Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Professional resource project take 2
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Professional resource project take 2

4,091

Published on

An comprehensive look at book genres

An comprehensive look at book genres

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
4,091
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
87
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. A Study of Book Genres Amanda Deising IDT 7064 University of Memphis June 22, 2010 T he more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you'll go. ~ Dr. Seuss ~
  • 2. Rationale
    • As a librarian, I have discovered that many students do not read as much as they should simply because they do not know what they like.
    • This study will highlight various genres of books, and hopefully help students and educators distinguish between the genres and provide ways to help students find their niche.
    • Each genre will be examined individually, although some presentations may reflect more than one genre at a time. There are a vast amount of resources available to conduct genre studies.
    06/22/10
  • 3. Types of Genres
    • There are many types of genres, a typical school library can be broken into nine catagories.
    • Each genre will be discussed individually, but here is an overview of the listing where I obtained my information. http://www.gcms.k12.il.us/gcmsel/lynnet/literary_genres.htm.
    • Picture Books and Easy to Read
    • Fantasy
    • Historical Fiction
    • Realistic Fiction
    • Mystery
    • Non-Fiction
    • Folktales
    • Poetry
    • Biographies
    06/22/10
  • 4. Picture Books & Easy to Read
    • Picture Books : stories written around one or two themes with the illustrations being an integral part of the book. You will find these under "E" for Easy Fiction in my library.
    • Easy To Read : fiction stories that are written at a level for beginning readers. Easy-to-read books also have a call number of "E" in my library.
    • Here is an example of well known, children’s author, Bill Martin reading Brown Bear, Brown Bear
    • Video Clip of Laura Bush reading to kids
    • http://www.gcms.k12.il.us/gcmsel/lynnet/literary_genres.htm
    06/22/10
  • 5. Types of Fiction
    • There are several types of fiction…
    • Fantasy
    • Historical Fiction
    • Realistic Fiction
    • Mystery
    • Here is a Web Quest activity to help students understand the different types of fiction.
    • Web Quest retrieved from http://www.spart5.k12.sc.us/techtraining/teacher/webquests/Genre/Reading.htm#Task
  • 6. Fantasy
    • A type of fiction that contain elements such as characters or settings that could not exist in life as we know it today. Examples include characters such as dragons or animals with human characteristics. Settings might be magical or other-world. Fantasy books are marked with a "Fantasy" sticker on the spine label and are given a call number of "F" (for fiction) and located within the Fiction section.
    • Books like Twilight and Harry Potter exploded on the the scene, creating a group of readers that otherwise may never have found their niche.
    • http://www.gcms.k12.il.us/gcmsel/lynnet/literary_genres.htm
    06/22/10
  • 7. Historical Fiction
    • give a historically accurate portrayal of life during a particular time in history. They have a strong sense of place and time. This type of book has a call number of "F" and is located alphabetically by author's name within the fiction section
    • I have discovered that this a genre that older kids, such as 4-6 graders enjoy.
    • Kidsreads.com
    • Podcast
    • http://www.gcms.k12.il.us/gcmsel/lynnet/literary_genres.htm
    06/22/10
  • 8. Realistic Fiction
    • Set in present-day, the characters encounter modern day difficulties and dilemmas. Realistic fiction includes mysteries, adventure stories, humorous stories, and much more. This type of book has a call number of "F" and is located alphabetically by author's name within the fiction section.
    • Extermely popular with girls grades 4-6 because it deals with real life problems and issues.
    • popular realistic-fiction books
    • http://www.gcms.k12.il.us/gcmsel/lynnet/literary_genres.htm
    06/22/10
  • 9. Mystery
    • stories that involve a suspenseful event (often a crime of some type). The reader uses clues from the story and gradually discovers who has committed the crime to solve the mystery by the end of the story. All mysteries in our library are marked with a "Mystery" sticker and have a call number of "F" and are located alphabetically by author's name within the fiction section
    • Interactive web quest
    • http://www.gcms.k12.il.us/gcmsel/lynnet/literary_genres.htm
