Ws 19

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  • Steve
  • Started in 2005, now 60+ staff, $10M RevenueOffices in Boston, Chicago, (U.S.)Brighton, Sheffield (U.K.)Israel2008 WinnersUS blended learning solution of the yearUK e-learning company of the yearUK rapid e-learning awards
  • We can broadly categorizse learning into these content types:Application of policies, processes and procedures Application of technical skillsApplication of soft skills (e.g. leadership and communication skills)Application of systems skillsWe can also categorize learners into:Low or no proficiency / prior knowledge in the subject matterAlready some proficiency or prior knowledge
  • Today: An approach that you can apply to probably 90% of your training needs.It’s not about splatting paint on a wall, but we will take a look at one model that can meet probably 90% of your eLearning design needs.
  • Learning models are patterns of interactions and activities to ensure any learning you create is effective. Using a learning model when developing rapid e-learning allows you to accelerate your writing and development by giving you a repeatable structure to follow. It can also accelerate the learner’s experience as it gives them a repeated structure. Learning models are good for inexperienced designers to follow and provide a consistent approach if you have a number of designers on one large project
  • Your work should be guided by the principles of what works for adult learning: Goal-oriented: Be clear that the learning will enable them to achieve a specific goal or objective. Relevancy-oriented: To engage, be relevant. The task at hand is the most important and the context is work-related. Practical: Focused on what is most useful to them in their work, and include opportunities to practice and apply learning on the job. Uses stories: Stories are excellent for taking others’ experience and packaging it to root itself in the memory more deeply than facts and procedures. (N.B. This is not relevant for systems training !) Should we refer to learning instead of training?
  • Today we’re going to focus on knowledge and skill builder and will look more closely at scenarios in a future session.Will this be
  • Today we’re going to focus on knowledge and skill builder and will look more closely at scenarios in a future session.Will this be
  • Today we’re going to focus on knowledge and skill builder and will look more closely at scenarios in a future session.Will this be
  • Today we’re going to focus on knowledge and skill builder and will look more closely at scenarios in a future session.Will this be
  • Probably works for about 90% of what you’re doing with training!This approach provides a simple structured learning sequence suitable for:Application of policies and procedures Application of technical skillsApplication of soft skills (e.g. leadership and communication skills)
  • What design works most of the time? CAN YOU REMOVE THE FINAL ARROW AS IT IS NOT A CONTINOUS CYCLE – I HAVE NEVER BEEN ABLE TO DO THIS. PERHAPS JUST A WHIT BOX OVERLAID
  • As a first screen, it’s a very good attention grabber...
  • A demo...Wish you were here...about the vacation policy – the surprise is that if you don’t go on holiday, it suggests you’re up to no good. They want you to take vacations so they engatge you upfront.
  • From treating customers directly:If you’ve got outcomes, do them in a salesy way (not a boring objective kind of way).
  • Set direction via a menu. By using really clear wording – take it in, etc. The menu sets the direction for the whole program.
  • Effective menus to tell you where you’re going...
  • There’s informative and then there’s an information dump...
  • Presenting info –Step by step animation
  • Advertising style strong animated sequences...
  • Explore through videos....
  • Exemplify and pracitce – play with the information – and practice.
  • Introduce some case studies...
  • Exploring and practicing...knowledge checks are built in as you go through the material. 4. questions for the learner to help consolidate the information themselves – internalize.
  • Reflection – using questions to reflect.The 4 is the thing not to cut...45 secs per question...
  • This is now for the organization (really) – not that many learners really want to know that they got 8 out of 10, but the org wants to know.
  • Summary screen – tell ‘em what you told ‘em.
  • What’s the final call to action – what was the point of the whole thing in the first place. What do you need to go out and do.
  • Support the links and who you can talk to. Where can you go when you need more?
  • When should you use ‘em?
  • The Goal-based scenario model componentsCAN YOU REMOVE THE FINAL ARROW AS IT IS NOT A CONTINOUS CYCLE
  • Simple scenarios with no branching
  • Paul mithcell scenariosBarclays “stories”
  • If we can, we can try to go out to the real thing and show the sceanrio interaction.
