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Review baroque thru neoclassicism

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  • 1. THEME: Best of Both Worlds“Consider the Nut” + “PMA”PMA+Key Ideas:• Reformation sparked iconoclasm in Northern Europe, nonetheless 1500-1600 was a great creative period• Artists sought new ways to represent figures without creating pagan idols• Powerfully influenced by Italian Renaissance• Albrecht Durer represents Northern realism/detail + Italianmonumentality• Capitalism & printmaking (more $ to buy art, more opportunities tosell/spread art)
  • 2. Matthias GrünewaldIsenheim Altarpiece (closed)ca. 1510-15oil on panelcenter panel, 9 ft. 9 1/2 in. x 10 ft. 9 in.Patron –Purpose –
  • 3. Printmaking techniques!• What are the advantages anddisadvantages of each?Woodcut EngravingEtching
  • 4. Albrecht DürerThe Great Piece of Turf1503watercolor16 x 12 1/2 in.
  • 5. Albrecht DürerThe Fall of Man1504engraving9 7/8 x 7 5/8 in.Italian influences + Northerncharacteristics. Can you namethem?
  • 6. Albrecht DürerKnight, Death and the Devil1513engraving9 5/8 x 7 3/8 in.
  • 7. Albrecht AltdorferThe Battle of Issus1529oil on panel4 ft. 4 1/4 in. x 3 ft. 11 1/4 in.
  • 8. Hans Holbein the YoungerThe French Ambassadors1533oil and tempera on panel6 ft. 8 in. x 6 ft. 9 1/2 in.
  • 9. Quentin MassysMoney-Changerand His Wife1514oil on panel7 ft. 3 3/4 in. x 2 ft. 2 3/8 in.
  • 10. Pieter AertsenMeat Still-Life1551oil on panel4 ft. 3/8 in. x 6 ft. 5 3/4 in.
  • 11. Pieter Breugel the ElderNetherlandish Proverbs1559oil on panel3 ft. 10 in. x 5 ft. 4 1/8 in.
  • 12. Pieter Breugel the ElderHunters in the Snow1565oil on panel3 ft. 10 in. x 5 ft. 4 in.
  • 13. Juan de HerreraEscorialnear Madrid, Spainca. 1563-1584
  • 14. El Greco(Domenikos Theotokopoulous)The Burial of Count Orgaz1586oil on canvas16 x 12 ft.
  • 15. Mannerism - "Oh, what the hey. We could never top theHigh Renaissance, so why bother?"- Comes from Italian word Maniera- Artifice- Mannerist art is deliberately intellectual, asking the viewer to respond in asophisticated way to the spatial challenges- Complicated compositions, distorted figures, complex allegoricalinterpretations- Calculated ambiguity gives Mannerism its enduring value
  • 16. Jacopo da PontormoDescent from the CrossCapponi Chapel, Santa Felicità, Florence, Italy1525-1528oil on wood10 ft. 3 in. x 6 ft. 6 in.
  • 17. ParmigianinoMadonna with the Long Neckca. 1535oil on wood7 ft. 1 in. x 4 ft. 4 in.
  • 18. BronzinoVenus, Cupid, Folly and Time(The Exposure of Luxury)ca. 1546oil on wood5 ft. 1 in. x 4 ft. 8 3/4 in.
  • 19. TintorettoLast SupperChancel. San Giorgio Maggiore, Venice, Italy1594oil on canvas12 ft. x 18 ft. 8 in.
  • 20. Paolo VeroneseChrist in the House of Levi1573oil on canvas18 ft. 6 in. x 42 ft. 6 in.
  • 21. Antonio Allegri da CorreggioAssumption of the VirginDome fresco of Parma CathedralParma, Italy1526-1530fresco
  • 22. Giovanni da BolognaAbduction of the Sabine Womenca. 1579-1583Marble
  • 23. Baroque Art in Italy and Spain
  • 24. Giacomo della Portafaçade of Il GesùRome, Italyca. 1575-1584
  • 25. Carlo MadernoAerial view of Saint Peter’sVatican City, Rome, Italy1506-1666
  • 26. Gianlorenzo Berninibaldacchino Saint Peter’sVatican City, Rome, Italy1624-33gilded bronzeapproximately 100 ft. high
  • 27. Gianlorenzo BerniniDavid1623marbleapproximately 5 ft. 7 in. high
  • 28. Gianlorenzo BerniniEcstasy of Saint TheresaCornaro Chapel,Santa Maria della Vittoria, Rome, Italy1645-1652
  • 29. Francesco Borrominifaçade ofSan Carlo alle Quattro FontaneRome, Italy1665-1676
  • 30. CaravaggioCalling of Saint MatthewContarelli Chapel, San Luigi dei FrancesciRome, Italyca. 1597-1601oil on canvas11 ft. 1 in. x 11 ft. 5 in.
  • 31. CaravaggioConversion of Saint PaulCerasi Chapel, Santa Maria del PopoloRome, Italyca. 1601oil on canvasapproximately 7 ft. 6 in. x 5 ft. 9 in.
  • 32. Artemisia GentileschiJudith Slaying Holofernesca. 1614-1629oil on canvas6 ft. 6 1/3 in. x 5 ft. x 4 in.
  • 33. Ceiling Frescoes• What do these images have in common?• What was appealing about ceiling paintings?
  • 34. Fra Andrea PozzoGlorification of Saint Ignatiusceiling fresco with stucco figuresin the nave of Sant’Ignazio, Rome, Italy1691-1694fresco
  • 35. Diego VelázquezSurrender of Breda1634-1635oil on canvas10 ft. 1 in. x 12 ft. 1/2 in.
