Design Studio: A Method for Concepting, Critique, and Iteration
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Design Studio: A Method for Concepting, Critique, and Iteration

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This presentation was given at the annual Boston UPA conference on May 7th, 2012. It describes one of the activities we use at Mad*Pow to generate lots of ideas for design projects while building a......

This presentation was given at the annual Boston UPA conference on May 7th, 2012. It describes one of the activities we use at Mad*Pow to generate lots of ideas for design projects while building a sense of collaboration and consensus across a multi-disciplinary project team.

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  • What I love most in a project is that moment when, in talking to your project team, the reactions you get are like:\nDude! That’s it! Rock! From Subject matter experts\nand Hell yeah! I want to build that! from your developers\n\nUnfortunately, that doesn’t happen for everyone. Or, if it does, it takes a lot of struggle and sacrifice to get there.\n\nHi everyone!\n\nAt mad*pow we all love that moment, and we do our damndest to make sure it happens. And today, i’d like to share one of the tools we use to stack the deck so that it does. And that tool is... DESIGN STUDIO\n
  • First, let me share a little bit about our process. This will probably feel pretty familiar to some of you.\n
  • We start with research. Knowing who we’re designing for is critical, right. So here we’re focusing on who these people are, not so much in terms of demographics (though in some projects that can be very important) but mostly focusing on behavior and attitudes and emotions.\n
  • Then we work to define the experience we’d like people to have with the product or service we’re designing. It’s not about UIs here, it’s about story and dialog. What’s the conversation someone has with the product over time.\n
  • And then, we get into the details. Putting together our concepts for the product and fleshing those out into detailed designs of interactions, screens, models, etc.\n\nNow we’re at a point where we can start to visualize what this thing is going to look like, the presence it will have in a physical or virtual space.\n
  • You’re all probably pretty familiar with the basic cyclical nature of the design process\nobserve/ a problem space > synthesize what we observe > create a solution to solve some specified problem\nput it out in the world in some way (wireframes, prototype, release, etc) and we begin the cycle again.\n\n
  • Most of you are also probably pretty familiar with the idea of generating a number of solutions and evaluating them; eliminating some, refining others, merging parts of them, until we come to one solution.\n\n
  • Inevitably we encounter some problems during this work…\n
  • Inevitably we encounter some problems during this work…\n
  • Inevitably we encounter some problems during this work…\n
  • Inevitably we encounter some problems during this work…\n
  • Inevitably we encounter some problems during this work…\n
  • Inevitably we encounter some problems during this work…\n
  • Inevitably we encounter some problems during this work…\n
  • Enter... THE BRAINSTORM\nIts pretty common to see teams pull the brainstorm card when they want to come up with something that everyone will agree to\n\nI’ll be honest. I HATE brainstorms. I don’t hate what they’re intended to do, but I hate the way they get executed. It’s like saying, “Hey, we have some shit we need to figure out, so lets all get together in a room for a while and talk about it without any real agenda.”\n
  • Lack Focus\nProgress to group think too quickly\nfail to generate a lot of ideas\n
  • Lack Focus\nProgress to group think too quickly\nfail to generate a lot of ideas\n
  • Lack Focus\nProgress to group think too quickly\nfail to generate a lot of ideas\n
  • Lack Focus\nProgress to group think too quickly\nfail to generate a lot of ideas\n
  • Lack Focus\nProgress to group think too quickly\nfail to generate a lot of ideas\n
  • Lack Focus\nProgress to group think too quickly\nfail to generate a lot of ideas\n
  • Lack Focus\nProgress to group think too quickly\nfail to generate a lot of ideas\n
  • If your goals are to generate ideas and get consensus on which idea(s) to pursue then it’s best to think of your meeting/workshop/whatever like this.\n
  • If your goals are to generate ideas and get consensus on which idea(s) to pursue then it’s best to think of your meeting/workshop/whatever like this.\n
  • If your goals are to generate ideas and get consensus on which idea(s) to pursue then it’s best to think of your meeting/workshop/whatever like this.\n
  • If your goals are to generate ideas and get consensus on which idea(s) to pursue then it’s best to think of your meeting/workshop/whatever like this.\n
  • If your goals are to generate ideas and get consensus on which idea(s) to pursue then it’s best to think of your meeting/workshop/whatever like this.\n
  • If your goals are to generate ideas and get consensus on which idea(s) to pursue then it’s best to think of your meeting/workshop/whatever like this.\n
  • If your goals are to generate ideas and get consensus on which idea(s) to pursue then it’s best to think of your meeting/workshop/whatever like this.\n
  • Design studio is an activity that does just this and does it while combining these ideals we have for the design process.\n\nThe activity itself comes form industrial design and architecture schools (and even appears in some art schools) and is built around these things called charrettes,\n\nA charrette is really nothing more than an intense period of design work which, in these schools would be followed by a presentation and then a critique from the instructor, other classmates, and perhaps other instructors.\n
