• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Romania Non Life 2009
 

Romania Non Life 2009

on

  • 3,335 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,335
Views on SlideShare
3,327
Embed Views
8

Actions

Likes
4
Downloads
0
Comments
0

2 Embeds 8

http://www.linkedin.com 6
http://www.lmodules.com 2

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Romania Non Life 2009 Romania Non Life 2009 Document Transcript

    • Country Map Map of the Area Market Developments Key Facts General Country Information Politics and the Economy Supervision and Control Taxation Legal System Insurance Market Overview Reinsurance Distribution Channels Multinationals, Captives, ART and Risk Management Insurance Policies Natural Hazards Property Construction and Machinery Breakdown Motor Workers' Compensation and Employers' Liability Liability Surety, Bonds and Credit Marine, Aviation and Transit Personal Accident and Travel Appendix No 1 - Market Statistics Appendix No 2 - Company Statistics Appendix No 3 - Directory INSURANCE MARKET REPORT ROMANIA: NON-LIFE (P&C) © AXCO 2009 NON-LIFE (P&C)
    • Contents Page Country Map 1 Map of the Area 2 Market Developments 3 Key Facts 4 General Country Information 6 History 6 Geographic Description 7 Population and Demographic Trends 8 Largest Cities 12 Politics and the Economy 13 Government Structure 13 Current Political Situation 13 Economy 15 Currency and Exchange Control 22 Supervision and Control 24 Legislation 24 Compulsory Insurances 25 Changes in Legislation 26 Supervision 30 Non-Admitted Insurance Regulatory Position 32 Fronting 35 Company Registration and Operating Requirements 35 Taxation 40 Legal System 42 Insurance Market Overview 45 Historical Development 45 The Market Today 46 Market Participants 50 Reinsurance 58 Local Reinsurance Market 58 Local Reinsurance Arrangements 58 Distribution Channels 66 Multinationals, Captives, ART and Risk Management 70 Multinationals 70 Captives 70 A.R.T. & Risk Management 71 Insurance Policies 72 Natural Hazards 75 Earthquake and Other Geological Hazards 75 Windstorm 80 Flood 81 Bushfire 85 Subsidence 85 Hail 85 Cresta Maps 85 Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Report © Axco 2009
    • Contents Page Property 86 Construction and Prevention 87 Social Hazards 89 Householder/Homeowner 89 Industrial and Commercial 92 Agriculture 95 Construction and Machinery Breakdown 98 Construction and Erection all Risks 98 Machinery Breakdown 100 Motor 102 Workers' Compensation and Employers' Liability 111 Liability 114 General Third Party 114 Product Liability 116 Professional Indemnity 117 Directors' and Officers' Liability 120 Pollution and Environmental Liability 122 Financial and Professional Risks 123 Surety, Bonds and Credit 124 Marine, Aviation and Transit 128 Marine Hull 128 Marine Cargo 131 Marine Liability 164 Energy 164 Aviation 165 Personal Accident and Travel 168 Personal Accident 168 Travel 170 Appendix No 1 - Market Statistics 172 Insurance Supervisor's Report 172 Non-Life Market Totals 173 Non-Life Insurance 174 Personal Accident 178 Appendix No 2 - Company Statistics 181 Appendix No 3 - Directory 183 Industry Organisations 183 Insurance Companies 183 Reinsurance Companies 186 Captive Managers 186 Intermediaries 186 Loss Adjusters 188 Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Report © Axco 2009
    • Country Map Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 1 © AXCO 2009
    • Map of the Area Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 2 © AXCO 2009
    • Market Developments • Groupama  has  bought  Asiban.  It  has  also  become  the  owner  of  OTP  Garancia  Asigurari  and  BT Asigurari, all of which will be united under the Groupama brand by the end of 2009. • The  Vienna  Insurance  Group  (VIG)  has  bought  Erste  Bank's  insurance  operations  in  central  and  east Europe.  In  Romania,  this  gives  it  ownership  of  BCR  Insurance,  to  add  to  its  existing  investments  in Asirom,  Omniasig,  Agras  and  Unita.  In  order  to  defuse  competition  concerns,  VIG  has  sold  Unita  and Agras to UNIQA. • PPF Investments has sold Ardaf and RAI to Generali PPF Holding. • Greek  financial  group  EFG  Eurobank,  the  majority  owner  of  Bancpost,  has  established  EFG  Eurolife General Insurance Co Ltd. • Bulgarian investor Eurohold has bought 70% of Asitrans and changed the company's name to Euroins Romania. • Coface, Euler Hermes, AIG Europe and QBE Insurance (Europe) have established Romanian branches on a freedom of services basis. • The Law on Obligatory House Insurance finally got through parliament on 8 October 2008 and received the  presidential  signature  on  4  November  2008.  When  the  administrative  infrastructure  has  been completed  in  mid-2009,  the  law  will  require  every  householder  to  buy  first-loss  insurance  against  the perils of earthquake, landslide and flood. • Statutory motor third party liability limits effective from 1 January 2008 are EUR 150,000 (USD 205,479) per event for property damage and EUR 750,000 (USD 1.03mn) per person for bodily injury. These will be increased on 1 January 2009 and 1 January 2010. • A  new  Company Law,  which  came  into  effect  on  1  December  2006,  has  made  D&O  insurance compulsory for the managers of joint stock companies. • With effect from 1 January 2007 the policyholders' protection fund levy for non-life insurance has been reduced from 1% of total premiums to 0.8%. The supervisory levy has been increased to 0.5%. The Future A  number  of  companies  deliberately  under-priced  their  motor  portfolios  in  2006  and  2007  in  order  to increase  their  gross  written  premiums  and  therefore  the  price  for  which  they  could  be  sold  to  a  foreign bidder. The failure to respond to a rapidly deteriorating claims environment led to an underwriting loss of nearly USD 135mn in 2007. Now that virtually every company which can be sold has been sold, there are hopes  that  insurers  will  try  to  return  to  profit  by  increasing  their  motor  rates  and  enforcing  accidental damage  deductibles.  Profitability  should  also  be  helped  in  the  long  run  by  insurers'  withdrawal  from  the consumer credit insurance segment. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 3 © AXCO 2009
    • Key Facts The graph below shows the growth in the life, non-life and PA and health markets for the period 2003 to 2007. • When this report was in preparation the rate of exchange was RON 2.78 : USD 1 and this rate has been used for all current conversions. For previous years the average annual rate for the year in question has been  used  (see  Currency  and  Exchange  Control  within  the  Politics  and  the  Economy  section  of  this report).  Where  figures  such  as  indemnity  limits  are  expressed  in  euros,  these  have  been  converted  to US dollars at a rate of EUR 0.73 : USD 1. • Romania  is  situated  in  the  north-east  corner  of  the  Balkan  Peninsula  and  occupies  an  area  of  91,699 square miles (237,500 sq kilometres). The estimated population in mid-2007 was 21.50 million, making Romania  the  second  most  populous  country  in  east  Europe  after  Poland.  The  population  is  shrinking and ageing and suffers from high rates of youth emigration. • Romania  is  a  relatively  new  country:  it  gained  its  independence  from  the  Turkish  Ottoman  Empire  in 1877, but only acquired its current borders after uniting with the Hungarian province of Transylvania in 1918.  The  country  had  a  hard-line  communist  regime  from  1948  until  the  overthrow  of  Nicolae Ceausescu in the revolution of December 1989. • The  general  election  held  on  30  November  2008  resulted  in  a  near  tie  between  the  centre-left  Social Democratic Party and the centre-right Democratic Liberal Party, both of which won around 33% of the popular vote. The complexion of Romania's next government will depend on which of the leading parties is able to form a coalition with the National Liberal Party, which won 18.6% of the vote. • Real GDP is expected to continue growing in 2009 despite the global economic slowdown, though at a much slower pace than in previous years. • Total  market  income  in  2007  was  RON  7.18bn  (USD  2.94bn),  of  which  non-life  accounted  for  RON 5.73bn  (USD  2.35bn).  This  made  Romania  the  39th  largest  non-life  market  in  the  world.  Non-life insurance penetration was 1.36% of GDP, equivalent to USD 106.96 per capita. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 4 © AXCO 2009
    • Key Facts • At the time this report was being prepared the Romanian insurance market comprised 42 companies, of which 21 were non-life, nine were life and 12 were composite. The structure of the non-life market has been  completely  transformed  over  the  last  two  years  by  the  group-building  acquisitions  of  the  Vienna Insurance  Group,  Generali  PPF  Holding,  UNIQA  and  Groupama.  Once  fully  assembled  these  four groups  will  have  an  aggregate  market  share  (based  on  the  2007  market  shares  of  their  component companies) of 68.5%. • Non-EU  insurers  are  not  allowed  to  conduct  insurance  business  in  Romania  without  authorisation. Romanian policyholders are allowed to place their insurance with non-admitted carriers abroad. • There are no longer any tariff classes. • The  compulsory  classes  include  motor  third  party  liability  and  professional  indemnity  for  an  increasing number of professions, including accountants, lawyers, insurance brokers, medical staff and hospitals. A form  of  D&O  has  been  made  compulsory  for  the  managers  of  joint  stock  companies.  The  Law on Obligatory House Insurance will eventually require every householder to buy first-loss insurance against the perils of earthquake, landslide and flood. • Foreign  companies  are  allowed  to  purchase  any  percentage  of  a  domestic  company's  equity  or  to establish  wholly-owned  subsidiaries  or  branches.  EU  insurers  may  enter  the  market  on  a  freedom  of establishment or freedom of services basis. • The  main  distribution  channels  are  direct  sales  force  and  agents.  In  2007  brokers  controlled  26.2%  of non-life premiums. Banks are an increasingly important source of loan-related business. • Romania  is  prone  to  both  flood  and  earthquake.  The  capital  city  Bucharest  lies  in  the  most  active seismic zone. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 5 © AXCO 2009
    • General Country Information History Early History 101 The indigenous people of Romania, known collectively as the Dacians, were conquered by the  Roman  Emperor  Trajan  between  101  and  117  AD.  They  were  organised  into  the Roman colony of Dacia Felix until being over-run by barbarians from the east in 271. The Romanians  believe  that  their  race  stems  from  the  union  of  the  native  Dacians  and  the Roman colonists, hence the name of the country and the many words in the language that are derived from Latin. 1200 In the middle ages the country was divided into a number of principalities. Transylvania in the north-west was ruled by Hungary, whilst Wallachia and Moldavia had native dynasties. The latter two became tributaries of the Turkish Ottoman Empire and were later ruled by Greek  families  from  Istanbul,  known  as  the  Phanariots,  who  were  imposed  on  the Romanians as an alternative to direct Turkish occupation. 1877 After  a  series  of  wars  between  Russia  and  Turkey,  the  provinces  of  Wallachia  and Moldavia  were  united  under  King  Karol  I  and  recognised  as  the  independent  Kingdom  of Romania. 20th/21st Century 1916 Romania joined World War 1 on the side of Britain and France, and was rewarded with the previously  Hungarian  territory  of  Transylvania  (in  1918)  and  the  provinces  of  Bessarabia and  Bucovina.  The  country  thus  doubled  in  population  and  territory  and  acquired  its present borders. 1941 The strength of a native fascist movement known as the Iron Guard and resentment at the Soviet annexation of Bessarabia and Bucovina caused Romania to enter World War 2 on the side of Nazi Germany. 1944 Soviet armies entered Romania in August. 1947 The continuing presence of the Soviets allowed the Romanian Communist Party to usurp power  and  declare  a  people's  republic  on  30  December.  Party  secretary  Gheorghe Gheorghiu-Dej pursued a hard-line Stalinist policy domestically, but resentment at Russia's creation of the Republic of Moldova out of the Romanian province of Bessarabia led to an increasingly independent stance within the communist bloc. 1965 Gheorghiu-Dej  died  in  March  and  was  succeeded  by  Nicolae  Ceausescu.  The  latter achieved  a  favourable  standing  for  Romania  in  the  West  by  refusing  to  follow  Russian foreign policy, but inflicted the most appalling privations on his own people as he pursued increasingly megalomaniac schemes of social engineering. 1989 Popular resentment at the excesses of the regime finally came into the open in December when  the  people  of  Timisoara  rioted  in  support  of  a  dissident  priest,  Laszlo  Tokes.  The spirit  of  revolution  spread  to  Bucharest  and  an  unprecedented  demonstration  on  21 December  caused  Ceausescu  and  his  wife  to  flee  the  capital  by  helicopter.  They  were soon caught and after a one-day show trial were executed on Christmas Day. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 6 © AXCO 2009
    • General Country Information 1990 After  the  fall  of  Ceausescu  a  group  of  Communist  Party  members  led  by  Ion  Iliescu assumed  power  under  the  name  of  the  National  Salvation  Front.  Romania's  first  free elections  were  held  on  20  May  and  were  won  by  Iliescu's  Party  of  Social  Democracy (PSD). 1991 A new constitution was adopted confirming Romania as a multiparty democracy. 1996 Control  of  both  the  presidency  and  parliament  passed  from  the  PSD  to  the  reformist Democratic Convention. 2000 After  four  years  of  political  instability  and  economic  decline,  power  was  returned  to  the PSD. Ion Iliescu was re-elected as president for the third time. 2004 In  March  Romania  was  admitted  to  Nato.  In  November/December  Traian  Basescu  was elected president. His ally Calin Tarinceanu became prime minister. 2005 In May Parliament ratified the EU accession treaty. In July the leu was redenominated by the removal of four zeroes. 2007 Romania became a member of the EU on 1 January. Geographic Description Country Name Romania. Frontiers and Coastline Romania occupies the north-east corner of the Balkan peninsula and borders on Ukraine to the north and east,  Moldova  to  the  east,  Bulgaria  to  the  south,  Serbia  to  the  west  and  Hungary  to  the  north-west.  The country has an eastern coastline of 145 miles (234 kilometres) on the Black Sea between its borders with Bulgaria and Ukraine. Land Area Romania has a land area of 91,699 sq miles (237,500 sq km). Administration For administrative purposes Romania is divided into 41 counties plus the municipality of Bucharest. Topography The eastern Carpathians and the Transylvanian Alps swing in a mountainous arc from the northern to the western  borders  of  Romania.  The  territory  enclosed  by  the  mountains  is  known  as  Transylvania  and  is predominantly hilly and wooded. The highest peak is Moldoveanu at 8,347 feet (2,544 metres). The outer rim of the country, extending from Oradea in the north-west through Timisoara and Bucharest to the Black Sea, is predominantly flat and fertile. Forests cover more than a quarter of the land. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 7 © AXCO 2009
    • General Country Information The main river is the Danube, which forms the southern border of Romania with Serbia and Bulgaria. The Danube  flows  into  the  Black  Sea  near  Romania's  border  with  Ukraine  forming  a  delta  region  of  1,544  sq miles  (4,000  sq  km)  made  up  of  lakes,  channels,  marshes  and  floating  reed  islands.  An  artificial  canal, completed under Ceausescu, connects the Danube at Cernavoda with the Black Sea at Agigea, cutting out 248  miles  (400  km)  of  barely  navigable  river.  This  forms  the  final  stretch  of  the  1,863-mile  (3,000-km) waterway linking Rotterdam with the Black Sea via the Rhein-Main and Nurnberg-Regensburg canals. Climate Romania  has  a  typical  continental  climate  characterised  by  cold  snowy  winters  and  hot  dry  summers. During  the  winter  months  snow  lies  for  30  to  50  days  at  low  levels  and  the  Danube  and  other  rivers regularly  freeze  over.  The  mildest  area  is  the  Black  Sea  coast  though  even  this  can  experience  severe conditions when cold winds blow out of the Russian steppes to the north-east. Average maximum and minimum temperatures and average monthly precipitation for the capital Bucharest, at latitude 44º 30' N and at a height of 302 feet (92 m) above sea level, are shown in the following tables: Population and Demographic Trends Population The latest census was conducted on 18 March 2002 and recorded a population of 21,680,974. This made Romania the second most populous country in east Europe after Poland. The latest population estimate for mid 2007 was 21.5 million. The total population since 1956 was as follows: Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 8 © AXCO 2009
    • General Country Information Year Population 2005 21,623,849 2002 21,680,974 1992 22,810,035 1977 21,559,910 1966 19,103,163 1956 17,489,450 Source: National Institute of Statistics Population projections are as follows: Year Population 2050 15,928,000 2025 19,494,000 2010 21,147,000 Source: UN Population Division (UNPD) Romania  has  an  unusually  large  rural  population:  in  2007  country  dwellers  accounted  for  44.7%  of  the population and city dwellers for 55.3%. According to the 2002 census, 89.5% of the population are ethnic Romanians. The next largest ethnic groups are the Hungarians of Transylvania with 6.6% and the Roma with 2.5%. The nomadic lifestyle of the Roma population has led to a significant under-recording of their numbers, which are unofficially estimated at two million. This would make them the largest minority group in Romania and the largest Roma population of any European country. The birth and death rates per 1,000 since 1985 were as follows: Year Birth rate Death rate Rate of natural increase 2007 10.0 11.7 (1.7) 2005 10.2 12.1 (1.9) 2001 9.8 11.6 (1.8) 2000 10.5 11.4 (0.9) 1995 10.4 12.0 (1.6) 1990 13.6 10.6 (3.0) 1985 15.8 10.9 (4.9) Source: National Institute of Statistics The birth rate fell almost every year after 1990, partly as a result of economic hardship and partly because a long-standing ban on birth control was abolished after the overthrow of Ceausescu. The rate did not rise again until 2004. The infant mortality rate per '000 live births since 1950 was as follows: Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 9 © AXCO 2009
    • General Country Information Year Infant mortality rate 2007 12.0 2005 15.0 2001 18.4 1990 26.9 1980 29.3 1970 49.4 1960 74.6 1950 116.7 Source: National Institute of Statistics The change in age structure of the population since 1970 is shown below, including projections for 2010, 2025 and 2050. Age group 1970 1980 1990 2000 2005 2010 2025 2050 To 14 25.9 26.7 23.6 18.4 15.7 15.1 13.4 12.5 15 to 59 60.8 60.1 60.8 62.6 65.1 64.6 62.0 48.3 60 and 13.2 13.3 15.7 19.0 19.3 20.3 24.5 39.1 above Source: UN Population Division (UNPD) Note: due to rounding some totals may not equal the breakdown above. The  change  in  age  structure  of  the  population  aged  65  and  80  and  above  is  shown  below,  including projections for 2010, 2025 and 2050. Age group 1970 1980 1990 2000 2005 2010 2025 2050 65 and 8.6 10.3 10.4 13.5 14.8 14.9 19.3 30.2 above 80 and 1.1 1.3 1.8 1.8 2.4 3.0 3.9 8.1 above Source: UN Population Division (UNPD) Life Expectancy Average life expectancy at birth for the period 2005 to 2007 was 69 for males and 76 for females. The table below shows how this has changed since 1970. Year Males Females 2005 to 2007 69.00 76.00 2003 to 2005 68.19 75.47 2000 to 2002 67.61 74.90 1990 to 1992 66.56 73.17 1980 to 1982 66.70 72.17 1970 to 1972 66.27 70.85 Source: National Institute of Statistics The following table shows expectations of life at various ages over the 2000 to 2005 period. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 10 © AXCO 2009
    • General Country Information Present age Males Females At birth 66.5 73.3 60 16.0 19.1 65 13.0 15.3 80 5.7 6.3 Source: UN Population Division (DESA) Major Causes of Death The following table shows the leading causes of death in 2005: Cause of death Male Female Diseases of the circulatory system 77,216 85,781 Neoplasms 26,292 18,614 Injury, poisoning and other 9,618 3,223 external causes Diseases of the digestive system 9,068 5,645 Diseases of the respiratory system 8,311 5,040 Infectious and parasitic diseases 1,925 664 Diseases of the genitourinary 1,364 1,012 system Diseases of the nervous system 1,055 907 Endocrine, nutritional and 1,018 1,230 metabolic diseases Other 2,594 1,524 Total 138,461 123,640 Source: National Institute of Statistics Of  the  men  who  died  of  infectious  and  parasitic  diseases  in  2005,  77%  died  of  tuberculosis.  Almost  four and a half times as many men as women died of the disease in that year. Language The official language is Romanian, the closest Romance language to Latin. It is written in Latin script with diacritical marks. The Hungarian and Roma minorities speak Hungarian and Romany respectively. English is most commonly used for international business purposes. Religion The majority religion is Christianity. More than 85% of the population are Orthodox Christians and there are also communities of Catholics, Lutherans, Uniates and Unitarians, particularly in Transylvania. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 11 © AXCO 2009
    • General Country Information Largest Cities Capital The capital of Romania is Bucharest, a city with an estimated population of 1,931,838 on 1 July 2007. It is situated  in  the  south  of  the  country  near  the  Bulgarian  border.  As  well  as  being  the  financial  and administrative  centre  of  the  country,  Bucharest  has  important  textile  and  engineering  industries.  Several multinational  IT  and  software  companies,  such  as  IBM  and  Oracle,  have  their  European  headquarters  in Bucharest and in early 2008 PepsiCo announced plans to build a new bottling plant in the city. Other Major Areas/Cities Population figures are estimates for 1 July 2007. Cluj-Napoca, the leading city of Transylvania, has a population of 310,243, one-third of whom are ethnic Hungarians.  It  is  home  to  Romania's  largest  university  and  has  its  own  airport  offering  domestic  and international flights. Iasi, the cultural capital of Moldavia, has a population of 315,214, and is situated near Romania's border with the Republic of Moldova. It has two universities, including Romania's oldest university. Constanta,  with  a  population  of  304,279,  is  the  largest  port  on  the  Black  Sea.  It  has  a  significant ship-building and ship-repair industry. Timisoara, in the west of the country near the Serbian border, has a population of 307,347. The city is an important transport hub and agricultural centre. Brasov, with a population of 277,945, is situated in the Carpathian Mountains near the geographical centre of the country. The city's manufacturing industries include tractors and aero-engineering. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 12 © AXCO 2009
    • Politics and the Economy Government Structure Constitution Romania adopted a new constitution in 1991 redefining the country as a parliamentary republic. Changes in  the  constitution  required  for  Romania  to  join  the  EU  were  adopted  by  referendum  in  October  2003. Amongst other provisions, the new constitution extended the presidential term from four to five years and strengthened the judiciary. Executive/Legislature The  head  of  state  is  the  president  who  is  directly  elected  for  a  maximum  of  two  five-year  terms.  The president appoints the prime minister. The executive is the cabinet, which is appointed and headed by the prime minister. The national legislature is a bicameral parliament composed of a Senate (137 members), which is elected for  a  four-year  term  by  proportional  representation,  and  a  Chamber  of  Deputies  (332  members).  The Chamber  of  Deputies  is  also  elected  for  a  four-year  term,  but  327  members  are  elected  by  proportional representation whilst the remaining seats are reserved for ethnic minorities. Electoral System President and parliament are elected by universal adult suffrage. Both chambers of parliament are directly elected  for  four-year  terms  from  42  multi-member  constituencies  comprising  41  counties  and  the municipality of Bucharest. The last parliamentary elections were held in November 2008; the next are held in November 2012. The last  presidential  elections  were  held  in  November  and  December  2004;  the  next  are  due  in  November 2009. Local Government The 42 local administrations are democratically elected. Each county has an elected council. There is also a centrally appointed prefect who can impede council-initiated legislation that is contrary to national law. Current Political Situation Present Government The results of the 2008 election are shown in the table below. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 13 © AXCO 2009
    • Politics and the Economy Party name Acronym % of vote Seats Democratic Liberal Party PDL 32.4 115 Social Democratic Party PSD 33.1† 110 Conservative Party PC 4 National Liberal Party PNL 18.6 65 Democratic Alliance of UDMR 6.2 22 Hungarians in Romania Minorities - 3.6 18 Others - 6.1 0 Total - 100.0 334 Note: † the Social Democratic Party (PSD) and Conservative Party (PC) share the same percentage of votes. Source: Parties and Elections in Europe The Prime Minister-designate is Mr Theodor Stolojan, who was nominated following the 2008 elections. He replaces  Mr  Calin  Tariceanu  of  the  National  Liberal  Party  (PNL).  Mr  Traian  Basescu  of  the  Democratic Liberal Party (PDL) remains president. A coalition government is to be formed between the pro-presidential PDL and left-of-centre Social Democratic Party (PSD). Political Situation The 2008 elections ended in a political stalemate, with neither the Social Democratic Party (PSD) nor the Democratic Liberal Party (PDL) winning a majority in government. Now, both parties are expected to form a coalition,  with  the  Prime  Minister-designate,  Mr  Calin  Tarinceanu,  being  appointed  its  leader.  The  two parties  have  differing  policies  and  are  likely  to  clash  on  domestic  and  foreign  issues.  The  PDL  support market-based  policies,  having  introduced  during  its  previous  mandate  an  income  tax  rate  that  the  PSD opposed. The PSD is more likely to implement social protection initiatives in order to bolster job rates and boost  workers'  rights.  Yet  the  unwillingness  of  the  PSD  to  press  ahead  with  judicial  reforms  or  pursue cases of corruption could see Romania face severe penalties from the European Commission for failure to adhere to European standards. The European Commission has required that the country report every six months  on  the  progress  it  has  made  in  tackling  contentious  issues  such  as  corruption  and  money laundering.  Penalties  might  include  withholding  EU  regional  aid  payments  in  cases  of  persistent  fraud  or suspending  the  country's  legal  system  if  it  fails  to  bring  offenders  to  trial.  In  May  2008  it  emerged  that  a British company was suing the Romanian state for USD 100mn in a high-level corruption case involving a former  prime  minister.  This  is  likely  to  be  adversely  received  by  the  European  Commission,  which  is already unhappy with the progress made thus far by Romania in its fight against corruption and could lead to a suspension of EU aid. International Relations Romania joined the EU on 1 January 2007. The EU remains concerned about corruption and the slow pace of judicial reforms, however. Romanian citizens have fewer rights than citizens of existing EU countries as many EU members, fearing an influx of cheap labour, have restricted the amount of work legally available to them. Romania is a member of the UN, Nato, World Bank and IMF. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 14 © AXCO 2009
    • Politics and the Economy Economy Economic Performance Romania emerged from communism with a state-owned economy entirely unsuited for competitive survival. Successive  governments  lacked  the  competence  or  the  will  to  undertake  structural  reforms,  resulting  in widespread  poverty  and  economic  backwardness.  As  a  result,  Romania  was  only  judged  to  have  a quot;functioning market economyquot; in October 2004, just two months before it signed its accession treaty with the EU. Real  GDP  growth  in  2007  was  slowed  by  a  fall  in  gross  value  added  in  agriculture  as  a  consequence  of drought, whilst on the demand side household consumption was the main driver; domestic demand in 2007 grew by a little over 13% year on year. Nevertheless, the prospects for the agricultural sector improved in the third quarter of 2008, with growth likely to average 8.6% in the year. Yet this acceleration in economic growth is likely to be short-lived, as the domestic economy feels the effects in 2009 of the global crisis on the  financial  markets.  Economic  forecasts  are  likely  to  be  revised  downwards  in  the  near  future,  as  the chances increase of Romania falling into a recession. A currency crisis or an IMF bail-out cannot be ruled out. Inflation fell to 4.8% in 2007 from 6.6% in 2006. Planned large increases in public spending in the run-up to the next election, as well as rising wages and high food prices, will all contribute to raising inflation to an anticipated rate of 7.9% in 2008. Nonetheless, a tightening of fiscal and incomes policies once the elections are over is expected to result in lower inflation in 2009. Romania's consolidated budget deficit for 2007 was equivalent to 2.3% of GDP according to government calculations and the country has set a target of 2.3% for 2008 also. The IMF has urged Romania to move away from the highly expansionary fiscal policy of 2007 and to target a budget deficit of 1.75%, however, but the government is unlikely to exercise fiscal restraint until after the elections due at the end of 2008. Gross Domestic Product The  actual  GDP  figures  for  the  five  years  to  2007  are  shown  below.  These  are  in  two  forms,  RON  and converted to US dollars at the average annual rate of exchange. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 15 © AXCO 2009
    • Politics and the Economy The  growth  in  real  GDP  for  the  five  years  to  2007  based  on  2000  prices  in  domestic  currency  is  shown below. Real GDP growth rates of 8.6% and 2.6% are forecast for 2008 and 2009 respectively. In 2007 the main contributors to the GDP were: Industry % of total Services 49.9 Industry 23.4 Agriculture and related industries 6.6 Source: National Institute of Statistics In 2007 GDP per capita in USD in Romania and comparative economies was as follows: Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 16 © AXCO 2009
    • Politics and the Economy Country GDP per capita Czech Republic 17,186 Hungary 13,873 Poland 11,397 Romania 7,586 Bulgaria 5,177 Source: IMF Current Account Balance The current account balance in US dollars for the five years to 2007 is expressed in the graph below. The current account deficit amounted to 13.6% of GDP in 2007, the result of a surge in imports caused by domestic demand growth. Foreign Exchange Reserves Foreign exchange reserves, excluding gold, are quoted in US dollars below. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 17 © AXCO 2009
    • Politics and the Economy Inflation Annual consumer price inflation for the five years to 2007 is shown in the graph below. Inflation is expected to rise to 7.9% in 2008 before falling to 5.8% in 2009. Interest Rates Key interest rates over the five years to 2007 are shown below. Investment type 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Deposit rate 11.02 11.54 6.42 4.77 6.70 Lending rate 25.44 25.61 19.60 13.98 13.35 Money market rate 18.95 20.01 8.99 8.34 7.55 Treasury bill rate 15.07 n/a n/a n/a 7.11 Source: IMF Employment The percentage of the working population unemployed over the five years to 2007 is shown in the graph below. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 18 © AXCO 2009
    • Politics and the Economy In  2007  the  economically  active  population  was  9,994,000.  The  following  table  shows  the  number  of employees in the main sectors of the economy in 2007: Sector Percentage Agriculture 29.5 Manufacturing 24.1 Trade 12.3 Construction 7.2 Transport, storage and communication 5.2 Education 4.2 Health and social assistance 4.0 Real estate and other services 3.0 Hotels and restaurants 1.4 Other 9.1 Total 100.0 Source: National Institute of Statistics Earnings Since  1  January  2008  the  gross  minimum  wage  in  Romania  has  been  RON  500  (USD  210)  per  month. Average gross monthly earnings for the listed industry types are shown below for April 2008. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 19 © AXCO 2009
    • Politics and the Economy Industry type Gross monthly earnings RON USD Financial intermediation (not 5,298 2,228 insurance & pensions) Mining and quarrying 3,145 1,323 Insurance and pensions 2,862 1,204 General government 2,843 1,196 Utilities 2,699 1,135 Education 1,945 818 Health and social assistance 1,595 671 Manufacturing 1,436 604 Construction 1,433 603 Wholesale, retail and repairs 1,421 598 Agriculture, hunting and related 1,174 494 services Hotels and restaurants 944 397 Source: National Institute of Statistics Romanian workers have enjoyed extremely high rates of earnings growth over the last few years, though it still remains the case that real wages in 2007 were only 12% above their level in 1990. Growth in average real and nominal net monthly earnings is shown below in percentages for the five years to 2007. 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Average net 27.7 23.8 24.5 16.1 20.4 nominal monthly earnings Real Earnings 10.8 10.5 14.3 8.8 15.0 Source: National Institute of Statistics Key Industries Manufacturing The  Ceausescu  regime  endowed  Romania  with  an  over-sized,  uncompetitive  and  resource-intensive state-owned manufacturing sector. Major industries included heavy engineering, chemicals, car production, shipbuilding and steel, the leading example of the latter being the Sidex-Galati steel mill. This employs over 20,000  workers  and  is  the  largest  in  south-east  Europe.  Some  industries  have  been  sold  to  foreign investors  (Sidex-Galati  to  Mittal  Steel  and  Automobile  Dacia  to  Renault),  but  the  majority  are  effectively bankrupt. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 20 © AXCO 2009
    • Politics and the Economy Production  of  sophisticated  consumer  goods  and  machine  tools  had  been  largely  neglected  and engineering products did not meet the standards expected by world markets, leaving Romania dependent on  imported  technology  and  foreign  direct  investment  (FDI).  Modernisation  of  Romania's  industry  has accelerated since 2000. Several foreign car manufacturing companies, such as Ford, Renault and Daimler, have either already invested in Romania or are involved in talks to do so. The private manufacturing sector is mainly focused on food processing, textiles, leather, footwear and light engineering. Agriculture Agriculture  accounted  for  29.5%  of  total  employment  in  2007  (a  higher  proportion  than  in  any  other  east European country except Albania) but only accounts for around 6.6% of GDP. Agricultural production has declined  precipitously  since  1990,  largely  because  of  a  land  restitution  programme  that  has  created  four million  smallholders  with  an  average  plot  size  of  only  2.28  hectares.  The  main  crops  are  wheat,  maize, sugar beets and sunflower seeds. Oil and Gas Romania  is  richly  endowed  with  reserves  of  oil  (230mn  tonnes)  and  natural  gas  (180bn  cubic  metres). Production has been declining for over 20 years, though there is hope that this will be reversed by a EUR 3bn (USD 3.8bn) investment programme, part of it directed to offshore exploration in the Black Sea. The country also has a refining capacity of 600,000 barrels a day. Textiles There has been significant foreign investment in the clothing and footwear sectors, which now account for over 16% of all exports. Exports and Imports In 2007 total exports were USD 40,265mn, with the most important commodities broken down as follows: Commodity Percentage Machinery and mechanical equipment 22.18 Base metals and products 16.32 Textiles and textile products 13.32 Vehicles and transport equipment 11.91 Mineral products 7.79 Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 21 © AXCO 2009
    • Politics and the Economy Source: National Institute of Statistics The most important export destinations were as follows: Destination Percentage Italy 17.0 Germany 16.9 France 7.7 Turkey 7.0 Hungary 5.6 Source: National Institute of Statistics In 2007 total imports were USD 69,946mn, with the most important commodities broken down as follows: Commodity Percentage Machinery and mechanical equipment 24.88 Vehicles and transport equipment 13.78 Mineral products 12.04 Base metals and products 11.08 Chemicals products 7.58 Source: National Institute of Statistics The most important sources of imports were as follows: Source Percentage Germany 17.2 Italy 12.7 Hungary 6.9 Russia 6.3 France 6.2 Source: National Institute of Statistics Currency and Exchange Control Currency and Exchange Rate The Romanian currency is the leu (plural lei), which is abbreviated to RON in this report. After years of high inflation the leu had fallen to the point where there were nearly 30,000 local currency units to the US dollar. A re-denomination exercise was therefore conducted on 1 July 2005 which involved the deletion of four zeroes. This changed the average 2005 US dollar exchange rate from 29,140 old lei (or ROL) to 2.914 new lei (or RON). Foreign exchange controls were lifted on 18 February 1997 and the leu was made internally convertible on 30 January 1998. After a number of years of actively managing the exchange rate of the leu, the National Bank announced in November 2004 that it would allow the currency to fluctuate in accordance with market forces. The average annual exchange rate against the US dollar for the five years to 2007 is shown below. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 22 © AXCO 2009
    • Politics and the Economy The  latest  exchange  rate  when  this  report  was  in  preparation  has  been  used  for  all  current  conversions (see Key Facts). For previous years, the average annual rate from the above chart for the year in question has been used. Exchange Control There are no foreign exchange controls. Permission is not needed to purchase foreign currency or to make remittances  abroad.  There  is  normally  no  shortage  of  hard  currency,  though  there  was  the  prospect  of Romania  facing  a  currency  crisis  as  foreign  investors  pulled  out  of  the  country  in  panic  in  October  and November 2008. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 23 © AXCO 2009
    • Supervision and Control Legislation EU Legislation The  European  Union  (EU)  is  a  grouping  of  27  European  countries  which  have  agreed  a  process  of co-operation and integration in economic, political and judicial affairs. The body of legislation created at the EU level, which has evolved over several decades, has an important impact  on  insurance  in  member  states  as  the  EU  works  to  complete  the  implementation  of  the  Financial Services Action Plan (FSAP) adopted in May 1999. The FSAP has three objectives: • a single market for wholesale financial services • open and secure retail markets • state-of-the-art prudential rules and supervision. The  considerable  progress  which  has  been  made  towards  adoption  of  the  FSAP  is  comprehensively covered in the separate Axco EU Legislation report which can be accessed by clicking on the link below. Domestic Insurance Legislation The  insurance  law  is  Law No 32/2000 on Insurance Companies and Insurance Supervision  which  came into effect on 10 April 2000. This regulates insurance companies and intermediaries and provided for the establishment  of  the  Insurance  Supervisory  Commission  (CSA).  The  law  has  been  supplemented  by numerous regulations issued by the CSA and by the following amendment laws: • Law No 76/2003, which came into effect on 26 March 2003 • Law No 403/2004, which came into effect on 28 October 2004 • Emergency Ordinance No 201/2005, which came into effect on 29 December 2005 • Law No 113/2006, which came into effect on 16 May 2006. The insurance law incorporates all the current EU insurance directives . Law No 136/1995 on Insurance and Reinsurance in Romania, which came into effect on 1 February 1996, regulates insurance contracts and sets out the basic principles of property, liability and personal insurance. The law was amended by Law No 76/2004, which came into effect on 26 May 2004 and Law No 172/2006, which came into effect on 19 May 2006. Law No 503/2004 on the Winding-up of Insurance Companies lays down the procedures for dealing with insolvent insurance companies. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 24 © AXCO 2009
    • Supervision and Control The  Law on Obligatory House Insurance,  which  was  passed  on  8  October  2008,  has  introduced compulsory insurance of dwelling houses against the perils of earthquake, landslide and flood. Legislative Process New insurance legislation is normally drafted by the CSA and approved by the Ministry of Finance and the Ministry  of  Justice.  Draft  legislation  must  be  considered  by  a  Committee  of  the  Senate  before  being debated and passed by the full Senate. Legislation then passes to the Chamber of Deputies for debate and approval  before  being  signed  into  law  by  the  president.  Insurance  legislation  may  also  be  introduced  by emergency ordinance, which may be passed by the government before being debated by parliament. The  Romanian  insurance  industry  has  been  plagued  by  hasty  and  ill  thought-out  legislation  arising  partly from a lack of government understanding of the industry and partly from the sheer number of laws which had to be passed before the country could accede to the EU. A current example is the Law on Obligatory House Insurance,  which  was  framed  before  a  technical  feasibility  study  had  been  conducted  and  which now requires the insurance coverage to be tailored to a pre-determined premium rather than vice versa. Statutory Tariffs There are no statutory tariffs. Compulsory Insurances List of Compulsory Insurances • Motor third party liability. • Air carriers and aircraft operators. • Nuclear liability. • Workers' compensation (state scheme). • Professional  indemnity  for  doctors,  nurses,  dentists,  hospitals,  pharmacists,  lawyers,  insurance intermediaries, administrators, liquidators, notaries and accountants. • Professional  indemnity  for  financial  institutions  which  keep  electronic  records  of  securities  transactions and companies which register electronic signatures. • Tour operators' bonds. • Personal  accident  and  occupational  disease  insurance  for  employees  who  belong  to  factory  fire brigades. • D & O for managers of joint stock companies. • Shipments of waste (financial guarantee or insurance). Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 25 © AXCO 2009
