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What's new and what's content in the new Australian Curriculum as at May 2011

What's new and what's content in the new Australian Curriculum as at May 2011

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  • 1. Welcome to the Western Sydney Mathematics Head Teacher Network Meeting
    Co-ordinator: Rowena Whittle
  • 2. Agenda 27th May 2011
  • 3. ACARA website
  • 4. The Australian Curriculum: Phase 1
    http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Home
  • 5. Click on arrow for a Guided tour
  • 6. The Australian Curriculum: Phase 1
    http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Home
  • 7. General Capabilities
    The Australian Curriculum includes seven general capabilities:
    Literacy
    Numeracy
    Information and communication technology (ICT) competence
    Critical and creative thinking
    Ethical behaviour
    Personal and social competence
    Intercultural understanding
  • 8. General Capabilities
    Implications for Mathematics
    Inclusion in programs as they are developed.
    Australian Curriculum website can help . . . .
    Scroll down
    Click on link
  • 9. General Capabilities in Mathematics
    Scroll down the page to read the broader implications relating to Mathematics
  • 10. The Australian Curriculum: Phase 1
    http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Home
  • 11. There are three cross curriculum priorities in the Australian Curriculum:
    The cross curriculum priorities are embedded in the curriculum and will have a strong but varying presence depending on their relevance to each of the learning areas.
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures
    • 12. Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia
    • 13. Sustainability.
  • Cross-curriculum priorities
  • 14. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures
    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities are strong, rich and diverse. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Identity is central to this priority and is intrinsically linked to living, learning Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, deep knowledge traditions and holistic world view.
    A conceptual framework based on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ unique sense of Identity has been developed as a structural tool for the embedding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures within the Australian curriculum. This sense of Identity is approached through the interconnected aspects of Country/Place, People and Culture. Embracing these elements enhances all areas of the curriculum.
    The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander priority provides opportunities for all learners to deepen their knowledge of Australia by engaging with the world’s oldest continuous living cultures. This knowledge and understanding will enrich their ability to participate positively in the ongoing development of Australia.
    The Australian Curriculum: mathematics values Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures. It provides opportunities for students to appreciate that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander societies have sophisticated applications of mathematical concepts.
    Students will explore connections between representations of number and pattern and how they relate to aspects of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. They will investigate time, place, relationships and measurement concepts in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander contexts. Students will deepen their understanding of the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples through the application and evaluation of statistical data.
    The Australian Curriculum: mathematics values Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures. It provides opportunities for students to appreciate that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander societies have sophisticated applications of mathematical concepts
    Students will explore connections between representations of number and pattern and how they relate to aspects of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. They will investigate time, place, relationships and measurement concepts in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander contexts.
  • 15. Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia
    The Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia priority provides a regional context for learning in all areas of the curriculum. China, India and other Asian nations are growing rapidly and the power and influence they have in all areas of global endeavour is extensive. An understanding of Asia underpins the capacity of Australian students to be active and informed citizens working together to build harmonious local, regional and global communities, and build Australia’s social, intellectual and creative capital.
    This priority is concerned with Asia literacy for all Australian students. Asia literacy develops knowledge, skills and understanding about the histories, geographies, cultures, arts, literatures and languages of the diverse countries of our region. It fosters social inclusion in the Australian community. It enables students to communicate and engage with the peoples of Asia so they can effectively live, work and learn in the region. Australia now has extensive engagement with Asia in areas such as trade, investment, immigration, tourism, education and humanitarian assistance and this engagement is vital to the prosperity of all Australians.
    The Australian Curriculum: mathematics provides opportunities for students to learn about the understandings and applications of mathematics in Asia. In the past, mathematicians from the Asia region have made significant contributions to the development of the human understanding of number, algebra and trigonometry. Mathematicians from Asia continue to contribute to the ongoing development of mathematical understanding.
    In this learning area, students investigate the concept of chance using Asian games. They explore the way Asian societies apply other mathematical concepts such as patterns and symmetry in art and architecture. Investigations involving data collection and representation can be used to examine issues pertinent to the Asia region.
