Country Map
                                                                Map of the Area
                              ...
Contents Page
           Country Map                                         1
           Map of the Area                 ...
Contents Page
           Property                                         86
             Construction and Prevention     ...
Country Map




Romania - Non-Life (P&C)       Country Visited: Jan 2009
                           1                  © A...
Map of the Area




Romania - Non-Life (P&C)       Country Visited: Jan 2009
                           2                 ...
Market Developments
    • Groupama  has  bought  Asiban.  It  has  also  become  the  owner  of  OTP  Garancia  Asigurari ...
Key Facts
    The graph below shows the growth in the life, non-life and PA and health markets for the period 2003 to
    ...
Key Facts
    • At the time this report was being prepared the Romanian insurance market comprised 42 companies, of
      ...
General Country Information

 History
    Early History
    101            The indigenous people of Romania, known collect...
General Country Information
    1990              After  the  fall  of  Ceausescu  a  group  of  Communist  Party  members...
General Country Information
    The main river is the Danube, which forms the southern border of Romania with Serbia and B...
General Country Information

                          Year                                                  Population
  ...
General Country Information

                                Year                                                Infant mo...
General Country Information

               Present age                                         Males                     ...
General Country Information

 Largest Cities
    Capital
    The capital of Romania is Bucharest, a city with an estimated...
Politics and the Economy

 Government Structure
    Constitution
    Romania adopted a new constitution in 1991 redefining...
Politics and the Economy

     Party name                                 Acronym                          % of vote      ...
Politics and the Economy

 Economy
    Economic Performance
    Romania emerged from communism with a state-owned economy ...
Politics and the Economy




    The  growth  in  real  GDP  for  the  five  years  to  2007  based  on  2000  prices  in ...
Politics and the Economy

                         Country                                   GDP per capita
              ...
Politics and the Economy

    Inflation
    Annual consumer price inflation for the five years to 2007 is shown in the gra...
Politics and the Economy




    In  2007  the  economically  active  population  was  9,994,000.  The  following  table  ...
Politics and the Economy

                Industry type                                              Gross monthly earning...
Politics and the Economy
    Production  of  sophisticated  consumer  goods  and  machine  tools  had  been  largely  negl...
Politics and the Economy
                                              Source: National Institute of Statistics



    The...
Politics and the Economy




    The  latest  exchange  rate  when  this  report  was  in  preparation  has  been  used  f...
Supervision and Control

 Legislation
    EU Legislation
    The  European  Union  (EU)  is  a  grouping  of  27  European...
Supervision and Control
    The  Law on Obligatory House Insurance,  which  was  passed  on  8  October  2008,  has  intro...
Supervision and Control

    Supplementary Information on Compulsory Insurances
    EU  legislation  establishes  minimum ...
Supervision and Control
    • Type A homes will be covered for a first-loss sum insured of EUR 20,000 (USD 27,397) for an ...
Supervision and Control
    • The  government  announced  insurance  premiums  of  EUR  10  or  EUR  20  per  dwelling  be...
Supervision and Control
    • Statutory limits effective from 1 January 2010 will be the lei equivalents of EUR 500,000 (U...
Supervision and Control
    A new Company Law, which came into effect on 1 December 2006, made D&O insurance compulsory fo...
Supervision and Control
    • supervision and on-site inspection directorate

    • financial stability and actuarial dire...
Supervision and Control

    Insolvency Regulation
    Law No 503/2004 on the Winding-up of Insurance Companies has given ...
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Romania Non Life 2009
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Romania Non Life 2009

5,857
-1

Published on

Published in: Economy & Finance, Business
0 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
5,857
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Romania Non Life 2009