    • Supervision and Control Supplementary Information on Compulsory Insurances EU  legislation  establishes  minimum  insurance  requirements  for  air  carriers  and  aircraft  operators  flying within,  into,  out  of  or  over  the  EU.  Insurance  is  obligatory  to  cover  liability  in  respect  of  passengers, baggage, cargo and third parties. For more details please see the EU Legislation report. A  financial  guarantee  or  insurance  is  required  for  all  shipments  of  waste  imported  into  the  EU,  exported from it or in transit through it. It is intended to cover costs where recovery or disposal is illegal or cannot be completed as intended. For more details please see the EU Legislation report. Compulsory insurance of dwelling houses against the perils of earthquake, landslide and flood is expected to come into effect in the middle of 2009. Further details are given in the Legislative Update section of this report. Changes in Legislation Legislative Update Law on Obligatory House Insurance The  floods  which  affected  Romania  in  2005  caused  estimated  property  damage  of  EUR  1.5bn  (USD 1.9bn), only 1% of which was insured. Demands for state assistance not only placed a severe strain on the budget but also reminded the government of the much greater financial burden which would result from a severe  earthquake.  The  government  therefore  decided  to  introduce  a  pre-funding  mechanism  for  natural catastrophe in the form of compulsory house insurance. Work on drafting the legal basis for the new scheme, known as the Law on Obligatory House Insurance, began  in  mid-2006  but  was  delayed  by  inter-ministerial  consultation  and  by  a  change  of  government  in early 2007. A draft law was finally submitted to parliament on 29 September 2007 but was not passed until 8  October  2008  and  did  not  receive  the  presidential  signature  until  4  November  2008.  It  will  now  take  at least  six  months  to  draft  the  secondary  legislation,  set  up  the  Insurance  Disaster  Pool  and  arrange reinsurance.  The  earliest  start  date  for  the  compulsory  insurance  scheme  will  therefore  be  the  middle  of 2009. The main points of the Law on Obligatory House Insurance are summarised below. • All owners of residential properties in both the public and private sectors will be obliged to insure their buildings  against  the  perils  of  earthquake,  landslide  and  flood.  Obligatory  insurance  will  not  extend  to annexes, outbuildings or contents. • Homes  covered  by  the  obligatory  insurance  requirement  will  be  divided  into  two  types:  Type  A constructed  of  steel,  concrete,  wood,  baked  brick  or  any  other  material  created  by  the  application  of heat;  and  Type  B  constructed  of  unbaked  brick  or  any  other  material  not  created  by  the  application  of heat.  The  precise  definitions  of  the  two  building  types  will  be  contained  in  regulations  issued  by  the Insurance Supervisory Commission (CSA). Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 26 © AXCO 2009
    • Supervision and Control • Type A homes will be covered for a first-loss sum insured of EUR 20,000 (USD 27,397) for an annual premium of EUR 20 (USD 27); Type B homes will be covered for a first loss sum insured of EUR 10,000 (USD  13,699)  for  an  annual  premium  of  EUR  10  (USD  14)  (actual  figures  will  be  the  local  currency equivalent converted at the exchange rate prevailing on the day of settlement). Policies will be written on a  reinstatement  basis.  Insurance  premiums  and  limits  may  be  adjusted  from  time  to  time  to  reflect factors such as building cost inflation and reinsurance costs. Such adjustments shall be carried out by the government during the first five years and by the CSA thereafter. • Apartment blocks comprising at least four apartments may be covered by a collective policy. If a house is covered by a lease, the lessor will be responsible for arranging the insurance. • Premiums will be tax-deductible for income tax payers. Premiums for those receiving social assistance benefits will be paid by the state. • The  insurance  scheme  will  be  underwritten  by  a  special  purpose  joint  stock  (re)insurance  company called the Insurance Disaster Pool (abbreviated to PAID) in which participating insurance companies will be shareholders. The maximum permissible shareholding will be 15%. PAID will be governed by Law No 32/2000 on Insurance Companies and Insurance Supervision and will be supervised by the CSA. PAID will act as 100% reinsurer of its shareholders' obligatory household underwriting and will be allowed to purchase  retrocession  coverage  in  the  international  market.  The  Romanian  government  may  lend money  to  PAID  to  cover  its  retrocession  premium  for  the  first  year  of  the  scheme  and  any  shortfall between  direct  premiums  collected  and  retrocession  premiums  due  over  the  following  four  years. Government  loans  may  also  cover  any  insured  losses  which  exceed  the  upper  limit  of  PAID's retrocession programme. • Obligatory  house  insurance  policies  will  be  issued  by  insurance  companies  which  are  shareholders  in PAID. Policies will be valid for one year with premiums payable annually at least 24 hours in advance. Premiums may be paid to insurers, agents or brokers or at local authority offices. Collected premiums, less an administration fee, should be passed on to PAID. The amount of the administration fee will be set by the CSA. • Local  authorities  should  provide  PAID  with  a  list  of  all  houses  and  homeowners  in  their  locality.  Each month PAID should provide each local authority with a list of residents who have not taken out obligatory house  insurance.  The  local  authority  should  write  to  defaulters  reminding  them  of  their  obligation  to insure. Those who do not insure will be liable to a fine of RON 100 to RON 500 (USD 36 to USD 180) and will not be entitled to any form of state aid if they suffer a catastrophe loss. • Obligatory house insurance policies may not be issued for illegally constructed dwellings. Insurers shall not  be  liable  to  compensate  policyholders  who  have  increased  the  vulnerability  of  their  properties  by carrying out building alterations without the necessary permit. • Losses should be adjusted by PAID insurers. • The  compulsory  insurance  requirement  will  come  into  effect  90  days  after  the  CSA  has  issued  all  the regulations necessary to bring the law into effect. The  Law on Obligatory House Insurance  has  proven  to  be  extremely  controversial,  not  least  with  the insurance  companies  which  might  be  thought  to  be  its  natural  supporters.  Areas  of  difficulty  are summarised below. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 27 © AXCO 2009
    • Supervision and Control • The  government  announced  insurance  premiums  of  EUR  10  or  EUR  20  per  dwelling  before  any modelling had been conducted. Subsequent research on reinsurance costs suggested that the scheme would  only  be  financially  viable  with  a  minimum  deductible  of  5%,  and  yet  no  deductible  has  been allowed for in the law. • In  order  to  avoid  comparison  with  the  compulsory  household  insurance  of  the  communist  era,  the government  has  refused  to  allow  premiums  to  be  collected  as  part  of  the  local  property  tax.  Premium collection  will  therefore  be  the  responsibility  of  participating  insurance  companies.  The  government expects  80%  of  Romania's  8.25  million  householders  to  pay  their  obligatory  insurance  premiums  as required  by  law.  Most  observers  doubt  whether  the  penetration  rate  will  be  anything  like  that  high, however, particularly in country regions where insurance companies have only a limited branch network. • Because  of  low  premium  levels  it  may  not  be  economic  for  insurers  or  intermediaries  to  market obligatory house insurance policies. As a result of these issues, not all insurance companies are expected to participate in PAID. Those that do participate will see the mandatory cover as an opportunity not only to educate the public about insurance but  also  to  cross-sell  top-up  household  cover  and  other  personal  lines.  Public  opinion  seems  also  to  be divided about the merits of being forced to insure, though the publicity given to recent disasters such as the Sichuan earthquake in China is said to have had a persuasive effect. Motor third party liability (MTPL) Ordinance No 14/2007,  which  came  into  effect  on  1  January  2008,  requires  MTPL  insurers  to  have minimum technical reserves for MTPL of 60% of their gross written MTPL premium income. A subsequent ordinance  has  laid  down  a  more  detailed  methodology  for  calculating  MTPL  reserves,  including  IBNR reserves. Alternative methodologies may still be used, provided they give rise to a higher level of reserves. Law No 136/1995 has been amended by Law No 304/2007 to allow motor accidents which do not involve bodily  injury  to  be  notified  to  insurers  by  means  of  an  quot;amicable  reportquot;  rather  than  a  police  report.  The motorists  involved  may  still  ask  for  a  police  report  if  they  prefer.  Although  the  new  claims  notification system  was  due  to  come  into  effect  on  1  July  2008,  objections  from  the  insurance  industry  mean  it  is unlikely to be adopted before 2009. Insurers are concerned that the new system will increase their claim handling costs and be an encouragement to fraud. Statutory MTPL limits Ordinances  issued  by  the  Insurance  Supervisory  Commission  (CSA)  have  set  out  the  following  timetable for increasing Romania's statutory MTPL limits: • Statutory limits effective from 1 January 2008 are the lei equivalents of EUR 150,000 (USD 205,479) per event for property damage and EUR 750,000 (USD 1.03mn) per person for bodily injury. • Statutory limits effective from 1 January 2009 will be the lei equivalents of EUR 300,000 (USD 410,959) per event for property damage and EUR 1.5mn (USD 2.05mn) per person for bodily injury. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 28 © AXCO 2009
    • Supervision and Control • Statutory limits effective from 1 January 2010 will be the lei equivalents of EUR 500,000 (USD 684,932) per event for property damage and EUR 2.5mn (USD 3.42mn) per person for bodily injury. Reinsurance directive Because parliament was unable to legislate for the transposition of the Reinsurance Directive in time, the CSA had to introduce the directive by regulation. This required a total of 15 different regulations extending the  rules  applicable  to  insurance  companies  to  apply  also  to  reinsurance  companies.  The  exercise  was finally completed on 23 June 2008. Accounting regulations Order No 7/2007 introduced accounting regulations for insurance business in accordance with the relevant EU directives, including the transposition of Directive 2006/46/EC. Intermediaries The CSA has established a register of insurance intermediaries in accordance with Directive 92/2002. New regulations require registered individuals to obtain a professional qualification within three years of further regulations being passed for the accreditation of specialist training institutions. Employers' liability Law No 237 Amending the Labour Code  extends  employers'  legal  liability  for  bodily  injury  to  include non-economic losses (before the amendment employers were only liable for economic losses). Employees are  now  allowed  to  sue  if  they  are  subject  to  undue  stress,  disrespectful  treatment  or  damage  to  their reputations.  Such  actions  are  exempt  from  the  normal  advance  court  tax  of  6%  to  8%  of  the  damages claimed. Green cards Border controls on Romanian vehicles were finally abolished in August 2007, allowing Romanian motorists to drive abroad without having to buy a separate green card. Compulsory D&O Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 29 © AXCO 2009
    • Supervision and Control A new Company Law, which came into effect on 1 December 2006, made D&O insurance compulsory for the managers of joint stock companies. Insurance law amendment Law No 32/2000 on Insurance Companies and Insurance Supervision was amended by emergency decree on  8  November  2006  to  allow  life  and  non-life  insurers  to  enter  the  voluntary  pensions  market.  The amendment  requires  participating  insurers  to  meet  separate  capital  requirements  for  insurance  and pensions and to maintain separate accounting records and reserves. The  amendment  also  allowed  non-bank  financial  operations  such  as  leasing  companies  to  sell complementary  insurance  products  and  extended  the  business  scope  of  insurance  brokers  to  include voluntary pensions. Projected Legislation International Financial Reporting Standards The CSA has approved a strategy for the progressive implementation of International Financial Reporting Standards over the period 2007 to 2010. Supervision Insurance Supervisory Authority The insurance supervisory authority is the Insurance Supervisory Commission (Comisia de Supraveghere a  Asigurarilor  or  CSA).  The  CSA  was  established  by  the  Law on InsuranceCompanies and Insurance Supervision  as  the  successor  to  the  Supervisory  Office  of  Insurance  and  Reinsurance  Activity  (SOIRA) which had been acting as insurance supervisor since 1 February 1992. The CSA should have commenced operations within 60 days of the new law coming into effect (that is, by 10 June 2000), but was held up by political infighting over the composition of its board. This was only resolved after the general election victory of the Social Democratic Party allowed the government to dictate a board of its own choosing, and the CSA finally commenced operations on 2 July 2001. The  CSA  is  an  autonomous  entity  answerable  to  the  Romanian  parliament.  The  commission  is  run  by  a seven-member  council  comprising  a  president,  two  vice-presidents  and  four  other  members.  Council members  are  appointed  by  parliament  for  a  five-year  term  and  must  have  at  least  five  years'  previous experience in finance or insurance. The current president is Angela Toncescu who took over the role from Nicolae Crisan when his five-year term expired on 1 July 2006. The CSA is funded by licence application fees and supervisory levies on premium and commission income. The  CSA  is  responsible  for  drafting  insurance  legislation,  issuing  regulations  under  the  Law on InsuranceCompanies and Insurance Supervision and approving legislation in other sectors of the economy which  might  have  a  bearing  on  insurance  .  The  commission  authorises  and  supervises  insurance companies  and  insurance  intermediaries,  manages  the  policyholders'  protection  funds  and  deals  with consumer  complaints.  The  CSA  had  152  staff  at  the  end  of  2007,  up  from  138  the  previous  year.  The commission is divided into 14 departments and directorates, of which the most important are: Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 30 © AXCO 2009
    • Supervision and Control • supervision and on-site inspection directorate • financial stability and actuarial directorate • front office directorate (responsible for handling consumer complaints) • regulation and licensing non-life insurance directorate • regulation and licensing compulsory insurance directorate • regulation and licensing life insurance and pension fund management directorate • guarantee fund department. Insurance  supervision  is  based  on  the  analysis  of  companies'  financial  returns,  supplemented  by  on-site inspections.  Inspections  normally  take  place  every  two  years  but  can  be  brought  forward  for  companies whose financial returns give grounds for concern. The CSA is currently changing its supervisory approach from compliance-based to risk-based in preparation for the introduction of Solvency II. Emergency Ordinance No 201/2005,  which  came  into  effect  on  29  December  2005,  requires  insurers  to employ  a  minimum  of  one  actuary  approved  by  the  CSA  who  is  responsible  for  calculating  premiums, technical reserves and the solvency margin and for submitting an annual actuarial report to the supervisory authority. The actuary must report any breaches of the law to the insurance company's management within two days. These must be reported to the CSA if management takes no action within 10 days. Insurers must also appoint an approved auditor who must report directly to the CSA if he or she uncovers any breaches of the law or any circumstances which may imperil the insurer's financial condition or lead to the expression of a qualified opinion in respect of its annual financial statement. At the beginning of 2007 insurance companies were required to set up internal risk management systems and to start submitting risk management reports to the CSA from 30 June 2008. Each insurer must have a risk management committee reporting directly to the board. Statutory Returns Insurers are required to submit audited accounts for a financial year ending 31 December by 30 April of the following  year.  Insurance  company  accounts  must  be  presented  in  accordance  with  International Accounting  Standards  and  the  relevant  EU  directives.  The  CSA  also  requires  annual  risk  management reports,  six-monthly  financial  reports,  quarterly  reports  on  the  assets  covering  technical  reserves,  and monthly reports on outstanding loss reserves and liquidity. The CSA has approved a strategy for the progressive implementation of International Financial Reporting Standards over the period 2007 to 2010. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 31 © AXCO 2009
    • Supervision and Control Insolvency Regulation Law No 503/2004 on the Winding-up of Insurance Companies has given the CSA a wide range of powers for intervening in the affairs of financially deficient insurers. These include the limitation of premium income, the prohibition of writing or renewing certain classes of insurance, the prohibition of certain investments, an increase in capital and the implementation of a financial recovery plan. If these prove ineffective, the CSA can  apply  to  the  courts  for  the  appointment  of  a  special  administrator  who  can  assume  control  of  the company for the purpose of preventing its actual insolvency. Romania  is  unusual  in  having  a  policyholders'  protection  fund  (PPF)  which  applies  to  both  individual  and corporate  direct  insurance  policyholders.  The  fund  was  established  as  part  of  the  state  budget  under  the terms  of  Law No 32/2000  but  was  only  properly  constituted  when  it  was  taken  over  by  the  CSA  on  1 January  2003.  The  original  unitary  fund  was  divided  into  separate  life  and  non-life  funds  on  1  January 2005. As far as non-life insurance is concerned, the fund provides full compensation for claims against insolvent motor third party liability insurers. For other lines of business, the fund pays 50% of outstanding claims as at the date bankruptcy proceedings are initiated, reduced to 25% in the case of credit and guarantee and financial  loss.  Policyholders'  claims  against  insolvent  insurers  take  precedence  over  those  of  all  other creditors. The PPF is only liable for claims which cannot be met from the bankrupt insurer's assets and only comes into play once bankruptcy proceedings have been concluded. The PPF is funded by a levy of 0.8% of insurers' collected annual premiums. Consumer Dispute Resolution The  CSA  has  a  memorandum  of  understanding  with  the  National  Authority  for  Consumer  Protection, allowing  policyholders  to  take  their  complaints  to  either  body.  The  CSA  has  a  dedicated  complaints department  called  the  Front  Office  Directorate,  and  though  this  has  no  authority  to  make  binding  awards against  insurers,  its  recommendations  are  said  to  carry  considerable  weight  with  company  managers.  If recommendation fails, the complainant has no option but the courts. There is no insurance ombudsman as such The  Front  Office  Directorate  dealt  with  1,296  complaints  against  insurers  and  brokers  in  2007,  of  which over 50% were settled in favour of the complainant. Around 75% of complaints related to motor insurance. Fewer than 10% of complaints were in relation to life insurance. The insurers' association UNSAR has established an arbitration forum which charges lower fees than the courts. Although the forum is mainly intended to resolve subrogation disputes between insurers it can also deal with disputes with policyholders if the policy includes an arbitration clause. Non-Admitted Insurance Regulatory Position Definition. Non-admitted insurance  refers  to  the  placing  of  insurance  outside  the  regulatory  system  of the country where the risk is located. A policy may be issued abroad, or a risk may be included in a global master policy, by an insurer which is not authorised in that country. An authorised insurer is one which is permitted to do business in a country (or region) by the local supervisory authority. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 32 © AXCO 2009
    • Supervision and Control Summary Unauthorised insurers are not allowed to carry on insurance activity in Romania. At the same time, there is nothing in the law to indicate that insurance must be purchased from locally authorised insurers, with the exception  of  compulsory  motor  third  party  liability  (MTPL).  This  is  generally  interpreted  to  mean  that insurers  can  issue  most  types  of  policy  from  abroad  if  approached  by  an  insurance  buyer  or  an intermediary. Insurers  from  European  Economic  Area  member  states  (European  Union  countries  plus  Norway,  Iceland and Liechtenstein) may provide insurance in Romania under freedom of services legislation. Legislation The  legal  provisions  setting  out  the  requirement  for  insurers  to  be  authorised  are  contained  in  Law No 32/2000 on Insurance Companies and Insurance Supervision.  According  to  Article 11(1)  of  the  law,  quot; insurance business in Romania may be carried on only by Romanian legal entities established as joint stock companies or mutual associations which have received official authorisation from the Insurance Supervisory Commission (CSA) according to the procedures laid down in Article 12 of this law quot; (translation from the insurers' association website). Subsequent clauses allow insurance business also to be conducted locally by authorised branches and subsidiaries of foreign insurance companies. The law is silent on the freedom of buyers and intermediaries to purchase insurance outside the country. Freedom of Services in the European Economic Area (EEA) Under  freedom  of  services  legislation  an  insurer  with  its  head  office  in  another  EEA  member  state (European  Union  countries  plus  Norway,  Iceland  and  Liechtenstein)  may  provide  insurance  in  Romania without having an office there, provided it has given the necessary notification to the supervisory authority in  its  home  state.  Freedom  of  services  legislation,  which  is  part  of  the  creation  of  a  single  market  in insurance services, effectively extends the licensed or admitted market to the whole of the EEA region. In this context, non-admitted insurers are those which are only established outside the EEA. Insurers The compulsory class of motor third party liability may only be conducted by insurance companies which have been specifically authorised by the CSA. Local Risk Definition. The definition of a local risk is the country: • in  which  the  property  is  situated,  where  the  insurance  relates  to  either  buildings  or  buildings  and  their contents, in so far as the contents are covered by the same policy Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 33 © AXCO 2009
    • Supervision and Control • of registration, where the insurance relates to vehicles of any type • where the policyholder took out the policy in the case of policies with a maximum duration of four months covering travel or holiday risks, whatever the class of non-life insurance involved • where the policyholder, being a natural person, has his or her habitual residence • where  the  policyholder,  being  a  legal  person,  has  the  establishment  to  which  the  insurance  policy relates. Exchange Controls.  There  are  no  exchange  controls  which  might  inhibit  business  being  placed  with non-admitted insurers abroad. Tax. It is not certain whether insurance premiums paid to non-admitted insurers are tax deductible for the buyer. Insurer responsibilities.  Insurers  involved  in  non-admitted  placements  do  not  have  to  warn  buyers  that they are not subject to local supervision. Multinationals.  There  is  no  legislation  relating  specifically  to  multinational  insurance  programmes  or multinational  insurers  and  such  insurances  and  insurers  are  subject  to  the  same  rules  as  all  other insurances and insurers. DIC/DIL.  The  legislation  does  not  address  the  use  of  global  difference  in  conditions/difference  in  limits covers or excess layers above a primary local policy. Premium taxes.  There  are  no  insurance  premium  taxes  or  fire  service  levies  payable  by  insurers  or policyholders.  Domestic  insurance  companies  are  subject  to  a  number  of  levies  on  their  gross  premium income but these do not apply to non-admitted insurers abroad. Buyers There  is  nothing  in  the  legislation  to  prevent  insurance  buyers  from  placing  their  business  with non-admitted insurers abroad, either directly or through an intermediary. The only exception is compulsory MTPL, which must be placed with an authorised insurer. Although  permission  is  not  required  for  making  premium  payments  abroad,  it  is  not  certain  whether insurance  premiums  paid  to  non-admitted  insurers  are  tax  deductible  for  the  buyer.  It  is  also  uncertain whether  claims  payments  made  by  non-admitted  insurers  are  liable  to  corporation  tax  when  received  in Romania.  Despite  these  uncertainties,  however,  local  brokers  do  not  know  of  any  instances  where  tax problems have arisen. Intermediaries Insurance  intermediaries  such  as  brokers  and  agents  have  to  be  authorised  to  do  business  in  Romania. Intermediaries  domiciled  in  other  EEA  states  are  allowed  to  do  business  in  Romania  under  freedom  of services legislation, provided they have given the necessary notification to their home country supervisory authority.  The  insurance  law  prohibits  Romanian  insurers  from  accepting  business  from  unauthorised intermediaries. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 34 © AXCO 2009
    • Supervision and Control According  to  sources  at  the  CSA,  insurance  brokers  are  only  allowed  to  place  business  with  authorised insurers.  There  appears  to  be  no  legal  provision  to  this  effect,  however,  and  some  of  the  leading international  brokers  believe  that  they  are  free  to  place  Romanian  business  with  non-admitted  insurers outside the EEA. Market Practice Most  foreign-invested  risks  are  written  on  a  freedom  of  services  or  fronting  basis  in  compliance  with Romanian law. Fines/Penalties Any  insurance  company  or  intermediary  which  carries  on  business  in  Romania  without  authorisation  is liable to a fine of RON 20,000 to RON 100,000 (USD 7,194 to USD 35,971). Individuals found responsible face prison terms of between three months and three years. Fronting There are no statutory obstacles to fronting: there is no requirement for a minimum local market retention and no supervisory control over rating levels or wordings. Most policies for foreign-invested enterprises are written on a fronting basis, which is widely regarded as the  most  efficient  and  economical  way  of  providing  local  servicing.  A  small  number  of  foreign  investors have  taken  advantage  of  quot;freedom  of  servicesquot;  provisions  since  Romania  joined  the  EU,  but  loss  of business  to  freedom  of  services  insurers  has  been  more  than  offset  by  a  flood  of  new  investors  into  the country for whom fronting is the preferred solution. If business is placed abroad on a freedom of services basis, the Romanian branch of the international broker controlling the programme often provides the local servicing. There is no requirement for the premium to be paid locally, though clear accounting records must be  kept  to  ensure  that  the  local  subsidiary's  contribution  to  the  global  premium  can  be  claimed  against Romanian tax. The main fronting companies are Allianz Tiriac, Astra, Asirom, Generali, AIG Romania and Asiban. Asirom is the fronting partner for Royal & SunAlliance and Zurich and is a member of the International Network of Insurers  (INI).  Fronting  commission  ranges  from  5%  to  7.5%  and  is  sometimes  subject  to  a  minimum fronting fee. Company Registration and Operating Requirements Establishing A Local Company Applications for new insurance licences should be made to the Insurance Supervisory Commission (CSA). There  is  a  two-stage  authorisation  process,  the  first  stage  authorising  the  establishment  of  the  company and the second stage its actual operation. Licence applications should be accompanied by the following documents: • memorandum and articles of association Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 35 © AXCO 2009
    • Supervision and Control • business  plan,  including  classes  of  insurance,  maximum  retention  per  risk,  reinsurance  programme, financial projections and availability of financial resources for covering technical reserves, the guarantee fund and the solvency margin • details of directors and managers • details of IT systems • details of shareholders owning more than 10% of the equity. Types of Insurance Organisation Insurance  business  may  only  be  conducted  by  joint  stock  companies,  mutual  insurance  associations  or foreign  insurance  company  branches.  Shareholders  owning  more  than  10%  of  the  equity  of  a  joint  stock company  must  be  approved  by  the  CSA.  Insurance  companies  may  be  subsidiaries  of  banks,  other insurance  companies  or  financial  holding  companies.  Holding  company  structures  are  discouraged, however,  by  an  omission  from  Romania's  tax  legislation  which  makes  service  charges  payable  by  a subsidiary  to  a  holding  company  liable  to  value  added  tax.  Legislation  correcting  this  anomaly  is  not expected  before  2011  at  the  earliest.  Cross-shareholdings  between  insurance  companies  and  insurance brokers are prohibited. Foreign Ownership Foreign  insurers  are  allowed  to  acquire  any  percentage  of  a  domestic  company's  equity  or  to  establish wholly  owned  subsidiaries  or  branches.  Insurers  domiciled  in  other  EU  states  may  establish  Romanian branches on a quot;freedom of establishmentquot; basis. Branches  established  by  non-EU  foreign  insurers  must  have  assets  in  Romania  equal  to  at  least  50%  of their  guarantee  fund  and  make  a  security  deposit  with  a  Romanian  bank  equal  to  at  least  25%  of  their guarantee  fund.  Foreign  branches  must  also  appoint  a  general  representative  approved  by  the  CSA  and comply with the local solvency margin. Types of Licence Composite insurers which existed before 31 December 2005 have been allowed to continue in their present form, subject to the financial and managerial separation of their life and non-life businesses. New insurance companies, however, may only be authorised for life or non-life. Non-life  insurance  is  divided  into  18  classes  following  the  EU  model  and  insurers  must  be  separately authorised for each one. Stand-alone personal accident and health are primarily non-life classes but may also be written by appropriately authorised life insurers. Direct insurance companies are allowed to write inwards reinsurance without specific authorisation. Capital Requirements The  minimum  capital  requirement  is  the  solvency  margin.  Joint  stock  insurance  companies  and  non-EU foreign branches must maintain a guarantee fund equal to one-third of their solvency margin, subject to the following minimum amounts: Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 36 © AXCO 2009
    • Supervision and Control • EUR 3.2mn (USD 4.38mn) for insurers writing third party liability, credit and surety • EUR 2.2mn (USD 3.01mn) for insurers writing other lines. Eligible guarantee fund assets are defined in accordance with the EU Solvency I Directive. Solvency Margins An  order  of  the  CSA  dated  14  December  2004  introduced  the  EU  Solvency I Directive.  The  minimum solvency margin is the greater of the following calculations: • 18% of gross written or gross earned premiums in the previous financial year up to EUR 53.1mn (USD 72.74mn) and 16% of gross written or gross earned premiums above this figure, subject to a maximum reinsurance coefficient of 50%, or • 26% of the average of three years' gross incurred claims up to EUR 37.2mn (USD 50.96mn) and 23% of claims above this figure, subject to a maximum reinsurance coefficient of 50%. The amount of gross written or gross earned premiums for the purposes of the first calculation should be increased by 50% for aviation, marine and general liability business. EU Solvency II The European Commission, in co-operation with member states, has initiated the quot;Solvency II Projectquot; with a view to establishing a solvency system that better reflects the true risks of insurers, including asset and operational  risks  in  addition  to  insurance  risk.  In  July  2007  the  framework  directive  setting  out  basic principles  was  adopted  by  the  Commission  and  passed  to  the  Council  and  Parliament  for  their consideration. It covers life, non-life, reinsurance and insurance groups in a single directive. Solvency II is expected to be passed by the European Parliament in 2009 or 2010 and implemented in 2012. The  directive  adopts  a  three  pillar  structure,  with  Pillar  I  covering  quantitative  requirements  including  a consistent approach to the valuation of assets and liabilities and the calculation of solvency and minimum capital  requirements;  Pillar  II  covering  qualitative  requirements  including  management  responsibility  and the  effectiveness  of  supervisory  authorities;  and  Pillar  III  dealing  with  public  disclosure  by  insurance entities. The proposal represents a significant departure from past practice, being based on principles rather than the  prescribed  approach  of  Solvency  l  and  recognising  that  the  risk  profile  of  all  companies  is  unique  so that  companies  may  propose  their  own  internal  models  rather  than  adopting  the  model  indicated  in  the directive. The framework directive has already come under criticism concerning a potential lack of harmonisation on some  aspects,  the  new  methods  of  calculating  the  minimum  capital  requirement,  the  risk  factors  set  for non-life  business,  the  measurement  of  the  risk-management  capabilities  of  firms  and  the  supervision  of insurance  groups.  Nonetheless,  most  European  insurers  already  have  formal  programmes  in  place  to change their risk and capital management systems to conform to the Solvency II Directive. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 37 © AXCO 2009
    • Supervision and Control Reserve Requirements Non-life companies are required to establish the following technical reserves: • unearned premium reserve calculated on a monthly pro rata basis • loss reserve representing the expected final cost of settlement, including loss adjustment expenses • IBNR reserve calculated on a statistical basis • catastrophe  reserve  created  by  setting  aside  5%  of  gross  written  premiums  in  respect  of  catastrophe risks  until  the  reserve  reaches  either  the  level  of  the  company's  own  retention  or  10%  of  aggregate catastrophe-exposed sums insured, whichever is the greater • unexpired risk reserve in respect of estimated future losses exceeding the relevant unearned premium reserve • equalisation reserve created by setting aside premiums from any class in which the year's net loss ratio is under 50%. All relevant reserves may be established net of reinsurers' share. Discounting of claims reserves is allowed. Insurers  writing  hard  currency  business  must  establish  separate  unearned  premium  and  loss  reserves  in hard currency. Equalisation reserves are due to be discontinued in 2009. Ordinance No 14/2007,  which  came  into  effect  on  1  January  2008,  requires  MTPL  insurers  to  have minimum technical reserves for MTPL of 60% of their gross written MTPL premium income. A subsequent ordinance  has  laid  down  a  more  detailed  methodology  for  calculating  MTPL  reserves,  including  IBNR reserves. Alternative methodologies may still be used, provided they give rise to a higher level of reserves. Investment Regulations Investment regulations for technical reserves are as follows: Permitted investment Restrictions Government bonds, public authority No restriction bonds, bonds issued by international financial institutions, corporate bonds and other debt securities traded on regulated markets Shares traded on regulated markets Maximum 50%/5% any one issuer and collective investment funds Loans Maximum 5% for unsecured loans Bank deposits Maximum 25% any one bank/90% in all Real estate Maximum 40% Other tangible assets Maximum 10% Debts owed by policyholders, No restriction intermediaries and reinsurers Deferred acquisition costs No restriction Cash in hand Maximum 3% Unsecured loans Maximum 5% Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 38 © AXCO 2009
    • Supervision and Control   Reserves may be invested anywhere in the EU, though with the proviso that at least 80% of assets must be held in the same currency as liabilities. Non-liquid investments may not exceed 10% of total assets. Retentions The  only  statutory  restriction  on  retention  levels  applies  to  consumer  and  mortgage  credit  insurance. According to regulations published on 27 February 2004: • the maximum net retention for consumer credit business should not exceed the local currency equivalent of EUR 5,000 (USD 6,849) per debtor • the maximum net retention for mortgage credit business should not exceed the local currency equivalent of EUR 50,000 (USD 68,493) per debtor • the total net retention for credit business should not exceed 12 times net assets in the previous financial year • net written premiums for credit business should not exceed 25% of total net written non-life premiums. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 39 © AXCO 2009
    • Taxation Insurance Premium Or Policy Taxes There are no insurance premium taxes or fire service levies payable by insurers or policyholders. Domestic  insurance  companies  are  subject  to  a  number  of  levies  on  their  gross  premium  income  as detailed in the table below: Insurance class Description of tax % To be paid by All Insurance premium tax nil n/a All Supervisory levy 0.4 Insurer All non-life Policyholders' protection 0.8 Insurer Motor liability Street victims' protection 1.5 Insurer   The  policyholders'  protection  fund  and  supervisory  levies  do  not  apply  to  other  EU  insurers  writing Romanian business from abroad on a freedom of services basis. Legislative Update The  policyholders'  protection  fund  levy  for  non-life  insurance  was  reduced  from  1%  of  total  premiums  to 0.8% from 1 January 2007. The supervisory levy was increased to 0.5% of premiums from the same date. The  Street  Victims'  Protection  Fund  levy  was  reduced  from  2.5%  of  cashed  motor  third  party  liability premiums to 1.5% from 1 January 2008. Withholding Taxes on Premiums Paid Overseas There are no withholding taxes deducted from reinsurance premiums ceded abroad. Romanian  insurers  are  required  to  deduct  16%  withholding  tax  from  commissions  payable  on  overseas inwards reinsurance premiums and from fees charged by non-resident consultants such as surveyors, loss adjusters and brokers. Romania has double taxation treaties with around 70 countries which may reduce the applicable withholding tax rate. VAT Romania has a VAT system with a standard rate of 19%. There is no VAT on insurance premiums. Insurers are unable to recover VAT on material damage claims from non-VAT-registered policyholders or on legal defence costs incurred on behalf of policyholders regardless of their VAT status. Corporation Tax Insurance companies pay the standard rate of corporation tax. This was reduced from 25% to 16% on 1 January  2005.  With  the  exception  of  equalisation  reserves,  transfers  to  technical  reserves  are  tax deductible. Until  1  January  2005  the  only  premiums  which  Romanian  policyholders  could  deduct  from  their  taxable profits were for (1) group personal accident and (2) insurance related to assets owned, rented or leased by the policyholder. As a result of subsequent changes in the Fiscal Code, premiums for all types of non-life insurance may now be claimed against tax. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 40 © AXCO 2009
    • Taxation Captives There  are  thought  to  be  no  captives  or  alternative  risk  transfer  arrangements  in  Romania  and  no information is available about their likely tax treatment. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 41 © AXCO 2009
