Indian remote sensing satellite mission
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  • Aerial photography can be defined as the science of taking a photo from a point in the air, for the purpose of making some type of study of earth. Terrestrial photo – Camera axis is horizontal or near horizontal Aerial photo – Camera axis is vertical or near vertical.Aerial photographs were the first form of Remote Sensing and they still remain most widely used images on even today also.Limitations / Drawbacks of aerial photographs:1. Scale is not uniform. It varies from strip to strip, photograph to photograph and also in same photo at different points.2. Minor structural features such as folds, small scale joints, fractures, lineation, foliation, crossbedding, ripple marks, etc. can not be interpreted unless the scale of photographs is sufficiently large to represent them photographically.3. In some cases exact rock identification may become difficult as rock exposures may be covered by surficial cover, soil, vegetation etc.4. Photo interpretation tells only about those features which are on the surface of Earth.5. Photographic remote sensing is restricted to 0.3 to 0.9 μm region of electromagnetic spectrum and longer wavelength’s valuable information is omitted.6. Photography is restricted by weather, lighting conditions and atmospheric effects.7. Information is recorded in the analog mode / non-digital format. In order to be computer processed, photos must be converted in to digital format although digital cameras are developed and are now used to acquire aerial photographs.
  • Aerial photography can be defined as the science of taking a photo from a point in the air, for the purpose of making some type of study of earth. Terrestrial photo – Camera axis is horizontal or near horizontal Aerial photo – Camera axis is vertical or near vertical.Aerial photographs were the first form of Remote Sensing and they still remain most widely used images on even today also.Limitations / Drawbacks of aerial photographs:1. Scale is not uniform. It varies from strip to strip, photograph to photograph and also in same photo at different points.2. Minor structural features such as folds, small scale joints, fractures, lineation, foliation, crossbedding, ripple marks, etc. can not be interpreted unless the scale of photographs is sufficiently large to represent them photographically.3. In some cases exact rock identification may become difficult as rock exposures may be covered by surficial cover, soil, vegetation etc.4. Photo interpretation tells only about those features which are on the surface of Earth.5. Photographic remote sensing is restricted to 0.3 to 0.9 μm region of electromagnetic spectrum and longer wavelength’s valuable information is omitted.6. Photography is restricted by weather, lighting conditions and atmospheric effects.7. Information is recorded in the analog mode / non-digital format. In order to be computer processed, photos must be converted in to digital format although digital cameras are developed and are now used to acquire aerial photographs.
  • Aerial photography can be defined as the science of taking a photo from a point in the air, for the purpose of making some type of study of earth. Terrestrial photo – Camera axis is horizontal or near horizontal Aerial photo – Camera axis is vertical or near vertical.Aerial photographs were the first form of Remote Sensing and they still remain most widely used images on even today also.Limitations / Drawbacks of aerial photographs:1. Scale is not uniform. It varies from strip to strip, photograph to photograph and also in same photo at different points.2. Minor structural features such as folds, small scale joints, fractures, lineation, foliation, crossbedding, ripple marks, etc. can not be interpreted unless the scale of photographs is sufficiently large to represent them photographically.3. In some cases exact rock identification may become difficult as rock exposures may be covered by surficial cover, soil, vegetation etc.4. Photo interpretation tells only about those features which are on the surface of Earth.5. Photographic remote sensing is restricted to 0.3 to 0.9 μm region of electromagnetic spectrum and longer wavelength’s valuable information is omitted.6. Photography is restricted by weather, lighting conditions and atmospheric effects.7. Information is recorded in the analog mode / non-digital format. In order to be computer processed, photos must be converted in to digital format although digital cameras are developed and are now used to acquire aerial photographs.
  • Aerial photography can be defined as the science of taking a photo from a point in the air, for the purpose of making some type of study of earth. Terrestrial photo – Camera axis is horizontal or near horizontal Aerial photo – Camera axis is vertical or near vertical.Aerial photographs were the first form of Remote Sensing and they still remain most widely used images on even today also.Limitations / Drawbacks of aerial photographs:1. Scale is not uniform. It varies from strip to strip, photograph to photograph and also in same photo at different points.2. Minor structural features such as folds, small scale joints, fractures, lineation, foliation, crossbedding, ripple marks, etc. can not be interpreted unless the scale of photographs is sufficiently large to represent them photographically.3. In some cases exact rock identification may become difficult as rock exposures may be covered by surficial cover, soil, vegetation etc.4. Photo interpretation tells only about those features which are on the surface of Earth.5. Photographic remote sensing is restricted to 0.3 to 0.9 μm region of electromagnetic spectrum and longer wavelength’s valuable information is omitted.6. Photography is restricted by weather, lighting conditions and atmospheric effects.7. Information is recorded in the analog mode / non-digital format. In order to be computer processed, photos must be converted in to digital format although digital cameras are developed and are now used to acquire aerial photographs.
