020 Bringing Musicians Together With Nick Townsend | The Gemini Project Podcast | Transcript
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

020 Bringing Musicians Together With Nick Townsend | The Gemini Project Podcast | Transcript

on

  • 376 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
376
Views on SlideShare
376
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

020 Bringing Musicians Together With Nick Townsend | The Gemini Project Podcast | Transcript 020 Bringing Musicians Together With Nick Townsend | The Gemini Project Podcast | Transcript Document Transcript

  • 020 Bringing Musicians Together With Nick Townsend | The Gemini Project Podcast Shownotes at : http://thegeminiproject.com.au/020 The Gemini Project Podcast Bringing Musicians Together Interview With Nick Townsend By Adam SpencerAdam:  Session 20 of The Gemini Project Podcast, where I have a chat with Nick Townsend,the founder of musomatch.com.au.  Let’s get into it.Recorded introduction:  Soundcheck.  Welcome to The Gemini Project Podcast, where yourhost, Adam Spencer, and his special guests share their secrets on how to take your musicbusiness to the next level.  Visit thegeminiproject.com.au or find us on Facebook to take the nextstep.  Now strap yourselves in.  It’s showtime! (music)Adam:   Hi guys.  Welcome to Session 20 of The Gemini Project Podcast.  That’s right.  The big2­0.  So 20 episodes down and I’m still going strong.  I am absolutely loving what I’m doing intalking with the musicians who actually care about their music business and want to push theirmusic out into the world rather than waiting for the glory to come to them, which I think is a littlebit of a problem out there.  But I have met some absolutely amazing people and spoken withsome of the most talented musicians I’ve ever, ever met.  And yeah, it’s just been really greatand thank you so much for coming on for the ride.  And thank you for listening to this because,you know, it’s my goal to help you guys out by bringing the information to you.So let’s get the formalities out of the way.  My name is Adam Spencer for those of you who thisis the first show you’ve listened to.  I am the creator and host of The Gemini Project Podcast,and this show is for you.  Yes, you who is a talented and motivated musician who wants to be alittle bit different, be innovative in how you get your music out there and just try new things and 1
  • see what works and what isn’t working, and building your music business that way.  That’s whatwe’re all about here and we bring that advice to you from industry professionals but alsopredominantly from those musos that have been out there in the real world and tried it all or atleast tried something and found that it works.So that’s the formality out of the way.  Thank you so much for being here again.  As this episodeis being recorded and going to air, you know, I am excited but at the same time I am also, youknow, exhausted because I am currently in the process of ferociously putting together aconference which is around three weeks away as this goes to air.  So learning a lot of newthings.  I’m loving it.  And some amazing people are coming on board.  And I’ll share more aboutthat in the coming weeks.  I’ll have a link in the shownotes actually for you guys to go ahead andregister your interest to come along with the night.  It’s going to be held in Newcastle, New SouthWales, and I hope to see you there.  Honestly, I’ll be on stage for a little while and then I’ll have achance to have a chat with you guys afterwards.So let’s move on into the show.  In this interview I have a chat with Nick Townsend, who is thefounder and creator of musomatch.com.au, and Nick is from overseas from Europe.  And he’sbeen in Australia for a while now, but Nick is a drummer and I’ll let him tell you about the reasonwhy he started Musomatch and how you can actually also get signed up to Musomatch as well.So guys, without any further ado, let’s get into the interview with Nick.  And we start off by justfinding out a little bit about Nick.  See you on the other side.  (transitioning)Welcome to The Gemini Project Podcast, Nick.  It’s a pleasure to have you here.  We’ve spokena few times before this interview.  Can you give us just a little bit of a background on yourself,Nick?  And then we’ll jump into the awesome project that you are working on.Nick:  Thank you.  Yeah.  I’m from England.  I’m 43 years old.  I’ve been a drummer since I was15, played in various bands, speed metal bands, blues bands, and stuff.  Some points in my life Imanaged to get courted and we supported bands like Fido and Toploader before.  While I wasplaying music, I’ve been a project manager in telecoms in Vodafone in UK, business change andweb­design changes as well for British Telecom as a consultant.  I love playing music andchatting to musos, supporting local music and getting people together.Adam:  Right.  What you’re doing I think is absolutely awesome and amazing.  You know, there’sa couple people out there trying to do the same thing but I have personally used your platform aswell.  I have just put an event up there today and it’s so user friendly.  The user interface isamazing.  So for people listening, the platform is called musomatch.com.au and Nick, you’ll bethe best person to kind of give us a bit of an explanation about what it’s about and kind of whatyour main goal, you know, behind it is.Nick:  Okay.  Yeah, it’s great.  I’m glad you like the platform by the way.  It was designed withthe KISS principle – “keep it simple, stupid!” 2
