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Employee engagement strategies and practices
Employee engagement strategies and practices
Employee engagement strategies and practices
Employee engagement strategies and practices
Employee engagement strategies and practices
Employee engagement strategies and practices
Employee engagement strategies and practices
Employee engagement strategies and practices
Employee engagement strategies and practices
Employee engagement strategies and practices
Employee engagement strategies and practices
Employee engagement strategies and practices
Employee engagement strategies and practices
Employee engagement strategies and practices
Employee engagement strategies and practices
Employee engagement strategies and practices
Employee engagement strategies and practices
Employee engagement strategies and practices
Employee engagement strategies and practices
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Employee engagement strategies and practices

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A report by i4cp into the strategies used to deliver high employee engagement at high performing organisations

A report by i4cp into the strategies used to deliver high employee engagement at high performing organisations

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  • 1. GlobaEmployee Engagement:Strategies & PracticesAn i4cp ReportStrategy Leadership Talent Culture Market
  • 2. Employee Engagement: Strategies & PracticesThe five domains ofhigh-performance organizationsAbout i4cpi4cp focuses on the people practices that make high-performance organizations unique. Years of researchmake it clear that top companies approach their workforces differently. At i4cp, we work with our network oforganizations to: Reveal what high-performance organizationsare doing differently. Identify best and next practices for all levelsof management. Provide the resources to show how workforceimprovements have bottom-line impact.Through our exclusive, vendor-free network – in which peerscollaborate to drive strategic research and share tools andinsights – i4cp provides a unique, practical view of how humancapital practices drive high-performance.Visit i4cp.com to learn more.About this reportHaving an engaged workforce has a high correlation with market performance. This fact drives high-performance organizations to manage engagement much the same as they measure and monitorfinancial and operational performance. By combining data with on-the-ground initiatives from some ofthe worlds top organizations, this report clearly shows where the critical connections between employeeengagement and business performance should be made. It also provides actionable strategies forimplementing the practices that will put your organization on the road to a more engaged andproductive future.About the Market Performance Index (MPI)i4cp’s Market Performance Index, or MPI, is based on self-reported ratings of organizationalperformance in four key areas—market share, revenue growth, profitability and customer satisfaction—as compared to the levels achieved five years previously. The average of the four ratings determinesMPI score.
  • 3. ContentsAligning culture, strategy and performance ...................................................................................................................1Promote a culture in which employees understand organizational goals and are empowered toachieve them .......................................................................................................................................................................2Trust is the foundation of engagement at 3M..........................................................................................................3Measure the impact of engagement on the business...................................................................................................4Rio Tinto links engagement to business results ......................................................................................................6Include engagement in managers’ performance reviews............................................................................................7Jack in the Box links engagement to profits.............................................................................................................8Ensure prompt, focused follow through by managers ..................................................................................................9Conclusions and recommendations.............................................................................................................................. 10Recommendations for conducting employee engagement surveys ................................................................. 1010 Steps for increasing employee engagement ................................................................................................... 11Authors and contributors ................................................................................................................................................ 15References ........................................................................................................................................................................ 15©2013 Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp)Use of all results, analysis and findings requires explicit permission from i4cp.
