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OECD GOV Mobile government
OECD GOV Mobile government
OECD GOV Mobile government
OECD GOV Mobile government
OECD GOV Mobile government
OECD GOV Mobile government
OECD GOV Mobile government
OECD GOV Mobile government
OECD GOV Mobile government
OECD GOV Mobile government
OECD GOV Mobile government
OECD GOV Mobile government
OECD GOV Mobile government
OECD GOV Mobile government
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OECD GOV Mobile government

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  • 1. M-GOVERNMENT: ESTABLISHING THE FRAMEWORK Barbara-Chiara Ubaldi OECD E-Government Project Manager Reform of the Public Sector Division
  • 2. Content overview 1. What is m-government? 2. Why m-government : Origin and context of OECD work 3. How to make it happen: prerequisites, main barriers and challenges 4. Who can benefit? 5. Where to go: The OECD role
  • 3. 1. From e-government to m-government (the what) • What is m-government? • Differences between e-government and m-government services provision: more than a shift in technologies, a fundamental change (e.g. different relationship btw mobile state and mobile public officials, mobile state and mobile citizens, mobile citizens and mobile civil servants) • Key role of mobile technology to pursue next generation of public services: citizen centric, integrated, measurable and transparent • New technologies enable more open specifications, greater sharing of resources, interoperability, counting on future market trends • Key question: will e-government be replaced by m-government? • Early stage of m–government development and part of the overall strategy of Public Sector modernisation and integrated service delivery strategy
  • 4. 1. From e-government to m-government (the what) Source: OECD Report on Mobile Government , 2011
  • 5. 2. Origin of OECD work on mgovernment (the why) • Countries are looking for increased agility, ubiquity and responsiveness of public services: mobile and wirelsess services platform-independent and available anywhere, anyhow, anytime and for anybody. • Strategic importance of wireless and mobile technology • Evident trends and need to establish a sound framework and settings for successful m-government • Purpose: assist governments worldwide for a coherent m-government framework and services
  • 6. Subscriptions per 100 inhabitants 2. Mobile Internet takes off in OECD Mobile subscriptions per 100 inhabitants 180 160 2G subscriptions 3G subscriptions Total (2G+3G) 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Over 500 million mobile broadband subscriptions in the OECD, averaging 42 subscriptions per 100 households (December 2010) Source: OECD Broadband Portal.
  • 7. Subscriptions per 100 inhabitants 2. …and in developing countries. 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 Over 300 million mobile broadband subscriptions in developing countries in 2010, more than double the amount one year earlier. Source: ITU World Telecommunication /ICT Indicators database.
  • 8. 2. Underlying concepts and motivational factors • Main reasons for the emergence of m-government solutions: – – penetration of mobile devices – ease of use for the citizens – easier interoperability – can bring government closer to citizens and businesses – • wide acceptance of these technologies m-government services can be cheaper than computer-based services Motivational factors... – Better service accessibility, availability, responsiveness, quality – Service scalability (expanding coverage, size, broadening impact and enhancing organisational sustainability) – Better stakeholder participation – Integration, communication, interaction – Efficiency gains: Reduced costs (operational and fixed) – Better image and perception – increased adaptability to future requirements
  • 9. 3. A framework for m-government (the how) • Establishing an implementation framework... – – – – Analysis of the business requirements Establishment of conceptual architecture principles Coherence of the two: business requirements are met with the right solutions and principles are grounded in the business requirements Sorting out the challenges from the opportunities: impact (coordination of the strategic, managerial and operational levels) and responses (change or innovation that may need its own managerial process) • The framework should incorporate the following principles: • Interoperability • Security • Flexibility • Scalability • Openness • Integrity • transparency • Alignment with public sector modernisation and integrated service delivery strategy
  • 10. 3. Main challenges... • Careful analysis of challenges to avoid increasing the gap and creating new inefficiencies: – Organisational – Technical – Financial and economic challenges – Governance – Legal and regulatory challenges • Avoid enforcement but enable access to those who are willing • Pragmatic strategic planning: Infrastructure strategy, service delivery strategy, organisational change strategy, : end-user (civil servant, citizen, business) and m-enabled solution focus of the planning and not technology • Transparency • Linked to use of other new technologies and open government data
  • 11. 3. Future steps for governments • Technology few steps ahead of socio-economic and usability enablers necessary to make the transition • Designing and constructing m-government services accepted and used by citizens and businesses : Careful analysis of perceptions and expectation (e.g. trust, self-efficacy in using mobile technology) prototyping, evaluation of services to avoid obsolescence and inefficient use of resources • Evolutionary approach: small set of high-value services accessible from a range of technologies • Flexible applications that can be changed with changing needs • M-applications inclusive and with a national spread: from pilots to national scale projects • Increased linkages btw hardware and content: linking the hardware to a content delivery platform • Mid-term perspective and technology trends outlook taken into account
  • 12. 3. Future steps (2) • Delivering m-government services implies change: habits, fear of the unknown, security and economic factors and civil servants might feel threatened • Adaptation process needed: education, participation, interpersonal communication, motivation • Widespread acceptance of mobile technologies in everyday life does not guarantee the acceptance of the technologies for the provision of public services: the risk of low levels of uptake • Appraising the readiness of the society for m-government: maturity of technology, capacity of service providers, users’ interest • Partnering with the private sector (capability and availability have reached a more mature status than the one in the public sector)
  • 13. 4. OECD help to formulate policies that leverage the potential (where to go) • review existing m-government policies, frameworks and initiatives • assess public sector maturity to deliver results through m-gov • appraise alignment with other relevant strategies (OGD, E-gov, PS reform) • help delivering results: – Provide more services with fewer resources – Emphasis on priority in favour of activities (and not 7/7) to avoid proliferation – Look at strategic state and social value, not only with a ROI perspective on how m-government enables to economize on the traditional costs of e-government – Part of a multichannel delivery strategy to ensure appropriate combination of online and offline channels in a ubiquitous manner – Consider the impact on digital divide • Part of our digital cities?
  • 14. Thank you! For more information email: barbara.ubaldi@oecd.org or visit our website: http://www.oecd.org/gov/egov

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