  • For the purposes of our activity, a charrette breaks down into 3 pieces.\n\nSketching provides a way to quickly illustrate the concepts and components of a potential solution\nSketching allows us to quickly illustrate a concept and and explore how parts will fit together on a screen or in a flow.\n\nPresent is nothing more than putting our designs out for analysis. Participants put their sketches up in front of the group and describe quickly how they’re solution solves the problem at hand.\n\nCritique is a form of analysis that focuses on how a design does and does not meet a set of desired goals and principles.\nI’ll talk more about some specifics of critique in a few minutes. But it’s important to note how critical it is here. As it’s being relied upon to help determine the viability of ideas, not just against a problem we’re trying to solve for, but against other ideas.\n\n
  • For the purposes of our activity, a charrette breaks down into 3 pieces.\n\nSketching provides a way to quickly illustrate the concepts and components of a potential solution\nSketching allows us to quickly illustrate a concept and and explore how parts will fit together on a screen or in a flow.\n\nPresent is nothing more than putting our designs out for analysis. Participants put their sketches up in front of the group and describe quickly how they’re solution solves the problem at hand.\n\nCritique is a form of analysis that focuses on how a design does and does not meet a set of desired goals and principles.\nI’ll talk more about some specifics of critique in a few minutes. But it’s important to note how critical it is here. As it’s being relied upon to help determine the viability of ideas, not just against a problem we’re trying to solve for, but against other ideas.\n\n
  • For the purposes of our activity, a charrette breaks down into 3 pieces.\n\nSketching provides a way to quickly illustrate the concepts and components of a potential solution\nSketching allows us to quickly illustrate a concept and and explore how parts will fit together on a screen or in a flow.\n\nPresent is nothing more than putting our designs out for analysis. Participants put their sketches up in front of the group and describe quickly how they’re solution solves the problem at hand.\n\nCritique is a form of analysis that focuses on how a design does and does not meet a set of desired goals and principles.\nI’ll talk more about some specifics of critique in a few minutes. But it’s important to note how critical it is here. As it’s being relied upon to help determine the viability of ideas, not just against a problem we’re trying to solve for, but against other ideas.\n\n
  • For the purposes of our activity, a charrette breaks down into 3 pieces.\n\nSketching provides a way to quickly illustrate the concepts and components of a potential solution\nSketching allows us to quickly illustrate a concept and and explore how parts will fit together on a screen or in a flow.\n\nPresent is nothing more than putting our designs out for analysis. Participants put their sketches up in front of the group and describe quickly how they’re solution solves the problem at hand.\n\nCritique is a form of analysis that focuses on how a design does and does not meet a set of desired goals and principles.\nI’ll talk more about some specifics of critique in a few minutes. But it’s important to note how critical it is here. As it’s being relied upon to help determine the viability of ideas, not just against a problem we’re trying to solve for, but against other ideas.\n\n
  • For the purposes of our activity, a charrette breaks down into 3 pieces.\n\nSketching provides a way to quickly illustrate the concepts and components of a potential solution\nSketching allows us to quickly illustrate a concept and and explore how parts will fit together on a screen or in a flow.\n\nPresent is nothing more than putting our designs out for analysis. Participants put their sketches up in front of the group and describe quickly how they’re solution solves the problem at hand.\n\nCritique is a form of analysis that focuses on how a design does and does not meet a set of desired goals and principles.\nI’ll talk more about some specifics of critique in a few minutes. But it’s important to note how critical it is here. As it’s being relied upon to help determine the viability of ideas, not just against a problem we’re trying to solve for, but against other ideas.\n\n
  • For the purposes of our activity, a charrette breaks down into 3 pieces.\n\nSketching provides a way to quickly illustrate the concepts and components of a potential solution\nSketching allows us to quickly illustrate a concept and and explore how parts will fit together on a screen or in a flow.\n\nPresent is nothing more than putting our designs out for analysis. Participants put their sketches up in front of the group and describe quickly how they’re solution solves the problem at hand.\n\nCritique is a form of analysis that focuses on how a design does and does not meet a set of desired goals and principles.\nI’ll talk more about some specifics of critique in a few minutes. But it’s important to note how critical it is here. As it’s being relied upon to help determine the viability of ideas, not just against a problem we’re trying to solve for, but against other ideas.\n\n
  • For the purposes of our activity, a charrette breaks down into 3 pieces.\n\nSketching provides a way to quickly illustrate the concepts and components of a potential solution\nSketching allows us to quickly illustrate a concept and and explore how parts will fit together on a screen or in a flow.\n\nPresent is nothing more than putting our designs out for analysis. Participants put their sketches up in front of the group and describe quickly how they’re solution solves the problem at hand.\n\nCritique is a form of analysis that focuses on how a design does and does not meet a set of desired goals and principles.\nI’ll talk more about some specifics of critique in a few minutes. But it’s important to note how critical it is here. As it’s being relied upon to help determine the viability of ideas, not just against a problem we’re trying to solve for, but against other ideas.\n\n