  1. 1. Country Map Map of the Area Market Developments Key Facts General Country Information Politics and the Economy Supervision and Control Taxation Legal System Insurance Market Overview Reinsurance Distribution Channels Multinationals, Captives, ART and Risk Management Insurance Policies Natural Hazards Property Construction and Machinery Breakdown Motor Workers' Compensation and Employers' Liability Liability Surety, Bonds and Credit Marine, Aviation and Transit Personal Accident and Travel Appendix No 1 - Market Statistics Appendix No 2 - Company Statistics Appendix No 3 - Directory INSURANCE MARKET REPORT ROMANIA: NON-LIFE (P&C) © AXCO 2009 NON-LIFE (P&C)
  2. 2. Contents Page Country Map 1 Map of the Area 2 Market Developments 3 Key Facts 4 General Country Information 6 History 6 Geographic Description 7 Population and Demographic Trends 8 Largest Cities 12 Politics and the Economy 13 Government Structure 13 Current Political Situation 13 Economy 15 Currency and Exchange Control 22 Supervision and Control 24 Legislation 24 Compulsory Insurances 25 Changes in Legislation 26 Supervision 30 Non-Admitted Insurance Regulatory Position 32 Fronting 35 Company Registration and Operating Requirements 35 Taxation 40 Legal System 42 Insurance Market Overview 45 Historical Development 45 The Market Today 46 Market Participants 50 Reinsurance 58 Local Reinsurance Market 58 Local Reinsurance Arrangements 58 Distribution Channels 66 Multinationals, Captives, ART and Risk Management 70 Multinationals 70 Captives 70 A.R.T. & Risk Management 71 Insurance Policies 72 Natural Hazards 75 Earthquake and Other Geological Hazards 75 Windstorm 80 Flood 81 Bushfire 85 Subsidence 85 Hail 85 Cresta Maps 85 Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Report © Axco 2009
  3. 3. Contents Page Property 86 Construction and Prevention 87 Social Hazards 89 Householder/Homeowner 89 Industrial and Commercial 92 Agriculture 95 Construction and Machinery Breakdown 98 Construction and Erection all Risks 98 Machinery Breakdown 100 Motor 102 Workers' Compensation and Employers' Liability 111 Liability 114 General Third Party 114 Product Liability 116 Professional Indemnity 117 Directors' and Officers' Liability 120 Pollution and Environmental Liability 122 Financial and Professional Risks 123 Surety, Bonds and Credit 124 Marine, Aviation and Transit 128 Marine Hull 128 Marine Cargo 131 Marine Liability 164 Energy 164 Aviation 165 Personal Accident and Travel 168 Personal Accident 168 Travel 170 Appendix No 1 - Market Statistics 172 Insurance Supervisor's Report 172 Non-Life Market Totals 173 Non-Life Insurance 174 Personal Accident 178 Appendix No 2 - Company Statistics 181 Appendix No 3 - Directory 183 Industry Organisations 183 Insurance Companies 183 Reinsurance Companies 186 Captive Managers 186 Intermediaries 186 Loss Adjusters 188 Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Report © Axco 2009
  4. 4. Country Map Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 1 © AXCO 2009
  5. 5. Map of the Area Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 2 © AXCO 2009
  6. 6. Market Developments • Groupama  has  bought  Asiban.  It  has  also  become  the  owner  of  OTP  Garancia  Asigurari  and  BT Asigurari, all of which will be united under the Groupama brand by the end of 2009. • The  Vienna  Insurance  Group  (VIG)  has  bought  Erste  Bank's  insurance  operations  in  central  and  east Europe.  In  Romania,  this  gives  it  ownership  of  BCR  Insurance,  to  add  to  its  existing  investments  in Asirom,  Omniasig,  Agras  and  Unita.  In  order  to  defuse  competition  concerns,  VIG  has  sold  Unita  and Agras to UNIQA. • PPF Investments has sold Ardaf and RAI to Generali PPF Holding. • Greek  financial  group  EFG  Eurobank,  the  majority  owner  of  Bancpost,  has  established  EFG  Eurolife General Insurance Co Ltd. • Bulgarian investor Eurohold has bought 70% of Asitrans and changed the company's name to Euroins Romania. • Coface, Euler Hermes, AIG Europe and QBE Insurance (Europe) have established Romanian branches on a freedom of services basis. • The Law on Obligatory House Insurance finally got through parliament on 8 October 2008 and received the  presidential  signature  on  4  November  2008.  When  the  administrative  infrastructure  has  been completed  in  mid-2009,  the  law  will  require  every  householder  to  buy  first-loss  insurance  against  the perils of earthquake, landslide and flood. • Statutory motor third party liability limits effective from 1 January 2008 are EUR 150,000 (USD 205,479) per event for property damage and EUR 750,000 (USD 1.03mn) per person for bodily injury. These will be increased on 1 January 2009 and 1 January 2010. • A  new  Company Law,  which  came  into  effect  on  1  December  2006,  has  made  D&O  insurance compulsory for the managers of joint stock companies. • With effect from 1 January 2007 the policyholders' protection fund levy for non-life insurance has been reduced from 1% of total premiums to 0.8%. The supervisory levy has been increased to 0.5%. The Future A  number  of  companies  deliberately  under-priced  their  motor  portfolios  in  2006  and  2007  in  order  to increase  their  gross  written  premiums  and  therefore  the  price  for  which  they  could  be  sold  to  a  foreign bidder. The failure to respond to a rapidly deteriorating claims environment led to an underwriting loss of nearly USD 135mn in 2007. Now that virtually every company which can be sold has been sold, there are hopes  that  insurers  will  try  to  return  to  profit  by  increasing  their  motor  rates  and  enforcing  accidental damage  deductibles.  Profitability  should  also  be  helped  in  the  long  run  by  insurers'  withdrawal  from  the consumer credit insurance segment. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 3 © AXCO 2009
  7. 7. Key Facts The graph below shows the growth in the life, non-life and PA and health markets for the period 2003 to 2007. • When this report was in preparation the rate of exchange was RON 2.78 : USD 1 and this rate has been used for all current conversions. For previous years the average annual rate for the year in question has been  used  (see  Currency  and  Exchange  Control  within  the  Politics  and  the  Economy  section  of  this report).  Where  figures  such  as  indemnity  limits  are  expressed  in  euros,  these  have  been  converted  to US dollars at a rate of EUR 0.73 : USD 1. • Romania  is  situated  in  the  north-east  corner  of  the  Balkan  Peninsula  and  occupies  an  area  of  91,699 square miles (237,500 sq kilometres). The estimated population in mid-2007 was 21.50 million, making Romania  the  second  most  populous  country  in  east  Europe  after  Poland.  The  population  is  shrinking and ageing and suffers from high rates of youth emigration. • Romania  is  a  relatively  new  country:  it  gained  its  independence  from  the  Turkish  Ottoman  Empire  in 1877, but only acquired its current borders after uniting with the Hungarian province of Transylvania in 1918.  The  country  had  a  hard-line  communist  regime  from  1948  until  the  overthrow  of  Nicolae Ceausescu in the revolution of December 1989. • The  general  election  held  on  30  November  2008  resulted  in  a  near  tie  between  the  centre-left  Social Democratic Party and the centre-right Democratic Liberal Party, both of which won around 33% of the popular vote. The complexion of Romania's next government will depend on which of the leading parties is able to form a coalition with the National Liberal Party, which won 18.6% of the vote. • Real GDP is expected to continue growing in 2009 despite the global economic slowdown, though at a much slower pace than in previous years. • Total  market  income  in  2007  was  RON  7.18bn  (USD  2.94bn),  of  which  non-life  accounted  for  RON 5.73bn  (USD  2.35bn).  This  made  Romania  the  39th  largest  non-life  market  in  the  world.  Non-life insurance penetration was 1.36% of GDP, equivalent to USD 106.96 per capita. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 4 © AXCO 2009
  8. 8. Key Facts • At the time this report was being prepared the Romanian insurance market comprised 42 companies, of which 21 were non-life, nine were life and 12 were composite. The structure of the non-life market has been  completely  transformed  over  the  last  two  years  by  the  group-building  acquisitions  of  the  Vienna Insurance  Group,  Generali  PPF  Holding,  UNIQA  and  Groupama.  Once  fully  assembled  these  four groups  will  have  an  aggregate  market  share  (based  on  the  2007  market  shares  of  their  component companies) of 68.5%. • Non-EU  insurers  are  not  allowed  to  conduct  insurance  business  in  Romania  without  authorisation. Romanian policyholders are allowed to place their insurance with non-admitted carriers abroad. • There are no longer any tariff classes. • The  compulsory  classes  include  motor  third  party  liability  and  professional  indemnity  for  an  increasing number of professions, including accountants, lawyers, insurance brokers, medical staff and hospitals. A form  of  D&O  has  been  made  compulsory  for  the  managers  of  joint  stock  companies.  The  Law on Obligatory House Insurance will eventually require every householder to buy first-loss insurance against the perils of earthquake, landslide and flood. • Foreign  companies  are  allowed  to  purchase  any  percentage  of  a  domestic  company's  equity  or  to establish  wholly-owned  subsidiaries  or  branches.  EU  insurers  may  enter  the  market  on  a  freedom  of establishment or freedom of services basis. • The  main  distribution  channels  are  direct  sales  force  and  agents.  In  2007  brokers  controlled  26.2%  of non-life premiums. Banks are an increasingly important source of loan-related business. • Romania  is  prone  to  both  flood  and  earthquake.  The  capital  city  Bucharest  lies  in  the  most  active seismic zone. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 5 © AXCO 2009
