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Creativity in non trivial problem solving, ROWE,  and the limitations of bonuses
 

Creativity in non trivial problem solving, ROWE, and the limitations of bonuses

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Provocative presentation about the issues of motivation and creativity in the modern workplace.

Provocative presentation about the issues of motivation and creativity in the modern workplace.

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    Creativity in non trivial problem solving, ROWE,  and the limitations of bonuses Creativity in non trivial problem solving, ROWE, and the limitations of bonuses Presentation Transcript

    • Creativity in non trivial problem solving, ROWE, and the limitations of bonuses Copyrights (c) 2011-2013 Pragmatic Cohesion Consulting 1
    • A Compelling TED Talk • Dan Pink: The Puzzle of Motivation – “As long as the tasks involved only mechanical skills, bonuses worked as they would be expected: the higher the pay, the better the performance” – “But once the task called for even rudimentary cognitive skill, a larger reward led to poorer performance.” [1] • These results remained consistent across several cultural settings! [1] • The study was conducted by scientists from MIT, Carnegie Mellon, the University of Chicago; under a grant from the Federal Reserve Bank of the USA. [1] Copyrights (c) 2011-2013 Pragmatic Cohesion Consulting 2
    • The Bottom Line • “There is a mismatch between what science knows and what business does”[1] • “Too many organizations are making their decisions, setting their policies about talent and people, based on assumptions that are outdated, unexamined, and rooted more in folklore than in science.”[1] Copyrights (c) 2011-2013 Pragmatic Cohesion Consulting 3
    • The Bottom Line • The new and better approach is [1]: – “An approach build around intrinsic motivation, around a desire to do things because they matter, because we like them , because they are interesting, because they are part of something important” – Three Key elements are at the center of this new approach: Autonomy, Mastery, and Purpose. – Autonomy: the urge to direct our own lives – Mastery: the desire to get better and better at something that matters – Purpose: the yearning to do what we do in the service of something larger than ourselves Copyrights (c) 2011-2013 Pragmatic Cohesion Consulting 4
    • The Bottom Line • More About Autonomy: – “Traditional models of management are great if you want compliance. But if you want engagement self direction works better.”[1] – ROWE (Result Only Work Environment) in a ROWE people do not have schedules, they show up when they want, they do not have to show up at the office at certain time or anytime; they just got to get their work done. How they do it, when they do it, where they do it is totally up to them. Meetings are optional. This approach has been proven to increase: productivity, workers engagement, workers satisfaction; and turnovers went down. [1] Copyrights (c) 2011-2013 Pragmatic Cohesion Consulting 5
    • The Bottom Line • More About the effectiveness of Autonomy: the case of Wikipedia Vs Microsoft Encarta: – “10 years ago if you had gone to an economist anywhere and said: you had these two different models to create encyclopedias, which one do you think they would have chosen? Which one actually won?” [1] Copyrights (c) 2011-2013 Pragmatic Cohesion Consulting 6
    • Framing and Perceptual Blocks to Creativity [2] • Stereotyping: fixing observation into a standard category or group • Tacit Assumptions: imposing none mandated constraints • Inability to understand a problem at different levels: failing to see the forest for the trees • Inability to see the problem from another Person’s Perspective: failing to relate to another person’s values or objectives Copyrights (c) 2011-2013 Pragmatic Cohesion Consulting 7
    • Value-Based Blocks to Creativity [2] • Fear of taking risks: often linked to the fear of being judged as silly or stupid • Status Quo Bias: inability to embrace or even consider change • Reality Versus Fantasy: imagination can be first fueled by fantasy (Metaphorical Thinking) [5,6] • Judgment and Criticism: Not allowing enough exploration time for new ideas before judging them inadequate Copyrights (c) 2011-2013 Pragmatic Cohesion Consulting 8
    • Cultural and Environmental Blocks to Creativity [2] • Taboos: when strictly avoided, they can prevent the consideration of middle-ground satisfactory alternatives • Strength of Traditions: specially when those traditions reinforce the status quo bias. • Reason and Logic Versus Humor, Fantasy, and Artistic Thinking: systematically dismissing feelings, emotions, intuitions in problem solving is a bias favored by Western societies. See this author’s Slideshare presentation titled “About the benefits and Pitfalls of relying on analytical methods…”. [4] Copyrights (c) 2011-2013 Pragmatic Cohesion Consulting 9
    • Organizational Blocks to Creativity • Some company’s cultures are inhibitors of creativity. For example, there are abundant subtle ways of promoting criticism, judging ideas, stereotyping, and being risk adverse [2]. • Repeated subtle discriminations have been studied and have proven to have devastating effects [7] • Behaviors that discourage humor, playfulness, or artistic thinking also block creativity [2]. • Resisting change for the sake of preserving the organization’s traditions can be a major threat to creativity [2]. Copyrights (c) 2011-2013 Pragmatic Cohesion Consulting 10
    • Organizational Blocks to Creativity • Excessive process formalism, autocratic supervisors, lack of cooperation and distrust among coworkers can all become obstacles to creativity.[2] • Detailed and critical evaluations, close watch, focusing on tangible rewards, competing with others, limited choices and resources to do one’s job all are further deterrent to creativity.[3] • Extensive work experience within the same company can make employees blind to new ways of seeing problems and devising solutions.[2] Copyrights (c) 2011-2013 Pragmatic Cohesion Consulting 11
    • The Enablers of Creativity • Expertise in the Domain [3] • Skill in creative thinking [3] • Intrinsic motivation to do the task well [3] • See the TED Talk at the beginning of this presentation. [1] Copyrights (c) 2011-2013 Pragmatic Cohesion Consulting 12
    • Copyrights (c) 2011-2013 Pragmatic Cohesion Consulting 13 References: • [1] Dan Pink. 2009. The Puzzle of Motivation. TED Talks. http://www.ted.com/talks/dan_pink_on_motivation.html • [2] Robert T. Clemen. 1996. Making Hard Decisions. Wadsworth publishing company. Belmont, CA. • [3] Teresa Amabile. 1988. A Model of Creativity and Innovation in Organizations. Research in Organizational Behavior, 10, 123-167. • [4] Pragmatic Cohesion Consulting. About the benefits and pitfalls of relying on analytical methods. 2012. Slideshare. http://www.slideshare.net/adidierk/about-the-benefits-and- pitfalls-of-relying-on-analytical-methods • [5]Gordon, William. 1961. Synectics. Harper & Row. New York, NY • [6] Gordon, Williams. 1969. The Metaphorical way or learning and knowing. SES Associates. Cambridge, MA • [7] Mary P. Rowe. 1990. Barriers to Equality. Employee Responsibility and Rights journal. Vol 3, Nbr 2, pp 153-163 For Comments and Questions contact didier@pragmaticohesion.com