  • 4. www.i4cp.com Page 1 | ProprietaryTime-to-full-productivityEmployee Engagement: Strategies & Practices©2013 Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp)EXECUTIVE SUMMARYAligning culture, strategy and performancei4cps research on employee engagement confirms that in high-performing organizations (HPOs) engagementis much more than a periodic survey followed by activity-planning. Engagement is about aligning culture,strategy and performance, and re-thinking the ways in which these connect. It is the result of a series ofactivities that need to be embedded into every step of theemployee life cycle process from the employer brandportrayed, recruiting and onboarding, to leadership, learningand development, and reward and recognition. A criticalelement of this alignment is a culture that makes engagementthe responsibility of frontline managers and top leadershiprather than an activity wholly owned by human resources.Having an engaged workforce has a high correlation with market performance. HPOs excel at practices thatincrease engagement—far out-performing lower-performing organizations (LPOs). These practices include: Maintaining cultures in which employees understand organizationalgoals and are empowered to achieve them. Measuring the impact of engagement on the business. Including engagement in manager performance appraisals anddevelopment plans. Emphasizing prompt and focused follow through on engagement issueswith frequent and regular communications on the impact to the business.i4cp’s 2012 survey on employee engagement revealed that 35% of HPOs actively measure and regularlymonitor the impact of engagement on the business and act quickly to respond compared to 21% of lowperformers. HPOs manage engagement much the same as they measure and monitor financial andoperational performance. The most commonly used metrics for analysis are customer satisfaction, profitabilityand revenue growth, with HPOs much more likely to use these metrics in all three areas.HPOs describe difficulty defining engagement across global workforces, identifying the right metrics to use indifferent markets, sustaining focus on engagement during difficult periods, and effectively tackling the action-planning element—much the same as LPOs. However, HPOs persevere through these issues to realize resultsby recognizing that not following up in meaningful ways can be more counter-productive than not surveyingemployees at all.Some organizations have yet to begin to connect operating and financial information with employeeinformation. The good news is that it can begin with small, incremental steps working with basic metrics thatcan be refined over time. Making those critical connections between employee engagement and businessperformance may be challenging at first, but prove well worth the investment.Engagement is aboutaligning culture, strategy andperformance, and re-thinking theways in which these connect.
  • 5. Employee Engagement: Strategies & PracticesProprietary | Page 2 ©2013 Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp) www.i4cp.comPromote a culture in which employees understandorganizational goals and are empowered to achieve themEmployees in high-performing organizations understand their companys business strategy and operatinggoals, and most importantly, what they need to do to contribute to their success. Equally important is that theygenuinely want—and are able to—take ownership of challenges and find solutions.HPOs recognize the importance of creating andsustaining an environment that aligns their businessobjectives with a culture that empowers theiremployees. HPOs also use employee surveys as onlyone method of identifying how well they are doing.Additionally, they monitor and manage performance,individually and collectively, to ensure it is successfuland aligned to the key business performanceobjectives.Over two-thirds of respondents from high-engagementorganizations (HEOs) agreed to a high or very highextent that there is a clear understanding in theirorganization of what the company stands for, what itwants to achieve and how employees contribute tothat success.This reinforces the importance of clear and consistentcommunication by all levels of leadership throughoutthe organization. Messages employees receive aboutthe organization and their contributions to plans andstrategies are absolutely critical to engagement.When asked about the extent to which they agreed with the statement that their organization’s leadershiphelps employees see and feel how they are contributing to the organization’s success and future, over a thirdof the overall (aggregate) respondents agreed to a high or very extent, but respondents from HEOs (47%) weretwice as likely to agree as those from LEOs (21%). This finding had significant correlations with both marketperformance (r =.21**) and engagement (r=.42**).High-Engagement Organizations (HEOs)Respondents to the survey indicating >70%of their workforce is highly engaged(96 of 334 survey respondents).Low-Engagement Organizations (LEOs)Respondents to the survey indicating <30%of their workforce is highly engaged(94 of 334 survey respondents).