  • Aerial photography can be defined as the science of taking a photo from a point in the air, for the purpose of making some type of study of earth. Terrestrial photo – Camera axis is horizontal or near horizontal Aerial photo – Camera axis is vertical or near vertical.Aerial photographs were the first form of Remote Sensing and they still remain most widely used images on even today also.Limitations / Drawbacks of aerial photographs:1. Scale is not uniform. It varies from strip to strip, photograph to photograph and also in same photo at different points.2. Minor structural features such as folds, small scale joints, fractures, lineation, foliation, crossbedding, ripple marks, etc. can not be interpreted unless the scale of photographs is sufficiently large to represent them photographically.3. In some cases exact rock identification may become difficult as rock exposures may be covered by surficial cover, soil, vegetation etc.4. Photo interpretation tells only about those features which are on the surface of Earth.5. Photographic remote sensing is restricted to 0.3 to 0.9 μm region of electromagnetic spectrum and longer wavelength’s valuable information is omitted.6. Photography is restricted by weather, lighting conditions and atmospheric effects.7. Information is recorded in the analog mode / non-digital format. In order to be computer processed, photos must be converted in to digital format although digital cameras are developed and are now used to acquire aerial photographs.

Indian remote sensing satellite mission Indian remote sensing satellite mission Presentation Transcript

  • A Seminar on Dated: 24th September 2011 GUIDED BY MR. B. S. MANJARE P.G. Department of Geology Rashtrasant Tukadoji Maharaj Nagpur University, Nagpur 2011 - 2012
  • 1. NARRATIVE 2. SPACE TECHNOLOGIES IN SUPPORT OF NATIONAL POWER 3. TYPES OF SATELLITES & LAUNCH VEHICLES 4. IRS SATELLITE AND ITS CHARACTERISTICS 5. APPLICATIONS IN GEOLOGY 6. SUMMARY 7. REFERENCES
  • NARRATIVE Period After 1945 Space Research Headed By Dr. Vikram Sarabhai & Homi Bhabha In1957, the soviet union successfully launched first satellite sputnik In the 1960s, the soviet union enabled ISRO with close ties. OBJECTIVE OF ISRO Design & Development of Satellites Post launch management of satellite system Dr. Vikram Sarabhai
  • SPACE TECHNOLOGIES IN SUPPORT OF NATIONAL POWER prime objective to develop space technology and application various national tasks Support of economy areas like water shade , agriculture, geology, water resource etc. Establishment of NNRM providing operational remote sensing data services Indian National Satellites (INSAT) & Indian Remote Sensing (IRS) satellites
  • TYPES OF SATELLITES & LAUNCH VEHICLES Geosynchronous Sunsynchronous 1. PSLV 2.GSLV
  • IRS SATELLITE AND ITS CHARACTERISTICS  Learning phase  Aryabhata (360Kg), Bhaskara-I,II (Remote Sensing)  First indigenous satellite launched July 1980 Rohini1 (40Kg) with the help of SLV rocket
  • IRS 1A Launch Date: 17 MARCH 1988  I st in series of Remote Sensing Satellite  Polar sun synchronous orbit from the vostok in USSR ORBITAL PARAMETER Altitude - 904 Km Inclination - 99 degrees Local Time - 9:40 A.M Repetivity - 22 Days Orbits/day-14 Period -103 minutes Sensors- LISS-I, LISS-II Mission completed July 1996 after serving for 8 years ORBITAL PARAMETERS IRS-1A IRS-1B L. Date 29.08.1991 IRS-P2(L.D:15 OCT.1994) Resolution: 32.74 meter Repetivity :24 days
  • LISS - I Sensor LISS - II Sensor Linear Imaging Self Scanning Sensors (LISS) Resolution -72.5 m Swath -148 km Repetivity- 22 days Spectral Bands 0.45 - 0.52 microns (B) 0.52 - 0.59 microns (G) 0.62 - 0.68 microns (R) Solid state detectors. Charge Coupled Devices (CCD). Terrain in the cross track Detector stored image & form scan lines Two dimensional picture. Resolution depends on no. of photo detector & the swath. Resolution -36.25 m Swath -74 x 2 km Repetivity -22 days Spectral Bands 0.45 - 0.52 microns (B) 0.52 - 0.59 microns (G) 0.62 - 0.68 microns (R) 0.77 - 0.86 microns 0.77 - 0.86 microns (NIR) (NIR)
  • 2nd Generation Satellite IRS Large Ground Station Network 1C 1D  On Board Tape Recorder (OBTR) with capacity Launch Date:19May, 1995 Launch Date:27 Sep, 1997 IRS1C of 62 Gb, storing data 24 min.  Enhanced Payloads like better Spatial resolution additional spectral band, improved repetitively ORBITAL PARAMETER Orbit: Polar Sun synchronous Altitude: 817 Km Inclination: 98.69 deg L.Time:10:30 A.M (descending mode) Repetivity: 24 Days Orbits/cycle :341 Period:101.35 min Sensors: PAN, LISS-III, WiFS Mission completed IRS1D Mission completed
  • IRS1D IRS1C Altitude: 817 Km PANCHROMATIC SENSORS • 5.8m resolution (Pan only), 5 day revisit by tilting the camera LISS III • 23.5m and 70m resolution, 3 spectral bands V-NIR (23.5m resolution), 24 day repeat cycle, swath 141km WiFS • 188m resolution, 810km swath, 2 spectral bands, 5 day revisit
  • Oceansat-1 Launch Date: 26May 1999  first satellite built for Ocean applications  weight 1050 kg orbit by PSLV-C2 Sriharikota.  Two sensor Ocean Colour Monitor (OCM)  Multi - frequency Scanning Microwave Radiometer (MSMR) for oceanographic studies.  Extend applications to several newer areas.  Having swath 1420km to 1660km Mission completed on August 8, 2010
  • 3rd Generation Launch Date 17Oct,2003 Launch Date 20 April,2011 Resourcesat-1 & 2 Mission Objectives:  Provide continued remote sensing data for integrated land & water resource management with enhanced multi-spectral / spatial coverage and stereo imaging. Further carry out studies improved urban planning, national security, forestry and disaster management.