  • For the purposes of our activity, a charrette breaks down into 3 pieces.\n\nSketching provides a way to quickly illustrate the concepts and components of a potential solution\nSketching allows us to quickly illustrate a concept and and explore how parts will fit together on a screen or in a flow.\n\nPresent is nothing more than putting our designs out for analysis. Participants put their sketches up in front of the group and describe quickly how they’re solution solves the problem at hand.\n\nCritique is a form of analysis that focuses on how a design does and does not meet a set of desired goals and principles.\nI’ll talk more about some specifics of critique in a few minutes. But it’s important to note how critical it is here. As it’s being relied upon to help determine the viability of ideas, not just against a problem we’re trying to solve for, but against other ideas.\n\n
  • For the purposes of our activity, a charrette breaks down into 3 pieces.\n\nSketching provides a way to quickly illustrate the concepts and components of a potential solution\nSketching allows us to quickly illustrate a concept and and explore how parts will fit together on a screen or in a flow.\n\nPresent is nothing more than putting our designs out for analysis. Participants put their sketches up in front of the group and describe quickly how they’re solution solves the problem at hand.\n\nCritique is a form of analysis that focuses on how a design does and does not meet a set of desired goals and principles.\nI’ll talk more about some specifics of critique in a few minutes. But it’s important to note how critical it is here. As it’s being relied upon to help determine the viability of ideas, not just against a problem we’re trying to solve for, but against other ideas.\n\n
  • For the purposes of our activity, a charrette breaks down into 3 pieces.\n\nSketching provides a way to quickly illustrate the concepts and components of a potential solution\nSketching allows us to quickly illustrate a concept and and explore how parts will fit together on a screen or in a flow.\n\nPresent is nothing more than putting our designs out for analysis. Participants put their sketches up in front of the group and describe quickly how they’re solution solves the problem at hand.\n\nCritique is a form of analysis that focuses on how a design does and does not meet a set of desired goals and principles.\nI’ll talk more about some specifics of critique in a few minutes. But it’s important to note how critical it is here. As it’s being relied upon to help determine the viability of ideas, not just against a problem we’re trying to solve for, but against other ideas.\n\n
  • For the purposes of our activity, a charrette breaks down into 3 pieces.\n\nSketching provides a way to quickly illustrate the concepts and components of a potential solution\nSketching allows us to quickly illustrate a concept and and explore how parts will fit together on a screen or in a flow.\n\nPresent is nothing more than putting our designs out for analysis. Participants put their sketches up in front of the group and describe quickly how they’re solution solves the problem at hand.\n\nCritique is a form of analysis that focuses on how a design does and does not meet a set of desired goals and principles.\nI’ll talk more about some specifics of critique in a few minutes. But it’s important to note how critical it is here. As it’s being relied upon to help determine the viability of ideas, not just against a problem we’re trying to solve for, but against other ideas.\n\n
  • For the purposes of our activity, a charrette breaks down into 3 pieces.\n\nSketching provides a way to quickly illustrate the concepts and components of a potential solution\nSketching allows us to quickly illustrate a concept and and explore how parts will fit together on a screen or in a flow.\n\nPresent is nothing more than putting our designs out for analysis. Participants put their sketches up in front of the group and describe quickly how they’re solution solves the problem at hand.\n\nCritique is a form of analysis that focuses on how a design does and does not meet a set of desired goals and principles.\nI’ll talk more about some specifics of critique in a few minutes. But it’s important to note how critical it is here. As it’s being relied upon to help determine the viability of ideas, not just against a problem we’re trying to solve for, but against other ideas.\n\n
  • For the purposes of our activity, a charrette breaks down into 3 pieces.\n\nSketching provides a way to quickly illustrate the concepts and components of a potential solution\nSketching allows us to quickly illustrate a concept and and explore how parts will fit together on a screen or in a flow.\n\nPresent is nothing more than putting our designs out for analysis. Participants put their sketches up in front of the group and describe quickly how they’re solution solves the problem at hand.\n\nCritique is a form of analysis that focuses on how a design does and does not meet a set of desired goals and principles.\nI’ll talk more about some specifics of critique in a few minutes. But it’s important to note how critical it is here. As it’s being relied upon to help determine the viability of ideas, not just against a problem we’re trying to solve for, but against other ideas.\n\n