  • 6. www.i4cp.com Page 3 | ProprietaryTime-to-full-productivityEmployee Engagement: Strategies & Practices©2013 Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp)STRATEGY IN ACTIONTrust is the foundationof engagement at 3M3M differentiates between employee satisfaction and employeeengagement by looking at how the perceptions, behaviors and driversassociated with each word differ. The company found that while engagedemployees are satisfied and demonstrate satisfaction behaviors as well asengagement behaviors, the same is not necessarily true in reverse:satisfied employees don’t always display engagement behaviors.3M defines engagement as: “an individual’s sense of purpose andfocused energy, evident to others in the display of personal initiative,effort and persistence directed toward organizational goals.”With this in mind, 3M’s engagement model looks at conditions forengagement that include engagement attitudes, engagement behaviorsand organizational outcomes. The basic building blocks of engagement at3M are: Fair/consistent treatment leads to peopletrusting their environment, Trusting one’s environment leads to a sense of safety, People feel safe to take action on their owninitiative, supporting engagement and innovation.How does a global company ensure alignment worldwide?Karen B. Paul, Ph.D., who leads Global HR Measurement for 3M, says thatthe fundamentals of engagement are universal; the desire for meaning andpurpose in the workplace knows no borders; how the company capitalizeson the fundamentals is local, and how these two facts are aligned canproduce engagement and financial success.At 3M, employee engagement is definitely on the rise with consistentincreases on key measures—commitment, innovation, engagement andrisk-taking, even during a time of economic uncertainty. 3M’s researchvalidates the business case for employee engagement, finding thatengagement attitudes predict 3M plant absenteeism (short-term disability),reduced benefits costs, evidence that lab employee engagement attitudesare linked to innovation and profitability, and linking employee engagementwith customer loyalty and sustainability.3M improvestrust by: Providing education andtraining for supervisorsand managers; Promoting employees’understanding andinvolvement with 3M; Ensuring thatcompensation is seen asfair and equitable, andopening the channels ofcommunication; Building accountabilityand rewards -metrics, pay,promotions andperformancemanagement; Focusing on interpersonalelements such asapproaching one anotherwith respect and warmth; Expecting leaders keeptheir promises, involvepeople in decision-making, distribute workequitably, communicateopenly and demonstrateconcern; Emphasizing engagementin all leadership classesand through mentoringinitiatives such as“Leaders TeachingLeaders.”
  • 7. Employee Engagement: Strategies & PracticesProprietary | Page 4 ©2013 Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp) www.i4cp.comMore than1.5x1.5x4.5x3xMeasure the impact of engagement on the businessAmong those organizations that are measuring the impact of engagement on the business, more respondentsfrom HPOs (35%) reported doing so than those from LPOs (21%). Among organizations that are activelymeasuring the impact of engagement on the business, the most commonly used metrics are customersatisfaction, profitability and revenue growth, with HPOs much more likely to use these metrics in all threeareas.Significantly more HPOs measure the impact of employeeengagement on key business performance indicators*Percent of organizations measuring the business impact of engagementCustomer satisfactionHPOs 83%LPOs 50%ProfitabilityHPOs 67%LPOs 38%Revenue growthHPOs 63%LPOs 13%Market shareHPOs 42%LPOs 13%Source: i4cps Employee Engagement SurveyWhile researchers and HR practitioners have been able to establish a relationship between employeeengagement and business performance in a specific context, developing an approach that can be appliedwidely has proved elusive.Hank Jonas, who leads Organizational Effectiveness at Corning says that it’s important to keep in mind thatmaking these connections is much more complex for some organizations than others. Companies that are verysingular industries, such as banks or retailers, that ascribe to the basic model of employee satisfaction drivescustomer satisfaction—which in turn drives business results—are able to identify specific, consistent measuresof customer satisfaction. Others, by virtue of their industry and scope, don’t have that same ease; it wouldrequire a very sophisticated process in order to establish those linkages Jonas says.Some leaders may be hesitant or even resistant to the notion of tying employee survey data to hard businessdata altogether because they believe that survey results are simply reactive. If business is good, the results willbe good and if the business is not doing well the employees will be unhappy—and this is what will berepresented in survey results.