    • Legal System Summary and Trends Because  of  their  communist  inheritance,  most  Romanians  have  little  consciousness  of  their  legal  rights. This natural aversion to litigation is reinforced by the poor quality and high cost of the court system and the low level of awards which emerge at the end of the legal process. As a result of these factors, only 2.7% of motor third party liability (MTPL) claim payments in 2007 were for personal injury. As  in  other  former  communist  countries,  lawyers  are  beginning  to  work  on  a  no-win,  no-fee  basis,  while judges are becoming more sympathetic to claims for pain and suffering. Loss of future earnings claims are starting  to  be  compensated  in  full  and  to  reflect  the  recent  increase  in  wages  and  living  standards.  As  a result, serious injury awards have risen from around USD 6,000 in 2003 to around USD 50,000 in 2008. Basis of Legal System The Romanian legal system is based on a civil code. The code was modelled on the French civil code of 1804 and became effective on 1 December 1865. Although  the  civil  code  confers  a  general  right  to  sue  for  negligence,  communist-era  practices  which restricted this right have only recently been amended. The concept of medical malpractice, for example, did not exist until the 1998 Health InsuranceAct introduced a legal distinction between medical institutions and the  healthcare  professionals  who  work  for  them.  Other  professions  only  obtained  legal  status  when  the Acton the Organisation and Activities of Self-employed Professionals  was  passed  in  June  1999.  Product liability  was  not  specifically  recognised  as  a  legal  concept  until  a  Product LiabilityAct  importing  the  EU Product Liability Directive  was  passed  in  2000.  Employees'  rights  to  sue  for  occupational  accident  and disease were only made explicit when a new Labour Code came into effect in 2003, and their right to sue for non-economic losses when the Labour Code was amended in 2007. Following  the  French  model,  the  Romanian  civil  code  imposes  a  strict  liability  on  tenants  for  damage  to their  landlord's  property  and  on  property  owners  for  damage  caused  by  spread  of  fire.  Punitive  damages are not available. The statute of limitations allows a maximum of two years from the date of the loss for making an insurance claim and three years from the date when the tortfeasor could be identified for bringing a civil action. When this report was being prepared, liability for motor accidents could be decided only by the police or the courts. For third party property damage, the police report is final unless legally challenged within 15 days. Liability for bodily injury claims can only be decided by the courts: by a civil court if the injury requires fewer than  10  days'  medical  care;  by  a  criminal  court  if  the  injury  is  fatal  or  necessitates  more  than  10  days' medical care. Although the law was changed in 2007 to allow motor accidents which do not involve bodily injury  to  be  notified  to  insurers  by  means  of  an  quot;amicable  reportquot;  rather  than  a  police  report,  the  new system of claim reporting will not be implemented before 2009 because of opposition from insurers. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 42 © AXCO 2009
    • Legal System Litigiousness As  a  result  of  their  communist  inheritance,  most  Romanians  have  little  concept  of  their  legal  rights. Litigation is therefore rare even in the context of a motor accident. The scale of the Romanian aversion to litigation can be judged from the fact that only 2.7% of MTPL claims payments in 2007 were for bodily injury rather than property damage. Access to the Courts Access to the courts is impeded by Law No 146/1997, which imposes a scale of court taxes ranging up to 10%  of  the  damages  sought.  The  tax,  which  applies  to  all  civil  actions  except  labour  disputes  and non-economic  loss  claims  by  employees,  must  be  paid  in  advance  and  therefore  acts  as  a  major disincentive  to  the  private  plaintiff.  The  tax  does  not  apply,  however,  to  claims  decided  by  the  criminal courts, which have jurisdiction over motor accidents involving death and serious injury. Although lawyers normally require a substantial advance payment, it is becoming increasingly common to work on a contingency fee basis. Total lawyers' fees are limited to 10% of the damages awarded. Court Procedure There are four levels of courts. Small claims are heard before local courts, which operate in each sector of Bucharest  and  in  each  county  and  district  outside  the  capital.  Larger  claims  are  heard  by  tribunals  of justice.  There  are  15  appellate  courts  which  hear  the  largest  civil  and  commercial  cases  and  which  also hear appeals from the tribunals of justice. The highest court is the supreme court. Because liability for the most serious accidents can only be decided by the criminal courts, it can take two or three years before claims are referred to insurers. Although most claims can still be settled out of court, an increasing number of claimants are now legally represented. The EU has expressed official reservations about the qualifications, experience and political impartiality of the judiciary. Because of the generally low level of judicial competence, judgements can bear little relation to the facts of the case, which acts as a further disincentive for victims to seek justice through the courts. Assessment of Compensation The  National  Health  Insurance  Institute  is  allowed  to  recover  accident  treatment  costs  from  a  negligent driver's  MTPL  insurers.  There  are  no  recovery  rights,  however,  in  respect  of  disability  or  survivorship pensions  paid  by  the  National  Institute  for  Pensions  and  Other  Social  Security  Benefits.  Loss  of  future earnings  claims  are  therefore  based  on  the  difference  between  pre-accident  earnings  and  social  security benefits. Until  recently,  damages  were  generally  limited  to  medical  expenses  and  other  material  losses  directly attributable to the plaintiff's injury. Awards for pain and suffering were rare and were only made in cases of severe injury resulting from extreme recklessness - for example, if the defendant was drunk or attempting to evade arrest. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 43 © AXCO 2009
    • Legal System Over  the  last  two  years  personal  injury  awards  have  grown  significantly.  This  is  partly  because  more claimants  are  legally  represented  and  therefore  demanding  proper  compensation  for  their  loss  of  future income, which is itself being driven up by recent increases in wages and living standards (in July 2008, for example, average net wages grew by an astounding 26% on a year-on-year basis). Because of increasing judicial indulgence, awards for pain and suffering are also becoming larger and more frequent. In 2003 it was rare for personal injury claims to reach the then-MTPL limit of RON 20,000 (USD 6,024): in 2008 large claims  were  reaching  EUR  30,000  to  EUR  40,000  (USD  41,096  to  USD  54,795),  while  the  largest  had reached  EUR  100,000  (USD  136,986).  Pain  and  suffering  is  still  a  relatively  small  component  of  total awards - an average of EUR 3,000 to EUR 5,000 (USD 4,110 to USD 6,849) - but is growing fast enough for  the  motor  insurers'  bureau  BAAR  to  have  started  collecting  award  data  from  its  members  in  order  to encourage judicial consistency over the quantum of damages. If their suit is successful, a plaintiff's legal costs, including the 10% advance court tax, may be recovered from the losing side. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 44 © AXCO 2009
    • Insurance Market Overview Historical Development History 1866 Romania's  first  insurance  company,  Transilvania,  was  founded.  Between  then  and  World War 2 a diverse market evolved comprising both Romanian and foreign companies. 1947 All insurance companies were nationalised after the communists came to power and were replaced  by  a  central  insurance  organisation  with  Soviet  participation  called  Sovrom Asigurare. 1952 Sovrom  Asigurare  was  replaced  by  a  wholly  Romanian  state  insurance  monopoly  called Administratia Asigurarilor de Stat, or ADAS for short. ADAS's  main  function  was  to  write  the  domestic  compulsory  classes.  These  were  motor third  party  liability,  personal  accident  for  passengers  in  public  transport  undertakings,  fire and  earthquake  insurance  on  privately  owned  houses  and  insurance  of  privately  owned livestock.  State  property,  which  comprised  the  entire  industrial  base  plus  most  of  the country's  housing  stock,  was  not  insured,  any  losses  being  made  good  from  a  dedicated government  fund.  Premium  rates  were  set  by  government  decree,  and  ADAS  appears  to have acted as little more than another tax collector. A  sub-section  of  ADAS  dealt  with  hard  currency  and  Romanian  international  business, principally marine and aviation. 1980 ADAS set up an underwriting agency in London called Cullum Underwriting Agencies Ltd which  accepted  mainly  North  American  casualty  business  such  as  asbestosis  and pollution. The operation was put into run-off in 1985 when the extent of its liabilities began to  emerge,  but  Astra,  one  of  the  successor  companies  to  ADAS,  was  still  paying  Cullum claims 25 years later, mainly by commutation. 1991 Following the fall of the Ceaucescu regime the new government passed a number of laws which  dissolved  the  ADAS  monopoly  and  allowed  the  formation  of  private  insurance companies and intermediaries. Law No 47/1991 dealt with the approval, organisation and operation of insurance companies, whilst Government Decision No547 dated August 1991 established the Supervisory Office of Insurance and Reinsurance Activities (SOIRA). A further piece of legislation, Government Decision No 1279 effective 1 January 1991, split ADAS  into  three  state-owned  joint  stock  companies.  The  largest  was  Asirom  (Asigurarea Romaneasca),  which  inherited  all  ADAS  assets  and  liabilities  relating  to  life  and  other domestic insurances, including the compulsory classes. The much smaller Astra inherited all  assets  and  liabilities  relating  to  international  insurance  and  reinsurance  activities.  The third  company,  Carom,  became  the  Romanian  claims  settling  agency  for  international motor business. 1996 The four compulsory classes, and Asirom's monopoly of them, remained in force until Law No 136 became effective on 1 February. 1999 Asirom was privatised. 2000 The Law on Insurance Companies and Insurance Supervision was passed. 2001 The  Insurance  Supervisory  Commission  commenced  operations  on  2  July.  All  insurance companies  were  obliged  to  seek  re-authorisation  under  the  terms  of  the  new  insurance law, resulting in a fall in company numbers from 73 to 46. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 45 © AXCO 2009
    • Insurance Market Overview 2002 Astra was privatised. 2005 The Vienna Insurance Group (VIG) acquired Omniasig.Romania suffered four incidents of catastrophic flooding which caused 69 deaths and economic losses of around RON 5.5bn (USD  1.89bn).  The  government  proposed  the  introduction  of  mandatory  earthquake  and flood insurance for householders. 2006 UNIQA bought a minority shareholding in Astra. 2007 Romania joined the EU on 1 January.The motor third party liability tariff was abolished.The VIG acquired Asirom. The Czech PPF Group acquired Ardaf and RAI. 2008 The  VIG  acquired  BCR  but  sold  Unita  to  UNIQA.Groupama  acquired  OTP  Garancia,  BT and Asiban.Generali, Ardaf and RAI in Romania all became part of Generali PPF Holding. The Market Today Summary and Trends Romania's  membership  of  the  EU  on  1  January  2007  has  had  two  damaging  effects  on  the  insurance market.  One  was  the  abolition  of  the  motor  third  party  liability  (MTPL)  tariff  before  most  insurance companies were experienced or disciplined enough to operate in a completely free rating environment. The other was a desperate scramble by foreign insurers to buy market share in a country which is regarded as having significant growth potential for the future (not only is Romania the second most populous country in central and east Europe, but before the credit crisis engulfed the Balkans in October 2008, long-term real GDP  growth  was  forecast  at  5%  per  annum  and  long-term  real  premium  growth  at  10%  to  15%  per annum).  Since  acquisition  prices  for  Romanian  insurance  assets  were  related  to  gross  written  premiums rather than profits, it was natural for some insurance companies to use discounted premiums as a way of temporarily  boosting  their  market  share  in  order  to  inflate  their  sale  price.  Because  MTPL  is  the  most price-sensitive  mass  market  insurance  line,  this  was  where  the  premium  discounting  was  most  acute, despite  the  fact  that  loss  frequency  and  severity  were  increasing  rapidly.  The  net  result  of  this  clash  of interests was an underwriting loss for the market as a whole of RON 323.91mn (USD 132.86) in the first year of EU membership. The  profitability  of  the  market  is  expected  to  improve  in  2008-09,  partly  because  the  recent  acquisition spree  has  now  run  its  course,  and  partly  because  the  new  foreign  owners  will  soon  be  in  a  position  to rationalise  their  newly-created  insurance  groups.  New  reserving  standards  and  rising  indemnity  limits  are expected to provide an excuse to increase MTPL premium levels, while the wider imposition of a EUR 100 (USD  137)  accidental  damage  excess  and  new  methods  of  controlling  the  costs  of  crash  repairs  should help to stabilise the motor casco account. Loss ratios on consumer credit policies will rise in the short to medium  term  as  the  credit  crisis  bites,  but  most  insurers  had  the  sense  to  stop  writing  new  business  in 2008. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 46 © AXCO 2009
    • Insurance Market Overview The  most  positive  market  development  is  the  introduction  of  a  mandatory  natural  catastrophe  scheme  in mid-2009 to cover residential properties against the perils of earthquake, landslide and flood. Buildings of standard  construction  will  be  insured  for  EUR  20,000  (USD  27,400)  for  an  annual  premium  of  EUR  20 (USD  27);  buildings  of  non-standard  construction  for  a  sum  insured  of  EUR  10,000  (USD  13,700)  for  a premium  of  EUR  10  (USD  14).  The  scheme  will  be  underwritten  by  a  special  purpose  joint  stock (re)insurance  company  called  the  Insurance  Disaster  Pool  (abbreviated  to  PAID)  in  which  participating insurance companies will be shareholders. PAID will act as 100% reinsurer of its shareholders' obligatory household underwriting and will purchase retrocession coverage in the international market. As a result of defects in the design of the scheme, not all insurance companies are expected to participate in PAID. Those that do participate will see the mandatory cover as an opportunity not only to educate the public  about  insurance  but  also  to  cross-sell  top-up  household  cover  and  other  personal  lines.  Public opinion seems also to be divided about the merits of being forced to insure, though the publicity given to recent disasters such as the Sichuan earthquake in China is said to have had a persuasive effect. Market Size The total market size in 2007 was broken down as follows: Life Non-Life Personal Accident & Total Market Health Premium in RON (mn) 1,432.0 5,590.3 153.6 7,175.9 Premium in USD (mn) 587.4 2,293.0 63.0 2,943.4 % of total market 20.0 77.9 2.1 100.0 Source: Comisia de Supraveghere a Asigurarilor - CSA (Insurance Supervisor) In 2007 Romania was the 39th largest non-life market in the world. The table below shows the size of the Romanian  non-life  market  in  2006  (latest  available  year  for  all  countries)  in  relation  to  some  of  its  east European neighbours. Country Premium (USD mn) Serbia 510.6 Bulgaria 661.4 Romania 1,634.4 Hungary 1,928.8 Ukraine 2,649.3 Poland 5,174.7 Source: Axco The following table compares the annual growth rates of non-life premium income in local currency with the nominal GDP growth and inflation rates over the last five years. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 47 © AXCO 2009
    • Insurance Market Overview 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2003 to 2007 Premium growth 49.7 36.9 33.9 35.9 24.7 210.6 (%) Nominal GDP 30.4 24.8 16.9 18.9 19.9 102.2 growth (%) Inflation rate (%) 15.3 11.9 9.0 6.6 4.8 n/a Source: Axco The non-life market has shown exceptionally strong growth over the last five years, though some of this is attributable  to  its  low  starting  point  and  Romania's  persistently  high  inflation  rate.  Positive  influences include: • an increase in foreign investment, particularly in privatisation assets which were not previously insured • an increase in bank lending for property development and domestic mortgages • an increase in the availability of lease finance for motor cars and industrial equipment • progressive  increases  in  motor  third  party  liability  premiums  to  cover  increases  in  statutory  indemnity limits • foreign  investors  insisting  that  Romanian  service  suppliers  carry  EU  levels  of  third  party  liability  and professional indemnity insurance. According to preliminary figures for the first half of 2008, non-life premiums grew by 15.1% year-on-year to RON 1.96bn (USD 705.04mn). The  following  graphic  shows  the  comparative  sizes  of  the  life,  non-life  and  PA  and  health  markets  in  US dollar  terms  over  the  period  from  2003  to  2007.  Stand-alone  personal  accident  and  health  are  non-life classes. The  following  graphic  shows  the  breakdown  of  non-life  premium  income  in  2007  between  the  major business lines: Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 48 © AXCO 2009
    • Insurance Market Overview Market Penetration Market  premium  as  a  percentage  of  GDP  and  expenditure  on  a  per  capita  basis  expressed  in  USD  are shown below for the year 2007; comparisons are made with Bulgaria and Hungary to show where Romania stands in the spectrum from the less progressive to the more forward thinking east European countries. Life including riders Non-life (P&C) Personal Accident & Total Healthcare† % per capita % per capita % per capita % per capita Romania 0.35 27.40 1.36 106.96 0.04 2.94 1.75 137.30 Bulgaria 0.39 20.06 2.19 113.32 0.16 8.20 2.74 141.58 Hungary 2.01 279.45 1.58 218.54 0.08 11.01 3.67 509.00 Note: † PA & Healthcare data represents PA & Healthcare business other than life riders, whether written by life, non-life or specialist healthcare insurers. Details of the split of such business (where available) are included in Appendix 1. Source: Axco The main factors holding back the development of the Romanian market are summarised below. • Industrial assets were not insured under communism. Even today, state-owned enterprise managers will only buy insurance to the extent that it is required for a bank loan. • With  the  exception  of  motor  casco,  there  is  no  tradition  of  voluntary  personal  insurance  in  Romania. Most  Romanians'  experience  of  insurance  is  limited  to  the  compulsory  classes  of  the  communist  era, and most people still see insurance as a form of taxation rather than a service. Voluntary insurance is further  discouraged  by  low  income  levels.  As  a  result,  in  2007  only  29.6%  of  market  premiums  were written for private individuals and 70.4% for companies. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 49 © AXCO 2009
    • Insurance Market Overview • As a further legacy of communism, legal awareness is extremely undeveloped. There is therefore little third  party  liability  insurance  outside  the  compulsory  classes  and  policies  are  priced  to  reflect  the  low level of court awards. Despite  these  historical  impediments,  brokers  are  finding  it  easier  to  sell  insurance  to  small  to medium-sized enterprises, though it remains the case that companies buy aspects of insurance (such as leased plant and car insurance and employee benefits) rather than comprehensive insurance programmes. Market Participants Summary and Trends At  the  time  this  report  was  being  prepared  the  Romanian  insurance  market  comprised  42  companies,  of which 21 were non-life, nine were life and 12 were composite. As  in  other  east  European  countries,  Romania's  ex-state  insurance  companies  have  had  their  market shares severely eroded by competition. Asirom's market share has fallen from 47.0% to 9.3% since it lost its monopoly of motor third party liability business in 1997, while Astra was forced to turn itself into a motor insurer  after  losing  its  monopoly  of  marine  and  aviation  business.  The  main  gainers  have  been  Allianz Tiriac  and  Omniasig,  both  of  which  have  aggressively  pursued  market  share  since  being  taken  over  by foreign interests. Other fast-growing insurers are bancassurers such as Asiban, BCR and BT, which have benefited from the increase in their parent banks' loan portfolios. The structure of the Romanian market has been transformed over the last two years by the group-building acquisitions of the Vienna Insurance Group (VIG), Generali PPF Holdings, UNIQA and Groupama, which have brought together 12 companies with an aggregate market share of 68.0%. Many of these companies have  been  bought  from  banks,  which  have  largely  withdrawn  from  equity  participation  in  the  Romanian insurance  market.  The  only  significant  company  which  is  not  foreign-controlled  is  Astra,  but  even  this  is 27% owned by UNIQA and is expected to be taken over completely in 2009. Privatisation/Deregulation The two state-owned companies which were created out of the ADAS monopoly in 1991, Asirom and Astra, have both been privatised. Asirom was privatised in 1999 and Astra in 2002. The market has been wholly deregulated in accordance with EU free market principles. State Insurance Companies The only state-owned company active in the insurance field is the export credit insurer Eximbank, although this  is  now  subject  to  a  special  law  (Law No 96/2000)  and  is  no  longer  registered  as  an  insurance company. Market Structure At  the  time  this  report  was  being  prepared  the  Romanian  insurance  market  comprised  42  companies,  of which 21 were non-life, nine were life and 12 were composite. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 50 © AXCO 2009
    • Insurance Market Overview The structure of the Romanian non-life market has been completely transformed over the last two years by the group-building acquisitions of the Vienna Insurance Group (VIG), Generali PPF Holdings, UNIQA and Groupama.  Once  fully  assembled  these  four  groups  will  have  an  aggregate  market  share  (based  on  the 2007 market shares of their component companies) of 68.0%. The composition of the new groups is shown in the tables below. Vienna Insurance Group Company 2007 market share % Omniasig 15.4 BCR 9.8 Asirom 9.4 Group total 34.6   The VIG is pursuing a quot;multi-brandquot; strategy in Romania, which means that Omniasig, BCR and Asirom will maintain  their  separate  identities  and,  indeed,  continue  to  compete  against  each  other.  Omniasig's  main focus  will  be  corporate  accounts  (though  it  will  continue  to  write  some  personal  lines  for  the  sake  of portfolio balance), while Asirom, which has the higher brand recognition and the larger retail network, will focus  on  personal  lines.  BCR  will  focus  on  bancassurance  under  the  terms  of  a  15-year  co-operation agreement signed between the VIG and Banca Comerciala Romana. The group is expected to seek cost savings by combining back office functions such as IT, claims handling and reinsurance. Generali PPF Group Company 2007 market share % Generali 5.6 Ardaf 2.8 RAI 0.4 Group total 5.8   Generali,  Ardaf  and  RAI  are  an  accidental  combination  which  arose  from  the  fact  that  PPF  Investments began making its own acquisitions in Romania before combining with Generali in Generali PPF Holdings. It was uncertain at the time this report was being prepared whether the three Generali PPF companies would maintain separate identities or be merged. The agricultural specialist FATA is owned directly by Generali and is not part of the Generali PPF Group. Groupama Group Company 2007 market share % Asiban 7.8 BT 4.6 OTP 0.3 Group total 12.7 Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 51 © AXCO 2009
    • Insurance Market Overview   Groupama  has  announced  its  intention  of  merging  its  three  acquisitions  under  the  single  brand  of Groupama Asigurari by the end of 2009. All three companies were originally established as bancassurers, though Asiban also writes a lot of broker-controlled commercial lines. UNIQA Group Company 2007 market share % Unita 8.3 Astra (27% owned) 6.4 Agras 0.2 Group total 14.9   UNIQA's  entry  into  the  Romanian  market  began  in  2006  when  it  bought  27%  of  Astra  and  agreed  with majority  shareholder  Nova  Trade  that  the  company  should  be  run  as  a  joint  venture  until  2008,  when UNIQA  would  increase  its  shareholding  to  51%.  This  timetable  has  been  delayed,  however,  by  the unexpected  opportunity  to  acquire  Unita  and  Agras  from  the  VIG,  which  has  taken  priority  over  the increased  shareholding  in  Astra.  Once  the  Unita  and  Agras  acquisitions  have  been  completed,  however, UNIQA is expected to assume control of Astra (though under re-negotiated terms) and to merge all three companies under the UNIQA brand. For now, Astra has not formally adopted the UNIQA name though it trades under the UNIQA logo. Aside from the four insurance groups, most other companies are also foreign-owned: Insurer Majority owner Allianz Tiriac Allianz New Europe Holding AIG Romania AIG Central Europe Asito Kapital Norcross Insurance Co Ltd ATE Agrotiki Insurance (Greece) CLAL Romania CLAL Insurance (Israel) EFG Eurolife General EFG Eurobank (Greece) Euroins Romania Eurohold (Bulgaria) Garanta Ethniki Hellenic General Insurance Co (Greece) Interamerican Romania Eureko BV   Banks  used  to  form  an  important  category  of  shareholder  but  most  of  their  insurance  subsidiaries  have been acquired by the new groups: Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 52 © AXCO 2009
    • Insurance Market Overview Insurer Ownership Asiban Used to have four bank shareholders with 25% of the equity each. Now owned by Groupama. BT Used to be owned by Banca Transilvania. Now owned by Groupama. OTP Garancia Used to be owned by OTP Bank Romania. Now owned by Groupama. BCR Used to be owned by Banca Comerciala Romana. Now owned by Vienna Insurance Group.   Remaining  bank-owned  insurers  include  Garanta  (part  of  the  National  Bank  of  Greece  Group),  Delta (Romexterra Bank) and EFG Eurolife General (EFG Eurobank). There are no quoted insurers left in Romania. The few remaining independent insurers are owned by local business groups or expatriate Romanians. The  following  graphic  ranks  the  top  10  insurance  companies  on  the  basis  of  their  2007  non-life  premium income converted into US dollars: Market Concentration The following table shows the market shares of the top one, five and 10 companies over the period from 2003 to 2007 (%): Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 53 © AXCO 2009
    • Insurance Market Overview Year 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Top insurer 25.1 25.7 23.7 22.4 19.7 Top five insurers 66.7 65.8 65.4 62.6 62.7 Top 10 insurers 87.4 87.5 89.8 89.0 89.7 Source: CSA Market  concentration  has  remained  fairly  stable  over  the  last  five  years,  mainly  because  of  the  limited number  of  companies  which  have  the  financial  or  logistical  resources  to  write  motor  business,  which accounts  for  over  70%  of  market  premiums.  There  is  also  a  tendency  for  foreign-invested  property business to be limited to a small number of top insurers. The largest insurer, Allianz Tiriac, has suffered a recent loss of market share, mainly because of its attempt to impose a compulsory accidental damage excess on its motor casco policies. The main beneficiaries of Allianz's distress have been Omniasig and Unita, which have aggressively expanded their motor portfolios. The ex-state insurers Asirom and Astra have suffered long-term erosion of their market shares, some of it resulting from their attempts to purge poor-quality business from their inherited portfolios. Bancassurers such as BCR, Asiban and BT have benefited from the increase in their parent banks' loan portfolios. The high market shares of the top 10 insurers mean that the bottom 23 companies have only 10.3% of the market between them. Whilst some of the smaller companies can justify their existence as quasi-captives, the majority must be grossly uneconomic and are expected to disappear as EU solvency and corporate governance standards are enforced. Company Changes • Porsche Asigurari, a subsidiary of the Porsche Financial Group, has been authorised. The new insurer will initially write motor casco schemes for Porsche Leasing and Porsche Mobility. • Life insurer Grawe Romania is planning to acquire ASITO Kapital Insurance. • The Vienna Insurance Group (VIG) has sold 100% of Unita to UNIQA. The sale includes the assets and licence of Unita's 93%-owned subsidiary Agras, which has transferred its portfolio to Omniasig. • Groupama  has  bought  Asiban.  It  has  also  become  the  owner  of  OTP  Garancia  Asigurari  following  its acquisition of the parent company OTP Garancia in Hungary. These acquisitions give Groupama three licences  in  Romania:  BT  Asigurari,  Asiban  and  OTP  Garancia.  Groupama  plans  to  unite  the  three licences under the single brand of Groupama Asigurari by the end of 2009. • The  VIG  has  bought  Erste  Bank's  insurance  operations  in  central  and  east  Europe.  In  Romania,  this gives it ownership of BCR Insurance, to add to its existing investments in Asirom and Omniasig. Erste Bank's Romanian banking subsidiary BCR is party to a 15-year co-operation agreement between Erste Bank and the VIG. • PPF  Investments  has  sold  72.7%  of  Ardaf  and  99.9%  of  RAI  to  Generali  PPF  Holding  for  EUR  78mn (USD 106.85mn). • Coface, AIG Europe, Euler Hermes and QBE Insurance (Europe) have established Romanian branches on a freedom of services basis. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 54 © AXCO 2009
    • Insurance Market Overview • The  VIG  has  increased  its  shareholding  in  Asirom  to  99.8%.  The  company  has  changed  its  name  to Asirom Vienna Insurance Group. • Greek  financial  group  EFG  Eurobank,  the  majority  owner  of  Bancpost,  has  established  EFG  Eurolife General Insurance Co Ltd. • Groupama has bought 90% of BT Asigurari and entered into a bancassurance partnership with BT's old owner Banca Transilvania. • Bulgarian investor Eurohold has bought 70% of Asitrans and changed the company's name to Euroins Romania. • Ardaf  emerged  from  receivership  by  raising  EUR  30mn  (USD  41.10mn)  in  fresh  capital.  The  company was subsequently bought by PPF Investments, part of the Czech PPF Group which has a joint venture holding company with Generali for the two companies' central and east European insurance assets. The PPF Group also bought all the shares in RAI Asigurari. • MKB Romexterra Bank has bought 35% of Delta. • Garanta Asigurari has taken over NBG Asigurari. • ABG Insurance has changed its name to ATE Insurance Romania. • Credit Europe Asigurari has been licensed. This is part of Credit Europe Group NV from Holland. Total Assets The Insurance Supervisory Commission (CSA) no longer publishes separate figures for the net assets of life and non-life insurers. Technical Reserves In  2007  gross  non-life  technical  reserves  amounted  to  RON  4.59bn  (USD  1.88bn).  The  following  table shows  the  development  of  technical  reserves  over  the  period  2003  to  2007  in  RON  millions  and  as  a percentage of gross premiums: 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 RON bn 1,222.0 1,682.2 2,305.6 3,129.8 4,591.3 As % of gross 66.3 66.7 68.2 68.2 80.2 premiums Source: CSA In 2007 gross technical reserves were allocated as follows: Type of reserve Percent of total reserves Unearned premium 57.8 Claims reserve 30.5 IBNR reserve 7.2 Catastrophe reserve 3.9 Equalisation reserve 0.5 Unexpired risk reserve 0.1 Total 100.0 Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 55 © AXCO 2009
    • Insurance Market Overview Source: CSA The comparatively low level of reserves, particularly of claims reserves, is a reflection of low loss ratios and the small amounts awarded for third party bodily injury claims. Expense Ratios The following table shows the development of acquisition costs and administrative expenses expressed as a percentage of gross premiums over the period 2003 to 2007: Expenses as % of 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 premium income Acquisition costs 8.8 10.9 13.2 15.2 17.1 Administrative 18.0 21.5 17.8 15.7 13.2 expenses Total 26.8 32.4 31.0 30.9 30.3 Source: CSA Profitability Because of the number of composites in the market the CSA only publishes technical results for non-life insurance. The following table shows technical results in RON millions over the period 2003 to 2007: Technical result 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 RON mn 81.53 44.65 (52.54) (169.33) (323.91) USD mn 24.56 13.68 (18.03) (60.28) (132.86) Source: CSA The decline in profitability in 2004 and 2005 was the result of mounting losses in a relatively small number of companies. Companies which made a loss equivalent to more than 5% of their gross premium income included  Asiban  (5.9%),  Generali  (8.0%),  Astra  (11.2%),  Unita  (10.9%)  and  Interamerican  (20.3%).  The CSA  attributes  these  losses  to  a  variety  of  causes,  including  inadequate  premium  levels,  excessive  staff costs and investments in new premises. A number of companies sacrificed profit for market share in 2006 and 2007 in order to maximise the price for which they could be sold to a foreign bidder (Asiban, for example, achieved a sale price of EUR 2 for every EUR 1 of gross written premium). The fact that some companies were deliberately under-pricing their motor portfolios forced the rest of the market to hold back from the premium increases which were desperately necessary to counteract the deteriorating claims experience. This largely explains the huge losses made on the technical account in 2006 and 2007. Now that virtually every company that can be sold has been sold, however, insurers and their new owners are expected to re-focus on making a profit. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 56 © AXCO 2009
    • Insurance Market Overview Retentions In  2007  insurers  retained  an  average  of  70.6%  of  their  gross  written  premiums.  The  retention  ratio  is relatively high for an emerging market because of the increasing number of companies which reinsure their property  accounts  on  a  non-proportional  basis.  Two  of  the  earliest  companies  to  transfer  to non-proportional arrangements were Omniasig and Asirom, which had retention ratios of 92.7% and 89.9% respectively in 2007. Most insurers have stable per risk property retentions of between EUR 250,000 and EUR  300,000  (USD  342,466-USD  410,959).  Most  catastrophe  retentions  are  under  EUR  500,000  (USD 684,932), though one insurer retains more than EUR 1mn (USD 1.37mn). The retention ratio is expected to rise in 2009 as more insurers are integrated into group programmes and as the consumer credit market, with its low retention ratio, goes into run-off. Pools The only pool is the nuclear pool, further details of which are given in the Energy section of this report. Insurance Association The  insurance  association  for  both  life  and  non-life  companies  is  the  National  Union  of  Insurance  and Reinsurance Companies of Romania (UNSAR), which was established in June 1994. The association has 25  members  which  account  for  over  80%  of  market  premiums.  A  number  of  insurers  refuse  to  join  the association, apparently out of reluctance to contribute to its insurance education activities. UNSAR acts as a professional standards body with a binding code of conduct as well as a technical forum and industry lobby. The association funds an insurance institute for education and training. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 57 © AXCO 2009
    • Reinsurance Local Reinsurance Market Summary and Trends There  are  no  professional  reinsurance  companies  in  Romania,  though  direct  insurers  have  always  been allowed  to  write  inwards  reinsurance  without  specific  authorisation.  A  number  of  insurers  used  to  write treaty  and  facultative  business  for  local  companies  which  were  too  small  to  be  of  interest  to  the international market. The only company which still does so is Omniasig. Astra writes some Turkish marine hull  and  P&I  risks  on  a  facultative  basis.  Total  inwards  premiums  in  2007  were  RON  27.57mn  (USD 11.31mn), down from RON 78.35mn (USD 27.89mn) in 2006. Local Reinsurance Company Operating Requirements There  is  no  statutory  distinction  between  insurance  and  reinsurance  business.  Direct  insurers  may therefore write inwards reinsurance without specific authorisation or increased capital. State Reinsurance Company There is no state reinsurance company. Local Reinsurance Companies There are no professional reinsurance companies in Romania. Reinsurance Written by Direct Companies The  only  company  which  is  still  believed  to  be  active  in  the  local  reinsurance  market  is  Omniasig,  which writes some property treaty and facultative business for small insurers. International Reinsurance (Inwards) The  only  company  which  is  thought  to  write  international  inwards  business  is  Astra.  This  writes  some Turkish marine hull and P&I risks on a facultative basis through brokers. Company Changes There have been no recent company changes. Local Reinsurance Arrangements Summary and Trends In  2007  insurers  retained  an  average  of  70.6%  of  their  gross  written  premiums.  The  retention  ratio  is relatively high for an emerging market because of the increasing number of companies which reinsure their property  accounts  on  a  non-proportional  basis.  Despite  this  move  from  proportional  to  non-proportional arrangements,  the  volume  of  ceded  premiums  increased  from  USD  185.2mn  to  USD  690.1mn  between 2003  and  2007,  largely  because  of  the  stricter  regulatory  requirements  of  the  Insurance  Supervisory Commission (CSA). Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 58 © AXCO 2009
    • Reinsurance The  growth  of  the  reinsurance  market  is  now  being  counteracted,  however,  by  the  increasing  number  of cedants  which  are  being  absorbed  into  international  group  programmes.  All  Allianz  companies  in  central and east Europe, for example, now participate in the group quot;super catquot; and quot;super surplusquot; programmes. Members of the Vienna Insurance Group participate in common catastrophe and green card excess of loss programmes and will soon be required to offer right of first refusal on other reinsurance lines to the group reinsurer VIG Re in Prague. Subsidiaries of Generali PPF Holdings will be required to cede to the group reinsurer GP Re in Sofia. Groupama, which has recently absorbed three insurance companies in Romania, is also believed to have group reinsurance facilities. The  most  exciting  development  in  the  reinsurance  market  is  new  legislation  establishing  a  mandatory catastrophe  scheme  for  residential  properties  covering  the  perils  of  earthquake,  landslide  and  flood.  The scheme will be underwritten by a special purpose joint stock (re)insurance company called the Insurance Disaster  Pool  which  will  act  as  a  conduit  to  the  international  retrocession  market.  Preliminary  estimates suggest  that  the  pool  could  generate  premiums  of  EUR  130mn  (USD  178.08mn)  and  might  require catastrophe cover of EUR 1.2bn (USD 1.64bn), making Romania the largest catastrophe market in central and east Europe. Regulatory Considerations There are no restrictions on non-admitted reinsurance. Foreign reinsurers do not have to be approved or put up deposits, and there are no deductions from reinsurance premiums ceded abroad. Insurers  need  specific  approval  from  the  Insurance  Supervisory  Commission  (CSA)  to  write  catastrophe risks.  The  CSA  requires  quarterly  declarations  of  accumulations,  PMLs,  net  retentions  and  catastrophe reserves  for  property,  cargo  and  motor  casco  and  insists  on  companies  having  appropriate  reinsurance cover. The CSA limits the maximum priority allowed under motor third party liability excess of loss contracts. The current maximum is EUR 400,000 (USD 547,945). Reinsurance Statistics The following table shows the development of outwards reinsurance premiums and outwards reinsurance ratios over the period from 2003 to 2007. Year 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 RI premiums ceded 614.9 716.3 927.8 1,471.0 1,682.4 (RON mn) RI premiums ceded 185.2 219.5 318.4 523.7 690.1 (USD mn) RI ratio (%) 29.9 28.4 27.5 32.0 29.4 Source: CSA The following table shows the reinsurance ratios of some of the leading insurers in 2007: Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 59 © AXCO 2009
    • Reinsurance Company RI ratio (%) AIG Romania 87.3 Allianz Tiriac 52.2 Generali 44.1 BCR 33.2 Unita 30.9 Asirom 10.1 Omniasig 7.3 Average 29.4 Source: CSA The  Romanian  Statistical  Office  provides  line  of  business  reinsurance  ratios  for  2003  and  2005  (latest available year). The CSA provides reinsurance ratios for 2004 to 2007, but only for fire and natural perils, motor casco and credit and guarantee. The available information is shown in the following table: Class/RI ratio (%) 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Fire and natural 68.6 69.7 57.5 66.6 56.9 perils Other damage to 42.0 n/a 44.6 n/a n/a property Motor third party 6.9 n/a 5.6 n/a 6.9 liability Motor casco 25.9 21.5 24.7 26.8 28.1 General third party 53.7 n/a 51.1 n/a n/a Credit 31.2 52.9 62.5 69.3 54.0 Marine hull 40.5 n/a 36.7 n/a n/a Cargo 52.0 n/a 31.7 n/a n/a Aviation hull 94.9 n/a 67.0 n/a n/a PA 8.0 n/a 3.7 n/a n/a Total 29.9 28.4 27.5 32.0 29.4 Retentions In  2007  insurers  retained  an  average  of  70.6%  of  their  gross  written  premiums.  The  retention  ratio  is relatively high for an emerging market because of the increasing number of companies which reinsure their property  accounts  on  a  non-proportional  basis.  Two  of  the  earliest  companies  to  transfer  to non-proportional arrangements were Omniasig and Asirom, which had retention ratios of 92.7% and 89.9% respectively in 2007. Most insurers have stable per risk property retentions of between EUR 250,000 and EUR  300,000  (USD  342,466-USD  410,959).  Most  catastrophe  retentions  are  under  EUR  500,000  (USD 684,932), though one insurer retains more than EUR 1mn (USD 1.37mn). The retention ratio is expected to rise in 2009 as more insurers are integrated into group programmes and as the consumer credit market, with its low retention ratio, goes into run-off. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 60 © AXCO 2009