  9. 9. General Country Information History Early History 101 The indigenous people of Romania, known collectively as the Dacians, were conquered by the  Roman  Emperor  Trajan  between  101  and  117  AD.  They  were  organised  into  the Roman colony of Dacia Felix until being over-run by barbarians from the east in 271. The Romanians  believe  that  their  race  stems  from  the  union  of  the  native  Dacians  and  the Roman colonists, hence the name of the country and the many words in the language that are derived from Latin. 1200 In the middle ages the country was divided into a number of principalities. Transylvania in the north-west was ruled by Hungary, whilst Wallachia and Moldavia had native dynasties. The latter two became tributaries of the Turkish Ottoman Empire and were later ruled by Greek  families  from  Istanbul,  known  as  the  Phanariots,  who  were  imposed  on  the Romanians as an alternative to direct Turkish occupation. 1877 After  a  series  of  wars  between  Russia  and  Turkey,  the  provinces  of  Wallachia  and Moldavia  were  united  under  King  Karol  I  and  recognised  as  the  independent  Kingdom  of Romania. 20th/21st Century 1916 Romania joined World War 1 on the side of Britain and France, and was rewarded with the previously  Hungarian  territory  of  Transylvania  (in  1918)  and  the  provinces  of  Bessarabia and  Bucovina.  The  country  thus  doubled  in  population  and  territory  and  acquired  its present borders. 1941 The strength of a native fascist movement known as the Iron Guard and resentment at the Soviet annexation of Bessarabia and Bucovina caused Romania to enter World War 2 on the side of Nazi Germany. 1944 Soviet armies entered Romania in August. 1947 The continuing presence of the Soviets allowed the Romanian Communist Party to usurp power  and  declare  a  people's  republic  on  30  December.  Party  secretary  Gheorghe Gheorghiu-Dej pursued a hard-line Stalinist policy domestically, but resentment at Russia's creation of the Republic of Moldova out of the Romanian province of Bessarabia led to an increasingly independent stance within the communist bloc. 1965 Gheorghiu-Dej  died  in  March  and  was  succeeded  by  Nicolae  Ceausescu.  The  latter achieved  a  favourable  standing  for  Romania  in  the  West  by  refusing  to  follow  Russian foreign policy, but inflicted the most appalling privations on his own people as he pursued increasingly megalomaniac schemes of social engineering. 1989 Popular resentment at the excesses of the regime finally came into the open in December when  the  people  of  Timisoara  rioted  in  support  of  a  dissident  priest,  Laszlo  Tokes.  The spirit  of  revolution  spread  to  Bucharest  and  an  unprecedented  demonstration  on  21 December  caused  Ceausescu  and  his  wife  to  flee  the  capital  by  helicopter.  They  were soon caught and after a one-day show trial were executed on Christmas Day. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 6 © AXCO 2009
  10. 10. General Country Information 1990 After  the  fall  of  Ceausescu  a  group  of  Communist  Party  members  led  by  Ion  Iliescu assumed  power  under  the  name  of  the  National  Salvation  Front.  Romania's  first  free elections  were  held  on  20  May  and  were  won  by  Iliescu's  Party  of  Social  Democracy (PSD). 1991 A new constitution was adopted confirming Romania as a multiparty democracy. 1996 Control  of  both  the  presidency  and  parliament  passed  from  the  PSD  to  the  reformist Democratic Convention. 2000 After  four  years  of  political  instability  and  economic  decline,  power  was  returned  to  the PSD. Ion Iliescu was re-elected as president for the third time. 2004 In  March  Romania  was  admitted  to  Nato.  In  November/December  Traian  Basescu  was elected president. His ally Calin Tarinceanu became prime minister. 2005 In May Parliament ratified the EU accession treaty. In July the leu was redenominated by the removal of four zeroes. 2007 Romania became a member of the EU on 1 January. Geographic Description Country Name Romania. Frontiers and Coastline Romania occupies the north-east corner of the Balkan peninsula and borders on Ukraine to the north and east,  Moldova  to  the  east,  Bulgaria  to  the  south,  Serbia  to  the  west  and  Hungary  to  the  north-west.  The country has an eastern coastline of 145 miles (234 kilometres) on the Black Sea between its borders with Bulgaria and Ukraine. Land Area Romania has a land area of 91,699 sq miles (237,500 sq km). Administration For administrative purposes Romania is divided into 41 counties plus the municipality of Bucharest. Topography The eastern Carpathians and the Transylvanian Alps swing in a mountainous arc from the northern to the western  borders  of  Romania.  The  territory  enclosed  by  the  mountains  is  known  as  Transylvania  and  is predominantly hilly and wooded. The highest peak is Moldoveanu at 8,347 feet (2,544 metres). The outer rim of the country, extending from Oradea in the north-west through Timisoara and Bucharest to the Black Sea, is predominantly flat and fertile. Forests cover more than a quarter of the land. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 7 © AXCO 2009
  11. 11. General Country Information The main river is the Danube, which forms the southern border of Romania with Serbia and Bulgaria. The Danube  flows  into  the  Black  Sea  near  Romania's  border  with  Ukraine  forming  a  delta  region  of  1,544  sq miles  (4,000  sq  km)  made  up  of  lakes,  channels,  marshes  and  floating  reed  islands.  An  artificial  canal, completed under Ceausescu, connects the Danube at Cernavoda with the Black Sea at Agigea, cutting out 248  miles  (400  km)  of  barely  navigable  river.  This  forms  the  final  stretch  of  the  1,863-mile  (3,000-km) waterway linking Rotterdam with the Black Sea via the Rhein-Main and Nurnberg-Regensburg canals. Climate Romania  has  a  typical  continental  climate  characterised  by  cold  snowy  winters  and  hot  dry  summers. During  the  winter  months  snow  lies  for  30  to  50  days  at  low  levels  and  the  Danube  and  other  rivers regularly  freeze  over.  The  mildest  area  is  the  Black  Sea  coast  though  even  this  can  experience  severe conditions when cold winds blow out of the Russian steppes to the north-east. Average maximum and minimum temperatures and average monthly precipitation for the capital Bucharest, at latitude 44º 30' N and at a height of 302 feet (92 m) above sea level, are shown in the following tables: Population and Demographic Trends Population The latest census was conducted on 18 March 2002 and recorded a population of 21,680,974. This made Romania the second most populous country in east Europe after Poland. The latest population estimate for mid 2007 was 21.5 million. The total population since 1956 was as follows: Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 8 © AXCO 2009
  12. 12. General Country Information Year Population 2005 21,623,849 2002 21,680,974 1992 22,810,035 1977 21,559,910 1966 19,103,163 1956 17,489,450 Source: National Institute of Statistics Population projections are as follows: Year Population 2050 15,928,000 2025 19,494,000 2010 21,147,000 Source: UN Population Division (UNPD) Romania  has  an  unusually  large  rural  population:  in  2007  country  dwellers  accounted  for  44.7%  of  the population and city dwellers for 55.3%. According to the 2002 census, 89.5% of the population are ethnic Romanians. The next largest ethnic groups are the Hungarians of Transylvania with 6.6% and the Roma with 2.5%. The nomadic lifestyle of the Roma population has led to a significant under-recording of their numbers, which are unofficially estimated at two million. This would make them the largest minority group in Romania and the largest Roma population of any European country. The birth and death rates per 1,000 since 1985 were as follows: Year Birth rate Death rate Rate of natural increase 2007 10.0 11.7 (1.7) 2005 10.2 12.1 (1.9) 2001 9.8 11.6 (1.8) 2000 10.5 11.4 (0.9) 1995 10.4 12.0 (1.6) 1990 13.6 10.6 (3.0) 1985 15.8 10.9 (4.9) Source: National Institute of Statistics The birth rate fell almost every year after 1990, partly as a result of economic hardship and partly because a long-standing ban on birth control was abolished after the overthrow of Ceausescu. The rate did not rise again until 2004. The infant mortality rate per '000 live births since 1950 was as follows: Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 9 © AXCO 2009