    In this learning area, students investigate the concept of chance using Asian games. They explore the way Asian societies apply other mathematical concepts such as patterns and symmetry in art and architecture. Investigations involving data collection and representation can be used to examine issues pertinent to the Asia region
  • 16. Mathematical understandings and skills are necessary to monitor and quantify both the impact of human activity on ecosystems and changes to conditions in the biosphere. Actions to improve sustainability involve students in processes such as auditing, reading measures and gauges, and interpreting data on invoices and accounts. Mathematical and statistical analysis enables informed decision making about present and future action
    Sustainability
    Sustainability addresses the ongoing capacity of Earth to maintain all life.
    Sustainable patterns of living meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Actions to improve sustainability are both individual and collective endeavours shared across local and global communities. They necessitate a renewed and balanced approach to the way humans interact with each other and the environment.
    Education for sustainability develops the knowledge, skills and values necessary for people to act in ways that contribute to more sustainable patterns of living. It is futures-oriented, focusing on protecting environments and creating a more ecologically and socially just world through action that recognises the relevance and interdependence of environmental, social, cultural and economic considerations.
    The Australian Curriculum: mathematics provides the foundation for the exploration of issues of sustainability. It equips students with the skills of measurement, mathematical modelling, and data collection, representation and analysis. These skills are needed to investigate data, evaluate and communicate findings and to make predictions based on those findings.
    Mathematical understandings and skills are necessary to monitor and quantify both the impact of human activity on ecosystems and changes to conditions in the biosphere. Actions to improve sustainability involve students in processes such as auditing, reading measures and gauges, and interpreting data on invoices and accounts. Mathematical and statistical analysis enables informed decision making about present and future action.
    The Australian Curriculum: mathematics provides the foundation for the exploration of issues of sustainability. It equips students with the skills of measurement, mathematical modelling, and data collection, representation and analysis. These skills are needed to investigate data, evaluate and communicate findings and to make predictions based on those findings.
  • 17. The Australian Curriculum: Phase 1
    http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Home
  • 18. Accessing the Curriculum: by Year
    The complete Australian Curriculum is available for download from the ACARA site.
    http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Home
    From a brief overview of the content for each Year in the Secondary school, smaller downloads can be selected.
  • 19. Content in the Curriculum : Example
    Next is an example to access Year 8
  • 20.
  • 21.
  • 22. Australian Curriculum Updates –
    Achievement standards (A, B, C, D) have not yet been adopted and are being considered further following feedback in the Consultation phase.
    Implementation proposed through K- 10 only (with Senior Courses being considered later).
    BOS currently looking at Curriculum document for Outcomes and working on Syllabus design.
    Tentative consultation process to begin – 6th June
    Still some issues such as movement of content from Stage 4 to Stage 3. BOS concerned that ‘Learning to do’ and ‘learning about’ is not evident in current structure.
    NEXT . . . . .
  • 23. Australian Curriculum Updates –
    Some sequencing challenges are being discussed such as the timing in the Numeracy continuum for the introduction of Area concepts.
    Dot plots and Order of Operations may be moved to Stage 3.
    Financial literacy is being expanded.
    These changes have implications in the level of training in the transition years that will need to be investigated.
    During the phasing, students in transition will also require special consideration in school programming (such as current Stage 4 content and new Stage 4 content may mean students miss out on some essential learning)
    Acknowledgement that implementation of new knowledge in Stage 3 and technology implementation will require teacher support and professional learning.
  • 24. Australian Curriculum Updates –
    Acknowledgement with implementation of new knowledge base required in Stage 3 and technology implementation, teacher support and professional learning are essential.
    The increased use of technology has been indicated for Primary schools. Also mindful for schools that the technology implications may require financial support in planning school Budgets.
    Schools need to provide feedback. ACARA have taken on board a lot of the suggestions contributed in the Consultation phase. Data looks more manageable now and BOS are working to provide useful tools for educators.
  • 25. Australian Curriculum Updates –
    Feedback relating to implications of moving from Stage 5 into current Senior Courses could be a consideration, ensuring students have knowledge base suitable to cope with demands of current courses.
    Some trialling of materials may occur in 2012.
    BOS have indicated that paper version will be produced. Internet access and downloads only will be available.