  • For the purposes of our activity, a charrette breaks down into 3 pieces.\n\nSketching provides a way to quickly illustrate the concepts and components of a potential solution\nSketching allows us to quickly illustrate a concept and and explore how parts will fit together on a screen or in a flow.\n\nPresent is nothing more than putting our designs out for analysis. Participants put their sketches up in front of the group and describe quickly how they’re solution solves the problem at hand.\n\nCritique is a form of analysis that focuses on how a design does and does not meet a set of desired goals and principles.\nI’ll talk more about some specifics of critique in a few minutes. But it’s important to note how critical it is here. As it’s being relied upon to help determine the viability of ideas, not just against a problem we’re trying to solve for, but against other ideas.\n\n
  • For the purposes of our activity, a charrette breaks down into 3 pieces.\n\nSketching provides a way to quickly illustrate the concepts and components of a potential solution\nSketching allows us to quickly illustrate a concept and and explore how parts will fit together on a screen or in a flow.\n\nPresent is nothing more than putting our designs out for analysis. Participants put their sketches up in front of the group and describe quickly how they’re solution solves the problem at hand.\n\nCritique is a form of analysis that focuses on how a design does and does not meet a set of desired goals and principles.\nI’ll talk more about some specifics of critique in a few minutes. But it’s important to note how critical it is here. As it’s being relied upon to help determine the viability of ideas, not just against a problem we’re trying to solve for, but against other ideas.\n\n
  • For the purposes of our activity, a charrette breaks down into 3 pieces.\n\nSketching provides a way to quickly illustrate the concepts and components of a potential solution\nSketching allows us to quickly illustrate a concept and and explore how parts will fit together on a screen or in a flow.\n\nPresent is nothing more than putting our designs out for analysis. Participants put their sketches up in front of the group and describe quickly how they’re solution solves the problem at hand.\n\nCritique is a form of analysis that focuses on how a design does and does not meet a set of desired goals and principles.\nI’ll talk more about some specifics of critique in a few minutes. But it’s important to note how critical it is here. As it’s being relied upon to help determine the viability of ideas, not just against a problem we’re trying to solve for, but against other ideas.\n\n
  • Ok. So how do we set up this awesome activity?\n
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  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • We need to know who our audience or users are. From our research we should be able to derive a set of personas that describe them, there behaviors and goals.\nWe need to place those users in a likely situation in which their going to engage with our product. We derive these SCENARIOS from our experience visioning such as journey maps.\nFor the purposes of a studio you won’t necessarily need ALL of the personas and scenarios. You want to define the highest priority. These are the usually the ones that make up the majority of your audience and the situations that make up the majority of ways in which the product will be used.\n\n
  • Ok, you’ve got your people, you’ve got your materials, so now it’s time to start the workshop.\n\n\n
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  • We get this a lot. actually, we get it more often when we’re telling people about the workshop than we do when we’re introducing it to participants in the workshop.\n\nNo matter either way though, because it’s no big deal.\n
  • If you can draw these 4 basic shapes, you’ve really got all you need.\n\nAlso show sketches from past studios\n
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  • Practice with warm up if necessary - Grandma Email\n\n\n
  • 5-8 minutes for individuals to sketch as many solutions as possible. (aim for 3 or 4)\nGoal is quantity over quality\nThese aren’t detailed sketches, but more high-level concepts: why we use 8 ups\nIf the scenario is long, might focus on lead in, first few steps, or generalize middle steps.\n\nOnce finished, everyone (within a team) posts their sketches on the wall (butcher paper) and then we move to presenting and critique.\n2-3 minutes to present your solution and then 3-5 minutes of critique from teammates\n
  • Facilitate the critique as little as possible, and remember to participate.\nAllow people to mark on sketches with red/green pens\n
  • Facilitate the critique as little as possible, and remember to participate.\nAllow people to mark on sketches with red/green pens\n
  • Facilitate the critique as little as possible, and remember to participate.\nAllow people to mark on sketches with red/green pens\n
  • Facilitate the critique as little as possible, and remember to participate.\nAllow people to mark on sketches with red/green pens\n
  • Facilitate the critique as little as possible, and remember to participate.\nAllow people to mark on sketches with red/green pens\n
  • Facilitate the critique as little as possible, and remember to participate.\nAllow people to mark on sketches with red/green pens\n
  • Facilitate the critique as little as possible, and remember to participate.\nAllow people to mark on sketches with red/green pens\n
  • Facilitate the critique as little as possible, and remember to participate.\nAllow people to mark on sketches with red/green pens\n
  • Facilitate the critique as little as possible, and remember to participate.\nAllow people to mark on sketches with red/green pens\n
  • Facilitate the critique as little as possible, and remember to participate.\nAllow people to mark on sketches with red/green pens\n
  • Facilitate the critique as little as possible, and remember to participate.\nAllow people to mark on sketches with red/green pens\n
  • Facilitate the critique as little as possible, and remember to participate.\nAllow people to mark on sketches with red/green pens\n
  • Facilitate the critique as little as possible, and remember to participate.\nAllow people to mark on sketches with red/green pens\n