  • Resourcesat-1 & 2 Features ORBITAL PARAMETER Orbit height : 817 km Orbit period : 101.35 min Number of Orbits per day : 14 Local Time Equator crossing : 10.30 a.m. Payload : Repetivity (LISS-3) : 24 days (341 orbits) Revisit (LISS-4) : 5 days Lift-off Mass : 1,360 kg Power : Solar Array generating 1250 W Mission Life : 5 years
  • CARTOSAT-1 (IRS P5) Mission Objectives: design & develop stereo imaging & cartographic applications. stimulate areas of user applications in urban management, mineral exploration, & disaster management Launch date 5 May,2005 ORBITAL PARAMETER Orbital Altitude : 618 km Inclination : 97.87 degree Local time: 10:30 AM Revisit : 5 days Repetition: 126 days Orbits/day: 14 Period : 97minutes Payload: two PAN sensors
  • PAN SENSOR Stereo viewing 2.5 m resolution 50 Fore look 260 Facility for across track tilt to give better revisit Aft look
  • 4th Generation Cartosat-2 ORBITAL PARAMETER Altitude: 630 km Period: 97.4 min. Time descend : 9.30 am Orbits/day: 14 Revisit: 4 days Repitivity: 310 day Power: solar array Pay load: PAN Launched 1/10/07 Operational life: 5 years PAN specification Resolution : better than 1mt Swath: 9.6 km Spectral band: 0.5-0.85 mm Solid state recorder: 64 GB capacity for image storage    An advance sensor to give specific spot imagery. Images use- detailed mapping, infrastructure development & management Land Information System (LIS) & Geographical Information System (GIS).
  • APPLICATION IN GEOLOGY Used for resources survey and management under National Natural Resources Management System (NNRMS) various application are:  Drought monitoring based on vegetation condition.  Flood risk zone mapping  Hydro-geomorphologic maps  Irrigationarea status monitoring  Land use and land cover mapping  Mineral Prospecting  Coastal studies  Forest survey
  • SUMMARY Synoptic View: high altitude very large area from a narrow look angle to recognize large structural pattern. Repetitive coverage: routinely monitoring of changes and seasonal effect studies. Uniformity over time: passes over the given area at approximately same time of the day and hence repetitive coverage is obtained. It gives valuable uniformity Uniformity over vast area: coverage in every direction possible to compile mosaic images of good consistency and accuracy for vast areas
  • REFERENCES  Assefa M. Melesse et.al. (2007), Remote Sensing Sensors and Applications in Environmental Resources Mapping and Modeling, Sensors, 7, 3209-3241  Dr. Ravi Prakash Gupta(2008), Remote Sensing Geology- 2--th Edition, Germany: Springer-Verlag Heidelberg, 53-121  Joseph. G. (1996), Imaging sensors for remote sensing, Remote Sensing Rev.13, 257–342.  Josea Sobrino et.al. (2004), Land surface temperature retrieval from LANDSAT TM 5, Journal of Remote Sensing of Environment, 90, 434-440  K kasturirangan (1995), “present scenario and future thrusts”, Journal of the Indian Society of Remote Sensing, 23(1), 1-6  Saumitra Mukherjee (2008), Role of Satellite Sensors in Groundwater Exploration, School of Environmental Sciences, New Delhi. Sensors, 8, 2006-2016  Paul J Curran (1985), Principles of Remote Sensing, London & New York: library of congress catalog Longman group Ltd., 130-226  Ranganath R. Navalgund, V. Jayaraman, P. S. Roy (2007), Remote sensing applications: An overview, CURRENT SCIENCE, 93(12)25, 1747-1766  Sylvie Soudarissanane etc. (2011), Scanning geometry: Influencing factor on the quality of terrestrial laser scanning points, ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, 66, 389–399
  • SSTO INDAIN SPACE MISSION : ROAD MAP System 2025 2015 Thermal Protection Systems Satellite with replaceable Power & Propulsion 2010 Inflatable Antenna GSLV- MkII 2005 Newer Bands SRE 2001 .. GSLV PSLV 93 .. INSAT Series IRS Series Multi platform Multi parameter Multi resolution Astrosat Thank you……