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Informal Help-Seeking & ICT USe
 

Informal Help-Seeking & ICT USe

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Presentation by Adnan Qayyum at the Canadian Network for Innovation in Education conference (2009)

Presentation by Adnan Qayyum at the Canadian Network for Innovation in Education conference (2009)

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    Informal Help-Seeking & ICT USe Informal Help-Seeking & ICT USe Presentation Transcript

    • Informal help-seeking & ICTs Adnan Qayyum Concordia University Canadian Network for Innovation in Education May 12, 2009
    • Agenda
      • Present general research problem
      • Review qualitative study
      • Discuss findings of quantitative study
      • So what? possible implications
    • General problem & method
      • General research problem
        • Buddhist wheel metaphor
        • explore student-generated interaction
        • describe how students interact outside of class for course-purposes, and the role of ICTs in doing so
      • Method
      • Exploratory mixed method -qual becomes means for developing or locating instrument
      • Qualitative study
        • what’s going on
      • Quantitative study
        • how common is this
        • identify underlying dynamics
    • Qualitative study
      • Guiding research questions
        • How do students interact with peers and others for course-related purposes outside of class?
        • How do ICTs affect this dynamic?
      • Collaboration with BCIT Learning & Teaching Unit
      • Data collection: Interviews, observations, existing documents, student blogs
        • 69 students in 29 groups
        • Individually and in groups
    • Findings: channels of communication
      • Talking
        • in person
        • via cellphones
      • Writing
        • via chat (e.g. MSN, Yahoo)
        • email
        • Facebook, MySpace
        • cellphone text messages
        • WebCT
    • Findings: topics of communication
        • Main topics
          • discussing school projects and assignments
          • discussing general school issues
          • seeking and sharing information about course administrative issues
          • organizing for school work
        • Other course-related topics
          • Studying in groups
          • Seeking help about course content
          • Working on assigned group projects
          • Reviewing each others work
          • Sharing resources
    • Findings: location of communication
        • Blend of social and work space
          • E.g. cafeterias, Student Hall, lounge spaces
        • Designated work spaces
          • E.g. labs, library, learning commons
        • Social spaces
          • E.g. restaurant, pub
        • Off campus
          • E.g. home
    • Quantitative study
      • Which factors might motivate students to communicate with and seek help from peers and instructors?
      • What communication channels do students use to interact with peers and instructors outside of class?
      • Why do students choose particular communication channels to support their learning?
    • Questionnaire
      • Main data collection instrument: 89 item survey
      • Content validity: peer review
      • Construct validity: pilot test (Fall 2008, N=40 
      • from .78 to .89)
      • Survey administered to 14 courses (6 to 93)
        • 449 students (438 usable after screening & cleaning)
      • Self-reporting
    • Respondents
      • Respondent’s demographics
      Not working 52% Working 48% Technology 79% Trades 21% Male 56% Female 43%
    • Q1: Which factors motivate students to communicate with peers and instructors?
      • Peer usefulness
        • Better comprehension, saves time, useful feedback, motivation, better work completed
      • Perception of instructors
        • available, approachable, knowledgeable, prompt
      • Peer trust
        • affective trust, reliable, timely
      • Independence
        • prefer to work on own; learn by trying things on own
      • Perception of course
        • Manageable workload; would recommend course
      • Threat
        • Fear of looking “stupid”; hesitate to approach instructor for help
    • Q2: What communication channels do students use to interact with peers and instructors outside of class?
      • Communicating with peers
      • 1. Talking in person
      • 2. Personal email (e.g. Hotmail, Telus, etc.)
      • 3. Talking via phone
      • 4. Text message via cellphones
      • 5. Instant messaging (MSN, Yahoo, etc)
      • 6. BCIT email account
      • 6. Facebook/MySpace
      • 8. WebCT
    • Q2: What communication channels to students used to interact with peers and instructors outside of class?
      • Communicating with instructors
      • Talking in person
      • BCIT email account
      • Personal email (e.g. Hotmail, Telus)
      • WebCT
      • Talking via phone
      • Instant messaging (MSN, Yahoo messenger)
      • Text message via cellphones
      • Facebook/MySpace
    • Q3: Why do students choose particular communication channels to support their learning?
      • Were there any significant relationships between factors that may motivate communication with peers and instructors, and the choice of communication channels?
      • Threat : fear of looking stupid, hesitating asking instructors
        • In Person
        • Personal email
        • Avoiding personal communication
    • Q3: Why do students choose particular communication channels to support their learning?
      • Peer usefulness : communicating with peers is useful
        • Facebook
        • Instant messaging
        • Text message
        • Phone
        • WebCT
        • In Person
        • Synchronous communication
      • Peer trust: peers are trustworthy, reliable, timely
        • In person
        • Phone
        • Instant messaging
        • Text messaging
        • Synchronous communication
    • So what?
      • How do might these findings inform design or teaching strategies?
      • How might these findings inform how institutions should allocate resources?
    • Possible implications
      • Threat important in help-seeking behaviour
      • Reducing threat
        • E.g. Facebook in class: good
        • Facebook without instructor; better?
      • Promote and encourage synchronous options
      • Institutional vs commonly available ICTs
        • Supply-side vs demand side ed tech (wikis, blogs)
    • Further information
      • [email_address]