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Symbolism, art nouveau

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  • 1. SYMBOLISM• Rejected optical world in favorof a fantasy world• Expression of the individualspirit• Spoke like “prophets” in signsand symbols• Rejection of Realism, found it“trivial” Sigmund Freud and theInterpretation of Dreams
  • 2. Pierre Puvis de ChavannesThe Sacred Grove1884oil on canvas2 ft. 11 1/2 in. x 6 ft. 10 in.
  • 3. Odilon RedonThe Cyclops1898oil on canvas2 ft. 1 in. x 1 ft. 8 in.“All my originality consists…inmaking unreal creatures livehumanly by putting, as much aspossible, the logic of the visibleat the service of the invisible”
  • 4. Henri RousseauThe Sleeping Gypsy1897oil on canvas4 ft. 3 in. 6 ft. 7 in.
  • 5. Aubrey BeardsleyThe Peacock Skirtfor Oscar Wilde’s Salome1894pen-and-ink illustration
  • 6. Edvard MunchThe Scream1893oil, pastel and casein on cardboard2 ft. 11 3/4 in. x 2 ft. 5 in.“I stopped and leaned against thebalustrade, almost dead withfatigue. Above the blue-black fjordhung the clouds, red as blood andtongues of fire. My friends has leftme, and alone, trembling withanguish, I became aware of thevast, infinite cry of nature”
  • 7. Gustav KlimtThe Kiss1907-1908oil on canvas5 ft. 10 3/4 in. x 5 ft. 10 3/4 in.
  • 8. Gustav KlimtDeath and Life1908-11oil on canvas70 1/8 x 78 in.
  • 9. Augustus Saint-GaudensAdams Memorial1891bronze5 ft. 10 in. high
  • 10. Auguste RodinWalking Man1905bronze6 ft. 11 3/4 in. high
  • 11. Auguste RodinBurghers of Calais1884-1889bronze6 ft. 10 1/2 in. high
  • 12. Architecture & Decorative ArtsArts and Crafts• Shaped by ideas of John Ruskin and William Morris• distrust of machines and capitalism Socialism• Produced function objects with high aesthetic value fora wide public• Floral or geometric designs, drawn from nature
  • 13. William MorrisGreen Dining Room1867
  • 14. Charles Rennie MackintoshIngram Street Tea RoomGlasgow, Scotland1900-1902
  • 15. Art Nouveau (1890-1914)Developed in Europe – Brussels, Barcelona, Paris and Vienna• Combines artistic media into one unified experience• Art Nouveau buildings were designed, furnished and decoratedby the same artist or teamCharacteristics:• vegetal or floral design• complexity of design• undulating surfaces• NO straight lines
  • 16. Victor Hortastaircase in theVan Eetvelde HouseBrussels, Belgium1896
  • 17. Louis Comfort TiffanyLotus Table Lampca. 1905leaded favrile glass, mosaic and bronze2 ft. 10 1/2 in. high
  • 18. Antonio GaudiCasa MiláBarcelona, Spain1907
  • 19. ARCHITECTURE- Skeletal architecture with a “curtain wall”- Emphasis on the vertical, building UP as modern cities grew- Greatest advances made by the Chicago School, formed afterthe Great Fire of 1871- Terracotta wrapped iron or steel- Invention of THE ELEVATOR
  • 20. Alexandre-Gustave EiffelEiffel TowerParis, France1889wrought iron984 ft. high
  • 21. Alexandre-GustaveEiffelEiffel TowerParis, France1889wrought iron984 ft. high
  • 22. Henry Hobson RichardsonMarshall Fieldwholesale storeChicago, Illinois1885-1887
  • 23. Louis Henry SullivanGuaranty BuildingBuffalo, New York1894-1896FORMFOLLOWSFUNCTION
  • 24. Louis Henry SullivanCarson, Pirie ScottBuildingChicago, Illinois1899-1904FORMFOLLOWSFUNCTION

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