matched<br />
    39. 39. e: anthony.draffin@itstrategies.info<br />w: www.itstrategies.info<br />t: www.twitter.com/adraffin<br />

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