CoTESOL Plenary Cultural Perspectives SLIFE Part1

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Plenary presented at the annual CoTESOL convention, Denver CO, November 11, 2011

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CoTESOL Plenary Cultural Perspectives SLIFE Part1

  1. 1. Andrea  DeCapua   Helaine  W.  Marshall  The  College  of  New  Rochelle   Long  Island  University   PART  I    
  2. 2. “Culture  acts  as  a  filter  or  set  of  lenses   through  which  we  view  and  interpret       the  world  around  us.”    DeCapua,  A,  &  Wintergerst,  W.  2004.  Crossing  cultures  in  the  language  classroom.    Ann  Arbor,  MI:  University  of  Michigan  Press.      (  
  3. 3. I  never  care  about  reading  un0l    I  come  here    In  my  country  nothing  to  read  but  here,  everywhere  print,  words  and  signs  and  books  and  you  have                      to  read  
  4. 4. Needs of SLIFE•  Develop basic literacy skills•  Learn basic and grade-level subject area concepts•  Develop academic ways of thinking•  Adapt to cultural differences in learning and teaching
  5. 5.  Two  Aspects  of  Culture    1 Ways  of  Thinking    2 Individualism  /  CollecQvism    
  6. 6. Ways  of  Thinking    ~  Derived  from  Learning    •  Western-­‐style  formal  educaQon  •  Informal  ways  of  learning  
  7. 7. Western-­‐Style  Formal  EducaQon   • Abstract  knowledge   • ScienQfic  reasoning   • Logical  deducQon   • Formal  school  seVngs   • Literacy  as  central      (Anderson-­‐LeviX,  2003;  Flynn,  2007;  Grigorenko,  2007;  Ozmon  &  Carver,  2008)    
  8. 8. Informal  Ways  of  Learning   •  Revolves  around  immediate  needs  of  family  and   community   •  Grounded  in  observaQon,  parQcipaQon  in   sociocultural  pracQces  of  family  and  community   •  Has  immediate  relevance   •  Centered  on  orality        (FaulsQch  Orellana,  2001;  Gahunga,  Gahunga,  &  Luseno,  2011;  Paradise  &  Rogoff,  2009)  
  9. 9.                                                                 Sample  Task   (Luria,  1976)  
  10. 10. Sample  QuesQon   What  do  dogs  and  rabbits                   have  in  common?      (Flynn,  2007)  
  11. 11. Academic  Tasks  •  DefiniQons   •  What  is  a  tree?  •  True/False   •  Denver  is  the  capital  of  Colorado.   •  New  York  City  is  the  capital  of  New  York  State.    •  ClassificaQon   •  Categorize  these  objects    
  12. 12. ContrasQng  Ways  of  Thinking               and  Learning   Academic   PragmaQc           •  ClassificaQon   •  Cooking   •  SorQng   •  Childcare     •  Sequencing     •  Farming     •  Compare/ contrast   •  Crajs   •  Defining   •  Religious  pracQces                    
  13. 13.  A  ConQnuum  of  Ways  of                       Thinking  &  Learning                               SLIFE  Informal Western-styleLearning Formal Education
  14. 14. Cultural Dimensions of:   Individualism     and     CollecQvism          (Hofstede,  2001;  NisbeX,  2003;  Oyserman  &  Lee,  2008;  Triandis,  1995;  2000)  
  15. 15. Individualism    •  Personal  efforts  praised,   rewarded    •  Personal  interests,  desires,   primary  •  Personal  judgments      •  Personal  responsibility  •  Self-­‐actualizaQon      
  16. 16. CollecQvism  •  “We”  rather  than  “I.”  •  People  see  themselves  as  part   of  an  interconnected  whole  •  “Web”  of  relaQonships  •  Group  is  more  important  than   any  single  individual  
  17. 17.    CooperaQve  Learning  à                                                                              Individual  Responsibility      SAMPLE  ROLES   •  Checker   •  Datakeeper   •  Group  Leader   •  Keyboard  Operator   •  Materials  Manager   •  Messenger   •  Permission  Giver   •  QuesQoner           •  Reader     •  Reporter   •  Summarizer   •  Timekeeper   •  Word  Analyst             •  Writer/Recorder  
  18. 18. AssumpQons  of  North  American     Teachers  and  Learners   1.  The  goals  of  instrucQon  are     a)  to  produce  independent  learners     b)  to  prepare  the  learners  for  their  future   2.  The  learner  brings  along   a)  preparaQon  for  academic  tasks   b)  an  urge  to  compete  and  excel  as  an  individual          (Adapted  from  DeCapua  &  Marshall,  2011)    
  19. 19. (Ibarra,  2001)  

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