  13. 13. General Country Information Year Infant mortality rate 2007 12.0 2005 15.0 2001 18.4 1990 26.9 1980 29.3 1970 49.4 1960 74.6 1950 116.7 Source: National Institute of Statistics The change in age structure of the population since 1970 is shown below, including projections for 2010, 2025 and 2050. Age group 1970 1980 1990 2000 2005 2010 2025 2050 To 14 25.9 26.7 23.6 18.4 15.7 15.1 13.4 12.5 15 to 59 60.8 60.1 60.8 62.6 65.1 64.6 62.0 48.3 60 and 13.2 13.3 15.7 19.0 19.3 20.3 24.5 39.1 above Source: UN Population Division (UNPD) Note: due to rounding some totals may not equal the breakdown above. The  change  in  age  structure  of  the  population  aged  65  and  80  and  above  is  shown  below,  including projections for 2010, 2025 and 2050. Age group 1970 1980 1990 2000 2005 2010 2025 2050 65 and 8.6 10.3 10.4 13.5 14.8 14.9 19.3 30.2 above 80 and 1.1 1.3 1.8 1.8 2.4 3.0 3.9 8.1 above Source: UN Population Division (UNPD) Life Expectancy Average life expectancy at birth for the period 2005 to 2007 was 69 for males and 76 for females. The table below shows how this has changed since 1970. Year Males Females 2005 to 2007 69.00 76.00 2003 to 2005 68.19 75.47 2000 to 2002 67.61 74.90 1990 to 1992 66.56 73.17 1980 to 1982 66.70 72.17 1970 to 1972 66.27 70.85 Source: National Institute of Statistics The following table shows expectations of life at various ages over the 2000 to 2005 period. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 10 © AXCO 2009
  14. 14. General Country Information Present age Males Females At birth 66.5 73.3 60 16.0 19.1 65 13.0 15.3 80 5.7 6.3 Source: UN Population Division (DESA) Major Causes of Death The following table shows the leading causes of death in 2005: Cause of death Male Female Diseases of the circulatory system 77,216 85,781 Neoplasms 26,292 18,614 Injury, poisoning and other 9,618 3,223 external causes Diseases of the digestive system 9,068 5,645 Diseases of the respiratory system 8,311 5,040 Infectious and parasitic diseases 1,925 664 Diseases of the genitourinary 1,364 1,012 system Diseases of the nervous system 1,055 907 Endocrine, nutritional and 1,018 1,230 metabolic diseases Other 2,594 1,524 Total 138,461 123,640 Source: National Institute of Statistics Of  the  men  who  died  of  infectious  and  parasitic  diseases  in  2005,  77%  died  of  tuberculosis.  Almost  four and a half times as many men as women died of the disease in that year. Language The official language is Romanian, the closest Romance language to Latin. It is written in Latin script with diacritical marks. The Hungarian and Roma minorities speak Hungarian and Romany respectively. English is most commonly used for international business purposes. Religion The majority religion is Christianity. More than 85% of the population are Orthodox Christians and there are also communities of Catholics, Lutherans, Uniates and Unitarians, particularly in Transylvania. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 11 © AXCO 2009
  15. 15. General Country Information Largest Cities Capital The capital of Romania is Bucharest, a city with an estimated population of 1,931,838 on 1 July 2007. It is situated  in  the  south  of  the  country  near  the  Bulgarian  border.  As  well  as  being  the  financial  and administrative  centre  of  the  country,  Bucharest  has  important  textile  and  engineering  industries.  Several multinational  IT  and  software  companies,  such  as  IBM  and  Oracle,  have  their  European  headquarters  in Bucharest and in early 2008 PepsiCo announced plans to build a new bottling plant in the city. Other Major Areas/Cities Population figures are estimates for 1 July 2007. Cluj-Napoca, the leading city of Transylvania, has a population of 310,243, one-third of whom are ethnic Hungarians.  It  is  home  to  Romania's  largest  university  and  has  its  own  airport  offering  domestic  and international flights. Iasi, the cultural capital of Moldavia, has a population of 315,214, and is situated near Romania's border with the Republic of Moldova. It has two universities, including Romania's oldest university. Constanta,  with  a  population  of  304,279,  is  the  largest  port  on  the  Black  Sea.  It  has  a  significant ship-building and ship-repair industry. Timisoara, in the west of the country near the Serbian border, has a population of 307,347. The city is an important transport hub and agricultural centre. Brasov, with a population of 277,945, is situated in the Carpathian Mountains near the geographical centre of the country. The city's manufacturing industries include tractors and aero-engineering. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 12 © AXCO 2009
  16. 16. Politics and the Economy Government Structure Constitution Romania adopted a new constitution in 1991 redefining the country as a parliamentary republic. Changes in  the  constitution  required  for  Romania  to  join  the  EU  were  adopted  by  referendum  in  October  2003. Amongst other provisions, the new constitution extended the presidential term from four to five years and strengthened the judiciary. Executive/Legislature The  head  of  state  is  the  president  who  is  directly  elected  for  a  maximum  of  two  five-year  terms.  The president appoints the prime minister. The executive is the cabinet, which is appointed and headed by the prime minister. The national legislature is a bicameral parliament composed of a Senate (137 members), which is elected for  a  four-year  term  by  proportional  representation,  and  a  Chamber  of  Deputies  (332  members).  The Chamber  of  Deputies  is  also  elected  for  a  four-year  term,  but  327  members  are  elected  by  proportional representation whilst the remaining seats are reserved for ethnic minorities. Electoral System President and parliament are elected by universal adult suffrage. Both chambers of parliament are directly elected  for  four-year  terms  from  42  multi-member  constituencies  comprising  41  counties  and  the municipality of Bucharest. The last parliamentary elections were held in November 2008; the next are held in November 2012. The last  presidential  elections  were  held  in  November  and  December  2004;  the  next  are  due  in  November 2009. Local Government The 42 local administrations are democratically elected. Each county has an elected council. There is also a centrally appointed prefect who can impede council-initiated legislation that is contrary to national law. Current Political Situation Present Government The results of the 2008 election are shown in the table below. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 13 © AXCO 2009
  17. 17. Politics and the Economy Party name Acronym % of vote Seats Democratic Liberal Party PDL 32.4 115 Social Democratic Party PSD 33.1† 110 Conservative Party PC 4 National Liberal Party PNL 18.6 65 Democratic Alliance of UDMR 6.2 22 Hungarians in Romania Minorities - 3.6 18 Others - 6.1 0 Total - 100.0 334 Note: † the Social Democratic Party (PSD) and Conservative Party (PC) share the same percentage of votes. Source: Parties and Elections in Europe The Prime Minister-designate is Mr Theodor Stolojan, who was nominated following the 2008 elections. He replaces  Mr  Calin  Tariceanu  of  the  National  Liberal  Party  (PNL).  Mr  Traian  Basescu  of  the  Democratic Liberal Party (PDL) remains president. A coalition government is to be formed between the pro-presidential PDL and left-of-centre Social Democratic Party (PSD). Political Situation The 2008 elections ended in a political stalemate, with neither the Social Democratic Party (PSD) nor the Democratic Liberal Party (PDL) winning a majority in government. Now, both parties are expected to form a coalition,  with  the  Prime  Minister-designate,  Mr  Calin  Tarinceanu,  being  appointed  its  leader.  The  two parties  have  differing  policies  and  are  likely  to  clash  on  domestic  and  foreign  issues.  The  PDL  support market-based  policies,  having  introduced  during  its  previous  mandate  an  income  tax  rate  that  the  PSD opposed. The PSD is more likely to implement social protection initiatives in order to bolster job rates and boost  workers'  rights.  Yet  the  unwillingness  of  the  PSD  to  press  ahead  with  judicial  reforms  or  pursue cases of corruption could see Romania face severe penalties from the European Commission for failure to adhere to European standards. The European Commission has required that the country report every six months  on  the  progress  it  has  made  in  tackling  contentious  issues  such  as  corruption  and  money laundering.  Penalties  might  include  withholding  EU  regional  aid  payments  in  cases  of  persistent  fraud  or suspending  the  country's  legal  system  if  it  fails  to  bring  offenders  to  trial.  In  May  2008  it  emerged  that  a British company was suing the Romanian state for USD 100mn in a high-level corruption case involving a former  prime  minister.  This  is  likely  to  be  adversely  received  by  the  European  Commission,  which  is already unhappy with the progress made thus far by Romania in its fight against corruption and could lead to a suspension of EU aid. International Relations Romania joined the EU on 1 January 2007. The EU remains concerned about corruption and the slow pace of judicial reforms, however. Romanian citizens have fewer rights than citizens of existing EU countries as many EU members, fearing an influx of cheap labour, have restricted the amount of work legally available to them. Romania is a member of the UN, Nato, World Bank and IMF. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 14 © AXCO 2009