    • Reinsurance Local Risk Sharing Coinsurance  is  discouraged  by  a  lack  of  trust  between  companies  and  the  desire  to  boost  market  share rankings by booking 100% of large-risk premiums. Coinsurance was reluctantly accepted for capacity and pricing  reasons  after  9/11  but  has  now  declined  in  response  to  the  greater  availability  of  facultative reinsurance.  Where  coinsurance  is  still  used,  the  maximum  number  of  companies  on  a  schedule  is  four. The main coinsurers are AIG Romania, Allianz Tiriac, Asirom and Generali. Coinsurance is more common in provincial markets where local enterprises have friendly relations with a number of insurers and therefore wish to spread their business around. It is rare for Romanian property treaties to be subject to coinsurance limitation clauses. There are no market pools apart from the nuclear pool and very little facultative exchange. Treaty Reinsurance General As  a  result  of  the  stricter  control  exercised  by  the  CSA,  almost  all  insurers  purchase  some  form  of reinsurance. The growth of the reinsurance market is now being counteracted, however, by the increasing number of cedants which are being absorbed into international group programmes. All Allianz companies in central  and  east  Europe,  for  example,  now  participate  in  the  group  quot;super  catquot;  and  quot;super  surplusquot; programmes. Members of the Vienna Insurance Group participate in common catastrophe and green card excess of loss programmes and will soon be required to offer right of first refusal on other reinsurance lines to the group reinsurer VIG Re in Prague. Subsidiaries of Generali PPF Holdings will be required to cede to the group reinsurer GP Re in Sofia. Groupama, which has recently absorbed three insurance companies in Romania, is also believed to have group reinsurance facilities. Reinsurance treaties are generally denominated and paid in euros. Leading  reinsurance  markets  for  Romanian  treaty  business  include  Swiss  Re,  Munich  Re,  Hannover  Re, Lloyd's underwriters, SCOR Re, Partner Re and Le Mans Re. Property Over  the  last  two  years  Romania  has  changed  from  a  predominantly  proportional  to  a  non-proportional market: indeed, Allianz Tiriac and Asiban are said to be the only top-10 insurers which still reinsure on a surplus  basis.  Proportional  arrangements  are  only  common  at  the  bottom  end  of  the  market.  The preference for non-proportional arrangements is partly a reaction to consistently low loss ratios, and partly a way of gaining access to the greater competitiveness of the non-proportional facultative market. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 61 © AXCO 2009
    • Reinsurance The  minimum  economic  retention  for  risk  excess  of  loss  contracts  is  EUR  200,000  (USD  273,973).  Most insurers have stable retentions of between EUR 250,000 and EUR 300,000 (USD 342,466-USD 410,959). Because  of  low  property  sums  insured,  insurers  rarely  need  treaty  capacity  of  more  than  EUR  10mn  to EUR  15mn  (USD  13.70mn  to  USD  20.55mn).  Maximum  treaty  capacity  is  stable  at  around  EUR  50mn (USD  68.49mn).  Because  insurers  lack  the  experience  to  do  PML  assessments,  risks  are  ceded  on  the basis of the maximum sum insured any one location. Engineering Because  of  the  small  volume  of  business,  most  insurers  cede  engineering  risks  to  combined  fire  and technical treaties. According to one insurer, for example, engineering business accounts for only 11% of its property cessions. Motor Domestic MTPL and green card risks are reinsured on an excess of loss basis. The normal priority is EUR 250,000 or EUR 300,000 (USD 342,466 or USD 410,959), though reinsurers will want to increase this in 2009. The CSA limits the maximum priority to EUR 400,000 (USD 547,945). Green card excess of loss was radically re-priced on 1 January 2007 when Romania acceded to the EU and green card cover became an automatic feature of all MTPL policies rather than an ad hoc purchase: according  to  an  analysis  by  Benfield  Group,  the  average  excess  of  loss  rate  fell  from  12.80%  in  2006  to 3.64% in 2007. Most casco quota shares have been cancelled as a result of low commission levels and the imposition of loss  corridors  and  loss  caps.  As  an  exception,  one  leading  motor  insurer  has  a  50%  quota  share  led  by Munich Re for solvency relief purposes. General Third Party The  increasing  volume  of  third  party  liability  business  has  made  it  economical  for  some  companies  to purchase excess of loss protections, whilst others still reinsure on a quota share basis. Maximum capacity for  combined  liability  treaties  (covering  public  liability,  product  liability,  employers'  liability,  professional indemnity and medical malpractice) is EUR 5mn (USD 6.85mn). Some treaties also include D&O, though others not. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 62 © AXCO 2009
    • Reinsurance Reinsurers  are  said  to  be  seeking  Romanian  liability  business,  presumably  on  the  basis  that  premium volumes  will  grow  with  the  increase  in  foreign  investment  but  loss  ratios  will  stay  low  until  attitudes  to litigation  change.  The  business  is  therefore  expected  to  be  highly  profitable  for  a  period  of  three  to  five years. Agriculture Agriculture specialists normally have stop loss programmes. Credit A number of insurers have credit risk treaties covering credit, bond and leasing risks. Cover for consumer credit  risks  is  no  longer  available  in  the  current  economic  climate.  Treaties  are  normally  arranged  on  a quota share basis subject to a loss cap. Marine Hull and Cargo Marine  treaties  are  generally  arranged  on  an  excess  of  loss  basis  with  capacity  of  up  to  USD  10mn. Shipbuilders' risks are reinsured on a facultative basis. Aviation Aviation hull and liabilities are reinsured on a facultative basis. Facultative Reinsurance Most large risks are foreign investments which tend to be fronted. There are said to be only 10 or 15 risks which exceed the largest insurers' automatic capacity of EUR 50mn (USD 68.49mn). Most facultative risks are  placed  on  a  non-proportional  basis,  often  under  parent  company  facilities.  In  the  current  climate, continental reinsurers are said to be far more competitive than the London market for non-proportional fire and CAR risks. There is more demand for facultative reinsurance in the marine, aviation and liability markets, particularly for  classes  such  as  PI,  D&O  and  bankers'  blanket  bonds  which  local  insurers  have  little  experience  of underwriting. London is said to be far more competitive than the continent for casualty business, in terms not only of price, but also of underwriting flexibility and wordings. A new force in the large risks market is Vienna Insurance Underwriters - a Vienna Insurance Group pool for large  industrial  risks  which  will  pool  the  treaty  capacity  of  group  companies  in  central  and  east  Europe. Under the terms of the pooling arrangement, the producing company issues a 100% policy and reinsures with the other pool members. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 63 © AXCO 2009
    • Reinsurance Catastrophe Reinsurance General The  main  catastrophe  risk  is  earthquake,  though  there  is  also  an  exposure  to  windstorm,  flood  and  hail. The  CSA  requires  all  property  and  motor  casco  insurers  to  buy  catastrophe  protections  -  a  total  of  29 companies as at 31 December 2007. Although insurers are required to send copies of their reinsurance contracts and quarterly accumulations to the  CSA,  there  is  no  standard  methodology  for  calculating  catastrophe  PMLs,  which  can  vary  by  up  to 300%  depending  on  the  choice  of  model.  According  to  a  study  by  Benfield  Group,  quot;from  the  ground  upquot; (FGU)  catastrophe  cover  was  EUR  370mn  (USD  506.85mn)  in  2007,  making  Romania  the  third  largest excess  of  loss  market  in  central  and  east  Europe  after  Poland  and  the  Czech  Republic.  Despite  an increase  in  aggregate  resulting  from  the  booming  mortgage  market,  Romanian  FGU  cover  nearly  halved between 2006 and 2007 as more insurers joined group catastrophe programmes. Most catastrophe retentions are under EUR 500,000 (USD 684,932), though one insurer retains more than EUR  1mn  (USD  1.37mn).  The  Benfield  study  found  that  average  programme  deductibles  in  2007  were 10.5%  of  property  premium  income,  whilst  average  limits  were  1,683%  of  property  premium  income. Because of the low level of direct market rates, particularly for earthquake, catastrophe reinsurance costs were 35% of property premium income. Some insurers' property portfolios are so small that the cost of their catastrophe  reinsurance  has  to  be  subsidised  out  of  other  lines.  The  average  rate  on  line  in  2007  (total catastrophe premium divided by total limit) was 2.09%, a slight increase from 2006. Because of advances in modelling, insurers do not get the automatic annual reductions in catastrophe rates which are expected in other countries. A  number  of  insurers  made  small  recoveries  from  their  catastrophe  reinsurers  in  2005  as  a  result  of  the year's exceptional floods. Catastrophe programmes are led both at Lloyd's and in the continental market. Law on Obligatory House Insurance A mandatory household insurance scheme covering the perils of earthquake, landslide and flood is due to be introduced in mid-2009 under the terms of the Law on Obligatory House Insurance, full details of which are provided in the Legislative Update section of this report. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 64 © AXCO 2009
    • Reinsurance When  the  scheme  eventually  goes  ahead,  the  reinsurance  programme  will  be  placed  by  a  consortium  of brokers  comprising  Aon  Benfield  Re,  Guy  Carpenter  and  Willis  Re.  The  programme  will  be  based  on  a dynamic and quot;self-adjustablequot; stratification of limits related to the aggregate exposure. A flexible structure is required  because  of  uncertainty  regarding  the  take-up  of  insurance,  especially  in  the  early  years  of  the scheme. Alternative Risk Transfer The only known examples of alternative risk transfer are solvency relief quota shares. Treaty Reinsurance Commission Surplus property commissions continue to rise by 1% to 2.5% a year. Average commissions are said to be 32.5% plus profit commission. Facultative Reinsurance Commission Most facultative risks are now placed on an excess of loss basis. Distribution Romanian reinsurance brokers must be authorised by the CSA. There is no requirement for cedants to use a  local  reinsurance  broker,  however,  and  no  restrictions  on  the  business  activities  of  foreign  reinsurance brokers. Reinsurance  programmes  are  placed  partly  direct  and  partly  through  brokers.  Reinsurance  brokers  with Romanian accounts include Aon Benfield Re, Willis Re, and Guy Carpenter. Romania is unusual in east European terms in supporting two domestic reinsurance brokers: Olsa Re and Stellar Re Europa. The former is an offshoot of Olsa Re in Peru and a sister company of insurance broker MAI CEE; the latter is a subsidiary of Stellar Intermediaries Inc of New York. Olsa Re's main client base is the lower-end companies which are too small to support an in-house reinsurance department, as well as some of the larger insurers which appreciate a local facility for the occasional facultative placement. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 65 © AXCO 2009
    • Distribution Channels Summary and Trends The  two  main  distribution  channels  are  direct  sales  force  and  commission-only  agents.  Banks  are  an increasingly  important  source  of  loan-related  property,  personal  accident  and  motor  business.  There  are over  380  licensed  brokers  which  placed  26.2%  of  non-life  premiums  in  2007.  A  number  of  brokers  are owned  by  banks  or  leasing  companies  and  were  set  up  to  handle  their  owners'  collateral  and  credit protection  insurance  schemes.  Brokers  have  also  become  an  important  force  in  the  motor  third  party liability (MTPL) market. Because Romania is predominantly a cash economy, little progress can be made with web-based sales or direct marketing. Clients can obtain motor quotations from insurers' websites but must visit a branch office to conclude the contract. Direct Handling The  dominant  distribution  channel  for  both  commercial  and  personal  lines  is  direct  sales  force.  This  is encouraged both by tradition and by the fact that personal lines clients normally call at branch offices to pay their premiums in cash. E-Commerce Although an Electronic Signature Act has been passed, electronic commerce has not taken off in Romania, partly because relatively few people have debit or credit cards, and partly because of fears about internet security.  Insurance  is  particularly  difficult  to  sell  electronically  because  of  the  legal  requirement  for  both parties to sign the policy. For these reasons insurers mainly use the internet for product promotion, though some companies allow potential clients to generate their own differentiated motor quotations electronically. There are some internet brokers but these are not said to produce much business. Because of low living standards there is relatively little home internet usage: in 2007, for example, only 35% of households were estimated  to  have  internet  access.  This  was  the  lowest  internet  penetration  rate  in  the  EU  apart  from Bulgaria (19%) and Greece (25%). Other Direct Marketing Direct selling of insurance, whether by post or telephone, is not a feature of the Romanian market. Quite apart from the low level of insurance awareness, which generally requires an agent to overcome, Romania is  predominantly  a  cash  economy  and  premiums  are  normally  paid  by  visiting  an  insurer's  branch  office. CLAL  experimented  with  selling  motor  casco  insurance  over  the  telephone  but  suffered  serious  losses through failing to inspect vehicles for pre-existing damage before holding covered. Bancassurance Bancassurance  has  become  an  important  distribution  channel,  particularly  for  loan-related  property  and motor. Over the last few years Romania has experienced a rapid expansion of consumer credit, equipment leasing and mortgage lending, and the banks' insistence on collateral insurance is by far the most effective way of introducing insurance to the uninsured. Mortgage borrowers, for example, are not only required to insure their homes but also to take out both life and personal accident policies. Banks may act as insurance agents and may establish their own insurance companies or brokers. There used to be seven insurance companies with bank shareholders but a number of these have recently been bought by foreign insurers which have signed long-term co-operation agreements with the vendor banks. Bank and ex-bank insurance companies include the following: Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 66 © AXCO 2009
    • Distribution Channels Insurer Ownership Asiban Used to have four bank shareholders with 25% of the equity each. Now owned by Groupama. BT Used to be owned by Banca Transilvania. Now owned by Groupama. OTP Garancia Used to be owned by OTP Bank Romania. Now owned by Groupama. BCR Used to be owned by Banca Comerciala Romana. Now owned by Vienna Insurance Group. Garanta Part of the National Bank of Greece Group Delta Romexterra Bank EFG Eurolife General EFG Eurobank (Greece) Agencies The  second  most  important  distribution  channel  after  direct  sales  force  is  commission-only  agents  and agency companies. Agents may be tied or untied, a tied agent being one who may not represent more than one  insurer  for  each  line  of  business.  Tied  agents  are  the  responsibility  of  their  principals  and  may  be non-insurance  undertakings  which  sell  insurance  as  a  complement  to  their  main  business  activity.  The most  important  categories  of  agent  are  leasing  companies  and  car  dealerships.  New  regulations  which came into force in November 2006 require agents to register with the Insurance Supervisory Commission (CSA)  and  pass  a  professional  examination.  Corporate  agents  must  arrange  professional  indemnity insurance  with  an  indemnity  limit  of  75%  of  the  brokers'  limit  if  they  only  deal  with  domestic  clients  and 100% of the brokers' limit if they offer services outside Romania. Most agents are said to have little technical knowledge and to provide no service once the premium has been paid. Insurance Brokers Insurance  brokers  were  recognised  for  the  first  time  by  the  Law on Insurance Companiesand Insurance Supervision,  which  came  into  force  in  2001.  According  to  the  law,  brokers  may  only  be  corporate  bodies authorised by the CSA with minimum capital of RON 25,000 (USD 8,993). Brokers are not allowed to have any business other than insurance broking and may not be owned by an insurance company. Managers of broking  companies  must  have  clean  criminal  records  and  satisfactory  experience  and  education.  New regulations which came into force in November 2006 require managers and a proportion of broking staff to pass a professional examination. In accordance with the EU Insurance Mediation Directive, brokers must have  PI  insurance  with  a  minimum  indemnity  limit  of  EUR  1mn  (USD  1.37mn)  any  one  event  and  EUR 1.5mn (USD 2.05mn) in all. Insurance brokers domiciled elsewhere in the EU have been allowed to operate in Romania on a freedom of establishment or freedom of services basis since 1 January 2007. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 67 © AXCO 2009
    • Distribution Channels The number of authorised broking companies was 383 at the end of December 2007, up from 313 in 2006. There  is  a  brokers'  association  called  UNSICAR  with  its  own  code  of  conduct,  to  which  80  of  the  larger brokers  belong.  Brokers  with  international  connections  include  Marsh,  Aon  Romania,  Eos  Risq,  Gras Savoye  (representing  Willis)  and  MAI.  Technical  standards  are  generally  low,  and  many  of  the  smaller brokers are quasi-captives which exist to recycle commissions back to their parent groups. Most banks and leasing  companies  have  established  their  own  brokers  to  place  their  collateral  and  credit  protection insurance  schemes.  The  leading  example  is  Porsche  Broker,  which  was  established  by  the  Porsche  car dealership  and  leasing  group  and  deals  exclusively  with  finance-related  motor  business.  There  are  a number of specialist MTPL brokers with a poor reputation for integrity and the quality of the business which they  produce.  Many  companies  are  small  personal  lines  agencies  which  have  been  forced  to  register  as brokers because the regulations do not allow agents to represent more than one insurer for each business line. In 2007 brokers placed estimated non-life premiums of RON 1.50bn (USD 614.03mn) equivalent to 26.2% of market premiums. Because of the common practice of banks and leasing companies establishing their own  brokers,  not  only  were  the  majority  of  broker-controlled  premiums  represented  by  motor  casco schemes,  but  some  of  the  largest  brokers  were  casco  scheme  specialists.  This  is  illustrated  by  the following  tables  which  show  (1)  the  percentage  of  premiums  placed  by  brokers  for  each  of  the  major business line and (2) the market shares of the top five brokers, in both cases based on 2007 data. Business line Percentage of premiums placed by brokers Marine cargo 44.6 Third party liability 41.5 Motor casco 33.0 Motor third party liability 21.1 Property 18.8 Non-life market average 26.2 Source: Media XPRIMM Broker % of broker-controlled premiums Porsche Broker 11.2 Marsh 10.3 Unicredit 7.8 Aon Romania 6.2 VBL Broker 5.0 Source: Media XPRIMM Intermediaries' Commissions Current brokers' commission levels are as follows: Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 68 © AXCO 2009
    • Distribution Channels Class Commission (%) Property 15 to 20 Motor third party liability 25 Motor casco 8 to 15 Liability 20 Cargo 20 Personal accident 20 to 25 Trade credit 10   Although most business is still placed on a commission basis, fees are becoming more common even with domestic  clients.  Because  of  short  credit  terms,  most  brokers'  clients  pay  their  premiums  directly  to  the insurance company. Agents,  domestic  brokers  and  insurance  companies  all  rebate  commission  to  key  clients.  Such  rebates normally  take  the  form  of  cash  payments  to  company  directors  and  are  part  of  the  pervading  culture  of corporate  corruption  in  Romania.  Rebate  levels  are  said  to  have  fallen  since  Romania  joined  the  EU  but can still be up to 10% of premiums. Consumer Protection Order No 3111 of 16 December 2004 regarding the Information to be Provided to Policyholders prescribes the information which insurance companies and intermediaries must provide to personal lines clients before entering into a contract of insurance. The information must be provided in written form and be signed by the client by way of acknowledgement. Information to be provided by insurance companies includes the name and  address  of  the  company,  details  of  the  contract  and  the  premium,  claims  procedures  and  dispute resolution mechanisms. Information to be provided by intermediaries includes whether they are an agent or a  broker,  the  services  they  provide  and  their  dispute  resolution  mechanisms.  Intermediaries  are  not required to disclose their commissions or other earnings. Company Changes There have been no recent company changes which are relevant from an international perspective. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 69 © AXCO 2009
    • Multinationals, Captives, ART and Risk Management Multinationals Local Multinationals Most large enterprises are either foreign-owned or state-owned. There are therefore few private companies which  are  large  enough  to  operate  outside  Romania,  although  there  are  some  Romanian  investments  in nearby countries such as Moldova, Macedonia and Serbia. If insured at all, these are normally covered by local market policies. Local insurers such as Generali, Allianz Tiriac, AIG Romania and the members of the Vienna Insurance Group would be able to co-ordinate regional programmes for Romanian multinationals if required. Foreign Multinationals As  a  result  of  its  accession  to  the  EU,  Romania  has  become  an  increasingly  attractive  destination  for foreign  direct  investors,  particularly  in  the  textile,  footwear,  financial  services,  retail  and  property  sectors. Total foreign investment is projected to reach EUR 7.80bn (USD 10.68bn) in 2008, an increase of 10% on 2007. Some foreign investors place their insurances wholly in the domestic market in order to take advantage of low rates and deductibles. It is much more common, however, for foreign investments to be insured on a fronting  basis,  which  is  widely  regarded  as  the  most  efficient  and  economical  way  of  providing  local servicing.  A  small  number  of  foreign  investors  have  taken  advantage  of  quot;freedom  of  servicesquot;  provisions since  Romania  joined  the  EU,  but  loss  of  business  to  freedom  of  services  insurers  has  been  more  than offset by a flood of new investors into the country for whom fronting is the preferred solution. If business is placed abroad on a freedom of services basis, the Romanian branch of the international broker controlling the  programme  often  provides  the  local  servicing.  There  is  no  requirement  for  the  premium  to  be  paid locally,  though  clear  accounting  records  must  be  kept  to  ensure  that  the  local  subsidiary's  contribution  to the global premium can be claimed against Romanian tax. The main fronting companies are Allianz Tiriac, Astra, Asirom, Generali, AIG Romania and Asiban. Asirom is the fronting partner for Royal & SunAlliance and Zurich and is a member of the International Network of Insurers  (INI).  Fronting  commission  ranges  from  5%  to  7.5%  and  is  sometimes  subject  to  a  minimum fronting fee. There are no statutory obstacles to fronting: there is no requirement for a minimum local market retention and  no  supervisory  control  over  rating  levels  or  wordings.  There  is  no  legal  objection  to  using  a  foreign language  wording.  It  is  normal  practice,  however,  to  issue  the  widest  available  local  wording  with  a difference  in  conditions/difference  in  limits  clause  attached.  Foreign  wordings  tend  only  to  be  used  if  an equivalent local market wording is not available. Captives Summary and Trends There  is  no  legislation  to  encourage  the  development  of  captives.  There  are  no  Romanian  captives  or captive owners. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 70 © AXCO 2009
    • Multinationals, Captives, ART and Risk Management Local Legislation Local legislation does not make any special provision for the establishment of captive insurers. Locally-Domiciled Captives There are no captives domiciled in Romania. Local Captive Owners There are no domestic enterprises which are large or sophisticated enough to justify a captive. A.R.T. & Risk Management Summary and Trends Financial  risk  management  is  completely  undeveloped.  Most  domestic  enterprises  are  either  wholly uninsured  or  only  buy  limited  insurance  lines  such  as  motor  casco,  leased  plant  or  employee  benefits. When companies do buy more comprehensive programmes they usually have a negligible deductible and rarely include business interruption. There are reported to be no risk managers in Romania. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 71 © AXCO 2009
    • Insurance Policies Supervision With the exception of motor third party liability (MTPL) there is no longer any supervisory control over policy wordings or rating tariffs. MTPL insurers have to advise the Insurance Supervisory Commission (CSA) of any changes in their rating schedules and provide actuarial justification. The CSA cannot interfere directly in  insurers'  pricing  decisions,  though  it  exercises  indirect  influence  through  its  solvency  and  reserving standards. Policy Wordings Policies issued to Romanian policyholders are written in Romanian. There appears to be no legal objection to  foreign  language  wordings,  and  some  insurers  routinely  issue  English  language  policies  for foreign-invested enterprises. Others issue parallel texts in either English/Romanian or French/Romanian. In case of legal dispute a foreign language wording would have to be translated into Romanian for the court, with the danger that its intended meaning could be lost. One  reason  that  loss  ratios  in  Romania  are  so  low  is  that  many  domestic  policies  provide  only  limited cover.  Some  limitations  are  the  result  of  insurers  failing  to  update  communist-era  policy  forms  (some household policies, for example, still require the policyholder to specify the cover they require for window frames and glass). Others are the result of underwriting caution or are used as a way of cutting the cost of insurance cover. Policy types which can have an unusual number of exclusion clauses include third party liability, marine cargo and group personal accident. Local Insurance Law Insurance  contract  terms  are  mainly  governed  by  Law No 136/1995 on Insurance and Reinsurance in Romania.  This  is  a  fairly  modern  piece  of  legislation  and  is  regarded  as  broadly  satisfactory  by  insurers. Amongst other provisions, a proposer is only required to disclose material facts to the extent that he or she is specifically asked by the insurer. Mid-term alterations in risk must be notified to the insurer. The Commercial Code allows a two-year claims reporting period after the occurrence of an insured event. This may be over-ridden, however, by any alternative notification of claims clause which may be included in a policy wording. Compulsory  insurance  policies,  as  well  as  policies  covering  risks  situated  in  Romania  and  written  for Romanian residents, must be subject to Romanian jurisdiction. Since Romania became an EU member on 1  January  2007,  choice  of  jurisdiction  within  the  EU  has  been  allowed  for  EU  policyholders  with  risks situated in Romania and for Romanian policyholders with risks situated elsewhere in the EU. Policy Issue There is no legal requirement for a policy to be issued within a certain time limit from inception of cover. The only compulsory class for which a certificate of insurance is required by law is motor third party liability. A windscreen sticker must also be displayed. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 72 © AXCO 2009
    • Insurance Policies In order to be valid, an insurance contract requires signatures from both parties, though not necessarily on the policy itself. In some cases a certificate of cover may be sent out signed by the insurer with a request for the policyholder to send back a signed letter of acceptance. Policy Currency Policies for domestic policyholders are normally denominated in lei. Because of the historical weakness of the  leu,  however,  most  policies  for  foreign  investors  are  denominated  in  foreign  currencies,  principally euros. Premium Payment and Terms For direct commercial accounts and broker-controlled accounts, insurers may confirm that cover is in force before the policy has been signed and the premium paid (in other words, a quot;hold coveredquot; is legally valid). The only class where premiums must be paid at inception or renewal is motor third party liability. For other classes,  payment  terms  may  be  freely  negotiated  between  the  policyholder  and  the  insurer,  though  once agreed, the terms must be strictly adhered to. Commercial premiums are normally payable within 30 days of inception or renewal, though it is also possible to pay in four quarterly instalments. It is quite common for policyholders  to  default  on  instalments  of  premium,  and  since  it  is  difficult  to  recover  premium  debts, insurers are often forced to cancel in mid-term. Insurance brokers are allowed to collect premiums but must establish an insurance broking account which is  legally  protected  from  other  creditors.  By  law,  insurance  brokers  may  not  hold  clients'  premiums  for longer than 30 days. Premiums  for  foreign  currency-denominated  policies  may  be  paid  in  foreign  currency.  Alternatively, premiums  and  claims  may  be  paid  in  lei  with  foreign  currency  amounts  converted  at  the  exchange  rate prevailing on the day of settlement. Cancellation and Renewal Policies may be cancelled by agreement or as a result of non-payment of premium. It is normal practice to give  20  days'  notice  of  cancellation.  If  a  Romanian  insurer  is  using  a  foreign  wording,  the  foreign  market cancellation provisions will apply. Renewal is normally subject to offer and acceptance of terms at each policy anniversary. An amendment to Law No 136/1995 effective from 26 May 2004 allows insurers to issue indefinite-term policies. Such policies may be cancelled if the insurer changes the policy conditions or if either party gives 20 days' notice before the next policy anniversary. Types of Policy Insurers  normally  issue  separate  policies  for  each  business  line,  though  it  is  becoming  more  common  to offer quot;packagequot; policies for small to medium-sized enterprises. Average Most policies are subject to pro rata average, though some new forms of first loss household policy may be average-free. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 73 © AXCO 2009
    • Insurance Policies Inflation Index-linking  is  comparatively  rare.  Some  commercial  policyholders  pay  their  premiums  and  adjust  their sums insured on a quarterly basis. The majority, however, have fixed sums insured which they review, if at all, at renewal. A common way of maintaining the real value of property sums insured is by denominating them in hard currency. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 74 © AXCO 2009
    • Natural Hazards Earthquake and Other Geological Hazards Exposure Like the rest of the Balkans, Romania is a relatively active seismic area, being affected by the compressive motions of the Eurasian and African tectonic plates. There are 10 seismic sources in the country, of which the most important is the Vrancea subduction zone situated along the south-eastern Carpathian arc. This generates  high  magnitude  earthquakes  every  40  to  50  years  on  average.  An  unusual  feature  of  the Vrancea  earthquakes  is  the  wide  area  over  which  they  are  felt,  forming  an  ellipse  stretching  from  the north-east  to  the  south-west  of  Romania,  including  Bucharest.  A  further  uncomfortable  feature  is  their tendency  to  produce  low  frequency  oscillations  to  which  medium  and  high-rise  buildings  are  particularly susceptible. These are exactly the building types favoured in the Ceausescu-era mass reconstruction of the capital. In  the  last  1,000  years,  322  earthquakes  have  been  recorded  with  a  magnitude  above  5  and  38  with  a magnitude above 7. A sub-crustal Vrancea earthquake has an estimated maximum magnitude of 8.1. The most  damaging  event  would  be  an  earthquake  in  the  vicinity  of  Bucharest,  which  has  an  estimated maximum magnitude of 7.8. Romania  can  be  divided  into  three  zones  for  hazard-assessment  purposes.  The  high-risk  zone  occupies the  east-central  part  of  the  country,  including  Bucharest;  the  medium  risk  zone  the  west-central  part  and the low risk zone the west. An  earthquake  building  code  was  introduced  only  in  1977  after  the  last  Bucharest  earthquake.  This requires  an  earthquake  resistance  of  8.6  on  the  Richter  scale.  The  code  was  modified  in  1992  when minimum  resistance  requirements  were  tailored  to  six  risk  zones.  With  few  exceptions,  insurers  will  only cover  buildings  erected  after  1977  or  older  buildings  which  have  been  strengthened  to  comply  with  the 1977 code. The low levels of property damage and injury experienced in the 1986 and 1990 earthquakes (which registered up to 7.0 on the Richter scale) suggest that insurers can have reasonable confidence in the efficacy of the 1997 code. Accumulations and PMLs Insurers used to base their earthquake PMLs on generalised models available from Munich Re and Swiss Re.  Country-specific  models  were  launched  in  2006  by  EQECAT  (Version  3.8)  and  Benfield  Group (GAPQuake  Romania).  Although  advances  in  modelling  should  have  led  to  greater  confidence  in  PML assessment,  results  from  the  two  most  recent  models  can  differ  by  up  to  300%.  GAPQuake  Romania generally produces the lower result and is therefore preferred by many insurers. A commonly quoted PML for a Vrancea earthquake is 7% of total sums insured for a 1:250 year event and 8%  for  a  1:500  year  event.  One  of  the  leading  property  insurers  works  on  the  basis  of  a  12%  PML  for household  and  a  5%  PML  for  industrial.  Modelling  carried  out  for  the  mandatory  household  insurance scheme  produces  an  estimated  PML  for  a  1:250  year  event  of  EUR  3bn  (USD  4.11bn)  based  on  a  total exposure (assuming 100% penetration) of EUR 113bn (USD 154.79bn). Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 75 © AXCO 2009
    • Natural Hazards Because  of  the  inadequacy  of  their  IT  systems  most  insurers  only  monitor  earthquake  accumulations  by Cresta zone. This is particularly unsatisfactory in the case of Bucharest, where some districts are founded on bedrock and others on sandy subsoil. As a result, at least one insurer is starting to use six micro-zones for  monitoring  its  capital  city  accumulations.  Most  earthquake  aggregate  is  concentrated  in  Bucharest. Earthquake  aggregates  are  said  to  be  equally  divided  between  domestic  and  commercial/industrial property. Estimates  of  earthquake  penetration  range  up  to  90%  of  policies  for  both  household  and  industrial. Although earthquake penetration is high as a percentage of policies, it is estimated that fewer than 15% of properties  in  Romania  are  insured,  some  of  which  are  covered  under  fronting  policies.  Domestic  market earthquake  accumulations  are  therefore  relatively  small,  though  rising  with  the  recent  increase  in  foreign investment, house prices and mortgage lending. Limits and Scope of Cover Earthquake  and  earthquake  fire  are  written  as  extensions  to  the  basic  FLEXA  policy.  In  order  to  counter anti-selection, some insurers include earthquake automatically for code-compliant structures and will only delete it at the policyholder's specific request. Sums insured are normally the same for fire and earthquake, though  some  insurers  have  persuaded  their  industrial  policyholders  to  accept  earthquake  sub-limits.  In order  to  simplify  underwriting,  some  insurers  decline  cover  in  districts  which  have  a  predominance  of non-code-compliant buildings. Law on Obligatory House Insurance The  floods  which  affected  Romania  in  2005  caused  estimated  property  damage  of  EUR  1.5bn  (USD 1.9bn), only 1% of which was insured. Demands for state assistance not only placed a severe strain on the budget but also reminded the government of the much greater financial burden which would result from a severe  earthquake.  The  government  therefore  decided  to  introduce  a  pre-funding  mechanism  for  natural catastrophe in the form of compulsory house insurance. Work on drafting the legal basis for the new scheme, known as the Law on Obligatory House Insurance, began  in  mid-2006  but  was  delayed  by  inter-ministerial  consultation  and  by  a  change  of  government  in early 2007. A draft law was finally submitted to parliament on 29 September 2007 but was not passed until 8  October  2008  and  did  not  receive  the  presidential  signature  until  4  November  2008.  It  will  now  take  at least  six  months  to  draft  the  secondary  legislation,  set  up  the  Insurance  Disaster  Pool  and  arrange reinsurance.  The  earliest  start  date  for  the  compulsory  insurance  scheme  will  therefore  be  the  middle  of 2009. The main points of the Law on Obligatory House Insurance are summarised below. • All owners of residential properties in both the public and private sectors will be obliged to insure their buildings  against  the  perils  of  earthquake,  landslide  and  flood.  Obligatory  insurance  will  not  extend  to annexes, outbuildings or contents. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 76 © AXCO 2009
    • Natural Hazards • Homes  covered  by  the  obligatory  insurance  requirement  will  be  divided  into  two  types:  Type  A constructed  of  steel,  concrete,  wood,  baked  brick  or  any  other  material  created  by  the  application  of heat;  and  Type  B  constructed  of  unbaked  brick  or  any  other  material  not  created  by  the  application  of heat.  The  precise  definitions  of  the  two  building  types  will  be  contained  in  regulations  issued  by  the Insurance Supervisory Commission (CSA). • Type A homes will be covered for a first-loss sum insured of EUR 20,000 (USD 27,400) for an annual premium of EUR 20 (USD 27); Type B homes will be covered for a first loss sum insured of EUR 10,000 (USD  13,700)  for  an  annual  premium  of  EUR  10  (USD  14)  (actual  figures  will  be  the  local  currency equivalent converted at the exchange rate prevailing on the day of settlement). Policies will be written on a  reinstatement  basis.  Insurance  premiums  and  limits  may  be  adjusted  from  time  to  time  to  reflect factors such as building cost inflation and reinsurance costs. Such adjustments shall be carried out by the government during the first five years and by the CSA thereafter. • Apartment blocks comprising at least four apartments may be covered by a collective policy. If a house is covered by a lease, the lessor will be responsible for arranging the insurance. • Premiums will be tax-deductible for income tax payers. Premiums for those receiving social assistance benefits will be paid by the state. • The  insurance  scheme  will  be  underwritten  by  a  special  purpose  joint  stock  (re)insurance  company called the Insurance Disaster Pool (abbreviated to PAID) in which participating insurance companies will be shareholders. The maximum permissible shareholding will be 15%. PAID will be governed by Law No 32/2000 on Insurance Companies and Insurance Supervision and will be supervised by the CSA. PAID will act as 100% reinsurer of its shareholders' obligatory household underwriting and will be allowed to purchase  retrocession  coverage  in  the  international  market.  The  Romanian  government  may  lend money  to  PAID  to  cover  its  retrocession  premium  for  the  first  year  of  the  scheme  and  any  shortfall between  direct  premiums  collected  and  retrocession  premiums  due  over  the  following  four  years. Government  loans  may  also  cover  any  insured  losses  which  exceed  the  upper  limit  of  PAID's retrocession programme. • Obligatory  house  insurance  policies  will  be  issued  by  insurance  companies  which  are  shareholders  in PAID. Policies will be valid for one year with premiums payable annually at least 24 hours in advance. Premiums may be paid to insurers, agents or brokers or at local authority offices. Collected premiums, less an administration fee, should be passed on to PAID. The amount of the administration fee will be set by the CSA. • Local  authorities  should  provide  PAID  with  a  list  of  all  houses  and  homeowners  in  their  locality.  Each month PAID should provide each local authority with a list of residents who have not taken out obligatory house  insurance.  The  local  authority  should  write  to  defaulters  reminding  them  of  their  obligation  to insure. Those who do not insure will be liable to a fine of RON 100 to RON 500 (USD 36 to USD 180) and will not be entitled to any form of state aid if they suffer a catastrophe loss. • Obligatory house insurance policies may not be issued for illegally constructed dwellings. Insurers shall not  be  liable  to  compensate  policyholders  who  have  increased  the  vulnerability  of  their  properties  by carrying out building alterations without the necessary permit. • Losses should be adjusted by PAID insurers. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 77 © AXCO 2009