  • Adam:  Yeah.Nick:  And also with the principle that most people who are going to access the site are eithergoing to be drunk or at the end of the night.  They’re gonna be musos.  They’re gonna be realpeople who don’t want to have to go through too many different barriers to get into what theywant.  It’s been around as an idea for about four years, eventually launched it aroundSeptember.  The inspiration was not being able to find a band, as simple as that really.  I landedin Coffs Harbour and from the UK a drum kit came three months later and I couldn’t find anybodyto play with.  And I got really tired of the muso shop notice boards where there is a bassistwanted, bassist wanted, bassist wants to join a band.  And I kind of thought well, as an examplethere, they’re never gonna get together because there’s no way that two notices talk to eachother.  But I thought if you could put it onto a site, then they would be instantaneously aware ofthem seeing who is available.So also, I need to find like­minded people.  I’ve got a very broad musical taste, so I just woke upone day and had this idea, wrote it all down.  The site that’s there now is just a proof of concept,all that was affordable at the present time.Adam:  Yeah.  Yup.  Cool.  And so, let’s give listeners just a short, brief run­through of kind of:Let’s just say that I’m looking for a band and I’m a guitarist, and I want to jump on there and findsomeone, find a band or put my services out there.  Let’s just go quick step by step on how wewould go about doing that.Nick:  Well, anybody can look on our site and search for musicians.  Anybody can jump on andjust search for postcodes, name, guitar, instrument, anything they want, to find somebody.  Butthen when they found that person, they then have to become a member to actually be able totalk to and chat to that person.  We’ve got to obviously protect people’s rights to privacy andstuff.Adam:  Yeah.Nick:  So if you then sign up to Musomatch and log in with your username and password, youthen are part of the community and you can talk to anybody on the site you want to.  You canaccess all the services on the site.  So as an example, I’m a drummer, I want to find someone toplay with in Coffs Harbour.  The postcode here is 2450.  The most simple way for you to findpeople in your area is put the postcode in to see who comes up.Adam:  Yeah.Nick:  And then if you want to, you can open another search field and say I want to find aguitarist.  So you can choose “guitar” and search.  And it uses the postcode and the guitar forthe search preferences. 3
  • Adam:  Right.Nick:  So that brings back all the guitarists in the area.  If you then want someone who playsguitar in Coffs Harbour 2450, but also likes heavy metal, then you can put a genre and it willcome up with those search parameters.Adam:  Yeah.Nick:  So it does allow you to really drill your search down to exactly what you need.Adam:  And so, when you go about signing up, the details that you used to sign up and say youclick your, you know, kind of what genre you are in and the kind of instrument that you play, allthat stuff is just used then in the search parameters when people are searching for people.Nick:  Yeah.  You can basically search on every parameter that’s put in as the main signupcriteria.Adam:  Are you able to change kind of your status in a sense like, you know, you’re looking for aband or you’ve found a band to kind of take you out of them search results?Nick:  You can change stuff to anything.  So I think the status has got four set parameters:Looking to gig, looking to jam, looking for a band, or none…Adam:  Yeah.Nick:  …I think are the four we started off with.Adam:  Right.Nick:  And obviously there is a dropdown.  When you search, you can drop down those differentparameters to search from.Adam:  Awesome.  Well, you know, I encourage people to go in and sign up tomusomatch.com.au.  How many members are you sitting on, around a hundred or justsomewhere between 100 and 200 members at the moment?Nick:  Yeah, 125.  I had a newspaper entry last week about a band that got together through thesite and played a gig that night, and that was a good day.  I got another 15 people in the site.The main problem I’ve had is getting promotion out there.  I think I need to now look at places likeNewcastle, Byron Bay…Adam:  Yup.Nick:  …and then broadening the horizons out.  I’ve tried contacting all the various newspapersand stuff.  But because it’s not a not­for­profit organization, it’s a business… 4