    06/22/10
  • 10. Non-Fiction
    • Informational books written by credible authors. Nonfiction books explain how things work, tell facts about many different topics, and show us how to do various things. Nonfiction books are located in a separate area of our library and use call numbers from the Dewey Decimal System.
    • When discussing Non-fiction with students it is important to provide them with a basic understanding of how the Dewey Decimal system works. Here are a couple of presentations about the Dewey Decimal System for various age groups.
    • Doin ' Dewey grades k-1.ppt
    • Dewey Decimal Classification System grades 2-3.ppt
    • DeweyDecimal grades 2-4.ppt
    • http://www.gcms.k12.il.us/gcmsel/lynnet/literary_genres.htm
    06/22/10
  • 11. Folktales
    • Stories that have been passed down to us over the years by real people. There are many types of folktales, including fables, tall tales, myths, and fairy tales. This type of book usually has a call number of 398.2 and can be found in the nonfiction area of our library.  
    • Fables are brief stories that teach a lesson or moral. The characters are usually animals, but they are given human characteristics. An example of a fable is "The Fox and the Grapes." Tall Tales are folktales that have a key element of exaggeration, such as Paul Bunyan.
    • Fairy Tales usually have magical elements with characters that could be fairies, giants, or elves. Many times magical deeds are performed. Cinderella is an example of a fairy tale. powerpoints from ICL 7301Versions of the Fairytale little red riding hood.ppt
    • Myths are stories that serve to explain some phenomenon of nature. Many incorporate gods and goddesses within the story. The story of King Midas is a myth.
    • http://www.gcms.k12.il.us/gcmsel/lynnet/literary_genres.htm
    06/22/10
  • 12. Poetry
    • Includes verses or poems. Poems may be humorous, serious, lyrical, or narrative (tells a story). Many poems have a rhythm and meter. Poems create imagery. Poetry books use a call number of "811" (those by American authors) or "821" (those by English authors) and are located within the nonfiction area of the library.
    • A very useful PowerPoint lesson on teaching poetry , by Kristy Johnson, it is useful not only for Kindergarten but for older kids as well.
    • Poetry Web quest
    • http://www.gcms.k12.il.us/gcmsel/lynnet/literary_genres.htm
    06/22/10
  • 13. Biographies
    • histories of a person's life or parts of his/her life. A biography that is written by a person about his/her own life is called an autobiography. These are located in the nonfiction area, and have a call number of "92" in my library.  Sometimes biographies of several people are grouped together within one book. These are called collective biographies and are given the call number "920" in my library.
    • Web Quest
    • http://www.gcms.k12.il.us/gcmsel/lynnet/literary_genres.htm
    06/22/10
  • 14. Resources
    • Breitsprecher, W. (2007). Doin’ Dewey. Retrieved from: http://www.slideshare.net/bogeybear/doing-dewey-getting-started .
    • Brydon, V. (2002). 'Pickle' book read with relish. Audio Clip. Retrieved from http://cjonline.com/indepth/laurabush/ .
    • Conner, G. (2010). Versions of Fairly Tale Little Red Riding Hood Powerpoint. University of Memphis.
    • Good Reads Inc. (2010). Popular Realistic Fiction. Retrieved from http://www.goodreads.com/shelf/show/realistic-fiction .
    • Hill, K. (1999). What’s Your Genre? Web Quest. Retrieved from http://www.spart5.k12.sc.us/techtraining/teacher/webquests/Genre/Reading.htm#Task .
    • It’s a Mystery to Me. Interactive Webquest. Retrieved from: http://www.teachnet-lab.org/hornik/mystery/mysteryindex.htm .
    • Lamb, A & Johnson, L. (2003). Poetry for Kids. Retrieved from: http://42explore.com/poetry.htm
    06/22/10
  • 15. Resources (cont.)
    • Johnson, K. (2010). Poetry for Kindergarten Powerpoint. University of Memphis. Used by permission.
    • Literary Genre definitions. Retrieved from http://www.gcms.k12.il.us/gcmsel/lynnet/literary_genres.htm .
    • Meyer, S. (2009). Twilight, March 19, 2009 blog entry. Retrieved from http://www.stepheniemeyer.com/twilight_movie.html .
    • Seuss. D. (1990). Oh the places you will go. New York: Random House .
    • Tribe, E. &Sproat, D. Whose Life is It Anyway? Webquest. Retrieved from: http://www.besd61.k12.il.us/webquests/7th%20Grade/BIOGRAPHY%20WEBQUEST/biography_webquest.htm .
    • Ward, K. Dewey Decimal Classification Powerpoint. Retrieved from http://www.slideshare.net/guestd778c6e/dewey-decimal-classification-system-3421291 .
    • Whitten, L. (2007) The Non-fiction Numbers. Retrieved from: http://www.slideshare.net/lwitten/dewey-decimal-primary .
    06/22/10

×