  18. 18. Politics and the Economy Economy Economic Performance Romania emerged from communism with a state-owned economy entirely unsuited for competitive survival. Successive  governments  lacked  the  competence  or  the  will  to  undertake  structural  reforms,  resulting  in widespread  poverty  and  economic  backwardness.  As  a  result,  Romania  was  only  judged  to  have  a quot;functioning market economyquot; in October 2004, just two months before it signed its accession treaty with the EU. Real  GDP  growth  in  2007  was  slowed  by  a  fall  in  gross  value  added  in  agriculture  as  a  consequence  of drought, whilst on the demand side household consumption was the main driver; domestic demand in 2007 grew by a little over 13% year on year. Nevertheless, the prospects for the agricultural sector improved in the third quarter of 2008, with growth likely to average 8.6% in the year. Yet this acceleration in economic growth is likely to be short-lived, as the domestic economy feels the effects in 2009 of the global crisis on the  financial  markets.  Economic  forecasts  are  likely  to  be  revised  downwards  in  the  near  future,  as  the chances increase of Romania falling into a recession. A currency crisis or an IMF bail-out cannot be ruled out. Inflation fell to 4.8% in 2007 from 6.6% in 2006. Planned large increases in public spending in the run-up to the next election, as well as rising wages and high food prices, will all contribute to raising inflation to an anticipated rate of 7.9% in 2008. Nonetheless, a tightening of fiscal and incomes policies once the elections are over is expected to result in lower inflation in 2009. Romania's consolidated budget deficit for 2007 was equivalent to 2.3% of GDP according to government calculations and the country has set a target of 2.3% for 2008 also. The IMF has urged Romania to move away from the highly expansionary fiscal policy of 2007 and to target a budget deficit of 1.75%, however, but the government is unlikely to exercise fiscal restraint until after the elections due at the end of 2008. Gross Domestic Product The  actual  GDP  figures  for  the  five  years  to  2007  are  shown  below.  These  are  in  two  forms,  RON  and converted to US dollars at the average annual rate of exchange. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 15 © AXCO 2009
  19. 19. Politics and the Economy The  growth  in  real  GDP  for  the  five  years  to  2007  based  on  2000  prices  in  domestic  currency  is  shown below. Real GDP growth rates of 8.6% and 2.6% are forecast for 2008 and 2009 respectively. In 2007 the main contributors to the GDP were: Industry % of total Services 49.9 Industry 23.4 Agriculture and related industries 6.6 Source: National Institute of Statistics In 2007 GDP per capita in USD in Romania and comparative economies was as follows: Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 16 © AXCO 2009
  20. 20. Politics and the Economy Country GDP per capita Czech Republic 17,186 Hungary 13,873 Poland 11,397 Romania 7,586 Bulgaria 5,177 Source: IMF Current Account Balance The current account balance in US dollars for the five years to 2007 is expressed in the graph below. The current account deficit amounted to 13.6% of GDP in 2007, the result of a surge in imports caused by domestic demand growth. Foreign Exchange Reserves Foreign exchange reserves, excluding gold, are quoted in US dollars below. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 17 © AXCO 2009
  21. 21. Politics and the Economy Inflation Annual consumer price inflation for the five years to 2007 is shown in the graph below. Inflation is expected to rise to 7.9% in 2008 before falling to 5.8% in 2009. Interest Rates Key interest rates over the five years to 2007 are shown below. Investment type 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Deposit rate 11.02 11.54 6.42 4.77 6.70 Lending rate 25.44 25.61 19.60 13.98 13.35 Money market rate 18.95 20.01 8.99 8.34 7.55 Treasury bill rate 15.07 n/a n/a n/a 7.11 Source: IMF Employment The percentage of the working population unemployed over the five years to 2007 is shown in the graph below. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 18 © AXCO 2009
  22. 22. Politics and the Economy In  2007  the  economically  active  population  was  9,994,000.  The  following  table  shows  the  number  of employees in the main sectors of the economy in 2007: Sector Percentage Agriculture 29.5 Manufacturing 24.1 Trade 12.3 Construction 7.2 Transport, storage and communication 5.2 Education 4.2 Health and social assistance 4.0 Real estate and other services 3.0 Hotels and restaurants 1.4 Other 9.1 Total 100.0 Source: National Institute of Statistics Earnings Since  1  January  2008  the  gross  minimum  wage  in  Romania  has  been  RON  500  (USD  210)  per  month. Average gross monthly earnings for the listed industry types are shown below for April 2008. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 19 © AXCO 2009
  23. 23. Politics and the Economy Industry type Gross monthly earnings RON USD Financial intermediation (not 5,298 2,228 insurance & pensions) Mining and quarrying 3,145 1,323 Insurance and pensions 2,862 1,204 General government 2,843 1,196 Utilities 2,699 1,135 Education 1,945 818 Health and social assistance 1,595 671 Manufacturing 1,436 604 Construction 1,433 603 Wholesale, retail and repairs 1,421 598 Agriculture, hunting and related 1,174 494 services Hotels and restaurants 944 397 Source: National Institute of Statistics Romanian workers have enjoyed extremely high rates of earnings growth over the last few years, though it still remains the case that real wages in 2007 were only 12% above their level in 1990. Growth in average real and nominal net monthly earnings is shown below in percentages for the five years to 2007. 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Average net 27.7 23.8 24.5 16.1 20.4 nominal monthly earnings Real Earnings 10.8 10.5 14.3 8.8 15.0 Source: National Institute of Statistics Key Industries Manufacturing The  Ceausescu  regime  endowed  Romania  with  an  over-sized,  uncompetitive  and  resource-intensive state-owned manufacturing sector. Major industries included heavy engineering, chemicals, car production, shipbuilding and steel, the leading example of the latter being the Sidex-Galati steel mill. This employs over 20,000  workers  and  is  the  largest  in  south-east  Europe.  Some  industries  have  been  sold  to  foreign investors  (Sidex-Galati  to  Mittal  Steel  and  Automobile  Dacia  to  Renault),  but  the  majority  are  effectively bankrupt. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 20 © AXCO 2009
  24. 24. Politics and the Economy Production  of  sophisticated  consumer  goods  and  machine  tools  had  been  largely  neglected  and engineering products did not meet the standards expected by world markets, leaving Romania dependent on  imported  technology  and  foreign  direct  investment  (FDI).  Modernisation  of  Romania's  industry  has accelerated since 2000. Several foreign car manufacturing companies, such as Ford, Renault and Daimler, have either already invested in Romania or are involved in talks to do so. The private manufacturing sector is mainly focused on food processing, textiles, leather, footwear and light engineering. Agriculture Agriculture  accounted  for  29.5%  of  total  employment  in  2007  (a  higher  proportion  than  in  any  other  east European country except Albania) but only accounts for around 6.6% of GDP. Agricultural production has declined  precipitously  since  1990,  largely  because  of  a  land  restitution  programme  that  has  created  four million  smallholders  with  an  average  plot  size  of  only  2.28  hectares.  The  main  crops  are  wheat,  maize, sugar beets and sunflower seeds. Oil and Gas Romania  is  richly  endowed  with  reserves  of  oil  (230mn  tonnes)  and  natural  gas  (180bn  cubic  metres). Production has been declining for over 20 years, though there is hope that this will be reversed by a EUR 3bn (USD 3.8bn) investment programme, part of it directed to offshore exploration in the Black Sea. The country also has a refining capacity of 600,000 barrels a day. Textiles There has been significant foreign investment in the clothing and footwear sectors, which now account for over 16% of all exports. Exports and Imports In 2007 total exports were USD 40,265mn, with the most important commodities broken down as follows: Commodity Percentage Machinery and mechanical equipment 22.18 Base metals and products 16.32 Textiles and textile products 13.32 Vehicles and transport equipment 11.91 Mineral products 7.79 Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 21 © AXCO 2009
