2.0 feudalism   life before the nation state
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2.0 feudalism life before the nation state

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2.0 feudalism   life before the nation state 2.0 feudalism life before the nation state Presentation Transcript

  • Nationalism defined • a strong feeling of loyalty or devotion to an ethnic nation – based on language, culture, and a shared history and/or a civic nation – based on shared beliefs and values (ethnic nationality doesn’t matter) • It is possible to speak of ethnic nationalism and civic nationalism
  • What did people identifyWhat did people identify themselves withthemselves with beforebefore the age of nationalism?the age of nationalism?
  • How did life in the Middle Ages develop? The pinnacle of the Roman Empire (c. 300 C.E.)
  • Fall of the Roman Empire (410 - 476 C.E.)
  • What system of organization developed in Europe after the fall of the Roman Empire? Feudalism
  • What is Feudalism? -A complex social system of Lords, vassals, and peasants Why Feudalism? – Feudalism was developed during a period of disorder; there was no central government to protect the people – Security & Sustenance (food) When was the system of Feudalism dominant? – Approximately 500 – 1500 – Fall of Rome - Enlightenment
  • Complex Feudal Relationships Lord Vassal Vassal (Knights) Vassal Peasant Serf Peasant Serf Peasant What significant group of people is missing from this diagram?
  • •Loyalty •Military Service •Taxes •Council Feudal Relationships (Upper Level) •Land (fief) •Protection Lord Vassal Vassal Vassal Both Lords and Vassals were “free”
  • Feudal Relationships (Lower Level) •Protection •A place to work & live Vassal (Lord) Serf Peasant Serf Serfs were NOT “free” •Mandatory labour •Did the actual work of farming •Had few rights •80-90% of population
  • The Manor 3 Field Rotation System
  • A Political Map of ________ - 1328 • Under feudalism there was a “King of the Franks,” not a “King of France” • The people did not view themselves as a “nation”
  • • What are you proud of in your life?What are you proud of in your life? • Where do your loyalties lie?Where do your loyalties lie? • What makes you proud to be a Canadian?What makes you proud to be a Canadian? • What freedoms are you proud to have?What freedoms are you proud to have? • What do you think a French peasant had to beWhat do you think a French peasant had to be proud of?proud of? • Where did his/her loyalties lie?Where did his/her loyalties lie?
  • • What does King Arthur claim as his source of authority? • How is this different from a democratic civic- nation? Watch Clip
  • • The church claimed to have ultimate authority fromThe church claimed to have ultimate authority from GodGod • To question authority, especially the king’s, was toTo question authority, especially the king’s, was to question Godquestion God • Popes and kings often came into conflict over whosePopes and kings often came into conflict over whose power was greaterpower was greater • Life for most people was harsh and short, but theLife for most people was harsh and short, but the faithful were promised an afterlife in paradisefaithful were promised an afterlife in paradise
  • Medieval Church: Positives & Negatives • Provided sense of meaning to difficult lives • Maintained knowledge of the past • Provided opportunities for women • Role of perish and village priests • Tended to become corrupt: Indulgences • Intolerant: persecution of heretics and witches • Source of religious wars • Inspired the Spanish Inquisition and the Crusades
  • • Governed by traditionGoverned by tradition • Based on heredityBased on heredity • No social mobility (couldn’t change classes)No social mobility (couldn’t change classes) • Different rights, privileges, and obligations went withDifferent rights, privileges, and obligations went with each classeach class • Lowest classes had the fewest privileges and did mostLowest classes had the fewest privileges and did most of the workof the work
  • A Feudal King with absolute power France Under Louis XIV • Reigned for 72 years (55 in his own right) • Ambitious and the most influential king in Europe • Monarchs everywhere wanted to “be like Louis” • Louis proclaimed himself the “Sun King” • Made the statement “I am the State” • Lived lavishly at the palace of Versailles
  • Louis created “jobs” for all the nobles
  • ““But what happens when the sun sets?”But what happens when the sun sets?”
  • What new development inspired people replace their traditional loyalties (family, church, lord, king etc…) with loyalty to the state? Nationalism
  • The first great example of Nationalism?