  • Adam:  Yeah.Nick:  …people don’t want to really help out.Adam:  (laughter)Nick:  They see it not as a charity.  It is a business and therefore, you have to fork out themoney for the advertising.Adam:  Yeah.  What is the kind of number 1 way you’re going about promoting it right now?  Is itjust kind of you meeting people when you go out, you know, to a music venue and stuff like that?Nick:  Yeah, posters.  I’m sending posters out everywhere.  I’ve sent posters out to all musicshops in Newcastle, all music shops in the Mid North Coast and the North Coast of New SouthWales.  I’ve contacted all the papers.  I spend one day a week doing promotional work.  Mostly,it seems that people are joining by word of mouth, which is what I wanted it to do.Adam:  Yeah.Nick:  They’re finding friends saying, “Hey, you know, you can get on this site and do this and dothat.”  And that is the really good way of people getting the word and joining on.Adam:  Well I’ll tell you what:  I’m gonna be telling every single muso that I know about thisservice and get them on there for you.  So you’ve already sent some posters down this way toNewcastle?Nick:  Yeah, yeah.  I know that musos are calling us.  I’ve got a couple of posters.  I spoke to aguy there Shawn.Adam:  Yeah.Nick:  And I know that I sent posters to, I think it was about seven or eight shops in Newcastle.That seemed like pretty vital, and I’ve sent them down to them.  But I don’t know.  I haven’t beenable to come down to Newcastle yet.  You know, the business has to start making money beforeI can start really rollin’ around and promoting a site as I want to.Adam:  Yeah.  I know exactly what you’re talking about.  I’ve been through that.  I’ll tell you what:Send me an email with all the shops that you sent these posters to, and on the day that I have acouple of hours spare I will personally go around and have a chat with some muso.  Chancesare I know all those shops that you’re gonna send me an email to.Nick:  I’ll bet you do.Adam:  Yeah.  And I’ll make sure that them posters are actually up for you.  So… 5
  • Nick:  Oh, I’ll send you posters down, Adam.  That’s probably the best way.Adam:  That will be great.  I was gonna mention that.  Please send any kind of point­of­sale stuffyou got and I’ll do what I can because I truly believe in what you’re building here.  I think it canreally grow and, you know, really kind of grow to a national level.  Of course, you know, like wehad spoken about in the past, this is a…Nick:  Well, that’s actually the plan, you know?Adam:  Yeah.  No, I know.Nick:  That’s actually the plan.Adam:  And I do believe it has the potential to get there.  And we spoke about in the past that thisis a concept design.  You know, obviously, you know, when you get established in some of thekind of regional areas on the East Coast here like Newcastle, Coffs Harbour and Byron Bay andthe things like that you mentioned, then you will need to start looking at, you know, obviouslyputting a little bit more money into it and, you know, just refining how it looks, its appearance andkind of enhance the services it has.  And then just hit Sydney and hit Melbourne with it.  And,you know, I’m pretty sure that’s kind of when you’ll see the tipping point.Nick:  Well, my background in telecoms and business changes allow me to put together the rightdocumentation.  I have had several quotes to do what I want to do with the site, but unfortunatelythey run around the $125,000 mark.Adam:  Yeah.Nick:  And when I have the ability to do that, then the goal, which is to get every single muso inAustralia onto the site so they can all be linked in together, they can all expand and advance andenrich their skills, you know, that’s something that we can do then to achieve it.  Because thenwe’ll have all the various services and functionality.  And hopefully by that point, sponsorshipand the advertising and on­board…Adam:  Yeah.Nick:  …the portal…Adam:  Well that’s great to hear that, you know, you have that goal to have every singlemusician on the site because that’s a very similar goal to what I have with The Gemini Project.  Iwant to be able to reach out and touch every musician and help every single musician, youknow, educate them and grow their music business themselves.  So it’s great that we have a bitof a synergy there.  And I do kind of see us being able to help each other even more as we kindof grow both of these projects.  I have a question for you, Nick, about kind of, in your opinion, theimportance of musicians being able to connect and freely kind of share information with each 6
  • other.  What’s your view on that?Nick:  Well, it’s interesting because Australia, I remember hunters and connectors and stuff.When I was younger coming out, you’ll see indie and stuff, and hearing all different kinds ofmusic, and obviously the INXS and Midnight Oils and stuff, but Australia has a great divergenceand diversity in music.  It stands out from other countries because it is such an Australiansound.  And that uniqueness needs to be supported and encouraged.  And I think that having allthe musicians in Australia who work in Australia – active musicians or who just sit at home andthey play and they cover stuff, you know, they all got their own little bit to add into it – if they canall be there together and they can all chat together, then that divergence in music and thatdiversity can only be encouraged and grown, and Australia’s sound can be kept.  It’s almost likekeeping something true.  And it only works if we use it.  