  25. 25. Politics and the Economy Source: National Institute of Statistics The most important export destinations were as follows: Destination Percentage Italy 17.0 Germany 16.9 France 7.7 Turkey 7.0 Hungary 5.6 Source: National Institute of Statistics In 2007 total imports were USD 69,946mn, with the most important commodities broken down as follows: Commodity Percentage Machinery and mechanical equipment 24.88 Vehicles and transport equipment 13.78 Mineral products 12.04 Base metals and products 11.08 Chemicals products 7.58 Source: National Institute of Statistics The most important sources of imports were as follows: Source Percentage Germany 17.2 Italy 12.7 Hungary 6.9 Russia 6.3 France 6.2 Source: National Institute of Statistics Currency and Exchange Control Currency and Exchange Rate The Romanian currency is the leu (plural lei), which is abbreviated to RON in this report. After years of high inflation the leu had fallen to the point where there were nearly 30,000 local currency units to the US dollar. A re-denomination exercise was therefore conducted on 1 July 2005 which involved the deletion of four zeroes. This changed the average 2005 US dollar exchange rate from 29,140 old lei (or ROL) to 2.914 new lei (or RON). Foreign exchange controls were lifted on 18 February 1997 and the leu was made internally convertible on 30 January 1998. After a number of years of actively managing the exchange rate of the leu, the National Bank announced in November 2004 that it would allow the currency to fluctuate in accordance with market forces. The average annual exchange rate against the US dollar for the five years to 2007 is shown below. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 22 © AXCO 2009
  26. 26. Politics and the Economy The  latest  exchange  rate  when  this  report  was  in  preparation  has  been  used  for  all  current  conversions (see Key Facts). For previous years, the average annual rate from the above chart for the year in question has been used. Exchange Control There are no foreign exchange controls. Permission is not needed to purchase foreign currency or to make remittances  abroad.  There  is  normally  no  shortage  of  hard  currency,  though  there  was  the  prospect  of Romania  facing  a  currency  crisis  as  foreign  investors  pulled  out  of  the  country  in  panic  in  October  and November 2008. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 23 © AXCO 2009
  27. 27. Supervision and Control Legislation EU Legislation The  European  Union  (EU)  is  a  grouping  of  27  European  countries  which  have  agreed  a  process  of co-operation and integration in economic, political and judicial affairs. The body of legislation created at the EU level, which has evolved over several decades, has an important impact  on  insurance  in  member  states  as  the  EU  works  to  complete  the  implementation  of  the  Financial Services Action Plan (FSAP) adopted in May 1999. The FSAP has three objectives: • a single market for wholesale financial services • open and secure retail markets • state-of-the-art prudential rules and supervision. The  considerable  progress  which  has  been  made  towards  adoption  of  the  FSAP  is  comprehensively covered in the separate Axco EU Legislation report which can be accessed by clicking on the link below. Domestic Insurance Legislation The  insurance  law  is  Law No 32/2000 on Insurance Companies and Insurance Supervision  which  came into effect on 10 April 2000. This regulates insurance companies and intermediaries and provided for the establishment  of  the  Insurance  Supervisory  Commission  (CSA).  The  law  has  been  supplemented  by numerous regulations issued by the CSA and by the following amendment laws: • Law No 76/2003, which came into effect on 26 March 2003 • Law No 403/2004, which came into effect on 28 October 2004 • Emergency Ordinance No 201/2005, which came into effect on 29 December 2005 • Law No 113/2006, which came into effect on 16 May 2006. The insurance law incorporates all the current EU insurance directives . Law No 136/1995 on Insurance and Reinsurance in Romania, which came into effect on 1 February 1996, regulates insurance contracts and sets out the basic principles of property, liability and personal insurance. The law was amended by Law No 76/2004, which came into effect on 26 May 2004 and Law No 172/2006, which came into effect on 19 May 2006. Law No 503/2004 on the Winding-up of Insurance Companies lays down the procedures for dealing with insolvent insurance companies. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 24 © AXCO 2009
  28. 28. Supervision and Control The  Law on Obligatory House Insurance,  which  was  passed  on  8  October  2008,  has  introduced compulsory insurance of dwelling houses against the perils of earthquake, landslide and flood. Legislative Process New insurance legislation is normally drafted by the CSA and approved by the Ministry of Finance and the Ministry  of  Justice.  Draft  legislation  must  be  considered  by  a  Committee  of  the  Senate  before  being debated and passed by the full Senate. Legislation then passes to the Chamber of Deputies for debate and approval  before  being  signed  into  law  by  the  president.  Insurance  legislation  may  also  be  introduced  by emergency ordinance, which may be passed by the government before being debated by parliament. The  Romanian  insurance  industry  has  been  plagued  by  hasty  and  ill  thought-out  legislation  arising  partly from a lack of government understanding of the industry and partly from the sheer number of laws which had to be passed before the country could accede to the EU. A current example is the Law on Obligatory House Insurance,  which  was  framed  before  a  technical  feasibility  study  had  been  conducted  and  which now requires the insurance coverage to be tailored to a pre-determined premium rather than vice versa. Statutory Tariffs There are no statutory tariffs. Compulsory Insurances List of Compulsory Insurances • Motor third party liability. • Air carriers and aircraft operators. • Nuclear liability. • Workers' compensation (state scheme). • Professional  indemnity  for  doctors,  nurses,  dentists,  hospitals,  pharmacists,  lawyers,  insurance intermediaries, administrators, liquidators, notaries and accountants. • Professional  indemnity  for  financial  institutions  which  keep  electronic  records  of  securities  transactions and companies which register electronic signatures. • Tour operators' bonds. • Personal  accident  and  occupational  disease  insurance  for  employees  who  belong  to  factory  fire brigades. • D & O for managers of joint stock companies. • Shipments of waste (financial guarantee or insurance). Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 25 © AXCO 2009
  29. 29. Supervision and Control Supplementary Information on Compulsory Insurances EU  legislation  establishes  minimum  insurance  requirements  for  air  carriers  and  aircraft  operators  flying within,  into,  out  of  or  over  the  EU.  Insurance  is  obligatory  to  cover  liability  in  respect  of  passengers, baggage, cargo and third parties. For more details please see the EU Legislation report. A  financial  guarantee  or  insurance  is  required  for  all  shipments  of  waste  imported  into  the  EU,  exported from it or in transit through it. It is intended to cover costs where recovery or disposal is illegal or cannot be completed as intended. For more details please see the EU Legislation report. Compulsory insurance of dwelling houses against the perils of earthquake, landslide and flood is expected to come into effect in the middle of 2009. Further details are given in the Legislative Update section of this report. Changes in Legislation Legislative Update Law on Obligatory House Insurance The  floods  which  affected  Romania  in  2005  caused  estimated  property  damage  of  EUR  1.5bn  (USD 1.9bn), only 1% of which was insured. Demands for state assistance not only placed a severe strain on the budget but also reminded the government of the much greater financial burden which would result from a severe  earthquake.  The  government  therefore  decided  to  introduce  a  pre-funding  mechanism  for  natural catastrophe in the form of compulsory house insurance. Work on drafting the legal basis for the new scheme, known as the Law on Obligatory House Insurance, began  in  mid-2006  but  was  delayed  by  inter-ministerial  consultation  and  by  a  change  of  government  in early 2007. A draft law was finally submitted to parliament on 29 September 2007 but was not passed until 8  October  2008  and  did  not  receive  the  presidential  signature  until  4  November  2008.  It  will  now  take  at least  six  months  to  draft  the  secondary  legislation,  set  up  the  Insurance  Disaster  Pool  and  arrange reinsurance.  The  earliest  start  date  for  the  compulsory  insurance  scheme  will  therefore  be  the  middle  of 2009. The main points of the Law on Obligatory House Insurance are summarised below. • All owners of residential properties in both the public and private sectors will be obliged to insure their buildings  against  the  perils  of  earthquake,  landslide  and  flood.  Obligatory  insurance  will  not  extend  to annexes, outbuildings or contents. • Homes  covered  by  the  obligatory  insurance  requirement  will  be  divided  into  two  types:  Type  A constructed  of  steel,  concrete,  wood,  baked  brick  or  any  other  material  created  by  the  application  of heat;  and  Type  B  constructed  of  unbaked  brick  or  any  other  material  not  created  by  the  application  of heat.  The  precise  definitions  of  the  two  building  types  will  be  contained  in  regulations  issued  by  the Insurance Supervisory Commission (CSA). Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 26 © AXCO 2009
