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English morphology affixiations (ades)
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English morphology affixiations (ades)

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  • 1. Ade Sudirman, S.Pd.
  • 2. Introduction  An affix is abound morpheme which can only occur if attached to word or a stem. Affixes may be derivational or inflectional (Trask 1993).
  • 3. A.1. Prefix  It is an affix which precedes the root, stem or base to which it is bound, such as English derivational affixes re- and un- . The example of prefixes are as follows: re, un, dis, pre, post, a, aero, anti, auto, mis, tele. Rebound, unhappy, disloyal, pretest, post-war, amoral, anticlimax, autobiography, misplace, telephone.
  • 4. A. 2. Infixes  An infix is affix which occupies a position in which it interrupts another single morpheme. As English does not have any affixes, it is better to look at Indonesian, Sundanese and Javanese. Exp: Kilau = k-em-ilau; Pasar = p-al-asar; Galak = g-u-alak.
  • 5. A. 3. Suffix  A suffix is a bound morpheme which follows the root in the form containing it. -er, -ess, -or, -ee, -ese, - ic, - cide. Keeper, goddess, corruptor, escapee, Chinese, heroic, suicide.
  • 6. A. 4. Circumfix  A circumfix is an affix which is realized as a combination of a prefix and a suffix. Indonesian has a variety of circumfixes, and English does not.
  • 7. B. Compounds  English Morphology
  • 8. Definition  A compound is a word formed by combining two or more words together to make a new meaning (Gatherer, 1986) A compound can be solid (consisting of one word), hyphenated (a hyphen between the words) and open (two words stand alone).
  • 9. B. 1. Solid Compounds  a. Solid compounds consist of double nouns: Air+plane = airplane; Bed+cloth = bedcloth. b. Solid compounds consist of an adjective and a noun: Black+list = blacklist. c. Solid compounds consist of a noun and an adjective: Road+worthy = roadworthy.
  • 10. B. 1. Solid Compounds (cont...)  d. Solid Compounds consist of preposition and a noun: Over+night = overnight. e. Solid Compounds consist of a verb and a preposition: Feed+back = feedback. f. Solid Compounds consist of a noun and a verb: Brain + wash = brainwash. g. Solid Compounds consist of a verb and a noun: Play+mate = playmate.
  • 11. B. 1. Solid Compounds (cont...)  h. Solid Compounds consist of an adjective and a verb: High+flow = highflow. i. Solid Compounds consist of an adverb and a verb: In+put = input. j. Solid Compounds consist of an adverb and an adjective: Ever+green = evergreen.
  • 12. B.2. Hyphenated Compounds  Hyphenated compounds consist of double nouns: Ball-point. Hyphenated compounds consist of adj and N: Soft-lenses. Hyphenated compounds consist of prep and N: Off-road. Hyphenated compounds consist of V and prep: Check-out. Hyphenated compounds consist of N and V: Man-made.
  • 13. B.2. Hyphenated Compounds (cont...)  Hyphenated compounds consist of adj and V: Short-cut. Hyphenated compounds consist of prep and V: Out-put. Hyphenated compounds consist of N and prep: Knock-out. Hyphenated compounds consist of pronoun and N: He-man.
  • 14. B.3. Open Compounds  a. Open compounds consist of double nouns: Credit card. b. Open compounds consist of adj and V: Deep freeze.
  • 15. C. Clippings  English Morphology
  • 16. Definition  formed by omitting Clippings are new words part of a word. The omission is normally at the end of a word or at the beginning. C.1. Clippings with the omission at the end of a word: Photograph = photo C.2. Clippings with the omission at the beginning of a word: Telephone = phone.
  • 17. D. Abbrevations  English Morphology
  • 18. Definition  An abrevation can be described as a reduced version of a word, phrase or sentence. It falls into blend and acronym. D.1. Blend A blend is aword composed of other words combined to form a new word. Exp: breakfast + lunch = brunch. D.2. Acronym An acronym is made up of some or all of the initial letters of an organization, institution, political party, etc. Exp: FBI, ILO, B.A.
  • 19. E. Back-formations  English Morphology
  • 20. Definition  Fromkin et al (1984) state that new words may be formed from already existing words by substracting an affix thought to be part of the old one. Exp: hawker = hawk Peddler = peddle
  • 21. The end Thank you

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