    • Natural Hazards • The  compulsory  insurance  requirement  will  come  into  effect  90  days  after  the  CSA  has  issued  all  the regulations necessary to bring the law into effect. The  Law on Obligatory House Insurance  has  proven  to  be  extremely  controversial,  not  least  with  the insurance  companies  which  might  be  thought  to  be  its  natural  supporters.  Areas  of  difficulty  are summarised below. • The  government  announced  insurance  premiums  of  EUR  10  or  EUR  20  per  dwelling  before  any modelling had been conducted. Subsequent research on reinsurance costs suggested that the scheme would  only  be  financially  viable  with  a  minimum  deductible  of  5%,  and  yet  no  deductible  has  been allowed for in the law. • In  order  to  avoid  comparison  with  the  compulsory  household  insurance  of  the  communist  era,  the government  has  refused  to  allow  premiums  to  be  collected  as  part  of  the  local  property  tax.  Premium collection  will  therefore  be  the  responsibility  of  participating  insurance  companies.  The  government expects  80%  of  Romania's  8.25  million  householders  to  pay  their  obligatory  insurance  premiums  as required  by  law.  Most  observers  doubt  whether  the  penetration  rate  will  be  anything  like  that  high, however, particularly in country regions where insurance companies have only a limited branch network. • Because  of  low  premium  levels  it  may  not  be  economic  for  insurers  or  intermediaries  to  market obligatory house insurance policies. As a result of these issues, not all insurance companies are expected to participate in PAID. Those that do participate will see the mandatory cover as an opportunity not only to educate the public about insurance but  also  to  cross-sell  top-up  household  cover  and  other  personal  lines.  Public  opinion  seems  also  to  be divided about the merits of being forced to insure, though the publicity given to recent disasters such as the Sichuan earthquake in China is said to have had a persuasive effect. In  addition  to  the  Romanian  government's  efforts  to  start  a  national  catastrophe  pool,  the  World  Bank  is encouraging  the  development  of  a  regional  catastrophe  pool  for  south-east  and  central  Europe.  Most observers doubt that this will come to fruition. Rating and Deductibles According  to  a  study  conducted  by  Benfield  Group  in  connection  with  the  Law on Obligatory House Insurance,  technical  earthquake  rates  for  household  risks  should  range  from  zero  to  19‰  depending  on location and construction class. Suggested technical rates for a typical portfolio mix of construction classes might be 2.7‰ for a high-risk zone, 0.31‰ for a medium risk zone and 0.02‰ for a low risk zone. Because  of  market  competition  and  a  lack  of  technical  underwriting  experience,  earthquake  risks  are  not adequately  rated.  All  insurers  quote  inclusive  fire  and  natural  perils  rates  and  allocate  between  10%  and 30% of their property premiums to earthquake and flood. In order to account for the earthquake exposure, property rates vary with the location and age of the building, though not with the nature of the subsoil. Most insurers use only three hazard rating zones. One leading insurer uses four age rating bands: Older buildings which survived the 1940 earthquake 1. Buildings constructed between the 1940 and 1977 earthquakes 2. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 78 © AXCO 2009
    • Natural Hazards Buildings constructed between 1977 and 1992 3. Post-1992 structures. 4. There  are  no  earthquake  deductibles  under  household  policies.  The  standard  deductible  under commercial/industrial policies is 2% of the sum insured, though this can be zero in low risk areas such as Cluj. Loss History Major earthquakes in the 20th century included that of 10 November 1940, which killed 1,000 people and caused  an  estimated  USD  10mn  of  damage.  The  surface  magnitude  was  7.3  on  the  Richter  scale.  More serious was the earthquake of 4 March 1977, which had a magnitude of 7.2 and caused serious damage in Bucharest 100km south of the epicentre. Some 1,581 people were killed and 11,300 injured. Approximately 32,900 apartments were destroyed or seriously damaged (including 20 high-rise apartment buildings) and numerous schools, hospitals and industrial complexes were affected causing significant production losses. Total damage was estimated at USD 2bn. A further earthquake on 30 May 1990 caused damage in southern Romania and Bulgaria and was felt as far away as Moscow and Istanbul. An earthquake measuring 5.5 on the Richter scale was felt in Bucharest on 27 October 2004, at precisely the time when Asirom was advertising a new household policy. Although no great damage was caused, the experience is said to have frightened large numbers of people into buying household policies. Utilities The normal method of heating in urban areas is by hot water radiators supplied by district power stations. There  is  a  limited  distribution  network  for  the  country's  natural  gas  production,  which  is  mainly  used  for industrial purposes. Disaster Planning As  a  result  of  the  catastrophic  floods  in  2005,  the  government  is  incorporating  disaster  risk  management into its plans for obligatory house insurance. CatNet(TM) Earthquake Map Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 79 © AXCO 2009
    • Natural Hazards Source: Swiss Re CatNetTM www.swissre.com (c) Country map: GfK Macon AG Windstorm Exposure Insurers do not regard windstorm as a particular hazard and the peril is freely underwritten. The icy winds which blow down from the Russian steppes in winter cause more damage by freeze and weight of snow than by wind speed. Accumulation of ice can cause damage to electrical transmission and distribution lines, though these are believed to be uninsured. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 80 © AXCO 2009
    • Natural Hazards Accumulations and PMLs Estimates of windstorm penetration range up to 90% of policies for both household and industrial. Although windstorm penetration is high as a percentage of policies, it is estimated that fewer than 15% of properties in Romania are insured. Windstorm  PMLs  are  far  below  earthquake  PMLs  and  are  not  separately  calculated.  Accumulations  are normally monitored by Cresta zone. Limits and Scope of Cover Most policies are extended to include windstorm for the full sum insured. Rating and Deductibles No  specific  charge  is  made  for  windstorm  cover,  which  is  normally  included  in  a  package  of  perils  with earthquake. There is no windstorm deductible. Loss History The  most  powerful  storm  for  60  years  caused  insured  losses  of  around  EUR  1mn  (USD  1.3mn)  along Romania's Black Sea coast in the summer of 2004. Flood Exposure Romania is regularly afflicted by severe flooding, which affects around 13% of its territory. There are two distinct flood seasons: the first from December to March, when the west, central and northern parts of the country  can  be  affected  by  a  combination  of  melting  snow  and  heavy  rain,  and  the  second  from  May  to September, when the east, central and northern parts can be affected by torrential rain. As the experience of  2006  demonstrated,  the  southern  border  regions  can  also  be  affected  by  central  European  rain  and snow-melt carried down the Danube. Most flood damage affects farmland rather than residential areas. Because of flood protection work carried out  during  the  Ceausescu  era  there  are  only  a  small  number  of  city  suburbs  which  are  flood-exposed. Romania's flood exposure appears to be worsening as a result of recent deforestation which is increasing the rate of rainwater run-off from the mountains. Romania  suffered  four  incidents  of  catastrophic  flooding  in  2005  which  caused  69  deaths  and  estimated property  damage  of  RON  5.5bn  (USD  1.89bn).  Around  40,000  housing  units  were  damaged  (including 5,000 total losses) and 620,000 hectares of farmland were flooded. Because of low insurance penetration in  rural  areas,  however,  insured  property  losses  were  only  around  EUR  16mn  (USD  20.25mn). Approximately  25%  of  houses  are  built  of  mud-brick  and  therefore  vulnerable  to  collapse  as  a  result  of prolonged  exposure  to  standing  water.  This  explains  the  large  number  of  buildings  which  became  total losses. Certain  areas  of  the  country  are  exposed  to  landslide  and  avalanche.  The  region  of  greatest  risk  is  the south-western part of the Carpathian Mountains. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 81 © AXCO 2009
    • Natural Hazards Accumulations and PMLs A  Romanian  flood  model  has  recently  been  produced  by  RMS  in  connection  with  the  new  compulsory household  insurance  scheme.  This  suggests  a  PML  for  a  1:250  year  event  of  EUR  250mn  (USD 342.47mn) based on a total exposure (assuming 100% penetration) of EUR 113bn (USD 154.79bn). Most  flood-exposed  properties  are  farmhouses  which  are  not  insured.  Insurers'  flood  PMLs  are  therefore far below their earthquake PMLs and are not separately calculated. Accumulations are normally monitored by Cresta zone. Estimates of flood penetration range up to 90% of policies for both household and industrial. Although flood penetration is high as a percentage of policies, it is estimated that fewer than 15% of properties in Romania are insured. Limits and Scope of Cover The majority of policies, both household and industrial, are extended to include flood. Sums insured are the same for flood as for fire. All insurers are aware of which areas are flood-exposed and either decline risks or increase deductibles. Law on Obligatory House Insurance The  floods  which  affected  Romania  in  2005  caused  estimated  property  damage  of  EUR  1.5bn  (USD 1.9bn), only 1% of which was insured. Demands for state assistance not only placed a severe strain on the budget but also reminded the government of the much greater financial burden which would result from a severe  earthquake.  The  government  therefore  decided  to  introduce  a  pre-funding  mechanism  for  natural catastrophe in the form of compulsory house insurance. Work on drafting the legal basis for the new scheme, known as the Law on Obligatory House Insurance, began  in  mid-2006  but  was  delayed  by  inter-ministerial  consultation  and  by  a  change  of  government  in early 2007. A draft law was finally submitted to parliament on 29 September 2007 but was not passed until 8  October  2008  and  did  not  receive  the  presidential  signature  until  4  November  2008.  It  will  now  take  at least  six  months  to  draft  the  secondary  legislation,  set  up  the  Insurance  Disaster  Pool  and  arrange reinsurance.  The  earliest  start  date  for  the  compulsory  insurance  scheme  will  therefore  be  the  middle  of 2009. The main points of the Law on Obligatory House Insurance are summarised below. • All owners of residential properties in both the public and private sectors will be obliged to insure their buildings  against  the  perils  of  earthquake,  landslide  and  flood.  Obligatory  insurance  will  not  extend  to annexes, outbuildings or contents. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 82 © AXCO 2009
    • Natural Hazards • Homes  covered  by  the  obligatory  insurance  requirement  will  be  divided  into  two  types:  Type  A constructed  of  steel,  concrete,  wood,  baked  brick  or  any  other  material  created  by  the  application  of heat;  and  Type  B  constructed  of  unbaked  brick  or  any  other  material  not  created  by  the  application  of heat.  The  precise  definitions  of  the  two  building  types  will  be  contained  in  regulations  issued  by  the Insurance Supervisory Commission (CSA). • Type A homes will be covered for a first-loss sum insured of EUR 20,000 (USD 27,400) for an annual premium of EUR 20 (USD 27); Type B homes will be covered for a first loss sum insured of EUR 10,000 (USD  13,700)  for  an  annual  premium  of  EUR  10  (USD  14)  (actual  figures  will  be  the  local  currency equivalent converted at the exchange rate prevailing on the day of settlement). Policies will be written on a  reinstatement  basis.  Insurance  premiums  and  limits  may  be  adjusted  from  time  to  time  to  reflect factors such as building cost inflation and reinsurance costs. Such adjustments shall be carried out by the government during the first five years and by the CSA thereafter. • Apartment blocks comprising at least four apartments may be covered by a collective policy. If a house is covered by a lease, the lessor will be responsible for arranging the insurance. • Premiums will be tax-deductible for income tax payers. Premiums for those receiving social assistance benefits will be paid by the state. • The  insurance  scheme  will  be  underwritten  by  a  special  purpose  joint  stock  (re)insurance  company called the Insurance Disaster Pool (abbreviated to PAID) in which participating insurance companies will be shareholders. The maximum permissible shareholding will be 15%. PAID will be governed by Law No 32/2000 on Insurance Companies and Insurance Supervision and will be supervised by the CSA. PAID will act as 100% reinsurer of its shareholders' obligatory household underwriting and will be allowed to purchase  retrocession  coverage  in  the  international  market.  The  Romanian  government  may  lend money  to  PAID  to  cover  its  retrocession  premium  for  the  first  year  of  the  scheme  and  any  shortfall between  direct  premiums  collected  and  retrocession  premiums  due  over  the  following  four  years. Government  loans  may  also  cover  any  insured  losses  which  exceed  the  upper  limit  of  PAID's retrocession programme. • Obligatory  house  insurance  policies  will  be  issued  by  insurance  companies  which  are  shareholders  in PAID. Policies will be valid for one year with premiums payable annually at least 24 hours in advance. Premiums may be paid to insurers, agents or brokers or at local authority offices. Collected premiums, less an administration fee, should be passed on to PAID. The amount of the administration fee will be set by the CSA. • Local  authorities  should  provide  PAID  with  a  list  of  all  houses  and  homeowners  in  their  locality.  Each month PAID should provide each local authority with a list of residents who have not taken out obligatory house  insurance.  The  local  authority  should  write  to  defaulters  reminding  them  of  their  obligation  to insure. Those who do not insure will be liable to a fine of RON 100 to RON 500 (USD 36 to USD 180) and will not be entitled to any form of state aid if they suffer a catastrophe loss. • Obligatory house insurance policies may not be issued for illegally constructed dwellings. Insurers shall not  be  liable  to  compensate  policyholders  who  have  increased  the  vulnerability  of  their  properties  by carrying out building alterations without the necessary permit. • Losses should be adjusted by PAID insurers. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 83 © AXCO 2009
    • Natural Hazards • The  compulsory  insurance  requirement  will  come  into  effect  90  days  after  the  CSA  has  issued  all  the regulations necessary to bring the law into effect. The  Law on Obligatory House Insurance  has  proven  to  be  extremely  controversial,  not  least  with  the insurance  companies  which  might  be  thought  to  be  its  natural  supporters.  Areas  of  difficulty  are summarised below. • The  government  announced  insurance  premiums  of  EUR  10  or  EUR  20  per  dwelling  before  any modelling had been conducted. Subsequent research on reinsurance costs suggested that the scheme would  only  be  financially  viable  with  a  minimum  deductible  of  5%,  and  yet  no  deductible  has  been allowed for in the law. • In  order  to  avoid  comparison  with  the  compulsory  household  insurance  of  the  communist  era,  the government  has  refused  to  allow  premiums  to  be  collected  as  part  of  the  local  property  tax.  Premium collection  will  therefore  be  the  responsibility  of  participating  insurance  companies.  The  government expects  80%  of  Romania's  8.25  million  householders  to  pay  their  obligatory  insurance  premiums  as required  by  law.  Most  observers  doubt  whether  the  penetration  rate  will  be  anything  like  that  high, however, particularly in country regions where insurance companies have only a limited branch network. • Because  of  low  premium  levels  it  may  not  be  economic  for  insurers  or  intermediaries  to  market obligatory house insurance policies. As a result of these issues, not all insurance companies are expected to participate in PAID. Those that do participate will see the mandatory cover as an opportunity not only to educate the public about insurance but  also  to  cross-sell  top-up  household  cover  and  other  personal  lines.  Public  opinion  seems  also  to  be divided about the merits of being forced to insure, though the publicity given to recent disasters such as the Sichuan earthquake in China is said to have had a persuasive effect. In  addition  to  the  Romanian  government's  efforts  to  start  a  national  catastrophe  pool,  the  World  Bank  is encouraging  the  development  of  a  regional  catastrophe  pool  for  south-east  and  central  Europe.  Most observers doubt that this will come to fruition. Rating and Deductibles No  specific  charge  is  made  for  flood  cover  which  is  normally  included  in  a  package  of  perils  with earthquake. There is normally no deductible except in the known flood-exposed areas. Loss History Major  floods  occurred  in  1974-75,  1980-81  and  again  during  the  unusually  severe  winter  of  1995-6.  A combination  of  thawing  snow  and  heavy  rain  at  the  beginning  of  1996  damaged  over  6,000  houses,  439 bridges and 128 factories, causing losses estimated at USD 51mn (mainly uninsured). The  country  was  affected  by  severe  rain  and  hail  in  June  and  July  1997.  The  whole  city  of  Oradea  was flooded but because of low insurance penetration there were only a small number of claims. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 84 © AXCO 2009
    • Natural Hazards Romania  suffered  four  incidents  of  catastrophic  flooding  in  2005  which  caused  69  deaths  and  estimated losses  of  RON  5.5bn  (USD  1.89bn).  Around  40,000  housing  units  were  damaged  (including  5,000  total losses)  and  620,000  hectares  of  farmland  were  flooded.  Because  of  low  insurance  penetration  in  rural areas,  however,  insured  property  losses  were  only  around  EUR  16mn  (USD  20.25mn).  The  largest individual  claim  was  for  a  sugar  factory,  which  was  settled  for  around  USD  2mn.  Because  of  the  21-day quot;hours clausequot; in catastrophe programmes, insurers were only able to make reinsurance recoveries for one of the four events. Further  flooding  occurred  in  April  2006  when  the  Danube,  which  forms  the  southern  border  of  Romania, rose  to  its  highest  level  since  1985.  Almost  all  losses  were  economic  or  uninsured.  Around  130,000 hectares  of  land  were  flooded,  some  naturally  and  some  as  a  result  of  controlled  flooding  to  protect downstream urban areas. Some 60,000 properties were damaged. Exceptionally  heavy  rainfall  in  July  2008  caused  flooding  in  the  river  basins  of  the  Siret,  Suceava,  Viseu and  Iza  in  northern  Romania.  Estimated  insured  losses  were  RON  15.7mn  (USD  5.63mn).  The  largest single claim involved a hypermarket in Suceava which suffered estimated contents damage of EUR 1.5mn (USD 2.05mn). Bushfire Exposure Romania has no exposure to bushfire. Subsidence Exposure Subsidence is not an insured peril. Hail Exposure The  whole  territory  of  Romania  is  exposed  to  summer  hail.  Although  this  causes  regular  crop  damage, there  is  only  one  recorded  instance  of  a  serious  motor  casco  loss.  This  occurred  in  1999  when  USD 550,000 of damage was caused to Daewoo cars stored in the open at Timisaora. Cresta Maps Click here to view the Cresta Accumulation Assessment Zones map Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 85 © AXCO 2009
    • Property Summary and Trends In 2007 property insurance generated premiums of RON 841.91mn (USD 345.33mn), equivalent to 14.7% of the non-life market total. It  is  estimated  that  less  than  15%  of  property  in  Romania  is  insured.  There  is  very  little  household insurance, and many domestic enterprises only insure to the extent required by their bank loans. The most developed part of the market is foreign-invested risks, but the majority of these are insured under fronting arrangements. The volume of business has been growing with the increase in foreign direct investment and bank lending, though this been counteracted by falling premium rates. A  mandatory  natural  catastrophe  scheme  will  be  introduced  in  mid-2009  to  cover  residential  properties against the perils of earthquake, landslide and flood. Buildings of standard construction will be insured for EUR  20,000  (USD  27,397)  for  an  annual  premium  of  EUR  20  (USD  27);  buildings  of  non-standard construction  for  a  sum  insured  of  EUR  10,000  (USD  13,699)  for  a  premium  of  EUR  10  (USD  14).  The scheme will be underwritten by a special purpose joint stock (re)insurance company called the Insurance Disaster Pool (abbreviated to PAID) in which participating insurance companies will be shareholders. PAID will  act  as  100%  reinsurer  of  its  shareholders'  obligatory  household  underwriting  and  will  purchase retrocession coverage in the international market. Statistics Premiums  from  2003  to  2004  are  gross  collected  premiums;  premiums  from  2005  onwards  are  gross written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. The  increase  in  the  loss  ratio  in  2005  was  the  result  of  four  flood  incidents  which  cost  a  total  of  EUR 16.0mn (USD 19.9mn). Major Insurers The top five property insurers and their percentage market shares over the period 2003 to 2007 were as follows: Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 86 © AXCO 2009
    • Property Company 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Allianz Tiriac 23.6 25.4 24.7 24.2 22.0 Omniasig 10.0 11.5 11.1 11.9 12.8 Asirom 12.8 12.1 11.1 9.9 9.2 AIG Romania 13.1 10.9 12.1 8.7 9.0 Generali 7.9 8.3 6.9 8.0 8.0 Top five total 67.4 68.2 65.9 62.7 61.0 Source: CSA/Media XPRIMM Construction and Prevention Building Regulations Adequate  building  regulations  were  introduced  only  in  1977,  with  the  result  that  some  insurers  decline properties built between 1950 and 1977. The 1977 regulations included an earthquake code which requires a  resistance  of  8.6  on  the  Richter  scale.  The  code  was  modified  in  1992  when  minimum  resistance requirements were tailored to six risk zones. The low levels of property damage and injury experienced in the 1986 and 1990 earthquakes (which registered up to 7.0 on the Richter scale) suggest that construction standards are far higher than in, for example, Turkey and that insurers can have reasonable confidence in the efficacy of the 1997 code. The  massive  bureaucracy  set  up  under  communism  to  enforce  the  building  regulations  is  still  largely  in place, and it is reported that even minor alterations to a building require endless approvals. A fire brigade licence is required before a new building can be opened. Built Environment The built environment, even in the historic city centres, is largely of incombustible construction and dates from two phases of national effort, one in the late 19th century and the other during the Ceausescu era. Ceausescu was a builder on a heroic scale, motivated partly by megalomania and partly by the desire to destroy  pre-communist  communities  and  traditions.  The  former  quality  is  most  vividly  displayed  in Bucharest where one-quarter of the historic centre was demolished between 1984 and 1989 to make way for the grandiose Civic Centre. This comprises the notorious Casa Poporului, the second largest building in the world after the Pentagon, and Bulevardul Unirii, a 4 km avenue lined with imposing neo-classical blocks of flats rising to 15 or more storeys. A simultaneous project known as quot;systematisationquot; was intended to do away with 6,300 villages and replace them with 120 new towns and 558 agro-industrial centres. The visible legacy of this project is a ring of concrete tower blocks around every town populated by industrial workers and displaced peasants. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 87 © AXCO 2009
    • Property Romania's  industrial  assets  mainly  date  from  the  forced  industrialisation  of  the  communist  era.  Although maintenance  standards  are  low  and  technologies  largely  obsolete,  industrial  structures  were  solidly  built and appear to have excellent fire resistance. Favourable features include the wide separation of production units  and  the  fact  that  much  industry  is  not  working  at  full  capacity.  More  recent  structures,  such  as hypermarkets and shopping malls, tend to be foreign-funded and to conform to international standards of fire resistance. Around  25%  of  the  housing  stock,  especially  in  rural  areas,  is  built  of  mud  brick  with  plaster  skim. Prolonged exposure to standing water can give rise to structural failure, which helps to explain why 5,000 buildings  became  total  losses  in  the  2005  floods.  A  further  8.5%  of  houses  are  built  of  timber,  35%  of masonry and 31.5% of reinforced concrete frame. Building Cost Index A building cost index is not published. Fire Brigades Insurers express themselves as satisfied with the organisation and efficiency of the fire brigades, which still remain  under  military  control.  As  well  as  the  public  fire  service,  all  factories  above  a  certain  size  are required to maintain their own brigades by law. Traffic congestion has recently become a serious problem in  Bucharest  and  is  likely  to  delay  fire  engines  on  call.  It  also  should  be  noted  that  water  shortages  can occur  in  major  towns  such  as  Ploiesti  (centre  of  the  oil  industry),  Constanta  (Romania's  leading  port), Cernavoda (site of the nuclear power station) and Craiova (site of the Daewoo car plant). High-rise buildings constructed since 1977 are fitted with dry risers. Physical Risk Management The main source of physical risk management is insurance company fire surveyors. It is normal practice to conduct both a valuation and a risk survey and not to go on cover until a re-survey has confirmed that all risk  improvement  recommendations  have  been  carried  out.  Policyholders  are  said  to  be  unresponsive  to survey  recommendations  unless  they  can  be  convinced  that  a  modest  investment  now  will  save  them money  in  the  future.  Major  risk  improvements  such  as  sprinkler  systems  are  normally  too  expensive  for Romanian companies to afford. Risk Quality Although Romania's industrial base was not insured under communism, factory managers had a duty quot;to defend  state  propertyquot;  and  faced  imprisonment  if  they  failed  to  do  so.  Risk  awareness  therefore  remains high  and  factories  are  well  equipped  with  manual  fire  extinguishing  appliances.  Although  foreign  owners are introducing more sophisticated fire prevention technologies, they are also concentrating production in single units, thus increasing the likelihood that losses will be large when they do occur. There  is  a  fire  protection  law  requiring  hydrants  and  extinguishers  to  scale.  The  fire  brigade  regularly checks  compliance  with  the  law  and  has  the  power  to  impose  fines  for  transgressions.  High-hazard industrial  installations  tend  to  have  sprinkler  protection,  but  given  the  shortage  of  funds  available  for maintenance, these should not be relied on. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 88 © AXCO 2009
    • Property Social Hazards Burglary Burglary is written either as an optional extension to the basic FLEXA policy or as a separate insurance. Cover is normally on a first loss basis. Burglary rates on retail stock range from 1% to 2.5%. As a result of a post-communist epidemic of petty crime, most retail premises have been fitted with good quality physical protections. This has led to a dramatic improvement in loss ratios, which can be as low as 25% for some companies. Romanians as a whole appear to have maintained social discipline far more successfully than, for example, the Bulgarians or the Russians. There is said to be no organised crime in the Russian sense and the police force  has  remained  professional  and  largely  uncorrupted.  Most  crime  is  of  the  quot;white  collarquot;  variety  and revolves  around  banking  and  investment  fraud.  Petty  crime  is  attributed,  rightly  or  wrongly,  to  Romania's large gypsy population. Arson Arson and fraud are not yet regarded as serious problems, though insurers remain alert to moral hazard. Strikes, Riots and Civil Commotions Strikes,  riots,  civil  commotion  and  malicious  damage  are  all  freely  underwritten,  but  insurers  report  little interest except from foreign-invested companies which buy full perils cover as a matter of course. There have been no manifestations of civil unrest since the fall of communism apart from two occasions in June  1990  and  September  1991  when  striking  miners  rampaged  through  Bucharest.  The  population appears  to  have  accepted  years  of  economic  hardship  and  poor  government  with  relative  passivity,  and there  seems  no  reason  for  this  to  change  in  the  foreseeable  future.  There  are  political  tensions  over  the language rights and administrative autonomy of the Hungarian minority in Transylvania, but little prospect that these will erupt into ethnic violence. Terrorism Terrorism  has  excluded  from  property  policies  since  2002.  Although  most  insurers  now  have  London market facilities for stand-alone terrorism insurance, there is reported to be little demand for cover. There are no domestic terrorist groups, though there is the possibility that foreign terrorists might target US or Israeli assets in Bucharest. Householder/Homeowner Summary and Trends According to a 2005 study by the National Statistics Institute, only 4.3% of dwellings were insured (6.2% in urban areas and just 1.8% in rural areas). This dismal penetration rate is variously attributed to ignorance, poverty  and  a  value  system  which  attaches  more  importance  to  a  motor  car  than  a  dwelling.  Insurers believe that penetration has now risen to between 10% and 15% of dwellings, stimulated by the following factors: Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 89 © AXCO 2009
    • Property • the growth of mortgage lending, for which household insurance is always required • the promotion of simplified policies with fixed sums insured and premiums • publicity surrounding the government's compulsory catastrophe insurance scheme • the increasing distribution of free household insurance as a promotional incentive. There  are  no  reliable  statistics  for  the  size  of  the  household  market.  The  nearest  approximation  is  new figures from the Insurance Supervisory Commission which show that in 2007 property premiums of RON 244.29mn  (USD  100.20mn)  were  attributable  to  individual  as  opposed  to  corporate  policyholders.  Since individual  policyholders  include  small  farmers  and  traders,  the  pure  household  market  must  be  worth somewhat less than USD 100mn in annual premiums. A  mandatory  natural  catastrophe  scheme  will  be  introduced  in  mid-2009  to  cover  residential  properties against the perils of earthquake, landslide and flood. Buildings of standard construction will be insured for EUR  20,000  (USD  27,400)  for  an  annual  premium  of  EUR  20  (USD  27);  buildings  of  non-standard construction  for  a  sum  insured  of  EUR  10,000  (USD  13,700)  for  a  premium  of  EUR  10  (USD  14).  The scheme will be underwritten by a special purpose joint stock (re)insurance company called the Insurance Disaster Pool (abbreviated to PAID) in which participating insurance companies will be shareholders. Because  of  unsatisfactory  features  of  the  scheme  design,  not  all  insurance  companies  are  expected  to participate in PAID. Those that do participate, however, will see the mandatory cover as an opportunity not only to educate the public about insurance but also to cross-sell top-up household cover and other personal lines.  Public  opinion  seems  to  be  divided  about  the  merits  of  being  forced  to  insure,  though  the  publicity given to recent disasters such as the Sichuan earthquake in China is said to have had a persuasive effect. Statistics Statistics  for  household  business  are  included  in  the  property  statistics  given  at  the  beginning  of  this section. Limits and Scope of Cover The most developed household policies cover fire and the full range of special perils, including earthquake, flood,  burglary  and  malicious  damage.  Some  insurers  offer  package  policies  with  third  party  liability, personal accident, glass breakage and livestock extensions. Cover is also available for loss of rent and/or costs  of  alternative  accommodation.  Policies  are  normally  written  on  an  indemnity  basis,  though reinstatement  conditions  are  available  for  buildings.  For  ease  of  sale,  mortgage-related  policies  are  often written on an average-free basis with a sum insured equal to the mortgage advance. Alternatively, insurers offer agreed value policies with buildings sums insured determined by floor area and type of construction. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 90 © AXCO 2009
    • Property A  mandatory  natural  catastrophe  scheme  will  be  introduced  in  mid-2009  to  cover  residential  properties against the perils of earthquake, landslide and flood. Buildings of standard construction will be insured for EUR  20,000  (USD  27,400)  for  an  annual  premium  of  EUR  20  (USD  27);  buildings  of  non-standard construction  for  a  sum  insured  of  EUR  10,000  (USD  13,700)  for  a  premium  of  EUR  10  (USD  14).  The scheme will be underwritten by a special purpose joint stock (re)insurance company called the Insurance Disaster  Pool  (abbreviated  to  PAID)  in  which  participating  insurance  companies  will  be  shareholders. Further  details  of  the  scheme  are  given  in  the  Legislative  Update  section  of  the  Supervision  and  Control section of this report. Rating and Deductibles Buildings  and  contents  rates  are  determined  by  construction  and  area,  with  exposure  to  earthquake  and theft being the main rating factors. The theft rate for contents is around 1.25% on a first loss basis. Household policies are normally free of excess. Loss Experience Household risk quality is said to be good because most mortgaged properties (which are the most likely to have  insurance)  are  newly  built  and  code-compliant.  The  main  causes  of  loss  are  flood  damage  in  rural areas and burglary in certain parts of Bucharest. Reinsurance Although  some  smaller  companies  have  property  quota  shares,  the  main  protection  for  the  household account is catastrophe excess of loss. Major Insurers The leading household insurers were originally owned by banks, though most of them have recently been taken over by foreign insurance companies. These include Asiban, BT and OTP Garancia (all now owned by Groupama) and BCR (owned by the Vienna Insurance Group). These not only have preferential access to  mortgage-related  business,  but  their  premiums  are  said  to  be  too  cheap  for  non-bank  insurers  to compete with. Leading non-bank insurers include Asirom, Allianz Tiriac and Astra. Distribution Distribution  is  partly  through  direct  sales  force  and  agents,  and  partly  through  banks  which  insist  on insurance  being  arranged  as  a  condition  of  mortgages  or  personal  loans.  Some  insurers,  such  as Omniasig,  give  free  household  policies  to  their  motor  casco  policyholders.  There  was  also  a  recent promotional campaign in which the Romania Libera newspaper gave away six months' free FLEXA cover to its readers. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 91 © AXCO 2009
    • Property Industrial and Commercial Summary and Trends Because  of  low  insurance  awareness,  the  most  developed  part  of  the  market  is  foreign-invested  risks, many of which are written on a fronting basis. Many state-owned enterprises are uninsured except when property has been pledged as collateral for a bank loan. Private and newly-privatised businesses are more likely to insure, but cover is often limited to leased equipment and business interruption is rare. Romanian fire rates rose by only 10% to 20% in the aftermath of 9/11 and remained broadly stable until the middle of 2004. The market then started softening at a rate of 10% to 20% a year. Although this level of reduction  was  still  achievable  in  competitive  tenders  in  2008,  the  normal  level  of  renewal  reduction  had fallen to only 5%, leading some observers to claim that the market was bottoming out. Despite the chronic softness of the market, rates are still slightly higher than western European benchmarks, though not high enough for Romania's earthquake exposure or variable risk quality. Statistics Statistics for commercial/industrial business are included in the property statistics given at the beginning of this section. Limits and Scope of Cover The basic policy covers the perils of fire, lightning, explosion and aircraft (FLEXA). There are two packages of  additional  perils,  one  covering  earthquake,  storm,  flood,  rain,  hail,  weight  of  snow,  avalanche  and landslide,  the  second  covering  burst  pipes,  sprinkler  leakage,  impact,  riot,  strike,  civil  commotion  and malicious  damage.  Most  policies  are  written  on  a  fire  and  named  perils  basis,  though  industrial  all  risks wordings are available from the leading insurers. Most  policies  for  foreign  investors  are  denominated  in  foreign  currency,  principally  euros,  with  premiums and claims payable in lei converted at the exchange rate prevailing on the day of settlement. State-owned  enterprises  tend  to  insure  for  quot;book  valuequot;,  which  represents  a  small  fraction  of  the  value actually at risk. Alternatively, selected assets may be insured up to the value of a company's bank loans. Some  state-owned  enterprises  are  now  insuring  for  cash  value,  whilst  private  enterprises  are  advised  to insure  on  a  reinstatement  basis  if  they  can  afford  the  premiums.  In  order  to  avoid  claims  disputes,  AIG Romania, for example, will only write business on a reinstatement basis. The  Romanian  civil  code  makes  tenants  strictly  liable  for  damage  to  their  landlord's  property  and  makes property owners strictly liable for damage caused by spread of fire. Fire policies often have separate sums insured in respect of these contingencies. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 92 © AXCO 2009
    • Property Business Interruption Business interruption policies continue to be rare, though there is increasing interest from large domestic enterprises, particularly if they have suffered an uninsured loss. As an indication of market experience, one leading  insurer  derives  less  than  8%  of  its  property  premium  income  from  business  interruption  policies. Insurers  are  said  to  be  wary  of  offering  cover,  partly  because  of  the  increased  loss  potential,  and  partly because  of  their  lack  of  experience  at  adjusting  business  interruption  claims.  As  a  result,  cover  is  often restricted to a low loss limit. Business interruption is mainly written for foreign-invested enterprises. The most common form of cover is loss  of  rent  insurance  for  property  owners.  Business  interruption  wordings  are  normally  derived  from  the national  market  of  the  policyholder  in  question.  For  domestic  policyholders,  some  insurers  use  the Association of British Insurers' wording. Cover is available for loss of profits following fire and the full range of special perils, including earthquake and flood. Rating and Deductibles Romanian fire rates rose by only 10% to 20% in the aftermath of 9/11 and remained broadly stable until the middle of 2004. The market then started softening at a rate of 10% to 20% a year. Although this level of reduction  was  still  achievable  in  competitive  tenders  in  2008,  the  normal  level  of  renewal  reduction  had fallen to only 5%, leading some observers to claim that the market was bottoming out. Despite the chronic softness of the market, rates are still slightly higher than western European benchmarks, though not high enough for Romania's earthquake exposure or variable risk quality. Anecdotal evidence suggests that pulp and  paper,  woodworking  and  cigarette  warehousing  risks  can  all  be  placed  for  under  0.1%  including earthquake. Most  Romanian  policyholders  are  unwilling  to  accept  deductibles.  A  small  number  of  large  corporations have started increasing their deductibles, which can be as high as EUR 1mn (USD 1.37mn). Major Risks Many  state-owned  enterprises  are  either  uninsured  or  only  partially  insured:  with  the  exception  of  the Cernavoda nuclear power station, for example, electricity generation is completely uninsured. The largest insured risks are recent privatisations and foreign direct investments. These include the Ford car plant at Craiova, the Petromidia oil refinery and the Oltchim petrochemical plant, all of which have sums insured  in  excess  of  USD  1bn.  The  Sidex-Galati  steel  mill,  which  is  owned  by  international  steel  group Mittal Steel, is believed to be the largest risk with a sum insured of more than USD 4.5bn. Loss Experience and Largest Losses With the exception of 1997 and 2005, the property loss ratio has been below 20% every year since 1993. Some insurers attribute this to low capacity utilisation, good fire separation and the strict enforcement of the building regulations. Others attribute it to high inflation and the common use of unrealistic book values, both of which tend to reduce the impact of any large losses. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 93 © AXCO 2009