  30. 30. Supervision and Control • Type A homes will be covered for a first-loss sum insured of EUR 20,000 (USD 27,397) for an annual premium of EUR 20 (USD 27); Type B homes will be covered for a first loss sum insured of EUR 10,000 (USD  13,699)  for  an  annual  premium  of  EUR  10  (USD  14)  (actual  figures  will  be  the  local  currency equivalent converted at the exchange rate prevailing on the day of settlement). Policies will be written on a  reinstatement  basis.  Insurance  premiums  and  limits  may  be  adjusted  from  time  to  time  to  reflect factors such as building cost inflation and reinsurance costs. Such adjustments shall be carried out by the government during the first five years and by the CSA thereafter. • Apartment blocks comprising at least four apartments may be covered by a collective policy. If a house is covered by a lease, the lessor will be responsible for arranging the insurance. • Premiums will be tax-deductible for income tax payers. Premiums for those receiving social assistance benefits will be paid by the state. • The  insurance  scheme  will  be  underwritten  by  a  special  purpose  joint  stock  (re)insurance  company called the Insurance Disaster Pool (abbreviated to PAID) in which participating insurance companies will be shareholders. The maximum permissible shareholding will be 15%. PAID will be governed by Law No 32/2000 on Insurance Companies and Insurance Supervision and will be supervised by the CSA. PAID will act as 100% reinsurer of its shareholders' obligatory household underwriting and will be allowed to purchase  retrocession  coverage  in  the  international  market.  The  Romanian  government  may  lend money  to  PAID  to  cover  its  retrocession  premium  for  the  first  year  of  the  scheme  and  any  shortfall between  direct  premiums  collected  and  retrocession  premiums  due  over  the  following  four  years. Government  loans  may  also  cover  any  insured  losses  which  exceed  the  upper  limit  of  PAID's retrocession programme. • Obligatory  house  insurance  policies  will  be  issued  by  insurance  companies  which  are  shareholders  in PAID. Policies will be valid for one year with premiums payable annually at least 24 hours in advance. Premiums may be paid to insurers, agents or brokers or at local authority offices. Collected premiums, less an administration fee, should be passed on to PAID. The amount of the administration fee will be set by the CSA. • Local  authorities  should  provide  PAID  with  a  list  of  all  houses  and  homeowners  in  their  locality.  Each month PAID should provide each local authority with a list of residents who have not taken out obligatory house  insurance.  The  local  authority  should  write  to  defaulters  reminding  them  of  their  obligation  to insure. Those who do not insure will be liable to a fine of RON 100 to RON 500 (USD 36 to USD 180) and will not be entitled to any form of state aid if they suffer a catastrophe loss. • Obligatory house insurance policies may not be issued for illegally constructed dwellings. Insurers shall not  be  liable  to  compensate  policyholders  who  have  increased  the  vulnerability  of  their  properties  by carrying out building alterations without the necessary permit. • Losses should be adjusted by PAID insurers. • The  compulsory  insurance  requirement  will  come  into  effect  90  days  after  the  CSA  has  issued  all  the regulations necessary to bring the law into effect. The  Law on Obligatory House Insurance  has  proven  to  be  extremely  controversial,  not  least  with  the insurance  companies  which  might  be  thought  to  be  its  natural  supporters.  Areas  of  difficulty  are summarised below. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 27 © AXCO 2009
  31. 31. Supervision and Control • The  government  announced  insurance  premiums  of  EUR  10  or  EUR  20  per  dwelling  before  any modelling had been conducted. Subsequent research on reinsurance costs suggested that the scheme would  only  be  financially  viable  with  a  minimum  deductible  of  5%,  and  yet  no  deductible  has  been allowed for in the law. • In  order  to  avoid  comparison  with  the  compulsory  household  insurance  of  the  communist  era,  the government  has  refused  to  allow  premiums  to  be  collected  as  part  of  the  local  property  tax.  Premium collection  will  therefore  be  the  responsibility  of  participating  insurance  companies.  The  government expects  80%  of  Romania's  8.25  million  householders  to  pay  their  obligatory  insurance  premiums  as required  by  law.  Most  observers  doubt  whether  the  penetration  rate  will  be  anything  like  that  high, however, particularly in country regions where insurance companies have only a limited branch network. • Because  of  low  premium  levels  it  may  not  be  economic  for  insurers  or  intermediaries  to  market obligatory house insurance policies. As a result of these issues, not all insurance companies are expected to participate in PAID. Those that do participate will see the mandatory cover as an opportunity not only to educate the public about insurance but  also  to  cross-sell  top-up  household  cover  and  other  personal  lines.  Public  opinion  seems  also  to  be divided about the merits of being forced to insure, though the publicity given to recent disasters such as the Sichuan earthquake in China is said to have had a persuasive effect. Motor third party liability (MTPL) Ordinance No 14/2007,  which  came  into  effect  on  1  January  2008,  requires  MTPL  insurers  to  have minimum technical reserves for MTPL of 60% of their gross written MTPL premium income. A subsequent ordinance  has  laid  down  a  more  detailed  methodology  for  calculating  MTPL  reserves,  including  IBNR reserves. Alternative methodologies may still be used, provided they give rise to a higher level of reserves. Law No 136/1995 has been amended by Law No 304/2007 to allow motor accidents which do not involve bodily  injury  to  be  notified  to  insurers  by  means  of  an  quot;amicable  reportquot;  rather  than  a  police  report.  The motorists  involved  may  still  ask  for  a  police  report  if  they  prefer.  Although  the  new  claims  notification system  was  due  to  come  into  effect  on  1  July  2008,  objections  from  the  insurance  industry  mean  it  is unlikely to be adopted before 2009. Insurers are concerned that the new system will increase their claim handling costs and be an encouragement to fraud. Statutory MTPL limits Ordinances  issued  by  the  Insurance  Supervisory  Commission  (CSA)  have  set  out  the  following  timetable for increasing Romania's statutory MTPL limits: • Statutory limits effective from 1 January 2008 are the lei equivalents of EUR 150,000 (USD 205,479) per event for property damage and EUR 750,000 (USD 1.03mn) per person for bodily injury. • Statutory limits effective from 1 January 2009 will be the lei equivalents of EUR 300,000 (USD 410,959) per event for property damage and EUR 1.5mn (USD 2.05mn) per person for bodily injury. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 28 © AXCO 2009
  32. 32. Supervision and Control • Statutory limits effective from 1 January 2010 will be the lei equivalents of EUR 500,000 (USD 684,932) per event for property damage and EUR 2.5mn (USD 3.42mn) per person for bodily injury. Reinsurance directive Because parliament was unable to legislate for the transposition of the Reinsurance Directive in time, the CSA had to introduce the directive by regulation. This required a total of 15 different regulations extending the  rules  applicable  to  insurance  companies  to  apply  also  to  reinsurance  companies.  The  exercise  was finally completed on 23 June 2008. Accounting regulations Order No 7/2007 introduced accounting regulations for insurance business in accordance with the relevant EU directives, including the transposition of Directive 2006/46/EC. Intermediaries The CSA has established a register of insurance intermediaries in accordance with Directive 92/2002. New regulations require registered individuals to obtain a professional qualification within three years of further regulations being passed for the accreditation of specialist training institutions. Employers' liability Law No 237 Amending the Labour Code  extends  employers'  legal  liability  for  bodily  injury  to  include non-economic losses (before the amendment employers were only liable for economic losses). Employees are  now  allowed  to  sue  if  they  are  subject  to  undue  stress,  disrespectful  treatment  or  damage  to  their reputations.  Such  actions  are  exempt  from  the  normal  advance  court  tax  of  6%  to  8%  of  the  damages claimed. Green cards Border controls on Romanian vehicles were finally abolished in August 2007, allowing Romanian motorists to drive abroad without having to buy a separate green card. Compulsory D&O Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 29 © AXCO 2009
