DEVELOPING
WORLD MOOCS:
A WORKSHOP ON MOOCS IN
AFRICA
EMERGE AFRICA
ANDREW DEACON, JANET SMALL, SUKAINA WALJI
18 June 2014
Introduction
0 5 10 15 20 25 30
Belgium
Cameroon
Germany
Kenya
Poland
Rwanda
United States/Ethiopia
Swaziland
Tanzania
Nigeria
Uganda
U...
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
None Blended Fully online Blended, Fully
online
Flexible courses formats offered by MOOCs
t...
MOOCs- open & online
Online courses
Open content MOOC
Online Course MOOC
Numbers: Participant numbers capped
by facilitation and assessment
resourcing
MOOCs have attracted 10 0...
MOOCs didn’t just appear….
Image – Giulia Forsythe
2000 - 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Open
education
Online
distance
learning
Open
education
resources
Open
conten
t
C...
April 2012
http://edutechnica.com/moocmap
October 2012
http://edutechnica.com/moocmap
April 2013
http://edutechnica.com/moocmap
October 2013
http://edutechnica.com/moocmap
Participants
Completion Rates
http://www.katyjordan.com/MOOCproject.html
= 2522
Mapping the landscape
e.g Global Citizenship
e.g Write Science
courses
e.g. Short corporate
courses via private
provider
e.g. most degrees
Showcase teaching
and introduce topics with
high-profile ‘rockstar’
presenters
Introduce fields and
support students in
un...
Category 1 Teaching showcase
General
interest high
profile course
Showcases the
institution by
means of an
engaging
subjec...
Category 1 Teaching showcase
General
interest high
profile course
Showcases the
institution by
means of an
engaging
subjec...
Category 2 Gateway skills
Provides
foundational,
bridging or
enhancement
skills for pre HE
entry or during
undergraduate
p...
Category 3 Graduate literacies
Post-
graduate
level courses
to support
application or
programmes
of study
Focussed on
buil...
Category 4 Professional showcase
Geared towards
vocational skills
development,
re-tooling and
professional
development.
Co...
Category 5 Research showcase
Showcase
research or
more
specialised
topics of
interest
Offered at
postgraduate
level and
as...
Category 5 Research showcase
Showcase
research or
more
specialised
topics of
interest
Offered at
postgraduate
level and
as...
Course offered simultaneously as a formal
and as a open course.
Small private open course nested inside a
MOOC
Massive Onl...
Wrapped MOOCs at UCT
Time Topic
Group meets every -Monday for 5
weeks
Critical Thinking in Global Challenges
https://www.c...
Practicalities
Imagining MOOCs
The six ‘P’s approach:
 purpose
 possibilities
 pedagogy
 platforms & partners
 provisioning
 proces...
Purpose
 Broad institutional goals
Using the MOOC categories
 Department / faculty goals
 Individual goals
Possibilities
 Having decided on audience, purpose and
category - what are the possible topics?
Make a proposal for an ac...
Pedagogy
 How you want your MOOC to be taught
online? (which will depend on your target
audience, course purpose and expe...
Platform and Partners
 Which platform partner will suit your MOOC
and work best for your institution?
 Other stakeholder...
Provisioning
 Two levels:
 1. Institutional - applies to all Massive Online
courses.
 2. Course level – applies to each...
Process & roll-out
 identifying an academic or team of academics willing
to devote the necessary time to the project
 co...
What to expect
 The key themes:
- sheer workload involved in planning and
developing the content,
- the resources require...
Considerations - opportunities
 Reaching huge numbers of students
 Reaching a much broader range of students
 Bringing ...
Consideration - time
 Every account from university MOOC-makers
indicates a considerable investment of time –
usually mor...
Considerations - risks
• adherence with copyright laws for use of all images, figures, journal
articles, etc.;
• licensing...
What we’re hoping for in this two week
workshop?
 Your ideas and perspectives
 A better understanding of other developin...
What’s next? This week
 Read the paper & engage in the first
discussion: How might institutions in Africa
respond to MOOC...
Questions arising from paper
1. How do you imagine your institution or department
might respond to or engage with MOOCs?
2...
What’s next - week two activity
1. Can you develop the landscape of higher
education provision we have presented and and
c...
Reading list
1. Our Paper on Developing World MOOCs: a curriculum perspective (in press).
Available at Google Drive or on ...
Contact
 Andrew.Deacon@uct.ac.za
 Janet.Small@uct.ac.za
 Sukaina.Walji@uct.ac.za
This work is licensed under the Creati...