So without the community on thewebsite, that particular part of what Musomatch is here to do won’t work.Adam:  That was a great answer.  And the question that I’m trying to introduce to my guests overthe past few episodes is, being in the industry for as long as you have, you’ve been a drummerand you’ve come over to Australia so you’ve kind of had that feel for, you know, the industry inEurope as well as here.Nick:  Yeah.Adam:  Would that be fair to say?Nick:  Yeah.Adam:  Kind of, over your time in the industry, what would be some of the maybe one or two ofthe most useful resources that you’ve kind of come across as a musician that you think mightbenefit some of the listeners here?Nick:  Only really, from a European point of view, what we used to do as a band is we wouldwrite music and record music, and then we would have to go out and gig it.  And we would haveto then sell the music.  There hasn’t been, as far as I know, any websites I’ve used over mycareer that have been beneficial.  The music scene in the UK was changed quite radically by thelicensing laws which, to get like music, you have to get a full license which costs an awful lot ofmoney.  Now here, when you have a license, it seems that you have a lot more ability to havekind of whatever you like doing on your premises.Adam:  Yeah.Nick:  So that’s really helpful.  Yeah.  I think in Australia the one thing I can’t find – but then I amin a very rural area…Adam:  Yeah. 7
  • Nick:  …I can’t find studios.  I can’t find rehearsal spaces.  I can’t find necessarily people to goplay with.  Every now and then there’s an event which you can go to and all of a sudden youmeet all these people and you’re “Where did they all come from?”Adam:  Uhm.Nick:  Once the event is finished, it’s gone.  So I want to find a way of keeping up to date withthe studios, the rehearsal spaces.  I need to know where to go and jam.  At the moment I’m inmy garage.Adam:  Right.Nick:  And I guess flooded in, flooded out, and there’s no way people can come to me.  There’sno way I can get out sometimes.  So it’s quite frustrating but I think if there is that one space,Musomatch will provide it, a resource for all people.  Once it’s up and once it’s got all themembership and supporters on it…Adam:  Yeah.Nick:  …then I think it will provide a resource which everybody will be able to use, which isn’tanywhere else I found so far.Adam:  Yeah, that’s great.  That’s really good.  Is there a particular book that you might haveread recently?  And it doesn’t have to be music industry related.  It can be just something thatwas inspiring to you.  Is there something that jumps to mind that you go “Wow, you know, I needto tell people about this”?Nick:  No.  (laughter)Adam:  Not really?Nick:  I have to say, with respect, I would love to have the time to read books but I run threebusinesses.  This is one.  And I’ve got three children.  And yeah, most of the time I get toreadings basically sitting here and doing work on the computer sort of 5 o’clock in the morning orat 10 o’clock at night.  I don’t actually get time to read books.  My inspiration for everything I do inlife has been just trying to make sure that my interactions with people are beneficial to me andbeneficial to them.Adam:  That’s great.Nick:  Making sure that wherever I go, whatever I do, I try to have fun and the people around mehave fun as well, whether that means we’re working hard or we’re playing hard.Adam:  Yeah. 8
  • Nick:  The main thing is to have fun because you’re only here once.  If you’re a musician andyou want to play your stuff, you got to play your stuff.  It’s soul music.Adam:  Yeah.  That’s an awesome note to probably wind up the episode on.  You know, beforewe go, so I really want to reiterate what Musomatch is doing, and that is bringing musicianstogether so they can, you know, find a band or put your services out there so you can actuallyhave a chance to go and jam.  And that’s very beneficial for people, you know, in rural areas butI also see the huge potential it has just for networking and building a more cohesive musiciancommunity in the cities as well.  So that’s fair to say, isn’t it Nick?  Was I being too bold toventure that far?Nick:  I think you’re absolutely right.  I think the best way to put that, Adam, is to say that thereare people who are living on a ranch in the middle of nowhere who may have the key to a bandwho is in Sydney or Brisbane or Melbourne or Perth.  They may hold the key to the way that,that band, you know, how their destiny could be changed to be much better and do much morefor the music industry.  And without connectivity that Musomatch will provide, no one would everknow.Adam:  Yeah.  Alright.Nick:  So that’s key to it.Adam:  Well that’s awesome.  I mean, we’re even going so far as to changing destinies here…Nick:  (laughter)Adam:  …with Musomatch and The Gemini Project.  Thank you so much, Nick…Nick:  Thank you Adam.Adam:  …for coming on the show.  And guys, please head on over to musomatch.com.au andsign up.  Enter your details in there.  You’ll get an email from Nick, you know, saying you’reapproved and welcome to Musomatch.  And you can then interact with Nick on the platformhimself.  Guys, please leave comments in the shownotes.  If you have any questions for Nick,you can leave them here.  Or Nick, what’s the best way for people to contact you if they’ve got aquestion?Nick:  Just email is the best way.  It’s N­I­C­K, nick@musomatch.com.au.Adam:  Cool.  That will be in the shownotes for people as well.  Nick, any kind of gems orwisdom to leave us on?Nick:  Play hard.  (transitioning)Adam:  Alright guys.  There you have it, play hard.  That’s some great advice.  You know, play 9