  • 8. www.i4cp.com Page 5 | ProprietaryTime-to-full-productivityEmployee Engagement: Strategies & Practices©2013 Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp)But companies can and should start modestly, says Jonas, if not by looking at hard business results, looking atengagement scores by performance ratings or by talent designations—those are the things that will start to getthe attention of senior leaders. “When you’re looking at survey data that may be telling you that your most high-potential people are less satisfied and engaged, that will pique some interest,” Jonas says.Organizations dont always start with a major corporate-wide initiative measuring a multitude of metrics andindicators. Most successful HPOs report a simple formula for success:1. Start smallWork with individual business unit leaders to build curiosity, then interest, andultimately commitment for resources and action. Many HPOs report using simplespreadsheets and/or database management vs. HRIS big-box systems.2. Collect readily available metrics firstCompile available data for both HR and business unit performance. Limit your impactto the business while gathering data.3. Look for reasonable correlationsDon’t look for or conclude cause-and-effect at first; check your data before drawing anyconclusions or recommending action.4. Ensure accuracyBuild rigor and validity in your processes. Challenge your own observations. Be yourown worst critic---it still wont be enough.5. Establish a historyExtend your analysis retrospectively looking for patterns and trends. Structure yourcollection with an eye to the future to prepare for an accumulation of data. Prepare fororganizational changes in structure.6. Build momentumHarvest and share success stories and seek endorsements from executives that havefound the data valuable.
  • 9. Employee Engagement: Strategies & PracticesProprietary | Page 6 ©2013 Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp) www.i4cp.comItems with a strong, consistentlink to the performance measuresmost important to Rio Tinto weremore meaningful than standardconceptual measures ofengagement.STRATEGY IN ACTIONRio Tinto links engagement to business resultsRio Tinto has been conducting surveys of employees for quite some time, initially focusing on gathering inputand opinions regarding issues that affect the organization rather than employment. Culturally, there was asense that the contributions of people impact business performance, but the company’s leadership wanted tomake solid connections between employee engagement and performance of the business.Rio Tinto’s approach to demonstrating that employee engagement is much more than an HR initiative to gaugesatisfaction began with the appointment of an advisor on employee engagement. A case study by TowersWatson, Rio Tinto’s partner on the initiative, notes that Rio Tinto already had a broad spectrum of businessmeasures, and rather than adopt standard engagement measures, was eager to establish links betweenemployee engagement and business performance unique to the organization. This was achieved by usinglinkage analysis to define the engagement measure. Towers Watson and Rio Tinto designed a wider surveythan usual to allow a broader field for correlation. The routine employee opinion analysis was completedswiftly, but the linkage analysis demanded more complex and time-consuming statistical modeling. Rio Tintoprovided performance data based on safety, production and maintenance measures.Six survey items emerged that showed strong, consistent links to the performance measures that are mostimportant to Rio Tinto’s plants and mines managers, far more meaningful than a standard conceptual measureof engagement. From this, Rio Tinto had a key performance indicator (KPI) linking engagement to businessresults. Towers Watson and Rio Tinto analyzed the underlying drivers—identified as leadership, externalreputation, and safety practices—to develop action plans for improvements as well as benchmark themselvesagainst similar organizations in Towers Watson’s database.