Developing World MOOCs
Developing World MOOCs
Developing World MOOCs
Developing World MOOCs
Developing World MOOCs
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Developing World MOOCs

  1. 1. DEVELOPING WORLD MOOCS: A WORKSHOP ON MOOCS IN AFRICA EMERGE AFRICA ANDREW DEACON, JANET SMALL, SUKAINA WALJI 18 June 2014
  2. 2. Introduction
  3. 3. 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Belgium Cameroon Germany Kenya Poland Rwanda United States/Ethiopia Swaziland Tanzania Nigeria Uganda USA United Kingdom Zimbabwe South Africa Participants from Countries Where are we from… Online courses at your institution yes potential yes established none
  4. 4. 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 None Blended Fully online Blended, Fully online Flexible courses formats offered by MOOCs taken No Yes, one Yes, many
  5. 5. MOOCs- open & online Online courses Open content MOOC
  6. 6. Online Course MOOC Numbers: Participant numbers capped by facilitation and assessment resourcing MOOCs have attracted 10 000s by having almost no individual support Motivation: Participants earn a qualification Participants selectively take what interests them from a MOOC Participants: Often have similar backgrounds Often very diverse backgrounds Assessment: Meets accreditation standards Assessment standards less rigorous and not accredited Cost: Pay to join course Participants access the course for free, paying for internet connection and optionally certificates Lecturer: Responsible for teaching a curriculum aligned to a qualification and providing support Lecturer’s role is more limited and excludes individual support
  7. 7. MOOCs didn’t just appear…. Image – Giulia Forsythe
  8. 8. 2000 - 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Open education Online distance learning Open education resources Open conten t Connectivist MOOC (cMOOCs) iTunes U, Khan Academy Open source software Learning management systems MIT – Open Courseware Consortium Open University - OpenLearn Stanford xMOOCs Udacity Coursera MITx edX FutureLearn NovoEd OpenUp Ed Open to Study Open Universities Australia Directly related An influence Learnin g objects Open Textbooks Adapted by Hodgkinson-Williams 2014 from UNESCO Cape Town OE Declaration Paris OER Declaration
  9. 9. April 2012 http://edutechnica.com/moocmap
  10. 10. October 2012 http://edutechnica.com/moocmap
  11. 11. April 2013 http://edutechnica.com/moocmap
  12. 12. October 2013 http://edutechnica.com/moocmap
  13. 13. Participants
  14. 14. Completion Rates http://www.katyjordan.com/MOOCproject.html
  15. 15. = 2522
  16. 16. Mapping the landscape
  17. 17. e.g Global Citizenship e.g Write Science courses e.g. Short corporate courses via private provider e.g. most degrees
  18. 18. Showcase teaching and introduce topics with high-profile ‘rockstar’ presenters Introduce fields and support students in undergraduate study Develop skills and introduce topics for postgraduate study. Showcase research and special interest topics of interest to postgraduate level Showcase professional careers for continuing education and qualifications
  19. 19. Category 1 Teaching showcase General interest high profile course Showcases the institution by means of an engaging subject or personality led. Global interest and matches a popular understanding of high profile MOOCs  n High production costs | high enrollment | loose curriculum ties May attract external funding
  20. 20. Category 1 Teaching showcase General interest high profile course Showcases the institution by means of an engaging subject or personality led. Global interest and matches a popular understanding of high profile MOOCs  n High production costs | high enrollment | loose curriculum ties May attract external funding
  21. 21. Category 2 Gateway skills Provides foundational, bridging or enhancement skills for pre HE entry or during undergraduate pathways towards specialisation. Could replace teaching for 'bottleneck courses.’ Local interest, either within the institution or at a country-wide setting. Moderate production costs | low enrollment | close curriculum ties May attract external funding |
  22. 22. Category 3 Graduate literacies Post- graduate level courses to support application or programmes of study Focussed on building postgraduate literacies. Likely to be of local or national interest. Moderate production costs | low enrollment | close curriculum ties May attract external funding
  23. 23. Category 4 Professional showcase Geared towards vocational skills development, re-tooling and professional development. Could be offered in conjunction with professional bodies. Likely to be of local interest, although some specialised topics may be globally relevant. . Moderate to high production costs |medium to high enrollment Close curriculum ties |May attract organisational funding High potential for pathway to credit or revenue generation
  24. 24. Category 5 Research showcase Showcase research or more specialised topics of interest Offered at postgraduate level and assume some background in the topicstill geared towards general or leisure learning. Likely to have global appeal. Moderate/high production costs | medium/high enrollment Loose curriculum ties
  25. 25. Category 5 Research showcase Showcase research or more specialised topics of interest Offered at postgraduate level and assume some background in the topicstill geared towards general or leisure learning. Likely to have global appeal. Moderate/high production costs | medium/high enrollment Loose curriculum ties
  26. 26. Course offered simultaneously as a formal and as a open course. Small private open course nested inside a MOOC Massive Online Course: formal course inspired by MOOC pedagogy Students in a course taking a MOOC with added local support and additional material Massive Open Online Course Formal course with lectures and support.