  • Tier 1 question – the set up –
  • Tier 2 of the questions --yes, that’s right, but why…
  • For a more realistic simulation of consequences you might need to create a true branching experience. A great way to create the blur of reality. This example includes a rating or scale…you can see reactions in “real time”This type of scenario best used when you think consequences are a crucial part of the learning, where it’s critical to feel the consequence of your mistakes.If someone thinks, “But I wouldn’t do that..”
  • Steve – go off to My Kineo here and show where the resources are – rapid guide, stakeholder excel spreadsheet, the forum.We should put a scoping template up on My Kineo to help them get started…
  • Contact us!
  • Ws 19

    1. 1. Listen to the audio: Canada: 416-800-9293 United Kingdom: +44 (0) 161 660 8220 United States: +1 516 453 0014 Access Code: 549-800-542 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the Webinar Webinar ID: 281-269-289 System Requirements: Windows® Vista, XP Pro, XP Home, 2003 Server, 2000, 2000 Server Mac OS® X 10.4 (Tiger®) or newer
    2. 2. Excuse me if I repeat myself Leveraging learning models to create courses that motivate and engage to be six steps to scoping and design
    3. 3. What we do:
    4. 4. April 28 - Kineo Insights Web Panel (Will Thalheimer and Vince Serritella) May 13 - Kineo Insights: How Companies are Getting the Most from Moodle May 27 - Design Hour: Yawn-Proof your eLearning without Busting the Bank Register at: http://www.kineo.com/mykineo/
    5. 5. www.kineo.com/mykineo
    6. 6. Join the conversation (we can’t hear you, but we can read!) Type Your Questions Here http://meetingwords.com/7r8DcWNo0D or
    7. 7. Excuse me if I repeat myself Leveraging learning models to create courses that motivate and engageto be six steps to scoping and design
    8. 8. Poll: What kinds of content do you mostly create as eLearning? •Policies, processes and procedures •Technical skills •Soft skills (e.g., leadership and communication skills) •Systems skills
    9. 9. What is a learning model?
    10. 10. Learning models: what do we mean? • Patterns consisting of sequences of interactions • Flexible across a range of subject matter areas • Can accelerate scripting and development consistent structure, reusable approaches • Can help the learner accelerate for same reason
    11. 11. Guiding Principles of Design • • • • Goal-oriented Relevant Practical Uses stories
    12. 12. [ Model Knowledge and skill builder model Scenario model Systems training model Best for... Suitable for…
    13. 13. [ Model Knowledge and skill builder model Scenario model Systems training model Best for... Systematic knowledge building and getting learners to demonstrate understanding – a more traditionally didactic model (i.e., tell and test) Suitable for… •Technical •Policies, processes and procedures •Induction
    14. 14. [ Model Knowledge and skill builder model Scenario model Systems training model Best for... Suitable for… Systematic knowledge building and getting learners to demonstrate understanding – a more traditionally didactic model (i.e., tell and test) •Technical Applying learning in context and through mistakes, strong connection with workplace practice – a more inductive learning model (i.e., test and tell) •Technical •Policies, processes and procedures •Induction •Policies, processes and procedures •Decision-making •Soft skills
    15. 15. [ Model Knowledge and skill builder model Scenario model Systems training model Best for... Suitable for… Systematic knowledge building and getting learners to demonstrate understanding – a more traditionally didactic model (i.e., tell and test) •Technical Applying learning in context and through mistakes, strong connection with workplace practice – a more inductive learning model (i.e., test and tell) •Technical Show Me, Try It, Test Me simulations •Policies, processes and procedures •Induction •Policies, processes and procedures •Decision-making •Soft skills •Systems skills
    16. 16. Knowledge and Skill Builder a.k.a. “tutorial”
    17. 17. 1 Get attention 2 Set direction 6 Action and support 3 Present information 5 Assess and Summarize 4 Exemplify and practice
    18. 18. Get attention
    19. 19. Get attention 1 Get attention 2 Set direction 6 Action and support 3 Present information 5 Assess and Summarise 4 Exemplify and practise
    20. 20. 1 Get attention 2 Set direction 6 Action and support 3 Present information 5 Assess and Summarize 4 Exemplify and practice