  • 10. www.i4cp.com Page 7 | ProprietaryTime-to-full-productivityEmployee Engagement: Strategies & Practices©2013 Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp)Include engagement in managers’ performance reviewsThe role of the manager in employee engagement cannot be underestimated. Of course, the messages sent tothe organization by senior leadership regarding the importance of engagement are important, but frontlinemanagers are the linchpin for building and sustaining engagement. The study found that high engagementorganizations are twice as likely as low engagement organizations to include engagement measures as part ofeach line manager’s performance review. With a correlation to engagement of 0.22**, organizations that failto tie engagement to performance measures are missing a key opportunity to improve engagement.i4cp’s Talent Management in the Trenches report bearsout the importance of line managers taking responsibilityfor managing talent, which also showed a strongcorrelation to high performance. Context is a key point,however, as it’s important to acknowledge that the workenvironment, culture and company type can alter thetalent management activities of line managers.Paul Humphries, EVP of HR and President, Medical,Automotive, and Aerospace for Flextronics, noted thatthe talent management priorities are quite different forfrontline managers in his organization. “When we thinkof talent management responsibilities for our frontlinemanagers, we primarily think of employee engagement,retention, attraction, reducing turnover, and trying toprovide a better work environment,” Humphries said.Half of the survey respondents agreed that engagement is a reflection of how employees feel about theirrelationship with their immediate supervisor, and far more respondents from HPOs agreed with this statementthan did those from LPOs. Managers who invest time in getting to know their employees and provide them withregular feedback, coaching and development opportunities are more likely to have effective, highly engagedteams that contribute to the success of the organization. i4cp’s report, Purpose Driven PerformanceManagement in High-Performance Organizations revealed that HPOs differentiate themselves by providingsupervisors with critical training related to performance management. This held true in every category oftraining―giving/receiving feedback, conducting a performance appraisal meeting, maintaining ongoingdocumentation, writing performance appraisals, providing motivation, developing goals. Tying engagement tothe performance measures of managers is not a common practice today (only 26% of companies reporteddoing it) but it should become one for organizations serious about increasing engagement among theworkforce.Incorporating action planning into the performance management process makes sense as it establishes clearand specific accountability. Organizations can help managers by focusing on key insights garnered from theengagement survey rather than bombarding them with a massive dump of data. By identifying key drivers thatmanagers can focus their time and energy on in terms of relevant and specific actions that will improveengagement, organizations have a better chance of gaining support from managers and with it, meaningfulchange. This can be facilitated by assisting managers in ensuring that their direct reports have line of sight tothe organization’s purpose and goals.Includes engagement as part of eachmanagers performance reviewHEOs 40%LEOs 19% 2xAgrees with the statement:"Employee engagement is a reflection ofhow employees feel about their relationshipwith their immediate supervisor"HEOs 65%LEOs 40%Source: i4cps Employee Engagement Survey1.5x
  • 11. Employee Engagement: Strategies & PracticesProprietary | Page 8 ©2013 Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp) www.i4cp.comSTRATEGY IN ACTIONJack in the Box links engagement to profitsJack in the Box Inc. has conducted annual employee surveys for nearly two decades,following the familiar cycle of conducting a survey each year, summarizing andsharing the results with the organization. Mark Blankenship, the company’s SVP andChief Administrative Officer, arrived to find that the company ascribed to the serviceprofit chain model* for operating its restaurants. The concept at the heart of this model is that if restaurantmanagers excel at hiring the right employees, those hires will provide superior service to guests, resulting inhappier (and loyal) guests, who would then be more loyal to the brand. This idea of hiring the right employees,treating them well, training consistently and paying above average—all of which leads to high levels ofcustomer service, loyalty and retention—was, as Blankenship wrote in HR Magazine, “ … the belief system orlogic chain. We put language to that effect in our annual reports” (2012).HR measured employee satisfaction and engagement through the annual survey and “demonstratedrelationships between satisfaction with the boss, benefits, training, turnover and so forth, but thats where HRsanalytical connection to the business stopped,” says Blankenship, who was intrigued that HR professionals didnot engage in connecting the "people" data to the financial and operational data, nor did leaders in financeand operations express interest in that same people data as an integral, strategic element of their analyticalwork. “After all,” says Blankenship, “they measure every aspect of restaurant and business performance.”Blankenship moved to assemble the restaurant performance data and connect the organization’s peoplemetrics and business performance, the beginnings of what became “a strategic shift in decision-making,"Blankenship says. The data told a story—restaurants staffed by happier employees had happier guests andcorrespondingly higher sales and profits. “We learned that the manager controlled much of what we saw asemployee satisfaction but that ‘happy employees’ were only part of the equation that led to our current ‘peopleequity scorecard.’”The organization began to change the way business was discussed—based on the data and process—and theyadded quarterly internal service surveys to follow-up the annual survey. The quarterly surveys defined eightdimensions: communication; feedback; interpersonal treatment; leadership; physical environment; rewardsand recognition; staffing; training and development. Blankenship says that the quarterly follow-up surveysmeasured the performance of restaurant managers, which were a component of the managers performancereview. “We used those results to inform our restaurant operations team about what was really drivingemployee engagement and performance. To their surprise, it was less about pay—despite entry-level wagesassociated with the quick-service restaurant industry—and more about consistent staffing, training andfeedback.”Jack in the Box was able to refine its people data down to eight dimensions of service and had employees ratetheir managers on these eight dimensions. This information was then shared with the restaurant managers,which enables them to assess their own performance. After a year of sharing this feedback with managersquarterly, the company made this process part of a manager’s regular performance review in order to holdthem accountable.*For complete information on the model see, The Service Profit Chain: How Leading Companies Link Profit and Growth to Loyalty,Satisfaction and Value, by James L. Heskett, W. Earl Sasser Jr, and Leonard A. Schlesinger, Free Press, 1997.
