Third dimension of pronunciation

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This ppt was intended to be used in a Phonetics class. This is my part of a group-presentation. Segmental and Suprasegmental features.

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Third dimension of pronunciation

  1. 1. THIRD DIMENSION OF PRONUNCIATION: Prosodic Features and Related Coarticulatory Phenomena. A PPT FOR A PRESENTATION IN PHONETICS CLASS. NOVEMBER 2013. IFDC SAN LUIS. Ppt for “my part” of the group presentation. STUDENT: ADELA PEREZ DEL VISO. TEACHERS: CHRISTI SUAREZ and CECILIA ARELLANO.
  2. 2. THIRD DIMENSION OF PRONUNCIATION: Prosodic Features and Related Coarticulatory Phenomena. Prosodic (suprasegmental) features: stress and pitch within syllables. Stress has a major role. English has a stress-timed rhythmic pattern. Coarticulation causes elisions, contractions and assimilations of neighboring sounds In spoken English Through stress, pitch and coarticulation, the speaker marks the elements which he requires (or not) the hearer to pay attention to. (Brown- Yule) Speakers produce blends and omissions •Change of consonant or vowel quality. •Loss of consonant or vowel. •Even loss of entire syllables.
  3. 3. INTONATION AND MEANING. Emphasis on syllables or words: articulated precisely on those containing more information. (Others are weakened, shortened, dropped, if predictable or guessed from context). Intonation contours carry referential meaning: the sentence indicates which part of the info is viewed as new, salient or topic. Intonational features can carry attitudinal meaning: statements different from questions; interest, doubt, certainty and other attitudinal aspects. Given-ness and New-ness of information are central in the description of an interaction. They can be learnt through the intonation in use. The acquisition of the phonology of the L2 involves learning how to produce distinctions relating sound to meaning at different levels.
  4. 4. THE LEARNING OF PRONUNCIATION. Traditionally phonology has not occupied a central position in English teaching and in Language research. Today, there are three characteristics of the phonological learning process that have been isolated: The influence of L1 Acquisition process in L 2 Phonology. Psychosocial and Individual Factors.
  5. 5. THE INFLUENCE OF L 1. Language transfer is basic to any theory of 2nd language phonological development. INTERLANGUAGE. Selinker: acknowledges the role of language transfer. System intermediate between the native language and the target language. Interlanguage extends on two levels: PHONEMES and SYLLABLE SRUCTURE, PROSODIC and voice-setting features. Example: Tendency to pitch unstressed syllables higher than preceding stressed ones (weaving or lilting impression) That was the normal pattern in Copenhagen Danish.  Transfer of voice-setting and prosodic features lead to serious intercultural misunderstanding in the target culture.
  6. 6. SOURCE Pennington, Martha, Pronunciation Revisited. University of Hawaii at Manoa.

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