    21. 21. Set direction 1 Get attention 2 Set direction 6 Action and support 3 Present information 5 Assess and Summarise 4 Exemplify and practise
    22. 22. Set direction 1 Get attention 2 Set direction 6 Action and support 3 Present information 5 Assess and Summarise 4 Exemplify and practise
    23. 23. Set direction 1 Get attention 2 Set direction 6 Action and support 3 Present information 5 Assess and Summarise 4 Exemplify and practise
    24. 24. 1 Get attention 2 Set direction 6 Action and support 3 Present information 5 Assess and Summarize 4 Exemplify and practice
    25. 25. Present information 1 Get attention 2 Set direction 6 Action and support 3 Present information 5 Assess and Summarise 4 Exemplify and practise
    26. 26. Present information 1 Get attention 2 Set direction 6 Action and support 3 Present information 5 Assess and Summarise 4 Exemplify and practise
    27. 27. Present information 1 Get attention 2 Set direction 6 Action and support 3 Present information 5 Assess and Summarise 4 Exemplify and practise
    28. 28. 1 Get attention 2 Set direction 6 Action and support 3 Present information 5 Assess and Summarize 4 Exemplify and practice
    29. 29. Exemplify and practice 1 Get attention 2 Set direction 6 Action and support 3 Present information 5 Assess and Summarise 4 Exemplify and practise
    30. 30. Exemplify and practice 1 Get attention 2 Set direction 6 Action and support 3 Present information 5 Assess and Summarise 4 Exemplify and practise
    31. 31. Exemplify and practice 1 Get attention 2 Set direction 6 Action and support 3 Present information 5 Assess and Summarise 4 Exemplify and practise
    32. 32. Exemplify and practice 1 Get attention 2 Set direction 6 Action and support 3 Present information 5 Assess and Summarise 4 Exemplify and practise
    33. 33. Exemplify and practice 1 Get attention 2 Set direction 6 Action and support 3 Present information 5 Assess and Summarise 4 Exemplify and practise
    34. 34. 1 Get attention 2 Set direction 6 Action and support 3 Present information 5 Assess and Summarize 4 Exemplify and practice
    35. 35. Assess 1 Get attention 2 Set direction 6 Action and support 3 Present information 5 Assess and Summarise 4 Exemplify and practise
    36. 36. Summarize 1 Get attention 2 Set direction 6 Action and support 3 Present information 5 Assess and Summarise 4 Exemplify and practise
    37. 37. 1 Get attention 2 Set direction 6 Action and support 3 Present information 5 Assess and Summarize 4 Exemplify and practice
    38. 38. Action 1 Get attention 2 Set direction 6 Action and support 3 Present information 5 Assess and Summarise 4 Exemplify and practise
    39. 39. Support
    40. 40. Scenarios
    41. 41. Poll: Are you using scenarios in your current eLearning designs? -Yes! -Sometimes. But they are a lot of work and expensive. -No. They are a lot of work and really expensive. -No. Scenarios would never work for our content. -Scenarios? What are those?
    42. 42. How do we learn anything? • • • • • We want to achieve something We try an approach We make mistakes We learn from the mistakes (hopefully) We try it differently next time
    43. 43. Goal based scenarios follow natural learning Story from an experienced salesperson Link to tutorial on how to open a sales call properly I have a goal: make a sale Consequence: They shut me up Feedback explains why product spiel is bad I have info on customer needs, my products, etc They ask a question about why we’re different – I go on (and on) about our products
    44. 44. 5 Provide support learning if required 1 Set up scenario 4 2 Provide key data Show consequence + Give feedback 3 Decision point opportunity to make mistake
    45. 45. Key elements for good scenarios • What point of view should you take? 1st person or 3rd person? • How realistic should you make it? • How many levels of branching should you use? • Need for plausible mistakes/critical errors • When and how do you give feedback (at the end or during the scenario?) • How can you use stories to illustrate
    46. 46. Poll: I learned something new today that I think I’ll try out on my next project! -Yes! -No. I knew all of this already. -Maybe. But I need to know more.
    47. 47. www.kineo.com/mykineo
    48. 48. April 28 - Kineo Insights Web Panel (Will Thalheimer and Vince Serritella) May 13 - Kineo Insights: How Companies are Getting the Most from Moodle May 27 - Design Hour: Yawn-Proof your eLearning without Busting the Bank Register at: http://www.kineo.com/mykineo/
    49. 49. steve.lowenthal@kineo.com cammy.bean@kineo.com mark.harrison@kineo.com

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