  • 12. www.i4cp.com Page 9 | ProprietaryTime-to-full-productivityEmployee Engagement: Strategies & Practices©2013 Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp)Ensure prompt, focused follow through by managersIt may seem simplistic, but the fact is that many organizations falter merely by failing to follow-through inmeaningful and visible ways or by depending on HR alone to drive execution. The onus here is on the leadersof the organization to set the tone—engagement becomes relevant in an organization in which the seniorleaders understand that engagement drives business results and view it as a business imperative rather thansomething that should be invested in simply because it is the right thing to do.It stands to reason that employees who haveparticipated in engagement surveys and observed realaction come out of the result of those surveys beyondthe presentations of the results and discussions aboutchange strategies will be more engaged. Our surveyfound that 38% of the respondents agreed to a high orvery extent with the statement:“My organization’sleadership helps employees see and feel how they arecontributing to the organization’s success and future.”Among those, the respondents from HPOs were muchmore likely to agree (50%) than those from LPOs (24%).The imperative for companies today is to act, butdifferently than they have in the past. Managers mustfocus on employees, individually, as the key to improvingemployee engagement throughout the enterprise. Byleveraging universal motivators—autonomy, mastery andpurpose—to make mutually rewarding progress, eachmanager can readily create natural win/win outcomes.To do their best, managers need: leaders to set the stage and lead by example; HR to facilitate the ongoingprocess; and finally, upper middle managers to become subject matter experts, who competently adviseleaders and mentor managers on an ongoing basis.Moreover, sustainable cultures of engagement are built on solid foundations of trust and engaged employeesare those who have confidence in their senior leaders. Leaders earn trust by being visible, communicatingclearly and often about company values, and walking the talk. Cultures in which employees are motivated andengaged are likely those in which leaders communicate effectively with employees about performance goalsand expectations. They are also visibly invested in employee engagement and demonstrate their commitmentby taking swift, decisive and transparent action on what is learned from employee surveys.Most respondents to the survey reported that theirleaders demonstrate investment in employeeengagement, and respondents from HPOs were muchmore likely (76%) to say this than LPOs (59%).Respondents from high engagement organizations weretwice as likely (89%) as those from low engagementcompanies (46%) to report that their leadershipdemonstrates investment in engagement, which had a0.34** correlation to engagement.Leaders demonstrate investment inemployee engagementHEOs 89%LEOs 46%Source: i4cps Employee Engagement Survey2xAgrees with the statements:"My organization does an effective job oftaking meaningful action followingengagement surveys"HPOs 31%LPOs 14%"My organizations leadership helpsemployees see and feel how they arecontributing to the organizationssuccess and future"HPOs 50%LPOs 24%Source: i4cps Employee Engagement Survey2x2x
  • 13. Employee Engagement: Strategies & PracticesProprietary | Page 10 ©2013 Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp) www.i4cp.comConclusions and recommendationsEmployee engagement has a high correlation to market performance. Increasing it is worth the investment andthe effort required. High-performing organizations cultivate high engagement among their employees. Andcompanies with highly engaged workforces generate better financial and customer satisfaction results thanthose with less engaged employees. Our study reveals that companies should take four key steps to ensure thevalue of their employee engagement survey efforts:Recommendations for conducting employee engagement surveysRecommendation Action BenefitTailor your approach Connect engagement activities to thebusiness strategy and identify linkagesbetween engagement