  • 36. Diego VelázquezKing Philip IV of Spain(Fraga Philip)1644oil on canvas4 ft. 3 1/8 in. x 3 ft. 1/8 in.
  • 37. Diego VelázquezLas Meninas1656oil on canvasapproximately 10 ft. 9 in. x 9 ft.
  • 38. Baroque Art in Northern Europe
  • 39. Peter Paul RubensElevation of the CrossAntwerp Cathedral, Antwerp, Belgium1610oil on panel15 ft. 2 in. x 11 ft. 2 in.
  • 40. Peter Paul RubensArrival of Marie de’ Mediciat Marseilles1622-1625oil on canvasapproximately 5 ft. 1 in. x 3 ft. 9 1/2 in.
  • 41. Anthony Van DyckCharles I Dismountedca. 1635oil on canvas9 ft. x 7 ft.
  • 42. Frans Hals – Leading Haarlem Painter of PortraitsArchers of Saint Hadrianca. 1633oil on canvasapproximately 6 ft. 9 in. x 11 ft.
  • 43. Judith Leyster –Portraitist (studied withHals)Self-Portraitca. 1630oil on canvas2 ft. 5 3/8 in. x 2 ft. 1 5/8 in.
  • 44. Rembrandt van RijnAnatomy Lesson of Dr. Tulp1632oil on canvas5 ft. 3 3/4 in. x 7 ft. 1 1/4 in.
  • 45. Rembrandt van RijnThe Company ofCaptain Frans Banning Cocq(Night Watch)1642oil on canvas11 ft. 11 in. x 14 ft. 4 in.
  • 46. Rembrandt van RijnSelf-Portraitca. 1659-1660oil on canvas3 ft. 8 3/4 in. x 3 ft. 1 in.
  • 47. Jan VermeerThe Letter1666oil on canvas1 ft. 5 1/4 in. x 1 ft. 3 1/4 in.Best known Dutch interior scenepainter- Glimpses into the lives of“prosperous, responsible andcultured citizens”
  • 48. Jan VermeerAllegory of the Art of Painting1670-1675oil on canvas4 ft. 4 in. x 3 ft. 8 in.The Science and Poetry of Light- Master of pictorial light
  • 49. Pieter ClaeszVanitas Still Life1630soil on panel1 ft. 2 in. x 1 ft. 11 1/2 in.Dutch still lifes
  • 50. Nicholas PoussinEt in Arcadia Egoca. 1655oil on canvas2 ft. 10 in. x 4 ft.
  • 51. Hyacinthe RigaudLouis XIV1701oil on canvas9 ft. 2 in. x 6 ft. 3 in.
  • 52. Jules Hardouin-Mansart &Charles Le BrunGalerie des Glaces(Hall of Mirrors)Palace of VersaillesVersailles, France1667-1670
  • 53. Christopher Wrennew Saint Paul’s CathedralLondon, England1675-1710
  • 54. From rocaille meaning “pebble” or “shell”“Trust the body” + More is MORE!• Shift of power from monarchy (LouisXIV and Baroque) to the aristocracy(Rococo)• Royal Academy set the taste for art inParis• Strong Satirical paintings• Epitomized by paintings that showaristocratic people enjoying leisuresRococoSometimes referred toas Late BaroqueArchitecture: Simple exteriors, ornate interiors- Naturalistic: small stones, shells, plant forms- Feminine – delicate, undulating- Silver & gold, light- Small relief sculptures – cupids, cloudsPainting:- Small in size- Fete galante – themes of love- Frivolity, playful, sensual- Pastels, delicate curves- Dainty figures
  • 55. François de CuvillièsHall of Mirrors, the AmalienburgNymphenburg Palace Park, Munich, Germanyearly 18th C.
  • 56. Antoine WatteauReturn from Cythera1717-1719oil on canvas4 ft. 3 in. x 6 ft. 4 in.Fête galanteThe French Academy –Rubenistes vs Poussinistes
  • 57. Jean-Honoré FragonardThe Swing1766oil on canvas2 ft. 11 in. x 2 ft. 8 in.
  • 58. Élisabeth Louise Vigée-LebrunSelf-Portrait1790oil on canvas8 ft. 4 in. x 6 ft. 9 in.
  • 59. William HogarthBreakfast Scene from Marriage à la Modeca. 1745oil on canvas2 ft. 4 in. x 3 ft.Satire!What would the contemporaryequivalent of this painting be?
  • 60. NEOCLASSICISM (1750-1815)• Enlightenment brought about the rejection of royal and aristocratic authority• Supported by Napoleon in order to associated himself with the successesof the Ancient Romans Empire.• Jacques-Louis David becomes First Painter• Neoclassical art was more democratic• Current events depicted have classical influencesINSPIRED by the excavation ofPompeii & Heculaneum- Grand Tour of Italy – A MUST!
  • 61. Jacques-Louis DavidOath of the Horatii1784oil on canvasapproximately 11 x 14 ft.The French Revolution – 1789David became Neoclassical painter-ideologistPatriotism & sacrifice!
  • 62. Jacques-Louis DavidThe Death of Marat1793oil on canvasapproximately 5 ft. 3 in. x 4 ft. 1 in.
  • 63. Richard Boyle and William KentChiswick Housenear London, Englandbegun 1725
  • 64. Jean-Antoine HoudonVoltaire1778marble18 7/8 in. high