Economy in a nutshell
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Economy in a nutshell

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This is a presentation I did, but never got to deliver. The audience was a group of credit managers and I think they were all running for cover causing the event organizer to cancel the event. Now, ...

This is a presentation I did, but never got to deliver. The audience was a group of credit managers and I think they were all running for cover causing the event organizer to cancel the event. Now, I provide it free to you.

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  • <br />
  • How did it get so bad? <br /> - Think about what happens if you have hundreds of glasses and you fill each one up a little at a time. <br /> - Now think of risk as water and the glasses as hedge funds, sovergein funds, your 401K, banks. <br /> Some risk evaporates - loans are payed-offs, swaps and derivatives are novated <br /> - But eventually every glass is almost full and there are no more glasses left. <br /> - As more risk gets poured into each glass, at some point it is going to overflow and that is what happened. <br /> - There was too much risk being poured into glasses around the world and at some point it overflowed <br /> - and firms like AIG, who wrote insurance against risk, couldn’t sip it out of the cups fast enough. <br /> - In order to be able to walk around with a glass of water without spilling it, you need some empty space for air or “tangible equity” <br /> - That is what we are doing now, figuring out where to pour risk water in order to keep these glasses from spilling - although many, many have <br /> <br />
  • - not just a US problem - all over the world: granted some economies were growing faster than the US. <br /> <br /> - real = adj. for inflation <br />
  • - Although it is not the government’s job to prop-up asset values, it is their job to help restore confidence with the american people and it is definitely an uphill battle. <br />
  • - We will probably keep trying until either we get it right or it happens on its own - it will probably be hard to tell. <br /> - At this point, there is a new announcement every week. <br /> - Many are designed to plug holes in demand - stimulus (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act) <br /> - Other are designed to prop-up asset prices - the original goal of TARP and now TALF and the mortgage relief orders <br /> <br /> - but what we need most is to.... <br /> <br /> <br />
  • - restore confidence and get shopping again <br /> <br /> - The January U.S. personal savings rate hit 5%, according to the BEA. That’s up from 3.9% savings rate last month and 0.1% a year ago. We’re now at levels last seen in the U.S. in 1993. <br /> <br /> - Although this somes good and prudent, it is not a good thing for our economy today. We had an economy that was driven by consumer spending and we need a little to get going again <br /> <br /> - Over the weekend, Obama did the Bush thing - \"What I don’t think people should do is suddenly stuff money in their mattresses and pull back completely from spending,\" Obama told The New York Time <br /> <br /> <br />
  • - AIG insured losses with banks around the world <br /> - The headline derivative is called a Credit Default Swap (CDS) <br /> - An entity would buy a CDS to insure against a loss on a bond or the default of a counter-party <br /> - Since AIG was at the nexus of many of these transactions, if we didn’t “bailout” AIG, there would have been failure everywhere. <br /> - I mean everywhere - Spain, London, France, here. <br /> - Much of the money being put into AIG is going to satisfy collateral obligations to their counter-parties - the world’s financial institutions <br /> <br />
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  • - prime the pump - government stimulus around the world <br /> - re-pricing and re-evaluating the cost of risk > if risk was priced right in the first place we probably wouldn’t have gotten into this mess <br /> > mis-priced risk led to artificially low and funky mortgage structures (ARMs, balloons) the creation of SIVs and an explosion of mortgage backed securities <br /> > if risk was properly priced, this wouldn’t have happened and asset prices wouldn’t have inflated <br /> - we have to get to a level were the fundamental rates of return are calculated using proper cost of capital <br /> - once we do that, and have available projects, the economy will rebound <br /> <br /> <br />
  • - They are raising marginal tax rates while hopefully not discouraging investment <br /> <br /> - China continued to buy U.S. debt amid a 27 percent increase in its holdings of foreign currencies in 2008. JP Morgan Chase predicted in a Feb. 6 report that China will keep buying Treasuries “not only for the near-term stability of the global financial system, but also because there is no viable and liquid alternative market in which to invest China’s massive and still growing reserves.” <br />
  • - resulting in <br /> - consumption again <br /> - and some other asset price bubble <br /> > because the world has a history of asset bubbles <br /> > the same thing that causes bubbles, also causes innovation and growth <br /> > you just want to make sure when it pops, there is something left over <br />
  • - and we will have byproducts <br /> - potentially inflation - although Bernake thinks this is less of a problem (but the commodity prices (sans oil) are preparing for it <br /> - and national debt. If we do this right, there is a shot we wil have a return on our bailout investment. <br /> <br />
  • - If we do this right, there is a shot we wil have a return on our bailout investment. <br /> <br />
  • - transitioning to the future <br />
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  • - suburbs like in Riverside, Tracy or Stockton may change as house remain vacant. Maybe the associations and banks will give back the land, and lower density and build more open space. <br /> <br />
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  • - cars will be smaller and more fuel efficient even though SUV sales have rebounded a little. I think there is something more than the cost of gas driving these decisions. It is getting trendy to be conscious and keep it simple. I still hear stories from my grandparents generation about the depression. <br /> <br />
  • <br />
  • - technology is a great thing - it can crush transactions costs. <br /> - google is a case in point (crushed the cost of getting ads in front of you and the margins of those that did it another way) <br /> - Things like webex do cut down on travel and boost productivity <br /> <br />
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  • - netbook sales are on fire - they are $200-$400 and are laptop replacements <br /> <br />
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  • - once we get to that level and resources, jobs, etc are reallocated, it will just be smaller and hopefully more profitable. <br /> - <br />
  • - lets just hope we don’t all go broke by then. <br /> <br />
  • - overview of onionomics <br /> - debtor/creditor negotiations (on both sides) <br /> - “story” liquidations and distressed M&A <br /> - I advise companies through board positions as well <br /> <br />