  • hard and work hard.  And I mean, we’re all doing that.  We’re all doing that in our business andalso with our music.  So, that was a fantastic interview with Nick.  I really love what he’s doingthere and what he’s building.  I can see the potential in it.  All we need is more people to getbehind it to give it that life to keep it going.  As I said in the interview, the links are going to be inthe shownotes for you guys to have a look and have a play around.  It’s a pretty self­explanatoryprocess to get yourself up there, to be found.  There’s already 120 people in the Coffs Harbourarea on that.  And Nick, as he mentioned, is going to be going around and getting more peopleinvolved from different regional areas and then also more metro areas as well.Anyway guys, that’s it.  That’s Session #20 wrapped up and done.  Actually, before I go, TheGemini Project Conference is gonna be held at Lizotte’s Restaurant on 23rd of April, Tuesdaynight, pretty quiet night for musicians, so thought I’d throw it on that night for you guys to comealong.  Got three awesome speakers lined up.  I can mention two here, but the third is a bit of asecret for now.  So Marcus Wright from Big Apachee is going to be helping us out and having achat on stage taking questions.  Kenny Jewell from The Studio.  Both these guys are awesomeguys.  I know them both very well and both of them have actually been on the podcast, which isawesome.  Third one, the secret, still working on getting him along.  There’s a little hint for you.Got some great people interested and coming along who’s registered.  Amy Vee is coming alongfrom Newcastle.  And we’ve got some people from the council involved coming along.  I’m notsure if Brian Lizotte, the venue owner, is gonna be there.  He might be tied up in anotherengagement on the Central Coast.  I could rattle off a whole bunch of other names but just goover and take the link to the page.  You’ll actually be able to see who else is coming along.Throw your interest down and forward that link on to anyone that you think might be interested.Got a cap of 50 people, 50 spots, and half of those are gone, spoken for already.  And if we gettoo much interest, I will consider opening it up even further.  And it’s completely free so pleasecome along.  It’s gonna be a great night, great networking, and a great chance for musicians tojust share some knowledge between each other.The other thing I want to mention guys, is please, by all means, if what you like here in theseinterviews and you want me to keep pushing forward and finding new people to talk to and getsome information to share, just take the link over to iTunes and give us a 5­star rating.  It’salways good to get that feedback.  And please, actually, be honest.  If it sucks, give me a 1.  Butthen, you know, you’re probably not listening to this if you thought it was only 1.  But, you know,give us an honest rating.  Give me a review for the podcast.  It helps get more people involved.And how that works is it’s just how iTunes kind of ranks their podcasts.  So if a musician islooking for some help and we’re at the top there, they’re gonna go ahead and listen to whatwe’ve got and be able to implement that information that we share.As I might have mentioned in the past episode, The Gemini Project website is getting a little bit ofa redesign on the home page, just clearing up our message and, you know, our offering and justmaking it a little bit easier for, you know, visitors to navigate around the site.  So that’s going to 10
  • be live shortly as well as a free resource that I’m gonna be giving away to musicians that I’vespent the last couple of weeks putting together and a good amount of money just getting it rightand getting it, you know, so I was happy with it myself.  Alright guys, that’s it.  That’s Episode#20.  In the coming episodes I’ve got an episode about cover songs and that kind of strategy.And keep your eye open for Adam’s Idea Of The Week, which is another little segment that I’mdoing where I share with you just a cool little idea or strategy that I’ve come across or justexperimenting with.  And I’ll share that with you in an article.  So guys, thank you for listening.And until next week, it’s all for the love of music.  Bye.  (music) ENDJoin the others in The Gemini Community by joining us on Facebook and start takingyour music to the next level.Join us on FacebookFollow me on TwitterSubscribe to our updatesIf you loved the info shared here I encourage you to help others discover The GeminiProject on Facebook and/or Twitter and if you want to delve a little deeper you can dothat by leaving a comment below. What would you like to ask?Subscribe ● Click Here to Subscribe via iTunes and/or leave a review for the podcast ● Click Here to Subscribe via RSS 11