data andbusiness outcomes.Builds the business case for employeeengagement.Involve top leaders Engage senior business and corporateleaders in conversations aboutengagement data and improvement.Builds leadership commitment to andinvolvement in employee engagementactivities.Communicate results quickly Hold town hall-style meetings withsenior leadership presenting scores,areas of strength, areas fordevelopment, and discussing actionplans being created.Acknowledge the input of employeesand communicate in a concrete waywhat changes the company will make.Develop a consistent message andtheme that communicates the valueand business importance ofengagement and the organization’scommitment to employees.Demonstrates the commitment ofsenior leaders to employeeengagement.Helps to shift the view of engagementfrom the focus of an annual survey to anintegral part of the culture of theorganization.Take action Respond to employee feedback bytaking action on items as quickly aspossible and communicating about it.Recognize and reward engagement byemphasizing when it is done well andcelebrating successful efforts.Sends the clear message that” weheard you said, here’s what we didabout it.”Sets the tone for and reinforces theimportance of engagement to bothemployees and managers alike.
  • 14. www.i4cp.com Page 11 | ProprietaryTime-to-full-productivityEmployee Engagement: Strategies & Practices©2013 Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp)Engagement is the result of a series of activities that need to be embedded into every step of the talentmanagement process. Our survey of close to 200 organizations and discussions with i4cp’s EmployeeEngagement Exchange members identified 10 key steps that organizations can take to increase employeeengagement:10 Steps for increasing employee engagementRecommendation Action BenefitRecruiting1. Design/ enhance your employerbrand around key engagementdrivers.Build an employee valueproposition and workplaceenvironment around attributesthat most engage employees.Creates a culture thatcontinually engagesemployees and helps improveinternal employee referralrates.2. Hire people that are more likelyto “fit’ your organization (from avalues/culture) standpoint.Embed values and behaviorsinto candidate identification,interview and assessmentpractices.Acclimates new staff morequickly into the organization.Onboarding3. Focus onboarding process onassimilation.Implement process to ensuremanagers meet with new staffon start dates, have workingenvironment prepared(including technology) and areassigned “buddies” to help newstaff with acclimation andintroductions to key people inthe organization.Accelerates time to fullproductivity and reduction oflearning curves for newemployees.
  • 15. Employee Engagement: Strategies & PracticesProprietary | Page 12 ©2013 Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp) www.i4cp.comRecommendation Action BenefitLeadership4. Give workers line of sight fromthe work they do to the biggerstrategic goals of theorganization and or businessunit.Educate workers on thebusiness; make companyperformance data available,identify drivers of performanceand show how what employeesdo affects them.Conduct town hall or groupmeetings in which seniorleadership discusses strategyand other issues.Creates a greater sense ofownership among employeesand establishes transparencybetween executivesleadership actions andobjectives.5. Involve employees inorganizational strategy.Establish an Employee Councilto increase communication withfront-line staff.Create a venue for employees tosubmit ideas on internalimprovements to a panel ofpeers who discuss anddetermine the feasibility of theidea and the potential impact tothe organization.Builds ownership of strategicgoals among employees.6. Focus on developing betterleaders and managers.Make the provision ofdevelopmental support such astraining, coaching andmentoring to line managers apriority.Train frontline leaders on thefollowing: giving and receivingfeedback, conductingperformance appraisalmeetings, addressing employeeperformance issues, and settingthe goals the employees will bemeasured against.Ensures that engagement istreated as a process byleaders rather than an event.