Economy in a nutshell Economy in a nutshell Presentation Transcript

  • Adam Meislik Managing Director onionomics llc corporate financial crisis management www.onionomics.com (949) 281-6458 adam@onionomics.comFriday, March 13, 2009
  • How did it get so bad? My cup (of risk) runneth overFriday, March 13, 2009
  • Don’t just blame the US Bulgaria house price change Text Text TextFriday, March 13, 2009
  • Friday, March 13, 2009
  • Friday, March 13, 2009
  • consumers at 70% of GDP, need to go shopping againFriday, March 13, 2009
  • A “bailout” explained AIG insured losses with global financial institutions The headline derivative is called a Credit Default Swap (CDS) An entity would buy a CDS to insure against a loss on a bond or the default of a counter-party or for speculation :) Since AIG was at the nexus of many of these transactions, if we didnʼt “bailout” AIG, there would have been failure everywhere I mean everywhere - Spain, London, France, here Much of the money being put into AIG is going to satisfy collateral obligations to their counter-parties - the worldʼs financial institutionsFriday, March 13, 2009
  • What’s going to get us out of this mess?Friday, March 13, 2009
  • restore capital markets health prime the pump re-price risk capital investmentFriday, March 13, 2009
  • Who’s going to pay for it?Friday, March 13, 2009
  • resulting in.... ...the same things that got us into this messFriday, March 13, 2009
  • by-products of stimulus inflation debtFriday, March 13, 2009
  • The US is now the largest hedge fund in the world... ...and let’s hope they run it like a hedge fund and generate a returnFriday, March 13, 2009
  • The future is...Friday, March 13, 2009
  • smallerFriday, March 13, 2009
  • houses cars commutes technology and...Friday, March 13, 2009
  • Suburbs of the futureFriday, March 13, 2009
  • Friday, March 13, 2009
  • houses cars commutes technology and...Friday, March 13, 2009
  • Friday, March 13, 2009
  • houses cars commutes technology and...Friday, March 13, 2009
  • more affordable real-estate means we can move back to the city technology can crush We are investing in high-speed rail again transaction costsFriday, March 13, 2009
  • houses cars commutes technology and...Friday, March 13, 2009
  • Netbook sales are estimated to double from 10mm in 2008 to 20mm in 2009Friday, March 13, 2009
  • houses cars commutes technology and...Friday, March 13, 2009
  • hair!Friday, March 13, 2009
  • just kidding... the world-wide economy Once we get to a new GDP level and resources, jobs, etc. are reallocated, it will just be smaller and ready to grow againFriday, March 13, 2009
  • Friday, March 13, 2009
  • Friday, March 13, 2009