    A Curriculum app is being considered.
    BOS hoping syllabus document will be available at end of year; materials currently being developed for Support in implementation.
    ACARA have requested full implementation by 2013.
    #
  • 26.
  • 27. LMC - Mark Grady
    Year 8 G & T Days
  • 28. http://animoto.com/play/iTsyX8Uq05znQdx4VMlIPw
    Animoto -
  • 29. Dan Piraro Cartoons
  • 30. 21st Century Visual Numeracy-
    Students as Decoders of Graphics
    Presented by Gretl Willett QT Mathematics Consultant K-6
    Acknowledging Associate Professor Joanne Mulligan, Macquarie Uni
    Research also by Diezmann & Lowrie, 2008.
  • 31. The 21st century has placed increasing demand on individual’s proficiency with a wide array of visual representations, that is graphics (Harris, 1996).
    Proficiency with visual tasks needs to be embedded across the curriculum (National Academies, 2006).
    In mathematics, various graphics (e.g., maps, charts, number lines, graphs) are used as a means of communication of mathematical ideas and also as tools for thinking about these ideas.
  • 32. In mathematics, students need to appreciate whether the intent of a graphic is to contextualise the task or to present information.
    Where do children see graphics?
    Where do children use graphics?
    They are becoming increasingly dependent on decoding graphics (icons)
  • 33. In mathematics, students need to appreciate whether the intent of a graphic is to contextualise the task or to present information.
    Where do children see graphics?
    Where do children use graphics?
    They are becoming increasingly dependent on decoding graphics (icons)
  • 34. NAPLAN Papers - Graphics
    Proportion of graphic representations in NAPLAN 2009-11
  • 35. Decoding Graphics
    Three levels of decoding with graphics
    • Elementary - extracting information (reading data)
    • 36. Intermediate - finding relationships between the data
    (reading between data)
    • Advanced - moving beyond the data
    (predicting and generating)
  • 37. Types of Graphics
    Contextual graphics represents objects, people or locations for illustrative purposes no mathematical information pertinent to the task
    Information graphics
  • 38. Contextual Graphics as Distractors
    Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (2010). National Assessment Program Literacy and Numeracy: Numeracy Year 5 2010 (p. 7). Sydney: Author.
  • 39. Contextual Graphics
    Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (2010). National Assessment Program Literacy and Numeracy: Numeracy Year 3 2010 (p. 15). Sydney: Author.
  • 40. Information graphics - need to be able to access the embedded information in order to solve the task (Diezmann & Lowrie, 2008).
  • 41. www.ebrueggeman.com/phpgraphlib
  • 42. Teachers can support the development of students' knowledge by providing them with opportunities to learn about the various elements that make up information graphics and to recognise contextual graphics can be distracters.
  • 43. Visual Numeracy –
    Graphical Languages
    Gretl Willett
  • 44. Patterns and Algebra: site to access e-book and pdf
    http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/primary/mathematics/resources/patterns/index.htm
    Space and Geometry (also on Curriculum Support site)
    http://bit.ly/kJAg8O
  • 45. Agenda 27th May 2011
  • 46. ICT in Mathematics
    Prezi - a presentation tool, both online and downloadable
    www.prezi.com
    (register – free to keep your own Prezi materials)
    Social bookmarking – delicious
    http://www.delicious.com/
    Register -Free
    CLIC - CURLS (Intranet – Portal access) through My applications tab (Next slide)
  • 47.
  • 48. ICT in Mathematics
    Live Binders : visual image of web page; able to group like-sites
    Register-free to keep all your Binders
    http://livebinders.com/
  • 49.
  • 50. Yammer – social media within DET
    Invitation to Axiom - community for Mathematics teachers
  • 51. Upcoming professional learning opportunities:
    Current: Kickstart ICT in Mathematics
    Integrating DER laptops in learning
    Semester 2: look out for the ebook of dates and courses soon
    Authentic Assessment and Moderation
    Geogebra
    Google Sketchup
    Laptops for Assessment
    Early Career Teacher in Mathematics
    Quality Programming
    SMART data analysis
  • 52. Next meeting : Thursday 18 August
    Thank You for connecting / attending