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  • In charrette 1. We were all about divergent thinking. It was quantity over quality.\n\nIn charrette two, after some analysis of all those ideas, we’re moving into convergent thinking. Sometimes we even do this in pairs. (my personal preference is to stick with individuals at this point)\n\nIn charrette three, we’re really focused on convergent thinking and concensus. Group collaboration is key here.\n
  • In charrette 1. We were all about divergent thinking. It was quantity over quality.\n\nIn charrette two, after some analysis of all those ideas, we’re moving into convergent thinking. Sometimes we even do this in pairs. (my personal preference is to stick with individuals at this point)\n\nIn charrette three, we’re really focused on convergent thinking and concensus. Group collaboration is key here.\n
  • In charrette 1. We were all about divergent thinking. It was quantity over quality.\n\nIn charrette two, after some analysis of all those ideas, we’re moving into convergent thinking. Sometimes we even do this in pairs. (my personal preference is to stick with individuals at this point)\n\nIn charrette three, we’re really focused on convergent thinking and concensus. Group collaboration is key here.\n
  • In charrette 1. We were all about divergent thinking. It was quantity over quality.\n\nIn charrette two, after some analysis of all those ideas, we’re moving into convergent thinking. Sometimes we even do this in pairs. (my personal preference is to stick with individuals at this point)\n\nIn charrette three, we’re really focused on convergent thinking and concensus. Group collaboration is key here.\n
  • In charrette 1. We were all about divergent thinking. It was quantity over quality.\n\nIn charrette two, after some analysis of all those ideas, we’re moving into convergent thinking. Sometimes we even do this in pairs. (my personal preference is to stick with individuals at this point)\n\nIn charrette three, we’re really focused on convergent thinking and concensus. Group collaboration is key here.\n
  • In charrette 1. We were all about divergent thinking. It was quantity over quality.\n\nIn charrette two, after some analysis of all those ideas, we’re moving into convergent thinking. Sometimes we even do this in pairs. (my personal preference is to stick with individuals at this point)\n\nIn charrette three, we’re really focused on convergent thinking and concensus. Group collaboration is key here.\n
  • In charrette 1. We were all about divergent thinking. It was quantity over quality.\n\nIn charrette two, after some analysis of all those ideas, we’re moving into convergent thinking. Sometimes we even do this in pairs. (my personal preference is to stick with individuals at this point)\n\nIn charrette three, we’re really focused on convergent thinking and concensus. Group collaboration is key here.\n
  • In charrette 1. We were all about divergent thinking. It was quantity over quality.\n\nIn charrette two, after some analysis of all those ideas, we’re moving into convergent thinking. Sometimes we even do this in pairs. (my personal preference is to stick with individuals at this point)\n\nIn charrette three, we’re really focused on convergent thinking and concensus. Group collaboration is key here.\n
  • In charrette 1. We were all about divergent thinking. It was quantity over quality.\n\nIn charrette two, after some analysis of all those ideas, we’re moving into convergent thinking. Sometimes we even do this in pairs. (my personal preference is to stick with individuals at this point)\n\nIn charrette three, we’re really focused on convergent thinking and concensus. Group collaboration is key here.\n
  • In charrette 1. We were all about divergent thinking. It was quantity over quality.\n\nIn charrette two, after some analysis of all those ideas, we’re moving into convergent thinking. Sometimes we even do this in pairs. (my personal preference is to stick with individuals at this point)\n\nIn charrette three, we’re really focused on convergent thinking and concensus. Group collaboration is key here.\n
  • After all scenarios that will be addressed are complete\nAsk participants to identify and discuss any common themes, patterns, components that emerged.\nDocument any open questions and assumptions that arose.\nCollect all of this and the sketches\n\nImportant to remember that the Studio (in most situations won’t generate the entire concept)\nRegroup with your design team to review the concepts against the scenarios and refine to generate a single concept\n\n
  • After all scenarios that will be addressed are complete\nAsk participants to identify and discuss any common themes, patterns, components that emerged.\nDocument any open questions and assumptions that arose.\nCollect all of this and the sketches\n\nImportant to remember that the Studio (in most situations won’t generate the entire concept)\nRegroup with your design team to review the concepts against the scenarios and refine to generate a single concept\n\n
  • This is a time commitment. \n\nDon’t schedule on Mondays or Fridays.\n
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  • If any of you are interested in learning more about this activity, and experience it, and you’re attending UPA next month in Vegas, I’ll be giving a tutorial there. And if you’re not going to be there, well, for christ’s sake, change your plans and go.\n

Transcript