    • Property Romania's loss pattern seems to have started changing in 2004, when a number of EUR 1mn (USD 1.3mn) claims occurred. Although these are not large in international terms, they are said to have come as a shock to a market which had paid few losses in excess of USD 250,000. Increasing loss severity is probably the result of increasing economic activity. Individual large losses include the following: 2005 A sugar factory was flooded. The claim was settled for around USD 2mn. 2007 The Oltchim petrochemical plant suffered an explosion in August and a fire in September. Each loss was estimated at EUR 2mn to EUR 3mn (USD 2.74mn-USD 4.11mn). Business interruption was not insured. Alro, which operates the largest aluminium smelter in central and east Europe, suffered a fire estimated at EUR 4mn (USD 5.47mn). The policy was led by AIG Romania and coinsured with Asirom, Omniasig and Generali. 2008 A hypermarket in Suceava suffered flood damage to contents estimated at EUR 1.5mn (USD 2.05mn). Major Insurers The top five property insurers and their percentage market shares over the period 2003 to 2007 were as follows: Company 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Allianz Tiriac 23.6 25.4 24.7 24.2 22.0 Omniasig 10.0 11.5 11.1 11.9 12.8 Asirom 12.8 12.1 11.1 9.9 9.2 AIG Romania 13.1 10.9 12.1 8.7 9.0 Generali 7.9 8.3 6.9 8.0 8.0 Top five total 67.4 68.2 65.9 62.7 61.0 Source: CSA/Media XPRIMM Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 94 © AXCO 2009
    • Property Because of the preponderance of foreign-invested risks in the national property account, the largest market shares are reserved for companies which have a tradition of writing multinational accounts, particularly on a fronting basis. Smaller companies with growing property accounts include Asiban and BCR, which receive large volumes of loan-related business from their banking partners. Reinsurance Over  the  last  two  years  Romania  has  changed  from  a  predominantly  proportional  to  a  non-proportional market: indeed, Allianz Tiriac and Asiban are said to be the only top-10 insurers which still reinsure on a surplus  basis.  Proportional  arrangements  only  remain  common  at  the  bottom  end  of  the  market.  The preference for non-proportional arrangements is partly a reaction to consistently low loss ratios, and partly a way of gaining access to the greater competitiveness of the non-proportional facultative market. The  minimum  economic  retention  for  risk  excess  of  loss  contracts  is  EUR  200,000  (USD  273,973).  Most insurers have stable retentions of between EUR 250,000 and EUR 300,000 (USD 342,466-USD 410,959). Because of low property sums insured, treaty capacity of EUR 10mn to EUR 15mn (USD 13.70mn to USD 20.55mn)  is  adequate  for  most  insurers.  Maximum  treaty  capacity  is  stable  at  around  EUR  50mn  (USD 68.49mn). Because insurers lack the experience to do PML assessments, risks are ceded on the basis of the maximum sum insured any one location. There  are  said  to  be  only  10  or  15  risks  which  exceed  the  largest  insurers'  automatic  capacity.  Most facultative  risks  are  placed  on  a  non-proportional  basis,  often  under  parent  company  facilities.  In  the current  climate,  continental  reinsurers  are  said  to  be  far  more  competitive  than  the  London  market  for non-proportional fire placements. Distribution Foreign-invested  risks  are  controlled  by  the  international  brokers.  Domestic  policyholders  mainly  deal directly  with  their  insurer  or  an  agent.  The  banks  exercise  considerable  influence  over  the  placing  of loan-related business. Agriculture Summary and Trends Despite the economic importance of the farming sector, agriculture insurance accounts for less than 1% of non-life  premium  income.  This  is  mainly  the  result  of  a  land  restitution  programme  which  divided  the co-operative farms of the communist era into four million private smallholdings with an average size of only 2.28 hectares. This huge community of farmers is difficult for insurance agents to access and has little in the way of cash income for premiums. As a result, in 2007 only 17% of arable land was covered by crop insurance. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 95 © AXCO 2009
    • Property The government used to pay a 50% premium subsidy for crop insurance, but this was cancelled in 2008. There  remain  two  types  of  government  compensation  scheme,  though  these  are  due  to  be  reviewed  in 2009  and  may  become  less  generous.  One  compensation  scheme,  which  is  for  farmers  with  commercial crop  insurance,  pays  75%  of  crop  losses  resulting  from  river  flooding,  torrential  rain,  hail,  storm  and  fire, leaving  commercial  insurers  to  cover  25%  of  compensated  losses  and  the  balance  of  risks  such  as landslide and normal rain. This strange risk sharing system means that the state is involved in 80% of crop claims.  Under  the  second  compensation  scheme,  which  covers  winter  freeze,  flood  and  drought,  the government pays 100% of crop losses in areas which have been declared agricultural catastrophe zones. The abolition of the government premium subsidy has forced most small farmers to cancel their insurance. The large farmers who still insure have not only forced insurers to reduce their premiums to compensate for the loss of government subsidy, but they also present a more concentrated hail exposure. Statistics In  2007  agriculture  insurance  premiums  were  RON  53.7mn  (USD  22.03mn).  The  average  paid  loss  ratio was  89.9%,  though  some  insurers  are  said  to  have  suffered  loss  ratios  of  up  to  200%  because  of exceptionally bad weather. Limits and Scope of Cover Crop The  main  insured  crops  are  wheat,  corn,  oil  seed  rape  and  sunflower.  Grapes  and  pip  fruit  also  form  an important part of the portfolio. Vegetables such as tomatoes and peppers are expensive to insure because of high sums insured per hectare. Arborio rice is cultivated by Italian landowners. Insurers  offer  a  total  of  seven  perils,  namely  early  frost,  late  frost,  hail,  rain,  storm,  fire  and  landslide.  In order to counter anti-selection, policies may only be issued if hail is included. Cover is available for loss of quality  but  is  not  encouraged  because  of  its  poor  loss  ratio.  Deductibles  or  franchises  may  be  used  to reduce  the  basic  premium  rate.  All  insured  farms  are  surveyed  to  ensure  that  the  type  of  crop  and  the planted area accord with the proposal form. Premiums are required in advance. Some insurers sell simplified quot;couponquot; policies with first loss sums insured and fixed premiums per hectare. Others offer crop and livestock as additions to rural household policies. Livestock Livestock policies cover all risks of mortality excluding infectious diseases, which are subject to government compensation. The indemnity basis is market value. Because of compulsory vaccination requirements, few farmers  bother  to  insure,  and  livestock  premiums  are  estimated  at  only  30%  of  the  total  agricultural account. Risk selection is required in respect of standards of animal husbandry. Rating and Deductibles Insurers  were  forced  to  reduce  their  crop  rates  in  2008  to  compensate  for  the  cancellation  of  the government's 50% premium subsidy. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 96 © AXCO 2009
    • Property Loss Experience The average loss ratio for crop is reported to be around 60%. This rose dramatically in 2007 because of exceptional claims for rain and hail. There will be large losses in 2008 for damage to Arborio rice resulting from a sudden temperature drop at the end of August. The livestock loss ratio is normally around 50%. Major Insurers The  leading  agriculture  insurer  is  FATA,  a  wholly-owned  subsidiary  of  the  Italian  insurer  FATA Assicurazioni  Italia.  This  is  a  relatively  recent  market  entrant  which  quickly  displaced  the  long-standing specialist insurer Agras. Agras and fellow Vienna Insurance Group member Unita have recently transferred their agriculture portfolios to Omniasig and are in process of being sold to UNIQA. FATA's main rivals in the agriculture market are Omniasig, Ardaf, Generali, Asirom, Allianz Tiriac and Euroins Romania. Reinsurance Agriculture specialists normally have stop loss programmes. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 97 © AXCO 2009
    • Construction and Machinery Breakdown Construction and Erection all Risks Summary and Trends The Romanian construction industry used to work without insurance. This has changed dramatically over the last two years as more and more projects are financed by foreign investors and banks, for which CAR insurance is an automatic requirement. Romania's accession to the EU has also led to a dramatic upsurge in  private  sector  construction  projects  such  as  apartment  complexes,  speculative  office  blocks  and shopping  malls.  Most  projects  are  under  EUR  30mn  (USD  41.10mn),  though  shopping  malls  can  have contract values in excess of EUR 400mn (USD 547.95mn). Because of inefficient procurement processes and instances of alleged corruption, little progress has been made with public infrastructure projects such as road schemes. Despite the recent rapid growth in the account, CAR/EAR business still accounts for less than 15% of property premium income. Statistics Statistics for CAR business are included in the statistics given at the beginning of the property section. Hazard The  main  hazards  in  Romania  are  earthquake  and  flood.  Flooding  is  an  annual  occurrence  and  causes regular damage to road works. Construction quality and site safety standards are said to be lower than elsewhere in the EU. Temporary pedestrian walkways, for example, can be thoughtlessly constructed and present a significant quot;slip and tripquot; hazard. Parts  of  Bucharest  have  an  extremely  friable  sub-soil,  and  there  have  been  a  number  of  cases  of  deep basement  excavations  causing  subsidence  damage  to  surrounding  properties.  Contractors'  liability  is therefore underwritten with caution. Building Contract Conditions Most  insured  contracts  are  carried  out  for  foreign  investors,  with  the  result  that  insurance  clauses  are normally derived from abroad. Policies may be arranged by either the main contractor or the principal but are normally in the joint names of all contracting parties, including sub-contractors. Limits and Scope of Cover CAR policies are based on the Munich Re wording and may include the catastrophe perils of earthquake and flood. There are normally two sections covering property damage and third party liability. Because of lack of experience, open covers are not normally available. Contractors' plant is normally uninsured. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 98 © AXCO 2009
    • Construction and Machinery Breakdown Contractors' Liability The  most  common  indemnity  limits  for  contractors'  liability  are  EUR  5mn  or  EUR  10mn  (USD  6.85mn  or USD  13.70mn).  Most  CAR  policies  include  a  contractors'  liability  section  which  can  accept  a  maximum indemnity  limit  equivalent  to  10%  or  20%  of  the  contract  sum.  Since  this  is  the  most  economical  way  of buying insurance, most clients limit their liability cover accordingly. Contractors' liability covers exclude the risk of vibration and subsidence damage to surrounding property, though this may be bought back subject to survey and an additional premium. Architects'  and  engineers'  professional  indemnity  is  only  requested  by  foreign  principals.  Local  insurers have capacity of up to EUR 5mn (USD 6.85mn) for construction PI. Rating and Deductibles Insurers claim to achieve reasonable technical rates for contracts which fall within their treaty capacity. A typical CAR rate for a 12-month construction period for a conventional office block is around 1.2‰. Typical deductibles are 1% of the sum insured for earthquake and EUR 3,500 to EUR 4,000 (USD 4,795 to USD 5,479) for all other perils. At the time this report was being prepared rates for large contracts reflected the extreme competitiveness of the continental facultative market: complex projects which would normally command a technical rate of 2.4‰ to 2.5‰, for example, were being quoted at only 1.2‰ to 1.3‰. Loss History Loss experience is generally good, though there have been cases of flood damage to road works, including a loss of up to EUR 200,000 (USD 273,973) in July 2008. Deep basement excavations in parts of Bucharest have led to subsidence claims from surrounding property owners,  one  of  which  involved  damage  to  the  Armenian  Orthodox  cathedral.  There  are  also  reports  of  a major loss in mid-2008 in which one part of a shopping complex collapsed into the basement excavations for another part. Major Insurers The  leading  CAR  insurers  are  AIG  Romania,  Asirom,  Allianz  Tiriac,  Omniasig  and  Generali.  A  small number of complex projects are placed directly abroad on a quot;freedom of servicesquot; basis. Reinsurance Some companies have separate engineering treaties, whilst others cede engineering risks to their property treaties. The larger insurers have capacity ranging from EUR 15mn to EUR 50mn (USD 20.55mn to USD 68.49mn). There is a reasonable volume of facultative business, which is mainly placed on a non-proportional basis. For  large  facultative  placements,  it  is  increasingly  common  for  both  the  cedant  and  the  direct  insured  to require a minimum reinsurer financial strength rating of A. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 99 © AXCO 2009
    • Construction and Machinery Breakdown Distribution CAR policies are generally placed by international brokers representing foreign principals or contractors. Building Cost Index A building cost index is not published. Principal Contractors The largest road-building consortium is Romstrada, a joint venture with the Italian contractor Italstrade. Machinery Breakdown Summary and Trends There  is  no  tradition  of  machinery  breakdown  insurance  in  Romania.  Most  fronting  policies  include machinery breakdown cover, but domestic risks are said to account for less than 5% of property premium income. The insurance requirements of banks and leasing companies have led to some expansion of the account,  but  companies  are  generally  wary  of  insuring  Soviet-era  plant  and  lack  the  specialist  surveyors who could allow them to underwrite other plant with confidence. Non-nuclear  power  generation  is  state-owned  and  currently  uninsured.  As  privatisation  proceeds, state-owned power plants will be bought by foreign energy groups and transferred to global programmes. Most Romanian plant is old and often of Soviet manufacture. This means that there is no ready supply of spare parts, and a minor breakdown can therefore turn into a total loss. As a result, insurers always try to survey, or at least to get their agents to fill in a machinery breakdown questionnaire. Most companies will not cover plant above a certain age. Statistics Statistics  for  machinery  breakdown  business  are  included  in  the  statistics  given  at  the  beginning  of  the property section. Limits and Scope of Cover Local  machinery  breakdown  policies  cover  sudden  and  unforeseen  damage,  excluding  fire  department perils.  Steam  boiler  and  pressure  vessel  explosion  is  an  engineering  rather  than  a  fire  department  peril. Most insurers offer computer and electronic equipment policies written on an all risks basis. New  machinery  is  insured  on  a  reinstatement  basis.  Older  plant  is  insured  on  either  an  indemnity  or  a quot;book valuequot; basis. Rating and Deductibles Average  rates  for  machinery  breakdown  policies  are  said  to  be  between  1%  and  1.5%.  Some  insurers impose compulsory deductibles of either 1‰ of the sum insured or 10% of the claim. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 100 © AXCO 2009
    • Construction and Machinery Breakdown Loss History Machinery breakdown is said to produce an acceptable loss ratio. Many losses involve the printing industry where claims of up to USD 200,000 have arisen. Statutory Inspection Requirements Statutory inspections of lifts, pressure vessels etc are carried out by a government agency. Extended Warranty Extended  warranties  for  motor  vehicles  are  available  from  a  Prague-based  administrator  called  Carlife which  has  registered  as  a  broker  in  Romania.  Warranties  are  fronted  by  Unita  for  Amtrust  International Underwriters in Dublin. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 101 © AXCO 2009
    • Motor Summary and Trends In  2007  motor  insurance  generated  premiums  of  RON  4.12bn  (USD  1.69mn),  equivalent  to  71.9%  of  the non-life market total. Casco policies accounted for premiums of RON 2.62bn (USD 1.07bn) and motor third party  liability  (MTPL)  for  RON  1.50bn  (USD  615.26mn).  Because  of  rising  premiums  and  the  increasing number of new cars, the market has grown by around 35% a year over the last five years. The MTPL tariff was abolished on 1 January 2007 when policies were also extended to include automatic green card cover. Statutory limits are being increased each year to meet the minimum required by the Fifth Motor Directive  by  2012.  Most  insurers  differentiate  their  MTPL  premiums  to  a  greater  or  lesser  degree. Premiums are on a rising trend but are not rising fast enough to compensate for high accident frequency, very  high  vehicle  repair  costs  and  a  significant  increase  in  bodily  injury  awards.  MTPL  produced  a significant underwriting loss in 2007. The  casco  market  is  dominated  by  leasing  schemes.  Increasing  numbers  of  insurers  are  imposing  a compulsory accidental damage deductible of EUR 100 (USD 137), though this is still not universal practice and is not applied to leasing schemes. Companies which have increased their rates, imposed a deductible and  taken  steps  to  bring  repair  costs  and  fraud  under  control  believe  that  they  are  now  in  a  position  to make money on their casco accounts. The following table shows the number of private cars on the roads between 2003 and 2007 and the annual rate of increase: Year 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Number of cars 3,088,000 3,225,000 3,364,000 3,221,000 3,541,000 % annual increase 3.9 4.4 4.3 (4.3) 9.9 Source: Romania in Figures 2008 The reduction in car numbers in 2006 was the result of older cars being taken off the road to avoid a new vehicle registration requirement. Romania has a strong domestic motor manufacturing tradition. Local car makers Dacia and Daewoo have been taken over by Renault and Ford respectively, leading to an improvement in both quality and price. This has led to the disappearance of the two-tier casco rating structure which used to apply to domestic and foreign cars. Legislative Update MTPL reserves Ordinance No 14/2007,  which  came  into  effect  on  1  January  2008,  requires  MTPL  insurers  to  have minimum technical reserves for MTPL of 60% of their gross written MTPL premium income. A subsequent ordinance  has  laid  down  a  more  detailed  methodology  for  calculating  MTPL  reserves,  including  IBNR reserves. Alternative methodologies may still be used, provided they give rise to a higher level of reserves. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 102 © AXCO 2009
    • Motor Border controls Border controls on Romanian vehicles were finally abolished in August 2007, allowing Romanian motorists to drive abroad without having to buy a separate green card. Accident reporting When this report was being prepared, liability for motor accidents could be decided only by the police or the courts. For third party property damage, the police report is final unless legally challenged within 15 days. Liability for bodily injury claims can be decided only by the courts: by a civil court if the injury requires fewer than  10  days'  medical  care;  by  a  criminal  court  if  the  injury  is  fatal  or  necessitates  more  than  10  days' medical  care.  The  relevant  law  (Law No 136/1995)  has  recently  been  amended  to  allow  motor  accidents which do not involve bodily injury to be notified to insurers by means of an quot;amicable reportquot; rather than a police report (though the motorists involved may still ask for a police report if they prefer). Although the new claims  notification  system  was  due  to  come  into  effect  on  1  July  2008,  objections  from  the  insurance industry  mean  it  is  unlikely  to  be  adopted  before  2009.  Insurers  are  concerned  that  the  new  system  will increase their claim handling costs and be an encouragement to fraud. Statutory MTPL limits Ordinances issued by the Insurance Supervisory Commission (CSA) have set out a timetable for increasing Romania's statutory MTPL limits as detailed below. • Statutory limits effective from 1 January 2008 are the lei equivalents of EUR 150,000 (USD 205,479) per event for property damage and EUR 750,000 (USD 1.03mn) per person for bodily injury. • Statutory limits effective from 1 January 2009 will be the lei equivalents of EUR 300,000 (USD 410,959) per event for property damage and EUR 1.5mn (USD 2.05mn) per person for bodily injury. • Statutory limits effective from 1 January 2010 will be the lei equivalents of EUR 500,000 (USD 684,932) per event for property damage and EUR 2.5mn (USD 3.42mn) per person for bodily injury. Projected Legislation No projected legislation was known of when this report was being prepared. Statistics Premiums  from  2003  to  2004  are  gross  collected  premiums;  premiums  from  2005  onwards  are  gross written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 103 © AXCO 2009
    • Motor The  following  table  shows  the  five-year  MTPL  loss  ratio  on  the  basis  of  gross  incurred  claims  to  gross earned premiums: Loss ratio (%) 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 MTPL 50.9 58.1 56.2 66.0 67.7 Source: CSA Statutory Third Party Limits Statutory  MTPL  indemnity  limits  effective  from  1  January  2008  are  the  lei  equivalents  of  EUR  150,000 (USD  205,479)  per  event  for  property  damage  and  EUR  750,000  (USD  1.03mn)  per  person  for  bodily injury. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 104 © AXCO 2009
    • Motor Statutory MTPL indemnity limits effective from 1 January 2009 will be the lei equivalents of EUR 300,000 (USD 410,959) per event for property damage and EUR 1.5mn (USD 2.05mn) per person for bodily injury. Between  2003  and  2008,  the  property  damage  limit  has  been  progressively  increased  from  the  lei equivalent  of  EUR  22,845  to  EUR  150,000,  while  the  bodily  injury  limit  has  been  increased  from  EUR 28,557 to EUR 750,000. Other Regulatory Considerations MTPL may only be written by specially authorised insurers, all of which must join the motor insurers' bureau BAAR and the Street Victims' Protection Fund (SVPF). At the time this report was being prepared the two entities  had  16  members  (ABC,  Allianz  Tiriac,  Ardaf,  Asirom,  Asiban,  Euroins  Romania,  Astra,  BCR,  BT, Carpatica, CLAL Romania, Generali, Interamerican, Omniasig, OTP Garancia and Unita). The SVPF acts as a compensation fund for the victims of unknown or uninsured drivers and as a guarantee fund in case of insurer insolvency. The SVPF's function as a compensation fund is financed with a levy of 1.5%  of  its  members'  collected  MTPL  premium  income.  Claims  against  insolvent  insurers  are  actually handled  by  BAAR,  which  recovers  its  outlay  from  the  general-purpose  non-life  policyholders'  protection fund. This is administered by the CSA and financed with a levy of 0.8% of insurers' gross written non-life premium  income.  The  CSA  is  also  responsible  for  maintaining  a  database  of  insured  vehicles  called CEDAM. Information from the database is fed to the SVPF, which acts as Romania's information centre for the purposes of the Fourth Motor Directive. There are different ways of estimating the percentage of uninsured drivers which produce rather different results.  A  comparison  of  the  CEDAM  database  of  insured  vehicles  with  the  interior  ministry  database  of registered vehicles suggests an uninsured percentage of more than 10%, particularly around the two peak MTPL renewal dates of 1 January and 1 July. Such a high percentage seems incompatible, however, with the fact that the SVPF receives so few claims from the victims of uninsured drivers (only 154 in the first six months of 2008). The SVPF experience seems to be corroborated by the results of a police stop-and-check exercise conducted between 21 and 31 January 2008, which found only 684 uninsured drivers in a sample of 123,000 vehicles (an uninsured percentage of only 0.6%). All MTPL policies used to renew on 1 January. After a period when policies could be issued for an indefinite period, policies may now only be issued on a renewable basis with terms of either six or 12 months. For historical reasons most policies still tend to renew on either 1 January or 1 July. International Motor Romania  is  a  member  of  the  International  Council  of  Bureaux,  where  it  is  represented  by  the  motor insurers' bureau BAAR. Domestic MTPL policies have been valid throughout the EU since Romania signed a multipartite guarantee agreement with the other members of the International Council of Bureaux on 16 March 2007. Because of opposition from the UK, however, border controls on Romanian vehicles were not abolished until August 2007. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 105 © AXCO 2009
    • Motor All  members  of  BAAR  must  make  an  initial  deposit  of  EUR  100,000  (USD  136,986)  in  the  green  card common fund and arrange unlimited green card excess of loss reinsurance with a maximum priority of EUR 400,000 (USD 547,945). Limits and Scope of Cover Terrorism is excluded from Romanian MTPL policies. There are no explicit arrangements for compensating the victims of a terrorist incident. Casco  policies  cover  fire,  natural  perils  (including  earthquake  and  hail),  accidental  damage  and  theft. Malicious  damage  is  excluded  by  all  insurers  unless  bought  back  for  an  additional  premium.  Because Romania enforces a zero blood/alcohol level, all casco policies exclude claims involving drink. Most new cars are leased or bought with bank credit. Casco insurance is compulsory for the three or five years of the financing term. Rating and Deductibles MTPL MTPL premiums were subject to a CSA tariff until the end of 2004. The tariff was liberalised in 2005 and was  abolished  completely  on  1  January  2007.  Tariff  premiums  were  based  only  on  engine  capacity. Insurers were allowed to deviate from the tariff by plus or minus 10% in 2005 and by plus 20% or minus 10% in 2006. Even after the abolition of the tariff, insurers still have to advise the CSA of any changes in their  rating  schedules  and  provide  an  actuarial  justification.  The  CSA  cannot  interfere  directly  in  insurers' pricing decisions, though it exercises indirect influence through its solvency and reserving standards. The progressive liberalisation of the tariff has encouraged all insurers to differentiate their premiums to a greater or lesser extent. Common differentiation factors include the age, sex and driving experience of the driver, garaging area, engine size, vehicle type and whether the vehicle is privately or corporately owned. As the table at the end of this section illustrates, average MTPL premiums have been rising steadily over the  last  five  years.  This  is  partly  because  of  progressive  increases  in  statutory  indemnity  limits,  partly because  of  rising  claims  costs,  and  partly  because  of  the  inclusion  of  automatic  green  card  cover  in  all policies  with  effect  from  1  January  2007.  As  the  deteriorating  loss  ratio  suggests,  however,  the  rate  of premium  increase  has  not  been  enough,  particularly  not  in  2007  when  a  number  of  insurers  were  using high  commissions  and  cheap  premiums  as  a  way  of  boosting  their  market  shares  to  make  themselves more attractive to potential foreign buyers. In  2007  the  average  premium  for  a  private  car  was  RON  161  (USD  66),  while  the  average  for  a company-owned  vehicle  was  RON  484  (USD  199).  The  following  examples  from  Interamerican's  tariff indicate market rating levels in 2008: Engine capacity (cc) Premium for private car (RON) Premium for company car in Bucharest (RON) 1,201-1,400 318 810 1,401-1,600 378 888 1,601-1,800 444 1,032 Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 106 © AXCO 2009
    • Motor Because  of  the  market's  poor  loss  experience,  most  insurers  were  expected  to  use  the  next  increase  in statutory indemnity limits as an excuse to increase their premiums substantially from 1 January 2009. The  following  table  shows  the  average  gross  earned  MTPL  premium  each  year  between  2003  and  2007 both in RON and as a chain index where 2003=100: Year Average MTPL premium (RON) Average premium index 2007 254 214 2006 203 171 2005 179 151 2004 148 125 2003 118 100 Source: CSA Casco Most insurers have adopted differentiated rating systems of greater or lesser sophistication, though the main rating factors remain car type and age. Other factors may include the age, sex and driving experience of the driver and the garaging area of the vehicle. The main differentiating factor used to be country of origin, with Romanian cars attracting an average rate of 2% to 2.5% and imported cars a rate of 4% to 4.5%. Over the last two years, however, differences in repair costs and values between local and foreign cars have narrowed to the point where the premium differential has almost disappeared. Average rates have also started to harden since the beginning of 2008, so that competitive rates for leasing schemes are now 4.5% to 5.0%, while rates for individual motorists are 5.5% to 6.0%. One major insurer was planning to increase its rates by an average of 10% from 1 October 2008. In an effort to reduce claim frequency Allianz Tiriac introduced a mandatory EUR 100 (USD 137) accidental damage deductible in 2006. The company lost so much business, however, that it was forced the make it a voluntary deductible only nine months later. Most other companies finally introduced a EUR 100 mandatory deductible in January 2008, though in many cases this only applies to individual motorists and not to leasing schemes. Many insurers also require a 10% theft deductible, though again this is waived for cars insured under leasing schemes. No Claims Discount System There  is  currently  no  bonus/malus  system  for  MTPL,  although  one  may  be  introduced  when  the  CEDAM database of insured vehicles is extended to include details of drivers' accident histories. Maximum  no  claim  bonus  for  casco  policies  is  60%  earned  over  five  years.  Some  insurers  limit  their maximum NCB to 50%. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 107 © AXCO 2009
    • Motor Loss Experience and Trends in Court Awards MTPL  is  said  to  be  seriously  loss-making  and  casco  slightly  less  so.  In  both  cases  this  is  the  result  of inadequate premiums, high claim frequency, fraud and rising loss costs. The size of the problem is clear from the earned/incurred loss ratio for MTPL, which rose from 50.9% to 67.7% between 2003 and 2007. In 2007 the loss ratio for private individuals rose by 7.0% to 74.8%, while the loss ratio for company vehicles fell by 2.7% to 61.6%. Because  of  low  legal  awareness  and  public  ignorance  about  the  purpose  of  MTPL  insurance,  third  party bodily injury claims accounted for only 2.7% of MTPL loss payments in 2007. The unusually high proportion of  third  party  property  damage  claims  means  that  MTPL  experience  is  closely  akin  to  casco  experience. Both accounts suffer from high and rising claim frequency, with MTPL claim frequency, for example, rising from  4.39  claims  per  100  policies  in  2003  to  7.05  per  100  in  2007.  This  is  the  result  of  poor  roads, inexperienced drivers and a huge increase in the number of cars. Falling road safety standards are clearly visible in the following table, which shows the number of road accident deaths and serious injuries over the period 2001 to 2005 (latest available figures). Year 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 Number of deaths 2,461 2,398 2,235 2,418 2,641 Number of serious 5,963 5,777 5,538 5,594 5,868 injuries Source: Romanian Statistical Yearbook 2006 Vehicle repair costs for both local and foreign cars are extremely high: indeed it is said to be cheaper to repair a car in Vienna than it is in Bucharest. This is largely because main dealers can insist on the use of dealership  garages  for  the  three  years  of  the  warranty  period,  which  allows  them  to  exercise  monopoly power over parts and labour pricing. This was starkly illustrated on 1 January 2008 when all the dealership garages  put  their  repair  costs  up  by  25%  to  30%.  Insurers  have  tried  to  respond  by  separating  their damage inspection and claim settlement functions, sub-contracting damage inspection to independent loss adjusters, and centralising claim settlement functions in national offices. This is partly for greater speed and efficiency, but is also a way of way of reducing both internal and external fraud. Despite intense opposition from the garages, insurers are also introducing the Audatex system for controlling the repair process. Fraud (including collusion between claims staff and garages) and theft are serious problems. One insurer which has set up a four-man anti-fraud team reckons to have saved EUR 2.5mn (USD 3.42mn) in two years. There are also organised leasing frauds involving gangs in Bulgaria and the Ukraine. Although third party bodily injury is only a small part of the claims experience at the moment, insurers have noted a significant increase in the size of new claims being put forward in 2008 and an increase in the number of claimants with legal representation. This may presage the beginning of what the Australians would describe as a quot;claims blow-outquot;. Further details of the factors influencing bodily injury awards are given in the Legal System section of this report. Major Insurers MTPL Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 108 © AXCO 2009
    • Motor The  top  five  MTPL  insurers  and  their  percentage  market  shares  over  the  period  2003  to  2007  were  as follows: Company 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Omniasig 10.8 10.6 12.5 13.8 15.9 Asirom 28.9 26.6 23.4 16.2 13.6 Unita 10.1 n/a 10.1 9.3 12.8 Allianz Tiriac 13.7 14.3 12.6 12.1 12.1 Astra 12.9 13.3 n/a 12.2 10.5 Ardaf n/a 10.6 13.6 n/a n/a Top five total 76.4 75.4 72.2 63.6 64.9 Source: CSA/Media XPRIMM Asirom's market share has been in gradual decline since the ex-state insurance company lost its monopoly of  MTPL  business  in  1997.  The  new  power  in  the  MTPL  market  is  the  Vienna  Insurance  Group,  owns Omniasig, Asirom and Unita, and therefore controlled 42.3% of MTPL premiums in 2007. Unita is due to be sold  to  UNIQA,  which  is  also  hoping  to  gain  majority  ownership  of  Astra.  Ardaf  is  said  to  have  been  a particular  source  of  rating  weakness  in  2007  while  it  was  being  quot;fattened  upquot;  to  be  sold  to  Generali  PPF Holdings. Casco The top five casco insurers and their percentage market shares over the period 2003 to 2007 were as follows: Company 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Allianz Tiriac 39.7 40.1 35.8 32.7 26.5 Omniasig 8.5 9.0 10.2 10.0 15.6 Asirom 17.1 14.9 13.2 11.5 8.7 Asiban n/a 5.4 8.7 10.0 8.5 Unita 4.9 6.4 8.4 n/a 8.2 Generali 5.3 n/a n/a 8.0 n/a Top five total 75.5 75.8 76.3 72.2 67.5 Source: CSA/Media XPRIMM Most  new  casco  business  derives  from  bank  or  leasing  company  schemes.  Market  share  used  to  go  to insurers  which  were  willing  to  write  lease  payment  guarantee  insurance,  but  Asirom  withdrew  from  that business in 2006 and most other companies in 2008. Allianz Tiriac lost a lot of business when it introduced a differentiated rating tariff and a compulsory accidental damage deductible in 2006, as also happened to Generali  in  2008.  Much  of  this  business  is  said  to  have  gone  to  Omniasig.  Asirom  used  to  write  casco insurance  for  every  taxi  fleet  in  Romania  but  started  withdrawing  from  the  business  on  1  October  2008 because of very high loss ratios. Reinsurance Domestic MTPL and green card risks are reinsured on an excess of loss basis. The normal priority is EUR 250,000 or EUR 300,000 (USD 342,466 or USD 410,959), though reinsurers will want to increase this in 2009. The CSA limits the maximum priority to EUR 400,000 (USD 547,945). Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 109 © AXCO 2009
    • Motor Green card excess of loss was radically re-priced on 1 January 2007 when Romania acceded to the EU and green card cover became an automatic feature of all MTPL policies rather than an ad hoc purchase: according  to  an  analysis  by  Benfield  Group,  the  average  excess  of  loss  rate  fell  from  12.80%  in  2006  to 3.64% in 2007. Most casco quota shares have been cancelled as a result of low commission levels and the imposition of loss  corridors  and  loss  caps.  As  an  exception,  one  leading  motor  insurer  has  a  50%  quota  share  led  by Munich Re for solvency relief purposes. Motor vehicle damage is normally included in companies' catastrophe excess of loss protections. Distribution The  main  distribution  channels  for  MTPL  are  branches  and  agents.  There  is  an  increasing  number  of specialist  brokers,  although  these  tend  to  demand  higher  commission  levels  than  other  intermediaries. Policies may also be sold through garages provided at least one employee is registered as an insurance company agent. Since  60%  of  new  cars,  particularly  in  the  corporate  market,  are  bought  with  bank  or  lease  finance,  the main access to casco business is through dealers', manufacturers' and banks' finance schemes. A number of  finance  companies  have  set  up  their  own  brokers,  and  these  control  around  33%  of  the  total  casco market.  Examples  include  Porsche  Broker,  Raiffeisen  Broker  and  Unicredit.  CLAL  experimented  with selling  casco  insurance  over  the  telephone  but  suffered  serious  losses  through  failing  to  inspect  vehicles for pre-existing damage before holding covered. There  is  said  to  be  considerable  corruption  in  the  motor  fleet  market,  with  cash  rebates  commonly  being given to fleet managers. Motor Fleets and Commercial Vehicles There is intense competition for fleet business, partly for the sake of premium volume, and partly because company  drivers  are  generally  more  experienced  than  private  motorists.  Risk  quality  is  said  to  be  good because  the  national  haulage  fleet  has  been  re-stocked  with  new  vehicles  to  comply  with  EU  emissions standards. Fleet  vehicles  may  be  individually  rated  and  subject  to  a  fleet  discount  related  to  claims  experience  and vehicle  numbers.  Alternatively,  fleets  may  be  charged  at  an  average  rate.  Because  of  the  intensity  of competition, there are no compulsory deductibles in the fleet market. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 110 © AXCO 2009
    • Workers' Compensation and Employers' Liability Summary and Trends The  main  source  of  work  injury  compensation  is  the  National  Institute  for  Pensions  and  Other  Social Security  Benefits  (CNPAS),  which  provides  disability  and  survivors'  pensions  related  to  the  worker's prospective old age pension entitlement. The institute also provides additional lump sum benefits financed by employers' risk-related payroll contributions ranging from 0.4% to 2.0% of wages. The  state  system  is  seen  as  providing  a  wholly  inadequate  level  of  compensation.  It  is  therefore increasingly  common  for  employers  to  supplement  state  benefits  with  voluntary  group  personal  accident policies. A  new  Labour Code  passed  in  2003  gave  employees  explicit  rights  to  sue  their  employers  for  injury  and disease arising out of negligence. An amendment to the code effective from 30 July 2007 created further rights  of  action  for  stress,  defamation  and  disrespectful  treatment.  Claims  founded  in  negligence  may  be covered by voluntary employers' liability policies. Statistics Statistics for employers' liability are included in the general third party statistics given in the next section. Regulatory Considerations The  main  source  of  compensation  for  occupational  accident  and  disease  is  the  National  Institute  for Pensions  and  Other  Social  Security  Benefits  (CNPAS),  which  pays  long-term  disability  and  survivors' pensions on the same basis as the worker's prospective old age pension entitlement. Long-term disability benefit  is  limited  to  those  who  have  lost  at  least  50%  of  their  work  capacity.  There  is  no  minimum contribution  period  for  the  victims  of  occupational  accident  and  disease,  who  are  assumed  to  have completed their full contribution period for purposes of benefit calculation. Temporary  incapacity  benefit  is  payable  by  the  employer  until  recovery  or  the  award  of  a  permanent disability pension. Benefit is payable for a maximum of 180 days from the first day of absence from work. If emergency  medical  treatment  is  required,  the  benefit  is  100%  of  the  claimant's  average  wage  in  the  six months  preceding  the  accident;  if  emergency  medical  treatment  is  not  required,  the  benefit  is  reduced  to 80%. CNPAS also provides lump sum benefits financed by employers' risk-related payroll contributions ranging from 0.4% to 2.0% of wages. The death benefit is four times the average gross monthly wage in Romania. There  is  a  scale  of  benefits  for  permanent  disability  ranging  up  to  a  maximum  of  12  times  the  average gross monthly wage. Employers must arrange personal accident and occupational disease insurance for employees who belong to factory fire brigades. A  new  Labour Code  passed  in  2003  gave  employees  explicit  rights  to  sue  their  employers  for  injury  and disease arising out of negligence. An amendment to the code effective from 30 July 2007 created further rights of action for stress, defamation and disrespectful treatment. There is no legal requirement to cover these risks with employers' liability insurance. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 111 © AXCO 2009