  27. 27. Wrapped MOOCs at UCT Time Topic Group meets every -Monday for 5 weeks Critical Thinking in Global Challenges https://www.coursera.org/course/criticalthinking Group meets every -Thursday for 5 weeks Principles of Written English https://www.edx.org/course/uc-berkeleyx/uc-berkeleyx-colwri2- 2x-principles-1348 Group meets every -Monday for 6 weeks Understanding Research: An Overview for Health Professionals https://www.coursera.org/course/researchforhealth Group meets every second Wednesday for 5 weeks Model Thinking https://www.coursera.org/course/modelthinking Group meets every Monday for 6 weeks Design and Interpretation of Clinical Trials https://www.coursera.org/course/clintrials Group meets every Wednesday for 10 weeks Data Analysis and Statistical Inference https://www.coursera.org/course/statistics Group meets every Thursday for 6 University Teaching 101 *NEW* https://www.coursera.org/course/univteaching101
  28. 28. Practicalities
  29. 29. Imagining MOOCs The six ‘P’s approach:  purpose  possibilities  pedagogy  platforms & partners  provisioning  process to roll out
  30. 30. Purpose  Broad institutional goals Using the MOOC categories  Department / faculty goals  Individual goals
  31. 31. Possibilities  Having decided on audience, purpose and category - what are the possible topics? Make a proposal for an actual MOOC (or variant) – develop a concept
  32. 32. Pedagogy  How you want your MOOC to be taught online? (which will depend on your target audience, course purpose and expected learning outcomes, as well as costs and possibly platform affordances)
  33. 33. Platform and Partners  Which platform partner will suit your MOOC and work best for your institution?  Other stakeholders and funders
  34. 34. Provisioning  Two levels:  1. Institutional - applies to all Massive Online courses.  2. Course level – applies to each course
  35. 35. Process & roll-out  identifying an academic or team of academics willing to devote the necessary time to the project  constituting a course development team (online learning designers, academics & student assistants from department who will be offering course)  initiate course design  course production schedule  test materials  launch course  Running/supporting/monitoring  Evaluation
  36. 36. What to expect  The key themes: - sheer workload involved in planning and developing the content, - the resources required for video production on top of the individuals’ ‘regular’ jobs. - Creating effective strategies to manage the large number of participants in the MOOC forums was also reported as a challenge. University of London 2013 report on MOOCs
  37. 37. Considerations - opportunities  Reaching huge numbers of students  Reaching a much broader range of students  Bringing expertise from the student community into the learning environment  Learning from the experience of experimenting with different activities and online formats
  38. 38. Consideration - time  Every account from university MOOC-makers indicates a considerable investment of time – usually more than expected in the production of the MOOC  The time spent on the delivery and management of the MOOC for the first time was also high.  Subsequent offerings of the same MOOC were less demanding of time.
  39. 39. Considerations - risks • adherence with copyright laws for use of all images, figures, journal articles, etc.; • licensing agreements for any software that is used by course- takers; • export control over any software or other technology that course- takers might have access to; • complaints or suits from course-takers who experience damages to their computers as a result of downloading course software; • accessibility issues (e.g., closed captioning, translation); and • culturally-related concerns about course content (e.g., sexual, religious, or politically-related language or images). (Univeristy of Illinois 2013 (p 16)
  40. 40. What we’re hoping for in this two week workshop?  Your ideas and perspectives  A better understanding of other developing country contexts and how MOOCs could be used  Your insights to how MOOCs and their variants can and are being used  Encourage the voices of developing world educators in the debates on MOOCs
  41. 41. What’s next? This week  Read the paper & engage in the first discussion: How might institutions in Africa respond to MOOCs?  Look over the some of the other resources & engage in the second discussion forum: Should African institutions engage with MOOCs, and if so how?  Third discussion forum: Do MOOCs bolster Western higher-education hegemony?
  42. 42. Questions arising from paper 1. How do you imagine your institution or department might respond to or engage with MOOCs? 2. How do the MOOC categories we outline resonate with your institutional or departmental priorities? 3. Have you ever experimented with MOOCs within your institution? If so, in what ways? and how has that worked? How did your students respond and relate to the material and presentations? 4. Have you consider using MOOCs in a wrapped or distributed flipped format? If so, how?
  43. 43. What’s next - week two activity 1. Can you develop the landscape of higher education provision we have presented and and customise it to your own context? Can you recognise what is happening in the formal, semi- formal and non-formal domains in your institution? 2. Can you suggest some additional categories of MOOCs we haven’t considered that might be appropriate to your context? What criteria might your institution or department use to determine what category of MOOCs
  44. 44. Reading list 1. Our Paper on Developing World MOOCs: a curriculum perspective (in press). Available at Google Drive or on Emerge Africa site: http://bit.ly/1nj7WWP 2. General reading list: presentations and reports about MOOCs  Presentations from The MOOCs4D International Invitational  Yuan, L., Powell, S. & Olivier, B, Beyond MOOCs: Sustainable online learning in institutions.  Stanford Online - Review of 2013: Harnessing New Technologies and Methods to Advance Teaching and Learning at Stanford and Beyond  African Higher Education and Research Space (AHERS) 3. Blogs, articles and opinion perspectives  On MOOCs as neocolonialism  On developing country perspective  On cultural barriers in the design of MOOCs  On the potential to improve access to higher education Reading list at: https://docs.google.com/document/d/16M-dpcK0Ws8v2QtQRvbgNfIXz0dgfZEMmCJ4r9ZWGkE/edit Please add resources and readings you have found!
  45. 45. Contact  Andrew.Deacon@uct.ac.za  Janet.Small@uct.ac.za  Sukaina.Walji@uct.ac.za This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/za/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA. Twitter: #emergeafrica
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