  33. 33. Supervision and Control A new Company Law, which came into effect on 1 December 2006, made D&O insurance compulsory for the managers of joint stock companies. Insurance law amendment Law No 32/2000 on Insurance Companies and Insurance Supervision was amended by emergency decree on  8  November  2006  to  allow  life  and  non-life  insurers  to  enter  the  voluntary  pensions  market.  The amendment  requires  participating  insurers  to  meet  separate  capital  requirements  for  insurance  and pensions and to maintain separate accounting records and reserves. The  amendment  also  allowed  non-bank  financial  operations  such  as  leasing  companies  to  sell complementary  insurance  products  and  extended  the  business  scope  of  insurance  brokers  to  include voluntary pensions. Projected Legislation International Financial Reporting Standards The CSA has approved a strategy for the progressive implementation of International Financial Reporting Standards over the period 2007 to 2010. Supervision Insurance Supervisory Authority The insurance supervisory authority is the Insurance Supervisory Commission (Comisia de Supraveghere a  Asigurarilor  or  CSA).  The  CSA  was  established  by  the  Law on InsuranceCompanies and Insurance Supervision  as  the  successor  to  the  Supervisory  Office  of  Insurance  and  Reinsurance  Activity  (SOIRA) which had been acting as insurance supervisor since 1 February 1992. The CSA should have commenced operations within 60 days of the new law coming into effect (that is, by 10 June 2000), but was held up by political infighting over the composition of its board. This was only resolved after the general election victory of the Social Democratic Party allowed the government to dictate a board of its own choosing, and the CSA finally commenced operations on 2 July 2001. The  CSA  is  an  autonomous  entity  answerable  to  the  Romanian  parliament.  The  commission  is  run  by  a seven-member  council  comprising  a  president,  two  vice-presidents  and  four  other  members.  Council members  are  appointed  by  parliament  for  a  five-year  term  and  must  have  at  least  five  years'  previous experience in finance or insurance. The current president is Angela Toncescu who took over the role from Nicolae Crisan when his five-year term expired on 1 July 2006. The CSA is funded by licence application fees and supervisory levies on premium and commission income. The  CSA  is  responsible  for  drafting  insurance  legislation,  issuing  regulations  under  the  Law on InsuranceCompanies and Insurance Supervision and approving legislation in other sectors of the economy which  might  have  a  bearing  on  insurance  .  The  commission  authorises  and  supervises  insurance companies  and  insurance  intermediaries,  manages  the  policyholders'  protection  funds  and  deals  with consumer  complaints.  The  CSA  had  152  staff  at  the  end  of  2007,  up  from  138  the  previous  year.  The commission is divided into 14 departments and directorates, of which the most important are: Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 30 © AXCO 2009
  34. 34. Supervision and Control • supervision and on-site inspection directorate • financial stability and actuarial directorate • front office directorate (responsible for handling consumer complaints) • regulation and licensing non-life insurance directorate • regulation and licensing compulsory insurance directorate • regulation and licensing life insurance and pension fund management directorate • guarantee fund department. Insurance  supervision  is  based  on  the  analysis  of  companies'  financial  returns,  supplemented  by  on-site inspections.  Inspections  normally  take  place  every  two  years  but  can  be  brought  forward  for  companies whose financial returns give grounds for concern. The CSA is currently changing its supervisory approach from compliance-based to risk-based in preparation for the introduction of Solvency II. Emergency Ordinance No 201/2005,  which  came  into  effect  on  29  December  2005,  requires  insurers  to employ  a  minimum  of  one  actuary  approved  by  the  CSA  who  is  responsible  for  calculating  premiums, technical reserves and the solvency margin and for submitting an annual actuarial report to the supervisory authority. The actuary must report any breaches of the law to the insurance company's management within two days. These must be reported to the CSA if management takes no action within 10 days. Insurers must also appoint an approved auditor who must report directly to the CSA if he or she uncovers any breaches of the law or any circumstances which may imperil the insurer's financial condition or lead to the expression of a qualified opinion in respect of its annual financial statement. At the beginning of 2007 insurance companies were required to set up internal risk management systems and to start submitting risk management reports to the CSA from 30 June 2008. Each insurer must have a risk management committee reporting directly to the board. Statutory Returns Insurers are required to submit audited accounts for a financial year ending 31 December by 30 April of the following  year.  Insurance  company  accounts  must  be  presented  in  accordance  with  International Accounting  Standards  and  the  relevant  EU  directives.  The  CSA  also  requires  annual  risk  management reports,  six-monthly  financial  reports,  quarterly  reports  on  the  assets  covering  technical  reserves,  and monthly reports on outstanding loss reserves and liquidity. The CSA has approved a strategy for the progressive implementation of International Financial Reporting Standards over the period 2007 to 2010. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 31 © AXCO 2009
  35. 35. Supervision and Control Insolvency Regulation Law No 503/2004 on the Winding-up of Insurance Companies has given the CSA a wide range of powers for intervening in the affairs of financially deficient insurers. These include the limitation of premium income, the prohibition of writing or renewing certain classes of insurance, the prohibition of certain investments, an increase in capital and the implementation of a financial recovery plan. If these prove ineffective, the CSA can  apply  to  the  courts  for  the  appointment  of  a  special  administrator  who  can  assume  control  of  the company for the purpose of preventing its actual insolvency. Romania  is  unusual  in  having  a  policyholders'  protection  fund  (PPF)  which  applies  to  both  individual  and corporate  direct  insurance  policyholders.  The  fund  was  established  as  part  of  the  state  budget  under  the terms  of  Law No 32/2000  but  was  only  properly  constituted  when  it  was  taken  over  by  the  CSA  on  1 January  2003.  The  original  unitary  fund  was  divided  into  separate  life  and  non-life  funds  on  1  January 2005. As far as non-life insurance is concerned, the fund provides full compensation for claims against insolvent motor third party liability insurers. For other lines of business, the fund pays 50% of outstanding claims as at the date bankruptcy proceedings are initiated, reduced to 25% in the case of credit and guarantee and financial  loss.  Policyholders'  claims  against  insolvent  insurers  take  precedence  over  those  of  all  other creditors. The PPF is only liable for claims which cannot be met from the bankrupt insurer's assets and only comes into play once bankruptcy proceedings have been concluded. The PPF is funded by a levy of 0.8% of insurers' collected annual premiums. Consumer Dispute Resolution The  CSA  has  a  memorandum  of  understanding  with  the  National  Authority  for  Consumer  Protection, allowing  policyholders  to  take  their  complaints  to  either  body.  The  CSA  has  a  dedicated  complaints department  called  the  Front  Office  Directorate,  and  though  this  has  no  authority  to  make  binding  awards against  insurers,  its  recommendations  are  said  to  carry  considerable  weight  with  company  managers.  If recommendation fails, the complainant has no option but the courts. There is no insurance ombudsman as such The  Front  Office  Directorate  dealt  with  1,296  complaints  against  insurers  and  brokers  in  2007,  of  which over 50% were settled in favour of the complainant. Around 75% of complaints related to motor insurance. Fewer than 10% of complaints were in relation to life insurance. The insurers' association UNSAR has established an arbitration forum which charges lower fees than the courts. Although the forum is mainly intended to resolve subrogation disputes between insurers it can also deal with disputes with policyholders if the policy includes an arbitration clause. Non-Admitted Insurance Regulatory Position Definition. Non-admitted insurance  refers  to  the  placing  of  insurance  outside  the  regulatory  system  of the country where the risk is located. A policy may be issued abroad, or a risk may be included in a global master policy, by an insurer which is not authorised in that country. An authorised insurer is one which is permitted to do business in a country (or region) by the local supervisory authority. Romania - Non-Life (P&C) Country Visited: Jan 2009 32 © AXCO 2009

×