  • 16. www.i4cp.com Page 13 | ProprietaryTime-to-full-productivityEmployee Engagement: Strategies & Practices©2013 Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp)Recommendation Action BenefitAppraisal7. Hold leaders accountable forengagement.Walk the talk. The tone of theculture is a foundation set bythe leadership upon whichemployee engagement is built(or not). If the conduct of theorganization’s leadership is inconflict with the messagesbeing sent to the workforce,investments in buildingengagement with employeeswill be wasted.Tie engagement scores of directreports and or business units toappraisals and rewards.Builds trust amongemployees and reinforces theimportance of engagementwith and by leaders—“what’smeasured matters.”Learning8. Provide ample learning optionsand opportunities.Establish development plansand career paths for all jobroles.Offer a mix of classroom, onlineand experiential learning.Provide career developmentsupport including online portalsand tools and coaching andmentoring.Builds commitment to theorganization as a place tolearn and grow.9. Use social and collaborativetools.Implement a social media richintranet to facilitate quickercommunication, informationsharing, collaboration andconnecting team members tocommunities they haveinterest in.Provides a vehicle fororganizational transparencyand messaging. Also,reinforces key engagementdrivers as well as surfacesissues that may soon (oralready does) impactengagement.
  • 17. Employee Engagement: Strategies & PracticesProprietary | Page 14 ©2013 Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp) www.i4cp.comRecommendation Action BenefitRewardandRecognition10. Prioritize and communicate on-going employee recognition andrewards.Institute programs such as“spot rewards” where managerscan reward employees who goabove and beyond.Spotlight employees (e.g. in acompany newsletter) thatconsistently demonstrateorganizational values and/orcame up with a new idea thatimproved companyperformance.Use social media to recognizeemployees publically. Forexample, posting a“congratulations” to theirLinkedIn page. Tie to keyperformance indicators.Makes employees feel valuedand appreciated. Also,increase morale and instillsgreater organizational pride.
  • 18. www.i4cp.com Page 15 | ProprietaryTime-to-full-productivityEmployee Engagement: Strategies & Practices©2013 Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp)Authors and contributorsAnalysis and input was contributed by Tony DiRomualdo, VP of research and Kevin Copestick, Director,Member Exchange Programs.Andrew Dixon is i4cp’s research coordinator and contributor to this report; managing the surveyimplementation and conducting the data analysis.Eric Davis, i4cp’s senior editor, provided editorial oversight, graphic design and proofing for this report.i4cp’s Employee Engagement ExchangeThis report and the associated survey are products of i4cps 2011-2012 Employee Engagement Exchange. Thegroup was comprised of representatives from the following organizations:Abbott LabsAlereChoice HotelsGraingerHertzINGJack in the BoxNew York TimesRBC DexiaSony PicturesEntertainmentToyotaZebra TechnologyWe extend our gratitude and appreciation to the many contributors, whose dedication to the study of employeeengagement made this research project possible.ReferencesBlankenship, Mark. (July, 2012). “Happier Employees + Happier Customers = More Profits: HR Professionals atJack in the Box Restaurants use Metrics to Make the Connection.” HR Magazine. www.shrm.orgBlankenship, Mark. (October, 2012). "How to Use the People Equity Model to Better Understand BusinessPerformance." 2012 HRPS Strategic Talent Management Forum. HRPS. Chicago. www.hrps.orgInstitute for Corporate Productivity. (2012). Talent Management in the Trenches. www.i4cp.comTowers Watson (2011). “Towers Watson and Rio Tinto: Providing a Rock-Solid Link Between EmployeeEngagement and Business Performance.” www.towerswatson.com
  • 19. Peers. Research. Tools. Data.i4cp enables high performance inthe world’s top organizations.Contact us at:1-866-375-i4cp (4427)or at www.i4cp.com

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