    • Workers' Compensation and Employers' Liability Legislative Update Law No 237 Amending the Labour Code, effective from 30 July 2007, extended the employer's legal liability for  bodily  injury  to  include  non-economic  losses  (before  the  amendment  employers  were  only  liable  for economic  losses).  Employees  are  now  allowed  to  sue  if  they  are  subject  to  undue  stress,  disrespectful treatment or damage to their reputations. Such actions are exempt from the normal advance court tax of 6% to 8% of the damages claimed. Projected Legislation No projected legislation was known at the time this report was being prepared. Expatriates EEC Regulation 1408/71 provides that a worker (employed or self-employed) should be insured for social security only in one EU member state, which in principle should be the country where they work. In case of a temporary posting of up to five years to another member state, the worker may continue contributing to their  home  country  system  and  be  exempted  from  host  country  contributions  provided  they  obtain  form E101 from their home country social security authorities. Expatriates from other EU member states working in Romania who have obtained form E101 do not have to be covered by Romanian workers' compensation, and vice versa. Limits of Indemnity Employers'  liability  (EL)  is  often  written  as  part  of  a  general  third  party  policy.  EL  indemnity  limits  range from 20% to 100% of the third party limit, subject to normal minimum of EUR 100,000 (USD 136,986) and a normal  maximum  of  EUR  500,000  or  EUR  1mn  (USD  684,932  or  USD  1.37mn)  in  the  aggregate.  EL extensions often have a sub-limit per employee in order to reduce the level of premium. Scope of Cover Insurers offer voluntary employers' liability policies to cover the risk of employers being sued in negligence for  additional  work  injury  compensation.  Cover  is  available  on  a  stand-alone  basis  or  as  a  section  of  a general third party policy. EL cover may include the employer's liability for occupational disease. Rating Policies are rated on wages and reflect the low level of risk. Loss Experience Experience suggests that employees will sue for wrongful dismissal or non-payment of wages, but not for industrial  accident  or  disease.  The  general  third  party  loss  ratio,  which  includes  employers'  liability experience, was only 5.4% in 2007. Major Insurers Most insurers offer employers' liability policies, though these tend only to be bought as longstop protection by foreign-invested companies. Reinsurance Employers' liability risks are either retained or ceded to combined liability treaties. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 112 © AXCO 2009
    • Workers' Compensation and Employers' Liability Distribution The main distribution channels for domestic business are branch and agency networks. Foreign invested risks are normally broker-controlled. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 113 © AXCO 2009
    • Liability General Third Party Summary and Trends In 2007 general third party insurance generated premiums of RON 107.42mn (USD 44.06mn), equivalent to 1.9% of the non-life market total. Personal injury claims are extremely rare outside the context of a motor accident. This is partly because of the high cost and inefficiency of the legal system and partly because Romanians have yet to develop a full sense of legal entitlement. The liability market is growing strongly, but only because of the increasing number of foreign investors who will not do business with Romanian contractors or service providers without seeing evidence of insurance. Foreign investors normally require indemnity limits of EUR 1mn to EUR 5mn (USD 1.37 to USD 6.85mn), which  are  far  in  excess  of  any  conceivable  third  party  bodily  injury  award.  Loss  ratios  are  therefore extremely low and reinsurers are keen to offer quota share capacity. Legislative Update There have been no recent changes in legislation. Projected Legislation No projected legislation was known of when this report was in preparation. Statistics Premiums  from  2003  to  2004  are  gross  collected  premiums;  premiums  from  2005  onwards  are  gross written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 114 © AXCO 2009
    • Liability Limits and Scope of Cover Some  local  policies  only  offer  aggregate  indemnity  limits.  Others  offer  each  claim  cover  subject  to  an aggregate limit of 200% of the each claim limit. Policies are written on a costs inclusive basis. Many local policies  offer  extremely  limited  coverage:  some,  for  example,  exclude  non-economic  losses,  while  others only cover losses which both occur and are reported to insurers within the policy year. General third party policies sometimes include an employers' liability and/or professional indemnity section. The Commercial Code allows a two-year claims reporting period after the occurrence of an insured event. This may be over-ridden, however, by any alternative notification of claims clause which may be included in a policy wording. The Romanian civil code requires a tenant to return rented property to the landlord in the same condition in which  he  or  she  received  it,  and  therefore  imposes  a  strict  liability  for  the  repair  of  any  damage.  Since Romanian leases do not require the tenant to arrange fire insurance, claims for damage to rented property can  fall  upon  the  tenant's  third  party  liability  insurer.  Some  insurers  exclude  claims  for  damage  to  rented property  from  tenants'  third  party  policies  and  add  a  separate  sum  insured  to  their  fire  policies.  Others include claims for rented property under liability policies subject to low sub-limits. Special  policies  are  available  to  cover  liability  for  damage  to  customers'  property  in  the  hands  of  motor garages, hotels, restaurants and security companies. The normal indemnity limit for small to medium-sized private businesses is EUR 100,000 (USD 136,986). Foreign-invested enterprises tend to buy local indemnity limits of EUR 1mn or EUR 2mn (USD 1.37mn or USD 2.74mn). Local capacity is EUR 5mn (USD 6.85mn) without facultative or head office support. Rating and Deductibles Because  of  lack  of  experience,  insurers  originally  tended  to  overcharge  for  third  party  liability  insurance. Rates are now more closely aligned with the low level of risk. Loss Experience Loss ratios are extremely low. There is no record of any significant personal injury claims, and it seems that the main risks are tenants' liability and third party property damage. Major Insurers The following table shows the top five general liability insurers and their percentage market shares over the period 2003 to 2007: Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 115 © AXCO 2009
    • Liability Company 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Allianz Tiriac 22.6 17.6 18.0 31.4 28.1 Omniasig 10.7 9.8 12.6 11.8 12.9 Astra 9.2 10.0 n/a n/a 7.4 Asirom 14.0 10.9 10.8 9.8 7.1 AIG Romania 10.8 13.0 12.3 8.6 7.1 Asiban n/a n/a 11.0 7.4 n/a Top five total 67.3 61.3 64.7 69.0 62.6 Source: CSA Reinsurance The  increasing  volume  of  third  party  liability  business  has  made  it  economical  for  some  companies  to purchase excess of loss protections, whilst others still reinsure on a quota share basis. Maximum capacity for  combined  liability  treaties  (covering  public  liability,  product  liability,  employers'  liability,  professional indemnity and medical malpractice) is EUR 5mn (USD 6.85mn). Reinsurers  are  said  to  be  seeking  Romanian  liability  business,  presumably  on  the  basis  that  premium volumes  will  grow  with  the  increase  in  foreign  investment  but  loss  ratios  will  stay  low  until  attitudes  to litigation  change.  The  business  is  therefore  expected  to  be  highly  profitable  for  a  period  of  three  to  five years. Distribution The main distribution channels for local business are branch and agency networks. Foreign invested risks are normally broker-controlled. Product Liability Summary and Trends Product liability was not specifically recognised as a concept under the Romanian civil code until a Product Liability Act  based  on  the  EU  directive  was  introduced  in  2000.  There  is  so  little  awareness  of  liability issues, however, that it is still extremely rare for either domestic businesses or exporters to buy insurance. Most export product liability policies are bought by machinery manufacturers. The main demand is said to come from car parts manufacturers, but cover for this sector is not available in Romania. Legislative Update There have been no recent changes in legislation. Projected Legislation No projected legislation was known of when this report was in preparation. Statistics There are no separate statistics for this class. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 116 © AXCO 2009
    • Liability Limits and Scope of Cover Product liability is normally written as a separate policy with an aggregate, costs inclusive, indemnity limit. Loss Experience Loss experience appears to be extremely good. Major Insurers The leading specialist insurer is AIG Romania. Reinsurance The  increasing  volume  of  third  party  liability  business  has  made  it  economical  for  some  companies  to purchase excess of loss protections, whilst others still reinsure on a quota share basis. Maximum capacity for  combined  liability  treaties  (covering  public  liability,  product  liability,  employers'  liability,  professional indemnity and medical malpractice) is EUR 5mn (USD 6.85mn). Distribution The main distribution channels for local business are branch and agency networks. Foreign invested risks are normally broker-controlled. Territorial Limits The leading insurers can cover worldwide exports excluding the US and Canada. AIG Romania and Allianz Tiriac have the facilities to cover North American export risks. Special Risks There are no special schemes for pharmaceutical companies or other high-risk manufacturers. Product Guarantee, Recall and Malicious Product Tamper AIG Romania has the facilities to write these classes in conjunction with product liability insurance. There is thought to be no demand for cover, however. Professional Indemnity Summary and Trends Except  for  the  special  case  of  accountants,  the  concept  of  professional  liability  did  not  exist  in  Romania before  1998.  Although  compulsory  PI  requirements  have  now  been  introduced  for  a  wide  range  of professions, legal awareness is still extremely undeveloped and claims are virtually unknown. Despite low rating levels, the PI market is showing strong growth because of the increasing number of foreign investors who will not do business with Romanian professional practices without seeing evidence of insurance. More firms are therefore buying cover and average indemnity limits are rising from EUR 200,000 (USD 273,973) to EUR 1mn or EUR 2mn (USD 1.37mn or USD 2.74mn). Some Romanian practices with an international clientele now buy indemnity limits of up to EUR 15mn (USD 20.55mn). Compulsory  insurance  requirements  apply  to  lawyers,  doctors,  dentists,  nurses,  pharmacists,  hospitals, insurance  intermediaries,  administrators,  liquidators,  notaries,  financial  institutions  which  keep  electronic records of securities transactions and companies which register electronic signatures. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 117 © AXCO 2009
    • Liability Legislative Update There have been no recent changes in legislation. Projected Legislation No projected legislation was known of when this report was in preparation. Statistics Separate statistics are not available for this class. Limits and Scope of Cover Local PI policies normally have aggregate, cost-inclusive indemnity limits, though policies are also available with each claim limits subject to an aggregate limit of 200% of the each claim limit. There is normally no deductible.  PI  is  sometimes  written  as  an  extension  to  a  general  third  party  policy,  in  which  case  the  PI section is subject to the same deductible as the general third party section. Most policies are written on a claims made basis with a retroactive date of inception or last renewal. An additional premium is required for a maximum of 12 months' retroactive cover. The Commercial Code allows a two-year claims reporting period after the occurrence of an insured event. This may be over-ridden, however, by any alternative notification of claims clause which may be included in a policy wording. Some insurers offer a two-year extended reporting period. Most policies are placed on an open market rather than association scheme basis. An  increasing  number  of  foreign  investors  will  not  do  business  with  Romanian  professional  practices without  seeing  evidence  of  PI  insurance.  More  firms  are  therefore  buying  cover  and  average  indemnity limits  are  rising  from  EUR  200,000  (USD  273,973)  to  EUR  1mn  or  EUR  2mn  (USD  1.37mn  or  USD 2.74mn). Some Romanian practices with an international clientele now buy indemnity limits of up to EUR 15mn (USD 20.55mn). Rating and Deductibles Because of lack of experience, insurers used to overcharge for PI business. Rates are now more closely aligned  with  the  low  level  of  risk.  Premiums  are  normally  calculated  as  a  rate  percent  on  the  aggregate indemnity limit. The average rate is below 0.2%. Loss Experience With the exception of accountants and hospitals, PI business is said to be claim-free. Major Insurers Leading PI insurers include Asirom, AIG Romania, Allianz Tiriac and Omniasig. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 118 © AXCO 2009
    • Liability Reinsurance The  increasing  volume  of  third  party  liability  business  has  made  it  economical  for  some  companies  to purchase excess of loss protections, whilst others still reinsure on a quota share basis. Maximum capacity for  combined  liability  treaties  (covering  public  liability,  product  liability,  employers'  liability,  professional indemnity and medical malpractice) is EUR 5mn (USD 6.85mn). Limits of up to EUR 15mn (USD 20.55mn) are  available  with  facultative  support.  Larger  or  more  complex  policies  are  now  being  placed  directly  in London on a freedom of services basis. Distribution The main distribution channels for local business are branch and agency networks. Foreign invested risks are normally broker-controlled. Professions Insurance Intermediaries PI is compulsory for insurance brokers and independent insurance agency companies in accordance with the  EU  Insurance Mediation Directive.  Minimum  indemnity  limits  are  EUR  1mn  (USD  1.37mn)  any  one event and EUR 1.5mn (USD 2.05mn) in all. Agency companies which only operate in Romania must have PI up to 75% of the brokers' level: agency companies which will operate elsewhere in the EU must have PI up to the same level as brokers. Lawyers The act requiring lawyers to arrange PI insurance did not originally specify a minimum indemnity limit. This omission  was  rectified  on  1  January  2002  when  junior  lawyers  were  required  to  insure  for  a  minimum  of USD 3,000 and senior lawyers for USD 6,000. Medical Indemnity  limits  for  hospitals,  doctors,  nurses,  dentists  and  pharmacists  are  set  each  year  by  the  CSA. Minimum indemnity limits range from EUR 1,500 (USD 2,055) in the aggregate for an individual doctor to EUR 500,000 (USD 684,932) for a hospital. Premiums, which are popularly regarded as a form of tax, are as little as EUR 5 (USD 7) for a doctor and less for a nurse. Medical  malpractice  business  is  virtually  claim-free,  apparently  because  allegations  of  professional negligence are normally judged by the disciplinary panels of medical associations, which rarely find against their own members. Two exceptional cases were reported in the local media in 2007 in which damages of EUR  50,000  to  EUR  100,000  (USD  68,493  to  USD  136,986)  were  awarded,  one  for  the  mistaken amputation of a patient's penis. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 119 © AXCO 2009
    • Liability Insurers  must  be  specifically  authorised  for  medical  malpractice  by  the  CSA,  which  requires  appropriate reinsurance support. Accountants The  accountants'  union  (CECCAR)  requires  professional  indemnity  insurance  as  a  condition  of membership.  The  profession  is  divided  into  three  categories,  effectively  self-employed  consultants, bookkeepers  and  accountancy  firms.  Each  is  required  to  insure  for  a  different  limit.  There  are approximately  25,000  members  of  the  accountants'  union,  the  majority  of  whom  are  employed  by companies and do not bother to insure. The main source of business is private accountancy partnerships with two or three partners, which typically buy indemnity limits up to EUR 50,000 (USD 68,493). Other Professions Policies  are  available  for  most  other  professions,  including  freight-forwarders,  tour  operators,  security guards, real estate agents, lawyers, software engineers, architects and consulting engineers. Directors' and Officers' Liability Summary and Trends Romania  is  the  only  country  in  the  world  which  has  made  D&O  (or  rather  quot;professional  insurance  for managersquot;) a compulsory class. The compulsory insurance requirement rests with the individual manager rather  than  the  company  and  only  applies  to  managers  of  Romania's  11,500  joint  stock  companies  (the vast majority of foreign-invested enterprises are limited liability companies and therefore not covered by the legislation).  Because  the  law  does  not  specify  a  minimum  indemnity  limit  most  companies  achieve  legal compliance  by  buying  cover  of  less  than  EUR  10,000  (USD  13,699).  Since  these  quot;symbolicquot;  policies command  premiums  of  less  than  EUR  100  (USD  137)  each,  the  compulsory  insurance  requirement  has done little to increase D&O premium volumes. Fewer than 5% of policies have meaningful indemnity limits, but even these are cheaply priced because of a complete absence of claims. Company Law A new Company Law based on EU standards came into effect on 1 December 2006. The main effect of the new law was to place an explicit duty on directors to act with diligence, care and in the best interests of the company.  The  law  also  requires  managers  of  joint  stock  companies  to  arrange  professional  liability insurance, though the nature and amount of the required cover is not more fully defined. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 120 © AXCO 2009
    • Liability D&O premiums are sometimes paid by directors personally and sometimes by the company. If paid by the company, premiums are treated as a benefit in kind and attract both personal income tax and employees' social insurance contributions. The  main  corporate  vehicles  in  Romania  are  limited  liability  companies  (quot;Societate  cu  Raspundere Limitataquot;  or  SRL)  and  joint  stock  companies  (quot;Societate  pe  Actiuniquot;  or  SA),  both  of  which  are  run  by directors appointed by shareholders. Directors may be sued by the company or by individual shareholders for causing losses to the company and may be sued by third parties for allowing the company to trade while insolvent. Limits and Scope of Cover It  is  important  to  differentiate  between  quot;professional  insurance  for  managersquot;,  which  was  made  a compulsory  class  when  the  new  Company Law  came  into  effect  on  1  December  2006,  and  conventional D&O insurance. Professional insurance for managers is not explicitly defined in the legislation, and it is therefore assumed that  insurance  based  on  a  conventional  D&O  policy  will  suffice.  The  compulsory  insurance  requirement only  applies  to  managers  of  joint  stock  (quot;SAquot;)  rather  than  limited  liability  companies.  The  obligation  to insure rests with the individual manager and not with the company. The law does not specify a minimum indemnity  limit  and  does  not  include  any  penalty  for  failure  to  insure.  The  only  occasion  on  which  a manager's insurance cover might be checked is if he or she has to register a change in their directorships at a trade registry. Trade registries in some cities ask to see evidence of D&O cover at this point. The law does  not  say  that  compulsory  D&O  cover  must  be  arranged  in  Romania  or  with  a  Romanian  insurer.  In order  to  satisfy  a  trade  registry  enquiry,  a  foreign  D&O  certificate  of  cover  has  to  be  translated  into Romanian. A foreign certificate may not be acceptable if it is not issued by an EU insurer. The normal way for insurers to comply with the law is to issue Side A of a standard D&O policy with the normal  exclusion  of  claims  made  against  a  director  by  the  company  deleted  (except  in  the  case  of  the director's criminal or fraudulent act). Although some directors buy personal policies, most companies buy collective  D&O  policies  which  include  both  Side  A  and  Side  B.  In  order  to  achieve  legal  compliance  at minimal  cost,  many  companies  buy  a  symbolic  limit  of  only  EUR  5,000  (USD  6,849)  in  the  aggregate. According to one insurer's analysis of its D&O portfolio in 2007, 74.5% of its policies had indemnity limits below  EUR  10,000  (USD  13,699)  and  a  further  21.3%  had  limits  between  EUR  10,001  and  EUR  50,000 (USD  13,700  and  USD  68,493).  Only  4.2%  of  policyholders  were  buying  what  might  be  regarded  as adequate cover. Conventional D&O policies comprise directors' liability and corporate reimbursement sections (Sides A and B). Policies are written on a claims made basis with aggregate, costs-inclusive indemnity limits. The normal indemnity  limit  is  EUR  500,000  to  EUR  1mn  (USD  684,932  to  USD  1.37mn),  though  some  policies  have indemnity limits of up to EUR 15mn (USD 20.55mn). Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 121 © AXCO 2009
    • Liability In Romanian parlance, all managers are known as directors whether they have a seat on the board or not. D&O policies indemnify members of the board and executive directors, who are the Romanian equivalent of quot;officersquot;. Employment practices liability is not normally written in Romania. Rating and Deductibles Most compulsory D&O policies have only symbolic indemnity limits and are issued with premiums of less than EUR 100 (USD 137). Because of excellent claims experience, rating levels for quot;realquot; D&O policies are low in international terms. Loss Experience D&O claims have been brought or threatened in Romania, though none has yet turned into an insured loss. As an example, a 15% shareholder in Asirom threatened to sue the directors for EUR 1.8mn (USD 2.26mn) in 2006 for having negligently overpaid for a company they acquired. Major Insurers The  leading  specialist  insurers  are  AIG  Romania,  Allianz  Tiriac  and  the  Romanian  branch  of  QBE Insurance (Europe). Most other companies will write D&O either for net account or subject to appropriate reinsurance. Reinsurance A number of non-specialist insurers are said to have some D&O capacity available under their combined liability treaties. Most business, however, is reinsured on a facultative basis, sometimes with a zero local market retention. Distribution The main distribution channels for local business are branch and agency networks. Foreign invested risks are normally broker-controlled. Pollution and Environmental Liability Summary and Trends Romania  has  an  Environmental Protection Law  which  makes  polluters  liable  for  clean-up  costs.  Cover  is available for sudden and accidental pollution damage. Legislative Update There have been no recent changes in legislation. Projected Legislation No projected legislation was known of when this report was in preparation. Statistics Separate statistics are not available for this class. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 122 © AXCO 2009
    • Liability Limits and Scope of Cover Romanian  third  party  liability  policies  may  be  extended  to  include  liability  for  sudden  and  accidental pollution. A  financial  guarantee  or  insurance  is  required  for  all  shipments  of  waste  imported  into  the  EU,  exported from it or in transit through it. It is intended to cover costs where recovery or disposal is illegal or cannot be completed as intended. For more details please see the EU Legislation report. Exposure Potential  insurers  should  be  fully  aware  of  the  legacy  of  the  Ceausescu  regime,  with  its  emphasis  on maximising  industrial  production  whatever  the  cost.  Industrial  pollution  is  calculated  to  affect  10%  of  the population  and  20%  of  the  country's  territory.  To  take  just  two  examples  of  its  effects,  life  expectancy around  the  Zlatna  copper  smelter  is  10  years  below  the  average,  whilst  pollution  from  the  artificial  fibre factory at Suceava gave rise to quot;Suceava Syndromequot; a unique respiratory and nervous complaint that led to  many  malformed  babies  being  born.  Romanian  pollution  also  has  an  international  dimension,  with chlorine emissions from the Giurgiu chemical plant having caused chronic respiratory complaints over the Danube  in  neighbouring  Bulgaria.  A  dam-burst  at  a  Romanian  gold  mine  in  2000  contaminated  the  river Tisza with cyanide and heavy metal residues, severely affecting irrigation and river fishery downstream in Hungary. Financial and Professional Risks Summary and Trends Most of Romania's banks have been taken over by foreign institutions which have transferred their bankers' blanket bonds to global policies written on a fronting basis. The only specialist insurers are AIG Romania and Allianz Tiriac. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 123 © AXCO 2009
    • Surety, Bonds and Credit Summary and Trends Credit  and  guarantee  insurance  generated  premiums  of  RON  400.67mn  (USD  164.34mn)  in  2007, equivalent to 7.0% of the non-life market total. The  main  part  of  the  credit  market  is  consumer  credit  and  lease  guarantee  policies  written  for  leasing companies  and  banks.  These  produced  reasonable  profits  between  2003  and  2005  but  the  loss  ratio deteriorated  in  2006  as  the  banks'  lending  policies  became  increasingly  promiscuous.  Insurers  began  to pull  back  from  the  market  in  2007  and  largely  abandoned  it  in  2008  as  economic  conditions  deteriorated and reinsurance capacity was withdrawn. Three of the leading bank-owned consumer credit insurers (BCR, Asiban and BT) were also taken over by the Vienna Insurance Group and Groupama. As a result of these factors, credit insurance premiums fell by 57.0% year-on-year in the first half of 2008. Following its accession to the EU, Romania has a diversifying trade credit insurance market comprising the state-owned Eximbank and newly-established branches of Euler Hermes and Coface. Statistics Premiums  from  2003  to  2004  are  gross  collected  premiums;  premiums  from  2005  onwards  are  gross written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Construction/Other Bonds There are only two insurance markets for contractors' performance bonds - Allianz Tiriac and the Romanian branch  of  QBE  Insurance  (Europe)  -  both  of  which  are  highly  selective  and  only  deploy  capacity  of  EUR 5mn  (USD  6.85mn)  each.  Brokers  buy  as  much  cover  for  their  clients  as  they  can,  but  the  bulk  of contractors' bonding requirements are met by the banks. Performance bonds are normally required for 5% to 10% of contract value. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 124 © AXCO 2009
    • Surety, Bonds and Credit Tour operators are required to provide insolvency bonds to cover advance payments made by customers and repatriation expenses. Tour operators have an association scheme underwritten by Asirom. Export Credit Following  its  accession  to  the  EU,  Romania  has  a  diversifying  export  credit  insurance  market  comprising the state-owned Eximbank and newly-established branches of Euler Hermes and Coface. The  oldest  export  credit  insurer  is  the  state-owned  Eximbank,  which  was  established  in  1992  as  a commercial bank and specialist export credit insurer. The company was made subject to a special law (Law No 96/2000)  in  2000  and  is  no  longer  registered  as  an  insurance  company.  Eximbank  is  increasingly focused on export finance and state-backed guarantee business and is no longer regarded as a rival to the commercial  export  credit  insurers.  In  2007  it  recorded  credit  insurance  premiums  of  only  RON  440,000 (USD 180,476) and covered only RON 132.41mn (USD 54.31mn) of exports. Until Romania joined the EU, Eximbank's only rival was Allianz Tiriac, which wrote commercial export credit risks as agent for Euler Hermes. Euler Hermes has now established a Romanian branch in its own right, as has  Coface.  Despite  the  arrival  of  two  international  specialists,  however,  Romanian  exporters  take  little interest in export credit insurance, and it is estimated that export business accounts for only 5% of the total credit market. Domestic Trade Credit Domestic trade credit is now written in Romania by local branches of Coface and Euler Hermes. There are no  statistics  to  show  the  size  or  growth  of  the  domestic  market,  but  it  is  still  believed  to  be  small.  Most policies are written on whole turnover basis providing 85% cover. Policyholders are drawn from all sectors of the economy, though the main users are suppliers to the construction industry. There is also increasing co-operation  with  trade  factors.  A  new  Bankruptcy Law  was  passed  two  years  ago  but  it  is  too  soon  to judge its effectiveness. Official sources of credit underwriting information are said to be reasonably good. By  far  the  largest  part  of  the  credit  insurance  market  is  consumer  credit  and  lease  guarantee  policies written  for  banks  and  leasing  companies.  Policies  are  normally  written  without  deductibles  and  are triggered  after  the  borrower  or  lessee  has  defaulted  on  three  monthly  instalments.  Some  policies  have break  clauses  which  allow  insurers  to  re-negotiate  terms  or  cancel  if  the  loss  ratio  hits  a  specified  level, though  the  insurer  remains  on  risk  for  the  quot;tailquot;  of  contracts  guaranteed  before  the  break  clause  was invoked. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 125 © AXCO 2009
    • Surety, Bonds and Credit Consumer credit and lease guarantee policies are popular with banks as a way of circumventing National Bank  of  Romania  restrictions  on  their  lending  ambitions.  Most  business  was  originally  written  by bank-owned  insurers  which  acted  as  quasi-captives,  but  was  also  written  by  independent  insurance companies  as  a  way  of  positioning  themselves  for  associated  motor  casco  and  collateral  insurance schemes. As a result of huge losses incurred on the business in the late 1990s, insurers such as Omniasig professionalised their underwriting by setting up dedicated credit scoring and claims handling departments. This  allowed  the  business  to  be  underwritten  at  a  profit  until  2006  when  the  banks'  increasingly promiscuous  lending  led  to  a  deteriorating  loss  ratio.  Most  insurers  have  now  reduced  their  exposure  or withdrawn from the market. Because  of  concern  about  the  catastrophe  potential  of  consumer  credit  business,  the  Insurance Supervisory Commission imposed the following conditions on credit insurers in February 2004: • companies must establish dedicated credit scoring departments • the maximum net retention for consumer credit business should not exceed the local currency equivalent of EUR 5,000 (USD 6,849) per debtor • the maximum net retention for mortgage credit business should not exceed the local currency equivalent of EUR 50,000 (USD 68,493) per debtor • the total net retention for credit business should not exceed 12 times net assets in the previous financial year • net written premiums for credit business should not exceed 25% of total net written non-life premiums • reinsurance should be placed with companies with a minimum BBB rating. A number of international reinsurers were willing to cover consumer credit business as part of a cedant's proportional  bouquet.  Treaties  were  normally  arranged  on  a  quota  share  basis  subject  to  a  loss  cap.  In 2007,  54.0%  of  credit  premiums  were  ceded  to  reinsurance.  In  the  current  economic  climate  it  is  still possible to include lease guarantees in miscellaneous credit treaties, but not consumer credit risks. Major Insurers The  top  five  credit  insurers  and  their  percentage  market  shares  over  the  period  2003  to  2007  were  as follows: Company 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 BCR 15.0 28.9 28.0 44.1 36.9 Asiban 42.6 27.8 25.2 13.5 22.3 Omniasig 7.4 11.0 23.4 10.5 18.4 Garanta 7.5 10.9 7.6 14.3 9.9 BT n/a n/a n/a n/a 3.9 Generali n/a n/a n/a 5.9 n/a Allianz Tiriac 11.1 11.6 9.8 n/a n/a Top five total 83.6 90.2 94.0 88.3 91.4 Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 126 © AXCO 2009
    • Surety, Bonds and Credit Source: CSA The credit insurance market is dominated by companies which were originally bank-owned and therefore acted as quasi-captives. BCR was originally owned by companies in the Banca Comerciala Romana group but  has  recently  been  taken  over  by  the  Vienna  Insurance  Group.  Asiban  was  owned  by  four  separate banks  but  has  now  been  bought  by  Groupama,  as  has  BT,  which  was  owned  by  Banca  Transilvania. Garanta  is  part  of  the  National  Bank  of  Greece  Group.  Omniasig  (which  is  also  part  of  the  Vienna Insurance Group) used to write the Daewoo Motors car leasing scheme as well as consumer credit policies for 11 banks. Mortgage Indemnity Insurance Mortgage indemnity insurance is not written in Romania. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 127 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit Summary and Trends In 2007 the MAT account generated premiums of RON 109.81mn (USD 45.04mn), equivalent to 1.9% of the non-life market total. This was made up as follows: Class Premium RON mn USD mn Marine hull 30.62 12.56 Marine liabilities 3.04 1.25 Cargo 40.11 16.45 Aviation hull 14.10 5.78 Aviation liabilities 18.08 7.42 Railway rolling stock 3.86 1.58 Total 109.81 45.04 Source: CSA Romania's state-owned fleets have been liquidated, and the hull market mainly comprises private operators with between one and three ships each. Most cargo insurance is arranged by foreign trade partners. The largest element in the aviation account is the national flag carrier Tarom, which is still in public ownership. Statistics Premiums  from  2003  to  2004  are  gross  collected  premiums;  premiums  from  2005  onwards  are  gross written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Marine Hull Summary and Trends Shipping is one of the many Romanian industries which collapsed after the fall of communism. The three main state-owned fleets have been forced into liquidation, and the shipping industry now consists of around 40  private  companies  with  between  one  and  three  ships  each.  There  are  also  five  shipyards,  not  all  of which are insured, and a Danube river fleet. The only local hull insurer of note is Astra, which also writes an inwards reinsurance account of Turkish Black Sea hull and P&I risks. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 128 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit Statistics Premiums  from  2003  to  2004  are  gross  collected  premiums;  premiums  from  2005  onwards  are  gross written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Hull premiums fell by 48.6% in 2004 when the Histria fleet was transferred to the Greek insurance market. Marine Hazard There  are  no  marine  hazards  which  are  specific  to  Romania's  Black  Sea  coast.  The  Danube  presents  a number  of  hazards  to  brown  water  shipping,  including  low  water  levels  in  times  of  drought,  shifting  sand bars and floating debris such as logs which can cause damage to pleasure vessel hulls. Marine Risks Romania's shipping industry has suffered a catastrophic decline over the last decade: between 1996 and 2005, for example, the number of freighters on the national register fell from 289 to 36, whilst total tonnage fell  from  6.36mn  DWT  to  176,000  DWT.  The  country  used  to  have  three  state-owned  fleets  (Navrom, Romline and Petromin) but these were all forced into liquidation and their vessels sold. The only significant remnant  of  the  state-owned  sector  was  the  Histria  fleet,  but  this  was  bought  by  Greek  owners  and re-flagged in 2003. The  state-owned  fleets  have  been  replaced  by  a  private  sector  of  about  40  companies  comprising  small owners,  managers  and  bare  boat  charterers.  Private  fleets  range  in  size  from  one  to  three  ships  and include  some  high-value  drilling  vessels  for  the  offshore  oil  industry.  There  is  also  a  substantial  port  and river  fleet  comprising  tugs,  barges  and  passenger  ferries  for  use  on  the  Danube.  The  development  of Romania  as  a  leisure  destination  has  also  increased  the  number  of  yachts  and  pleasure  vessels  on  the Danube and the Black Sea coast. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 129 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit Romania has a total of five ship-builders on the Black Sea and Danube. The largest is at Constanta where production ranges from river-going barges up to bulk carriers of 170,000 DWT. The Daewoo Mangalia yard has two dry docks with a capacity of 200,000 DWT including the largest repair dock on the Black Sea. It also has the capacity to produce rigs and specialist equipment for the offshore oil industry. The yards are reported to have full order books through to 2012-13. Limits and Scope of Cover Blue water vessels are generally insured on an all risks basis; Danube barges for total loss only. Rating Local  insurers  charge  rates  of  up  to  6.5%  for  river  vessel  hull,  though  they  are  losing  pleasure  craft business to freedom of services insurers in Austria and France which charge as little as 1%. Loss Experience and Largest Losses Loss  experience  has  been  generally  satisfactory,  despite  the  age  and  allegedly  poor  maintenance  of  the domestic fleet. The largest recent loss was a USD 2mn fire in a Danube passenger vessel. Major Insurers The following table shows the top three marine hull insurers and their percentage market shares over the period 2003 to 2007: Company 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Ardaf n/a 32.4 51.1 41.0 35.7 Astra 60.1 38.7 22.8 23.2 23.5 Omniasig 13.3 n/a n/a 17.7 18.2 Asirom 23.3 18.2 12.3 n/a n/a Top three total 96.7 89.3 86.2 81.9 77.4 Source: CSA Ardaf was put into receivership by the Insurance Supervisory Commission in July 2006, was rescued by the PPF  Group,  and  is  now  part  of  Generali  PPF  Holding.  The  company  is  believed  to  have  lost  its  leading position  in  the  domestic  market  to  Astra,  which  also  writes  an  international  inwards  account  of  Turkish Black Sea marine hull and P&I business. Omniasig withdrew from the blue water market in 2002 and now confines itself to river and brown water hulls. Asirom writes some pleasure craft and brown water hulls and issues fronting policies for two Norwegian-owned shipyards. Reinsurance Marine  specialists  have  hull  treaties.  Other  insurers  have  excess  of  loss  cargo  treaties  which  will  also accept cessions of hull business. Maximum capacity is believed to be around USD 10mn. Many hulls are reinsured on a facultative basis. Romania's shipyards require facultative capacity of up to USD 120mn per vessel. Distribution Distribution is either direct or through brokers. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 130 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit Marine Cargo Summary and Trends Much of Romania's foreign trade is either uninsured or insured by foreign trade partners. Although the local cargo account is small, the exclusion of most common causes of loss makes it a highly profitable class for insurers. Statistics Premiums  from  2003  to  2004  are  gross  collected  premiums;  premiums  from  2005  onwards  are  gross written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. ass='paragraph_text'>Premiums  from  2003  to  2004  are  gross  collected  premiums;  premiums  from  2005 onwards are gross written premiums. Inwards reinsurance premiums are included in gross premiums until 2006. Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 131 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit paragraph_text'>Premiums  from  2003  to  2004  are  gross  collected  premiums;  premiums  from  2005 onwards are gross written premiums. Inwards reinsurance premiums are included in gross premiums until 2006. Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. raph_text'>Premiums from 2003 to 2004 are gross collected premiums; premiums from 2005 onwards are gross  written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 132 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit text'>Premiums from 2003 to 2004 are gross collected premiums; premiums from 2005 onwards are gross written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. >Premiums  from  2003  to  2004  are  gross  collected  premiums;  premiums  from  2005  onwards  are  gross written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 133 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit iums  from  2003  to  2004  are  gross  collected  premiums;  premiums  from  2005  onwards  are  gross  written premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios  are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. from  2003  to  2004  are  gross  collected  premiums;  premiums  from  2005  onwards  are  gross  written premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios  are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 134 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit 2003  to  2004  are  gross  collected  premiums;  premiums  from  2005  onwards  are  gross  written  premiums. Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios  are  expressed  as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. to 2004 are gross collected premiums; premiums from 2005 onwards are gross written premiums. Inwards reinsurance premiums are included in gross premiums until 2006. Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 135 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit 04  are  gross  collected  premiums;  premiums  from  2005  onwards  are  gross  written  premiums.  Inwards reinsurance premiums are included in gross premiums until 2006. Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. e  gross  collected  premiums;  premiums  from  2005  onwards  are  gross  written  premiums.  Inwards reinsurance premiums are included in gross premiums until 2006. Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 136 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit ss  collected  premiums;  premiums  from  2005  onwards  are  gross  written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios  are  expressed  as  paid  claims  to  gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. llected  premiums;  premiums  from  2005  onwards  are  gross  written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios  are  expressed  as  paid  claims  to  gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 137 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit ed  premiums;  premiums  from  2005  onwards  are  gross  written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios  are  expressed  as  paid  claims  to  gross  written  or gross collected premiums depending on the year. emiums;  premiums  from  2005  onwards  are  gross  written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are included in gross premiums until 2006. Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 138 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit s; premiums from 2005 onwards are gross written premiums. Inwards reinsurance premiums are included in gross premiums until 2006. Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. emiums  from  2005  onwards  are  gross  written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios  are  expressed  as  paid  claims  to  gross  written  or  gross  collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 139 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit s  from  2005  onwards  are  gross  written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross premiums until 2006. Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. m  2005  onwards  are  gross  written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross premiums until 2006. Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 140 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit 5 onwards are gross written premiums. Inwards reinsurance premiums are included in gross premiums until 2006. Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. ards  are  gross  written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until 2006. Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 141 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit are  gross  written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006. Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. ross  written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 142 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. en  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios  are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 143 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit emiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios  are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. s. Inwards reinsurance premiums are included in gross premiums until 2006. Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 144 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit nwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios  are  expressed  as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. s  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios  are  expressed  as  paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 145 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit nsurance premiums are included in gross premiums until 2006. Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. nce  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios  are  expressed  as  paid  claims  to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 146 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit remiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios  are  expressed  as  paid  claims  to  gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. ms are included in gross premiums until 2006. Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 147 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit e included in gross premiums until 2006. Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. luded  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios  are  expressed  as  paid  claims  to  gross  written  or  gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 148 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit in gross premiums until 2006. Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. ross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios  are  expressed  as  paid  claims  to  gross  written  or  gross  collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 149 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit premiums until 2006. Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. ums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios  are  expressed  as  paid  claims  to  gross  written  or  gross  collected  premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 150 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit ntil 2006. Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. 2006. Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 151 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit Loss ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. s ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 152 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit ios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. re expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 153 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit pressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. ed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 154 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 155 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit ms to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 156 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit s written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. tten or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 157 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit or gross collected premiums depending on the year. oss collected premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 158 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit ollected premiums depending on the year. ted premiums depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 159 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit remiums depending on the year. ms depending on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 160 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit pending on the year. ng on the year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 161 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit the year. year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 162 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit p align='center'> Hazard There  are  said  to  be  no  particular  causes  of  loss,  other  than  the  normal  incidence  of  theft  and  collision damage. Romania produces few high-value manufactures for export and does little outwards trade with the high-theft countries of the former Soviet Union. Romania's  largest  port,  and  indeed  the  largest  on  the  Black  Sea,  is  Constanta,  which  has recently-modernised container facilities. There is also a satellite port at Agigea at the entrance to the Black Sea-Danube Canal. Pilferage and bad handling do not appear to be serious causes of loss. Limits and Scope of Cover Romanian policies are based on the Institute Cargo Clauses but may be subject to numerous underwriting exclusions. Common exclusions include theft, loading and unloading risks and damage to containers. Own vehicle goods in transit covers are often limited to total loss only. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 163 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit Rating Rates are said to be stable at a low level. Loss Experience Claims experience is exceptionally good, mainly because underwriters exclude many of the most common causes of loss. One observer suggests that loss ratios would rise from the current average of around 5% to 20% or 30% if full all risks cover were more commonly granted. Major Insurers The following table shows the top five marine cargo insurers and their percentage market shares over the period 2003 to 2007: Company 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Allianz Tiriac 19.9 23.0 33.1 27.4 29.6 Omniasig 8.0 11.6 18.7 15.1 23.5 Astra 6.7 6.6 8.5 18.4 8.5 Generali n/a n/a 8.9 7.5 6.2 BCR n/a n/a n/a 8.1 5.8 Asiban 25.9 21.8 8.2 n/a n/a Asirom 6.1 5.9 n/a n/a n/a Top five total 66.6 68.9 77.4 76.5 73.6 Source: CSA Reinsurance Marine treaties are generally arranged on an excess of loss basis with capacity of up to USD 10mn. Distribution Distribution is direct or through agents or brokers. Marine Liability Summary and Trends There is no compulsory insurance requirement for third party bodily injury. Voluntary P&I policies have low indemnity limits, with even lower sub-limits in respect of death, personal injury, personal effects etc. Marine liability is written in Romania by Astra, Allianz Tiriac and Omniasig. Compulsory Covers There is no compulsory insurance requirement for third party bodily injury. Energy Summary and Trends Energy supply Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 164 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit The Romanian oil industry is considered the oldest in the world, just ahead of the US. The first Romanian oil company was founded in 1864, and by the turn of the century Romania was the third largest producer in the world. It is still the largest producer in central Europe. The industry is centred on Ploiesti, onshore to the north of Bucharest, and is dominated by the ex-state-owned company Petrom, which was sold to Austria's OMV  in  2004.  The  refining  industry  has  been  split  up  and  sold,  part  of  it  to  Russia's  Lukoil  and  part  to Rompetrol Group BV, which operates the Petromidia refinery. The energy sector has suffered from decades of under-investment, neglect and political misdirection. Most of  the  infrastructure  is  rotted,  environmentally  unsound  and  obsolescent.  Now  that  the  industry  has  been privatised, Petrom plans to invest EUR 3bn (USD 4.11bn) by 2010, part of it directed to offshore exploration in the Black Sea. Romania has a single nuclear power station at Cernavoda situated at the junction of the Danube and the Danube-Black  Sea  Canal  in  the  south-east  of  the  country.  The  project,  using  Canadian  technology,  was initiated by Ceausescu in the early 1980s but construction was dogged by quality problems, particularly in connection  with  the  welding,  and  by  shortage  of  finance.  The  first  of  the  five  proposed  reactors,  with  an output of 760MW, was finally connected to the national grid on 11 July 1996. Energy insurance The oil industry was largely uninsured when it was in state ownership. Insurance coverage has increased with  privatisation,  though  most  of  the  business  has  been  lost  to  foreign  markets.  Petrom,  for  example,  is insured directly abroad by the OMV captive and global programme, the Lukoil refineries are insured under the  Russian  company's  refinery  programme,  whilst  the  Rompetrol  refinery  is  subject  to  fronting arrangements.  Some  offshore  drilling  vessels  are  covered  by  Astra  but  others  are  insured  directly  in  the London market. The Cernavoda nuclear power station is insured by a 12-member nuclear pool led by Generali. Aviation Summary and Trends Romania  has  both  an  airline  and  an  aeronautical  engineering  industry.  The  leading  airline  is  the state-owned  Tarom,  which  the  government  has  yet  to  privatise.  The  aeronautical  industry  includes helicopter  and  light  aircraft  manufacturer  IAR  Brasov  and  Turbomecanica,  which  makes  parts  and sub-assemblies for aircraft engines. The most fiercely contested account in the Romanian market is Tarom. After many years with Omniasig, the account was transferred to Allianz Tiriac in 2006 and to Astra in 2007. The airline's long period without a serious loss came to end in December 2007 when a B737 hit a maintenance vehicle on the runway of Bucharest's Otopeni airport as it was attempting to take off in thick fog. There were no fatalities, though the hull was a USD 10mn constructive total loss. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 165 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit Statistics Premiums  from  2003  to  2004  are  gross  collected  premiums;  premiums  from  2005  onwards  are  gross written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. The increase in the loss ratio in 2007 resulted from the total loss of a Tarom B737 at Bucharest's Otopeni airport on 30 December. Airlines The  national  flag  carrier  is  Tarom,  which  continues  to  be  state-owned.  Over  the  last  decade  Tarom  has reduced its fleet from 61 to 22 aircraft but has improved its overall fleet quality by substituting western for Russian types. The current fleet comprises ATR 42, B737, A310 and A318. There is a further state-owned carrier called Romavia with a mixed fleet of six aircraft which mainly operates in the charter market. Carpatair is a regional carrier based in Timisoara with a fleet of 12 SAAB 2000 and four other types. General Aviation General  aviation  risks  include  the  interior  ministry  fleet  of  helicopters  and  planes,  flying  schools  and wealthy private owners (one of whom recently purchased a USD 2.2mn helicopter). Space There is no market for space risks in Romania. Aviation Liabilities There is a compulsory aviation third party liability requirement in accordance with EC Regulation 785/2004. Airport liabilities are placed with local insurers. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 166 © AXCO 2009
    • Marine, Aviation and Transit Loss Experience Tarom  had  an  extremely  unfortunate  loss  experience  in  the  early  1990s,  including  the  total  loss  of  an Airbus, two B707s (chartered to Air Afrique), a BAC One-Eleven, an Antonov AN-24, an Ilyushin Il-18 and a Tupolev  Tu-154.  Market  sources  estimate  that  this  period  in  the  airline's  history  cost  the  insurance community up to USD 80mn in claims. A  long  loss-free  period  came  to  an  abrupt  end  on  30  December  2007  when  a  Tarom  B737  hit  a maintenance vehicle on the runway of Bucharest's Otopeni airport as it was attempting to take off in thick fog. The aircraft veered off the runway and came to a halt on the grass. There were no fatalities, though the aircraft  was  a  constructive  total  loss.  Insurer  Astra  has  made  a  loss  payment  of  USD  10mn.  Since  the aircraft had been given take-off clearance by the airport control tower there is thought to be a subrogation claim in progress against the airport liability insurer. Major Insurers The leading aviation insurer is Astra, which won the Tarom account from Allianz Tiriac on 1 February 2007 and also writes Romavia. General aviation markets include Allianz Tiriac, Asiban, BCR and Omniasig. Reinsurance Most  aviation  risks  are  reinsured  on  a  facultative  basis  with  a  negligible  domestic  retention.  The  tender conditions for Tarom and Romavia require 100% reinsurance backing. Distribution Most aviation business is handled on a direct basis. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 167 © AXCO 2009
    • Personal Accident and Travel Personal Accident Summary and Trends Stand-alone PA was a non-life class until 1 January 2005 but may now be written by both life and non-life companies.  PA  written  by  non-life  companies  generated  premiums  of  RON  66.16mn  (USD  27.14mn)  in 2007,  equivalent  to  1.2%  of  the  non-life  market  total.  PA  written  by  life  companies  generated  further premiums of RON 12.54mn (USD 5.14mn). PA is mainly bought on a group basis as a voluntary supplement to the low level of workers' compensation benefits  provided  by  the  social  security  system.  The  non-life  account  declined  in  size  in  2005  when  a re-grouping of insurance classes allowed composite insurers to transfer part of their PA underwriting from their  non-life  to  their  life  accounts.  Although  there  was  a  temporary  revival  in  2006,  the  migration  from non-life to life gathered pace in 2007, and most group benefits are now provided by life companies. The  individual  PA  market  mainly  comprises  passenger  accident  policies,  although  the  recent  growth  in consumer  lending  by  the  banks  has  led  to  an  increase  in  loan  protection  PA  policies.  Low-level  accident and health benefits are also provided for debit and credit card holders. Statistics Premiums  from  2003  to  2004  are  gross  collected  premiums;  premiums  from  2005  onwards  are  gross written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. The 14.6% reduction in PA premiums in 2005 resulted partly from a re-grouping of insurance classes at the beginning of the year which allowed composite insurers to transfer part of their PA underwriting from their non-life to their life operations. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 168 © AXCO 2009
    • Personal Accident and Travel Limits and Scope of Cover PA  policies  are  mainly  purchased  by  employers  as  a  voluntary  substitute  for  workers'  compensation  or employers' liability insurance. Terms of coverage are negotiated between trade unions and employers and vary  widely  from  company  to  company  and  between  managers,  clerical  staff  and  manual  workers.  Some employers  provide  lump  sum  death  benefits  related  to  employment  grade,  whilst  others  express  death benefits  as  a  multiple  of  annual  salary.  Typical  lump  sum  benefits  are  EUR  10,000  (USD  13,699)  for manual  workers,  EUR  20,000  to  EUR  30,000  (USD  27,397  to  USD  41,096)  for  administrative  staff  and EUR  50,000  to  EUR  70,000  (USD  68,493  to  USD  95,890)  for  managers.  Death  benefits  expressed  as salary multiples range from 100% to 300% of annual salary. The permanent total disability benefit is either 100% or 200% of the death benefit. Higher benefits are sometimes provided for drivers and travelling sales representatives to compensate for the road accident risk. Over the last few years the basic working hours PA policy has been loaded up with an increasing number of rider benefits. These might include: • 24-hour cover • medical expenses incurred as a result of accident • broken bone and/or burn benefit of EUR 500 to EUR 1,000 (USD 685 to USD 1,370) • temporary disability as a result of hospitalisation • hospital cash benefit of EUR 5 to EUR 50 (USD 7 to USD 68) per day • surgical cash benefit of EUR 500 to EUR 3,000 (USD 685 to USD 4,110) • funeral benefit (a disguised form of group life cover). The  large  number  of  health-related  riders  is  a  reflection  on  the  poor  quality  of  public  health  services  in Romania.  Broken  bone  and  burn  benefits  are  commonly  requested  for  high-risk  occupations  such  as construction. PA  and  occupational  disease  cover  is  a  compulsory  insurance  for  employees  who  belong  to  factory  fire brigades. There is no statutory benefit level, and capital sums are related either to salary or the fine for not insuring. Public transport undertakings, taxi firms and private motorists purchase PA cover for their passengers. The normal  death  benefit  is  RON  20,000  (USD  7,194)  per  capita.  Insurers  also  offer  individual  or  family  PA policies. Low-level accident and health benefits are increasingly provided for debit and credit card holders. Rating and Deductibles Group PA policies are rated on a per capita basis with premiums based on occupational hazard. There is a lack of national accident statistics and it is rare for holding insurers to make three years' claims experience available  to  competing  companies.  There  is  therefore  little  technical  basis  to  group  personal  accident quotations, which can be subject to irresponsible premium discounting. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 169 © AXCO 2009
    • Personal Accident and Travel Loss Experience Loss experience has been consistently good for many years. Major Insurers The top five PA insurers and their percentage market shares over the period 2003 to 2007 were as follows: Company 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Omniasig n/a n/a n/a 10.0 15.6 Astra 5.6 16.6 8.6 24.9 14.3 AIG Romania n/a 5.1 n/a n/a 11.2 Asirom 14.1 12.8 12.0 n/a 10.3 Allianz Tiriac 19.8 20.0 21.6 10.1 9.6 Garanta n/a 9.1 8.4 10.6 n/a Carpatica n/a n/a 11.6 11.1 n/a RAI 13.4 n/a n/a n/a n/a BCR 5.9 n/a n/a n/a n/a Top five total 58.8 63.6 62.2 66.7 68.1 Source: CSA Reinsurance Because  of  the  low  level  of  benefits,  most  PA  business  is  retained.  Aviation  specialists  package  their aircraft accumulation cover with their facultative hull and liability business. Distribution The main distribution channels are the companies' branch and agency networks. Foreign-invested risks are generally broker-controlled. Banks are the main source of loan-protection business. Creditor Insurance The  main  growth  in  the  individual  PA  market  comes  from  banks,  which  commonly  require  personal borrowers to protect their loan repayments with accidental death and permanent disability policies. Travel Summary and Trends Romanians have been allowed visa-free access to the Schengen Agreement countries of the EU since 1 January  2002.  Although  this  led  to  an  initial  reduction  in  travel  business  (since  travellers  were  no  longer required to have medical expenses insurance as a visa condition), increasing numbers of policies are now bought either on a voluntary basis or as part of a holiday quot;packagequot;. Statistics The  only  statistics  relating  to  travel  insurance  are  for  tourist  assistance  services.  Tourist  assistance premiums amounted to RON 46.61mn (USD 19.12mn) in 2007, an increase of 39.6% from 2006. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 170 © AXCO 2009
    • Personal Accident and Travel Limits and Scope of Cover Travel  policies  are  normally  limited  to  medical  expenses  and  emergency  repatriation  costs,  though comprehensive policies including cancellation and curtailment, PA, personal baggage and personal liability sections are available on request. Medical expenses limits range from EUR 25,000 to EUR 250,000 (USD 34,247 to USD 342,466). Overseas claims handling is sub-contracted to professional assistance agencies. Executive travel policies are available with standard extensions such as the cost of flying out a replacement executive  if  the  original  traveller  falls  ill.  War  and  terrorism  are  excluded  but  can  be  reinstated  for  an additional premium. Banks provide quot;freequot; travel cover for credit card customers, often with higher medical expenses limits than are available under individual policies. Rating and Deductibles The standard premium for medical expenses cover for European leisure travel is EUR 1 (USD 1) per day. Loss Experience Travel health can have poor results if insurers are not alert to fraud. There have been cases, for example, of policyholders booking themselves into foreign hospitals before they leave home and getting a Romanian doctor to falsely certify that their treatment was a genuine medical emergency. Major Insurers There  are  no  travel  insurance  specialists.  Companies  which  write  travel  insurance  include  Astra,  Asirom, Interamerican and Allianz Tiriac. AIG has withdrawn from the leisure travel market on a regional basis but remains a leading executive travel insurer. Reinsurance Travel policies are normally reinsured on a quota share basis. Distribution Travel insurance is mainly distributed by travel agents as part of a holiday package. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 171 © AXCO 2009
    • Appendix No 1 - Market Statistics Insurance Supervisor's Report Summary Market statistics are compiled by the Insurance Supervisory Commission (CSA) on the basis of insurance companies'  statutory  returns.  The  CSA's  annual  reports  are  normally  published  in  June  or  July  of  the following year, though they can be delayed for many months pending parliamentary approval. The  private  publishing  company  Media XPRIMM  publishes  quarterly  market  statistics  in  its  Insurance Profile magazine which are based on data supplied directly by the insurance companies. Change in Format The  CSA  adopted  the  EU  classification  of  business  classes  in  2001.  This  had  the  following  effect  on  the presentation of statistics: • property was divided between fire and natural perils and all other damage • separate statistics for agriculture were discontinued • marine business was divided between hull and cargo and new statistics were published for marine and aviation liabilities • personal accident was divided between PA, sickness and travel assistance. A further re-classification of business effective from 1 January 2005 resulted in credit and guarantee being split between its two constituent classes. Between  2002  and  2004  the  CSA  provided  separate  figures  for  gross  written  premiums  and  collected premiums. From 2005 onwards figures were provided only for gross written premiums. Inwards reinsurance premiums were included in gross premiums until 2006. Date of Latest Report The latest CSA report covering 2007 was published in October 2008.   ================================================================================= Update February 2009 New statistical information has become available since this report was published. Quarterly statistics for 2007.Q3 and 2008.Q3 have been added. These new statistics may be different from the statistics and commentary in the text of this report, which were prepared at the time of the consultant's visit to the country.   ================================================================================= Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 172 © AXCO 2009
    • Appendix No 1 - Market Statistics Non-Life Market Totals   ================================================================================= Update February 2009 New statistical information has become available since this report was published. Quarterly statistics for 2007.Q3 and 2008.Q3 have been added. These new statistics may be different from the statistics and commentary in the text of this report, which were prepared at the time of the consultant's visit to the country.   ================================================================================= Introduction Premiums  from  2003  to  2004  are  gross  collected  premiums;  premiums  from  2005  onwards  are  gross written  premiums.  Inwards  reinsurance  premiums  are  included  in  gross  premiums  until  2006.  Loss  ratios are expressed as paid claims to gross written or gross collected premiums depending on the year. Yearly Totals In this table complete years are shown. If quarterly figures are available these are shown under a quarterly table below. YEAR 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Total Non-Life Excluding PA & Healthcare Premiums RON Mn 1,749.9 2,403.9 3,273.2 4,426.1 5,590.3 PA & Healthcare Written By Non-Life Companies Premiums RON Mn 93.6 119.1 106.0 164.9 136.5 TOTAL NON-LIFE INCLUDING PA & HEALTHCARE Premiums RON Mn 1,843.5 2,523.0 3,379.2 4,591.0 5,726.8 Growth % 49.7% 36.9% 33.9% 35.9% 24.7% Premiums USD Mn 555.3 773.0 1,159.6 1,634.4 2,349.0 Growth % 49.0% 39.2% 50.0% 40.9% 43.7% Rate of Exchange 3.3200 3.2637 2.9140 2.8090 2.4380 to USD Source: Comisia de Supraveghere a Asigurarilor - CSA (Insurance Supervisor) Due to rounding some totals may not equal the breakdown above. Quarterly Totals Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 173 © AXCO 2009
    • Appendix No 1 - Market Statistics In  this  table  the  build  up  of  quarterly  figures  are  shown  where  these  are  available.  The  latest  quarter available is shown and for comparison the history back to the same position in the previous year. YEAR 2007 to Q3 2007 to Q4 2008 to Q1 2008 to Q2 2008 to Q3 Total Non-Life Excluding PA & Healthcare Premiums RON Mn 4,260.5 N/A 1,979.5 3,543.2 5,360.2 PA & Healthcare Written By Non-Life Companies Premiums RON Mn 56.8 N/A 14.4 31.7 59.3 TOTAL NON-LIFE INCLUDING PA & HEALTHCARE Premiums RON Mn 4,317.3 N/A 1,993.9 3,574.9 5,419.5 Growth % 25.7% N/A 15.6% 20.5% 25.5% Premiums USD Mn 1,770.8 N/A 791.2 1,418.6 2,150.6 Growth % 44.8% N/A 11.8% 16.6% 21.4% Rate of Exchange 2.4380 2.4380 2.5200 2.5200 2.5200 to USD Source: Comisia de Supraveghere a Asigurarilor - CSA (Insurance Supervisor) Due to rounding some totals may not equal the breakdown above. Non-Life Insurance   ================================================================================= Update February 2009 New statistical information has become available since this report was published. Quarterly statistics for 2007.Q3 and 2008.Q3 have been added. These new statistics may be different from the statistics and commentary in the text of this report, which were prepared at the time of the consultant's visit to the country.   ================================================================================= Premiums and Loss Ratios Yearly In this table complete years are shown. If quarterly figures are available these are shown under a quarterly table below. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 174 © AXCO 2009
    • Appendix No 1 - Market Statistics YEAR 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Property Premiums RON Mn 314.3 402.5 539.9 703.6 841.9 Growth % 42.9% 28.1% 34.1% 30.3% 19.7% Premiums USD Mn 94.7 123.3 185.3 250.5 345.3 Growth % 42.3% 30.3% 50.2% 35.2% 37.9% Loss Ratios % 11.8% 16.8% 21.3% 14.9% 18.9% Construction & Engineering Premiums RON Mn Growth % Premiums USD Mn No separate statistics are available for this class. Growth % Loss Ratios % Motor Premiums RON Mn 1,201.9 1,674.1 2,307.2 3,095.8 4,120.2 Growth % 54.1% 39.3% 37.8% 34.2% 33.1% Premiums USD Mn 362.0 512.9 791.8 1,102.1 1,690.0 Growth % 53.5% 41.7% 54.4% 39.2% 53.3% Loss Ratios % 56.8% 62.2% 59.0% 65.3% 61.3% Workers' Compensation & Employers' Liability Premiums RON Mn Growth % Premiums USD Mn No separate statistics are available for this class. Growth % Loss Ratios % Liability Premiums RON Mn 34.1 60.0 66.6 93.9 107.4 Growth % 44.6% 75.9% 11.0% 41.0% 14.4% Premiums USD Mn 10.3 18.4 22.9 33.4 44.1 Growth % 44.0% 78.9% 24.3% 46.3% 31.8% Loss Ratios % 3.1% 3.4% 5.8% 5.4% 8.3% Surety, Bonds & Credit Premiums RON Mn 101.6 159.9 264.7 400.8 400.7 Growth % 145.4% 57.5% 65.5% 51.4% (0.0)% Premiums USD Mn 30.6 49.0 90.8 142.7 164.3 Growth % 144.4% 60.2% 85.4% 57.1% 15.2% Loss Ratios % 25.0% 60.0% 56.9% 76.1% 80.0% Miscellaneous Premiums RON Mn 13.0 9.7 7.5 6.4 10.2 Growth % 134.6% (25.9)% (22.3)% (14.2)% 59.1% Premiums USD Mn 3.9 3.0 2.6 2.3 4.2 Growth % 133.6% (24.6)% (12.9)% (10.9)% 83.3% Loss Ratios % 0.6% 3.9% 1.5% 5.1% 22.6% Marine, Aviation & Transit Premiums RON Mn 85.1 97.7 87.2 125.5 109.8 Growth % 0.7% 14.9% (10.7)% 43.8% (12.5)% Premiums USD Mn 25.6 29.9 29.9 44.7 45.0 Growth % 0.2% 16.9% (0.0)% 49.2% 0.8% Loss Ratios % 14.1% 9.3% 18.9% 17.7% 35.9% Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 175 © AXCO 2009
    • Appendix No 1 - Market Statistics YEAR 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 TOTAL NON-LIFE (Excluding PA & Healthcare) Premiums RON Mn 1,749.9 2,403.9 3,273.2 4,426.1 5,590.3 Growth % 51.5% 37.4% 36.2% 35.2% 26.3% Premiums USD Mn 527.1 736.6 1,123.3 1,575.7 2,293.0 Growth % 50.9% 39.7% 52.5% 40.3% 45.5% Rate of Exchange 3.3200 3.2637 2.9140 2.8090 2.4380 to USD Source: Comisia de Supraveghere a Asigurarilor - CSA (Insurance Supervisor) Due to rounding some totals may not equal the breakdown above. Quarterly In  this  table  the  build  up  of  quarterly  figures  are  shown  where  these  are  available.  The  latest  quarter available is shown and for comparison the history back to the same position in the previous year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 176 © AXCO 2009
    • Appendix No 1 - Market Statistics YEAR 2007 to Q3 2007 to Q4 2008 to Q1 2008 to Q2 2008 to Q3 Property Premiums RON Mn 605.0 N/A 336.6 577.1 796.8 Growth % 19.5% N/A 33.2% 38.7% 31.7% Premiums USD Mn 248.1 N/A 133.6 229.0 316.2 Growth % 37.7% N/A 28.8% 34.2% 27.4% Loss Ratios % 5.4% N/A 3.6% 7.7% 10.3% Construction & Engineering Premiums RON Mn Growth % Premiums USD Mn No Statistics are available for this class. Growth % Loss Ratios % Motor Premiums RON Mn 3,108.5 N/A 1,494.4 2,689.8 4,092.8 Growth % 34.7% N/A 23.8% 28.8% 31.7% Premiums USD Mn 1,275.0 N/A 593.0 1,067.4 1,624.1 Growth % 55.2% N/A 19.8% 24.7% 27.4% Loss Ratios % 23.3% N/A 26.4% 47.5% 47.3% Workers' Compensation & Employers' Liability Premiums RON Mn Growth % Premiums USD Mn No Statistics are available for this class. Growth % Loss Ratios % Liability Premiums RON Mn 78.6 N/A 32.5 58.2 93.8 Growth % 6.8% N/A 6.5% 13.0% 19.2% Premiums USD Mn 32.3 N/A 12.9 23.1 37.2 Growth % 23.1% N/A 3.0% 9.3% 15.4% Loss Ratios % 1.1% N/A 1.6% 2.4% 2.4% Surety, Bonds & Credit Premiums RON Mn 315.6 N/A 56.8 112.2 164.0 Growth % 8.1% N/A (60.8)% (56.4)% (48.0)% Premiums USD Mn 129.4 N/A 22.5 44.5 65.1 Growth % 24.6% N/A (62.1)% (57.8)% (49.7)% Loss Ratios % 25.0% N/A 105.4% 66.0% 63.4% Miscellaneous Premiums RON Mn 152.9 N/A 59.1 105.9 212.8 Growth % 11.5% N/A (21.7)% (11.9)% 39.2% Premiums USD Mn 62.7 N/A 23.5 42.0 84.4 Growth % 28.4% N/A (24.2)% (14.8)% 34.7% Loss Ratios % N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Marine, Aviation & Transit Premiums RON Mn Growth % Premiums USD Mn No Statistics are available for this class. Growth % Loss Ratios % Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 177 © AXCO 2009
    • Appendix No 1 - Market Statistics YEAR 2007 to Q3 2007 to Q4 2008 to Q1 2008 to Q2 2008 to Q3 TOTAL NON-LIFE (Excluding PA & Healthcare) Premiums RON Mn 4,260.5 N/A 1,979.5 3,543.2 5,360.2 Growth % 28.5% N/A 15.7% 20.8% 25.8% Premiums USD Mn 1,747.5 N/A 785.5 1,406.0 2,127.0 Growth % 48.0% N/A 12.0% 16.9% 21.7% Rate of Exchange 2.4380 2.4380 2.5200 2.5200 2.5200 to USD Source: Comisia de Supraveghere a Asigurarilor - CSA (Insurance Supervisor) Due to rounding some totals may not equal the breakdown above. Personal Accident   ================================================================================= Update February 2009 New statistical information has become available since this report was published. Quarterly statistics for 2007.Q3 and 2008.Q3 have been added. These new statistics may be different from the statistics and commentary in the text of this report, which were prepared at the time of the consultant's visit to the country.   ================================================================================= Premiums and Loss Ratios Healthcare is addressed as a product line within the Axco life and benefits reports. Yearly In this table complete years are shown. If quarterly figures are available these are shown under a quarterly table below. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 178 © AXCO 2009
    • Appendix No 1 - Market Statistics YEAR 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 PA & Healthcare Written By Non-Life Companies Premiums RON Mn 93.6 119.1 106.0 164.9 136.5 Growth % 21.9% 27.2% (11.0)% 55.6% (17.2)% Premiums USD Mn 28.2 36.5 36.4 58.7 56.0 Growth % 21.4% 29.4% (0.3)% 61.5% (4.7)% Loss Ratios % 17.7% 13.8% 13.1% 14.7% 25.0% PA & Healthcare Written By Life Companies Premiums RON Mn N/A N/A 10.2 9.8 17.1 Growth % N/A N/A N/A (4.2)% 73.8% Premiums USD Mn N/A N/A 3.5 3.5 7.0 Growth % N/A N/A N/A (0.6)% 100.3% Loss Ratios % N/A N/A N/A 19.9% N/A TOTAL PA & HEALTHCARE Premiums RON Mn 93.6 119.1 116.2 174.8 153.6 Growth % 21.9% 27.2% (2.4)% 50.4% (12.1)% Premiums USD Mn 28.2 36.5 39.9 62.2 63.0 Growth % 21.4% 29.4% 9.3% 56.0% 1.2% Loss Ratios % 17.7% 13.8% 13.2% 15.0% 22.2% Rate of Exchange 3.3200 3.2637 2.9140 2.8090 2.4380 to USD Source: Comisia de Supraveghere a Asigurarilor - CSA (Insurance Supervisor) Due to rounding some totals may not equal the breakdown above. Quarterly In  this  table  the  build  up  of  quarterly  figures  are  shown  where  these  are  available.  The  latest  quarter available is shown and for comparison the history back to the same position in the previous year. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 179 © AXCO 2009
    • Appendix No 1 - Market Statistics YEAR 2007 to Q3 2007 to Q4 2008 to Q1 2008 to Q2 2008 to Q3 PA & Healthcare Written By Non-Life Companies Premiums RON Mn 56.8 N/A 14.4 31.7 59.3 Growth % (52.4)% N/A (3.8)% (6.9)% 4.5% Premiums USD Mn 23.3 N/A 5.7 12.6 23.5 Growth % (45.1)% N/A (6.9)% (9.9)% 1.1% Loss Ratios % 13.8% N/A 21.4% 20.6% 15.5% PA & Healthcare Written By Life Companies Premiums RON Mn Growth % Premiums USD Mn No Statistics are available for this class. Growth % Loss Ratios % TOTAL PA & HEALTHCARE Premiums RON Mn 56.8 N/A 14.4 31.7 59.3 Growth % (52.4)% N/A (3.8)% (6.9)% 4.5% Premiums USD Mn 23.3 N/A 5.7 12.6 23.5 Growth % 915.3% N/A (6.9)% (9.9)% 1.1% Loss Ratios % 13.8% N/A 21.4% 20.6% 15.5% Rate of Exchange 2.4380 2.4380 2.5200 2.5200 2.5200 to USD Source: Comisia de Supraveghere a Asigurarilor - CSA (Insurance Supervisor) Due to rounding some totals may not equal the breakdown above. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 180 © AXCO 2009
    • Appendix No 2 - Company Statistics Introduction Insurance companies are ranked on the basis of their gross written direct non-life premiums in 2007. Insurance Companies For more information on insurance companies, see the Market Participants section of this report under the heading Insurance Market Overview. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 181 © AXCO 2009
    • Appendix No 2 - Company Statistics INSURANCE Written Premiums Growth Market Written Premiums COMPANIES 2007 2007 % Share 2006 RON Mn USD Mn % RON Mn Allianz-Tiriac 1,137.6 466.6 10.6% 19.9% 1,028.7 Omniasig 883.9 362.6 64.9% 15.4% 536.1 BCR Asigurari 560.0 229.7 32.1% 9.8% 424.0 Asirom 535.3 219.6 4.6% 9.3% 511.9 Unita 474.2 194.5 82.9% 8.3% 259.2 Asiban 444.5 182.3 18.4% 7.8% 375.4 Astra 367.2 150.6 21.8% 6.4% 301.4 Generali 321.3 131.8 24.6% 5.6% 258.0 BT Asigurari 265.8 109.0 32.0% 4.6% 201.4 Ardaf 157.3 64.5 (18.1)% 2.7% 192.1 Carpatica Asig 109.5 44.9 (3.7)% 1.9% 113.7 AIG Romania 96.6 39.6 23.0% 1.7% 78.5 Euroins Romania 91.2 37.4 40.1% 1.6% 65.1 Garanta 75.7 31.1 (10.4)% 1.3% 84.5 Interamerican 36.9 15.1 43.2% 0.6% 25.8 FATA Asigurari 31.1 12.8 516.3% 0.5% 5.0 Asito Kapital 27.9 11.4 (8.7)% 0.5% 30.6 RAI 25.1 10.3 2.1% 0.4% 24.6 OTP Garancia 19.6 8.1 69.2% 0.3% 11.6 ABC Asigurari 11.1 4.6 41.2% 0.2% 7.9 AGRAS 10.7 4.4 (50.7)% 0.2% 21.6 EUROASIG 9.7 4.0 102.9% 0.2% 4.8 Delta Addendum 9.4 3.9 140.1% 0.2% 3.9 CLAL Romania 6.9 2.8 5,460.5% 0.1% 0.1 Credit Europe 5.7 2.4 N/A 0.1% N/A City Insurance 3.6 1.5 (6.3)% 0.1% 3.8 Gerroma 2.6 1.0 (15.3)% 0.0% 3.0 Certasig 2.2 0.9 17.7% 0.0% 1.9 Irasig 1.3 0.6 75.4% 0.0% 0.8 ATE Insurance 1.3 0.5 2,147.8% 0.0% 0.1 EFG Eurolife 0.9 0.4 N/A 0.0% N/A General Asimed 0.8 0.3 (15.8)% 0.0% 1.0 Grawe (0.1) 0.0 N/A 0.0% N/A Others 0.0 0.0 (100.0)% 0.0% 14.6 MARKET TOTAL 5,726.8 2,349.0 24.7% 100.0% 4,591.0 Source: Comisia de Supraveghere a Asigurarilor - CSA (Insurance Supervisor) Due to rounding some totals may not equal the breakdown above. Reinsurance Companies There are no professional reinsurance companies in Romania. For more information about the reinsurance market see the Reinsurance section of this report. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 182 © AXCO 2009
    • Appendix No 3 - Directory Industry Organisations International dialling code: + 40 Major city/town codes: Bucharest - 21 Insurance Supervisory Commission - CSA (Comisia de Supraveghere a Asigurarilor) 18 Amiral Constantin Balescu Street Bucharest Tel: 316 7880 Fax: 316 7864 www.csa-isc.ro National Association of Insurance Intermediaries and Consultants in Romania - UNSICAR (Uniunea Nationala a Societatilor de Intermediere si Consultanta in Asigurari din Romania) Splaiul Unirii 45 Sector 3 Bucharest Tel: 322 9127 Fax: 322 9127 www.unsicar.ro National Union of Insurance and Reinsurance Companies of Romania - UNSAR (Uniunea Nationala a Societatilor de Asigurare si Reasigurare din Romania) Bd Libertatii 12 Bl 113, Sc 3, Ap 68 Sector 4 Bucharest Tel: 317 7830 Fax: 317 7832 www.unsar.ro Romanian Motor Insurers' Bureau - BAAR Str Vasile Lascar 40 Sector 2 Bucharest Tel: 319 1302 Fax: 319 1301 www.baar.ro Insurance Companies International dialling code: + 40 Major city/town codes: Bucharest - 21 Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 183 © AXCO 2009
    • Appendix No 3 - Directory Cluj - 264 AIG Romania SA World Trade Centre PO Box 25-12 Bd Expozitiei 2 Sector 1 Bucharest Tel: 224 2908 Fax: 224 2940 Allianz Tiriac SA Str Caderea Bastiliei 80 Sector 1 Bucharest Tel: 208 2222 Fax: 208 2211 www.allianztiriac.ro Ardaf SA Str. Xenopol 3 400475 Cluj-Napoca Tel: 590 470 Fax: 431 774 www.ardaf.ro Asiban SA Str Mihai Eminescu 45 Sector 2 Bucharest Tel: 305 8000 Fax: 310 9967 www.asiban.ro Asigurarea Romaneasca - Asirom Vienna Insurance Group 31-33 Carol I Bd 70433 Bucharest Tel: 317 8136 Fax: 317 8132 Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 184 © AXCO 2009
    • Appendix No 3 - Directory www.asirom.com.ro Astra SA Str Nerva Traian 3, Bl M101 Sector 3 Bucharest Tel: 318 8080 Fax: 318 8017 www.astrasig.ro BCR Asigurari SA Str. Grigore Mora 23 Bucharest 1 Tel: 405 7403 Fax: 311 4493 www.bcrasig.ro Euroins Romania SA Str. Nicolae Caramfil 61B Bucharest 1 Tel: 233 3474 Fax: 233 3668 www.asitrans.ro FATA Asigurari Strada Av. Marcel Andreescu 30 Bucharest 1 Tel: 231 1885 Fax: 230 0041 www.fata-asigurari.ro Generali SA Str Ghe Polizu 58-60 Sector 1 Bucharest Tel: 312 3635 Fax: 212 2925 www.generali.ro Interamerican Romania International SA Sos Cotroceni 20 Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 185 © AXCO 2009
    • Appendix No 3 - Directory Sector 6 Bucharest Tel: 202 6700 Fax: 202 6742 www.interamerican.ro Omniasig Vienna Insurance Group 28 Aviatorilor Bvd Sector 1 Bucharest Tel: 231 5040 Fax: 231 5037 www.omniasig.ro Unita SA 30 Bd. Dacia Sector 1 Bucharest Tel: 212 0882 Fax: 212 0843 www.unita.ro Reinsurance Companies There are no professional reinsurance companies in Romania. Captive Managers There are no captive managers in Romania. Intermediaries International dialling code: + 40 Major city/town codes: Bucharest - 21 Insurance Brokers/Consultants Aon Romania 15 Henri Coanda Str Sector 1 Bucharest Tel: 212 5816 Fax: 315 5758 Asigest Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 186 © AXCO 2009
    • Appendix No 3 - Directory Str Louis Blanc 1. 40 Sector 1 Bucharest Tel: 230 4085 Fax: 230 4154 www.asigest.ro EOS RISQ Romania Bucharest Financial Plaza Calea Victoriei 15 Sector 3 Bucharest Tel: 314 2028 Fax: 315 9630 Gras Savoye Romania St Andrei Muresanu 21 Sector 1 Bucharest Tel: 231 9167 Fax: 231 9170 MAI Broker de Asigurare Suite 1 69 Unirii Blvd, bl. G2B Bucharest Tel: 321 3471 Fax: 321 3454 Marsh Sos Nordului 24-26 Sector 1 Bucharest Tel: 232 18474 Fax: 232 2102 Reinsurance Brokers Olsa Re 8 Alba Iulia Square, 17, 3, Suite 56 Bucharest Tel: 322 8804 Fax: 322 8804 Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 187 © AXCO 2009
    • Appendix No 3 - Directory Loss Adjusters There are no international loss adjusters with offices in Romania. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 188 © AXCO 2009