  • 1. DESIGN STUDIO A Method for Idea Generation, Critique, and Iteration ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 2. Research Concepting & Detailed Design Vision & Definition ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 3. Research Concepting & Detailed Design Vision & Definition ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 4. Research Concepting & Detailed Design Vision & Definition ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 5. Research Concepting & Detailed Design Vision & Definition ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 6. Synthesize Observations Create or Refine Observe & Evaluate ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 7. Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Solution ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 8. Inevitably, we run into challenges. Which option should we choose? We need to put all of these ideas in front of users and let them tell us. I just remembered... it also needs to do these 16 other things. ADAM CONNOR EXPERIENCE DESIGN DIRECTOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 9. The ever-dreaded Swoop-n-Poop ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 10. The ever popular brainstorm… ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 11. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 12. Yes, there is an “i” in “design,” but it falls in-between a whole bunch of other stuff. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 13. How can we engage team members, including stakeholders, so that we… ADAM CONNOR Generate lots of ideas? @ADAMCONNOR
  • 14. How can we engage team members, including stakeholders, so that we… ADAM CONNOR Generate lots of ideas? Give team members a chance to share ideas early in the project. @ADAMCONNOR
  • 15. How can we engage team members, including stakeholders, so that we… ADAM CONNOR Generate lots of ideas? Give team members a chance to share ideas early in the project. Learn about the perspectives each area of expertise involved has. @ADAMCONNOR
  • 16. How can we engage team members, including stakeholders, so that we… ADAM CONNOR Generate lots of ideas? Give team members a chance to share ideas early in the project. Learn about the perspectives each area of expertise involved has. Choose ideas based on consensus and their effectiveness for our objectives. @ADAMCONNOR
  • 17. How can we engage team members, including stakeholders, so that we… ADAM CONNOR Generate lots of ideas? Give team members a chance to share ideas early in the project. Learn about the perspectives each area of expertise involved has. Choose ideas based on consensus and their effectiveness for our objectives. Establish a shared sense of ownership in the solution? @ADAMCONNOR
  • 18. Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Solution Synthesize Observations Create or Refine Observe & Evaluate ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 19. Divergent Thinking ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 20. Divergent Thinking Convergent Thinking ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 21. Divergent Thinking Convergent Critique Thinking ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 22. Divergent Thinking Convergent Critique Thinking Individual Exploration Group Refinement ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 23. SKETCH PRESENT CRITIQUE ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 24. SKETCH PRESENT CRITIQUE ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 25. SKETCH PRESENT CRITIQUE ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 26. SKETCH PRESENT CRITIQUE ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 27. The ever-important setup. ADAM CONNOR EXPERIENCE DESIGN DIRECTOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 28. Framing the Problem ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 29. Framing the Problem Personas ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 30. Framing the Problem Personas Goals ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 31. Framing the Problem Personas Goals Principles ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 32. Framing the Problem Personas Goals Principles Scenarios ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 33. Framing the Problem Personas Goals Principles Scenarios Tip: Make sure this isn’t the first time people see these. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 34. Framing the Problem Personas Goals Scenarios Tip: Make sure this isn’t the first time people see these. You’ll also need… A Timer Paper Black, Red and Green Markers Tape Butcher Paper (optional) Principles ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 35. Choose the best scenarios for your studio by… Looking for scenarios that make up the “core” of the product (most encountered, largest audience, most sensitive) ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 36. Choose the best scenarios for your studio by… Looking for scenarios that make up the “core” of the product (most encountered, largest audience, most sensitive) Looking for scenarios that feature functions or challenges that there is significant discussion around. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 37. Choose the best scenarios for your studio by… Looking for scenarios that make up the “core” of the product (most encountered, largest audience, most sensitive) Looking for scenarios that feature functions or challenges that there is significant discussion around. Breaking down long scenarios into smaller sub-scenarios. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 38. Choose the best scenarios for your studio by… Looking for scenarios that make up the “core” of the product (most encountered, largest audience, most sensitive) Looking for scenarios that feature functions or challenges that there is significant discussion around. Breaking down long scenarios into smaller sub-scenarios. Getting agreement from the team on the chosen scenarios. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 39. Who gets an invitation? ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 40. Who gets an invitation? Cross-functional ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 41. Who gets an invitation? Cross-functional Key stakeholders ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 42. Who gets an invitation? Cross-functional Key stakeholders Up to 20 people (ideally more like 12-16) ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 43. Who gets an invitation? Cross-functional Key stakeholders Up to 20 people (ideally more like 12-16) Balanced teams of 3-6 people ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 44. Who gets an invitation? Cross-functional Key stakeholders Up to 20 people (ideally more like 12-16) Balanced teams of 3-6 people Tip: Create teams ahead of time and consider people’s personalities and attitudes. Make sure you have one person on each team who can act as the facilitator. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 45. On your mark. Get set. G0! ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 46. Wait! I can’t DRAW! ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 47. Wait! I can’t DRAW!!! Rectangle Ellipse Triangle Wavy Line ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 48. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 49. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 50. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 51. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 52. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 53. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 54. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 55. When communicating with sketches, the details you focus on need only be what’s necessary to illustrate your point. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 56. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 57. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 58. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 59. The design process is one of evolution, not production. Sketching facilitates faster exploration and refinement of ideas through iteration. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 60. WHAT HAPPENS Individuals sketch as many ideas as they can come up with in 5-8 minutes. 1 WHY Generate as many ideas as possible without time for over-analyzing. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 61. WHAT HAPPENS Individuals sketch as many ideas as they can come up with in 5-8 minutes. WHAT HAPPENS Individuals sketch 1 idea in 5-8 minutes based on ideas & critique shared in the previous charrette. 1 2 WHY Generate as many ideas as possible without time for over-analyzing. WHY Allow individuals to form their own conclusions on the strongest ideas. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 62. WHAT HAPPENS Collaboratively, members of a team sketch 1 idea in 20-25 minutes based on their earlier charrettes. 3 WHY Understand how groups compromise & where consensus has surfaced. ! WHAT HAPPENS Individuals sketch as many ideas as they can come up with in 5-8 minutes. WHAT HAPPENS Individuals sketch 1 idea in 5-8 minutes based on ideas & critique shared in the previous charrette. 1 2 WHY Generate as many ideas as possible without time for over-analyzing. WHY Allow individuals to form their own conclusions on the strongest ideas. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 63. What about group think and design-by-committee? ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 64. Critique is critical to the success of collaborative activities like studio because it allows participants to… Actively avoid personal preference and analyze ideas against the personas, scenarios, goals and principles that frame the project. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 65. Critique is critical to the success of collaborative activities like studio because it allows participants to… Actively avoid personal preference and analyze ideas against the personas, scenarios, goals and principles that frame the project. Collectively identify which ideas are most important in creating an effective design. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 66. Critique is critical to the success of collaborative activities like studio because it allows participants to… Actively avoid personal preference and analyze ideas against the personas, scenarios, goals and principles that frame the project. Collectively identify which ideas are most important in creating an effective design. Avoid group-think, design-by-committee and preferential based decision making. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 67. Rules & Guidelines for Critique ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 68. Rules & Guidelines for Critique Present quickly. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 69. Rules & Guidelines for Critique Present quickly. Everyone is equal and a critic. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 70. Rules & Guidelines for Critique Present quickly. Everyone is equal and a critic. Avoid getting sidetracked by problem solving. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 71. Rules & Guidelines for Critique Present quickly. Everyone is equal and a critic. Avoid getting sidetracked by problem solving. Ask questions as necessary. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 72. Rules & Guidelines for Critique Present quickly. Everyone is equal and a critic. Avoid getting sidetracked by problem solving. Ask questions as necessary. Use principles, personas, scenarios and goals to focus discussion. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 73. The aftermath and what comes next. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 74. How long is long enough? ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 75. How long is long enough? Sample Setup: 3 teams of 4 people working on 1 persona/scenario ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 76. How long is long enough? Sample Setup: 3 teams of 4 people working on 1 persona/scenario Opening 15 minutes ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 77. How long is long enough? Sample Setup: 3 teams of 4 people working on 1 persona/scenario Opening 15 minutes Scenario Review 5 minutes ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 78. How long is long enough? Sample Setup: 3 teams of 4 people working on 1 persona/scenario Opening 15 minutes Scenario Review 5 minutes Charrette 1 Sketching 5 minutes Present & Critique 28 minutes 7 min/individual (present: 3 min, critique 4 min) ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 79. How long is long enough? Sample Setup: 3 teams of 4 people working on 1 persona/scenario Opening 15 minutes Scenario Review 5 minutes Charrette 1 Sketching 5 minutes Present & Critique 28 minutes 7 min/individual (present: 3 min, critique 4 min) Charrette 2 Sketching 5 minutes Present & Critique 28 minutes 7 min/individual (present: 3 min, critique 4 min) ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 80. How long is long enough? Sample Setup: 3 teams of 4 people working on 1 persona/scenario Opening 15 minutes Scenario Review 5 minutes Charrette 1 Sketching 5 minutes Present & Critique 28 minutes 7 min/individual (present: 3 min, critique 4 min) Charrette 2 Sketching 5 minutes Present & Critique 28 minutes 7 min/individual (present: 3 min, critique 4 min) Charrette 3 Sketching 15 minutes Present & Critique 30 minutes 10 min/group (present: 3 min, critique 7 min) ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 81. How long is long enough? Sample Setup: 3 teams of 4 people working on 1 persona/scenario Opening 15 minutes Scenario Review 5 minutes Charrette 1 Sketching 5 minutes Present & Critique 28 minutes 7 min/individual (present: 3 min, critique 4 min) Charrette 2 Sketching 5 minutes Present & Critique 28 minutes 7 min/individual (present: 3 min, critique 4 min) Charrette 3 Sketching 15 minutes Present & Critique 30 minutes 10 min/group (present: 3 min, critique 7 min) Closing 30 minutes ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 82. How long is long enough? Sample Setup: 3 teams of 4 people working on 1 persona/scenario Opening 15 minutes Scenario Review 5 minutes Charrette 1 Sketching 5 minutes Present & Critique 28 minutes 7 min/individual (present: 3 min, critique 4 min) Charrette 2 Sketching 5 minutes Present & Critique 28 minutes 7 min/individual (present: 3 min, critique 4 min) Charrette 3 Sketching 15 minutes Present & Critique 30 minutes 10 min/group (present: 3 min, critique 7 min) Closing 30 minutes Total ~2 hours 45 minutes ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 83. How do I get people to come up with new ideas? ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 84. When shouldn’t you use a Design Studio? ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 85. You might not be ready to run a design studio for your project if… ADAM CONNOR You haven’t adequately framed and broken down the problem. @ADAMCONNOR
  • 86. You might not be ready to run a design studio for your project if… ADAM CONNOR You haven’t adequately framed and broken down the problem. You don’t have enough agreement on how you’ve framed the problem and broken it down. @ADAMCONNOR
  • 87. You might not be ready to run a design studio for your project if… ADAM CONNOR You haven’t adequately framed and broken down the problem. You don’t have enough agreement on how you’ve framed the problem and broken it down. A concept already exists that the team can’t or won’t stray from. @ADAMCONNOR
  • 88. You might not be ready to run a design studio for your project if… ADAM CONNOR You haven’t adequately framed and broken down the problem. You don’t have enough agreement on how you’ve framed the problem and broken it down. A concept already exists that the team can’t or won’t stray from. Some team member attitudes aren’t open to it. @ADAMCONNOR
  • 89. You might not be ready to run a design studio for your project if… ADAM CONNOR You haven’t adequately framed and broken down the problem. You don’t have enough agreement on how you’ve framed the problem and broken it down. A concept already exists that the team can’t or won’t stray from. Some team member attitudes aren’t open to it. Some remote situations. @ADAMCONNOR
  • 90. Design Studio allows us to… ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 91. Design Studio allows us to… Expand our ability to collect good ideas. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 92. Design Studio allows us to… Expand our ability to collect good ideas. Build consensus and a shared sense of ownership and collaboration in the creation of the solution. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 93. Design Studio allows us to… Expand our ability to collect good ideas. Build consensus and a shared sense of ownership and collaboration in the creation of the solution. Build a shared understanding of the problem space and the perspectives of individual team members have. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 94. Design Studio allows us to… Expand our ability to collect good ideas. Build consensus and a shared sense of ownership and collaboration in the creation of the solution. Build a shared understanding of the problem space and the perspectives of individual team members have. Speed up the design timeline in a project. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 95. Design Studio allows us to… Expand our ability to collect good ideas. Build consensus and a shared sense of ownership and collaboration in the creation of the solution. Build a shared understanding of the problem space and the perspectives of individual team members have. Speed up the design timeline in a project. Give team members an opportunity to understand the impacts that decisions have on the overall design and other considerations. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 96. It’s more than a workshop activity. ADAM CONNOR @ADAMCONNOR
  • 97. THANK YOU! Adam Connor Experience Design Director ! ! @adamconnor adam@adamconnor.com For more thoughts on critique, communication, and collaboration, check out discussingdesign.com. ! And look for Discussing Design from O’Reilly Media in 2015!