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Orientation to Teaching Online<br />Audrey L. CutlerCenter for Instructional Advancement and Technology<br />
Welcome!<br />All about you!<br />Name, Department<br />Experience with online and hybrid courses (as faculty or student)<...
 <br />Objectives<br />By the end of this workshops, participants will be able to: <br />Define online and hybrid courses ...
 <br />Defining Online & Hybrid Courses @ TU<br />
 <br />Defining Online & Hybrid Courses @ TU<br />Online Courses – Require no face-to-face meetings (no trips to campus) a...
Online Teaching and LearningChallenges and Rewards<br /> <br />Challenges:<br />Communication<br />No real-time F2F commun...
 <br />Changing Perspectives<br />Face-to-Face Classes<br />Instructor-centered (lecture-centered)<br />Take place on camp...
 <br />Your New Role as the Facilitator/Coach<br />Support students to construct their own knowledge<br />Does not diminis...
 <br />Similarities<br />You’re the expert!<br />Online, we often face these same concerns in face-to-face courses:<br />S...
Interaction and Feedback in a Traditional Course<br />
Interaction and Feedback in a Traditional Course<br />Instructor Presentation<br />Discussion <br />Simulation<br />Questi...
Understanding Content <br />Lecturette and graphics<br />DMC & Video<br />Audio <br />PPT with audio<br />Web resources<br...
 <br />Face-to-Face Communication<br />Face-to-Face signals used to gauge student comprehension or have reached content ov...
 <br />Online Communication<br />These same types of cues can be identified in online course <br />response to assignments...
 <br />Online Communication<br />Syllabus: Contract and Map – Use to set expectations, deadlines and policies.<br />Create...
<ul><li>Ice-breakers
Q & A
Feedback
Applications and interpretation questions
Problem questions/Case studies
Connective and causal effect questions
Comparative questions
Evaluative questions
Critical questions</li></ul>Interaction – Using Discussion Board & Groups<br />
GroupAreas<br /><ul><li>Peer Review
Group Projects
Journals</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>Feedback on assignments
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Online Courses: How are they unique?

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  • Easier for students to get (and stay) lost
  • Focus on online coursesB/c more independent-Content provided weekly via BlackboardVisit coppin bb site?
  • Transcript of "Online Courses: How are they unique?"

    1. 1. Orientation to Teaching Online<br />Audrey L. CutlerCenter for Instructional Advancement and Technology<br />
    2. 2. Welcome!<br />All about you!<br />Name, Department<br />Experience with online and hybrid courses (as faculty or student)<br />Goals? Concerns?<br />
    3. 3.  <br />Objectives<br />By the end of this workshops, participants will be able to: <br />Define online and hybrid courses at Towson<br />Identify the steps involved in preparation for and design of your online or hybrid course using the Quality Matters rubric<br />Evaluate the Digital Media Classroom as a resource for your online and hybrid course <br />Locate instruction design, library, and technical resources for assistance through the design process<br />
    4. 4.  <br />Defining Online & Hybrid Courses @ TU<br />
    5. 5.  <br />Defining Online & Hybrid Courses @ TU<br />Online Courses – Require no face-to-face meetings (no trips to campus) and all instruction is delivered electronically.<br />Hybrid Courses – Taught partially online. The face-to-face classroom meetings are reduced by at least 50% and replaced with online activities.<br />Web-supported Courses – Face-to-face classes that use online resources such as Blackboard to support instruction (unofficial designation).<br />
    6. 6. Online Teaching and LearningChallenges and Rewards<br /> <br />Challenges:<br />Communication<br />No real-time F2F communication & synergy<br />Slower communication<br />Majority of courses are still text-based<br />Time Management <br />More independence - Both for you and students<br />24/7 access<br />Rewards:<br />Flexibility (own pace, space, time)<br />Individual attention; guide each student<br />Addresses different learning styles<br />Self-reflection in redesign leads to better teaching<br />
    7. 7.  <br />Changing Perspectives<br />Face-to-Face Classes<br />Instructor-centered (lecture-centered)<br />Take place on campus<br />Designated days to meet<br />Instructional content and interaction occurs during class session<br />Online Course<br />Student-centered <br />Housed in Blackboard<br />Weekly modules – you create when your week starts/ends<br />24/7 Access<br />Content provided via Blackboard<br />Writing/reading to communicate<br />
    8. 8.  <br />Your New Role as the Facilitator/Coach<br />Support students to construct their own knowledge<br />Does not diminish the role of the instructor/faculty member<br />
    9. 9.  <br />Similarities<br />You’re the expert!<br />Online, we often face these same concerns in face-to-face courses:<br />Student attrition<br />Students do not comprehend course content &<br />Students do not participate actively in class discussions <br />The key to resolving many of these concerns:<br />Well designed and organized online/hybrid course<br />Clear and timely communication on the parts of both instructors and students<br />
    10. 10. Interaction and Feedback in a Traditional Course<br />
    11. 11. Interaction and Feedback in a Traditional Course<br />Instructor Presentation<br />Discussion <br />Simulation<br />Question and Answer<br />Classroom assessments<br />Office hours<br />Extra help<br />Review<br />Group-Oriented Work<br />Assessment <br />E-mail<br />Where does it go?<br />
    12. 12. Understanding Content <br />Lecturette and graphics<br />DMC & Video<br />Audio <br />PPT with audio<br />Web resources<br />Guest lectures<br />Simulations<br />Case studies<br />Question and answers for clarification<br />
    13. 13.  <br />Face-to-Face Communication<br />Face-to-Face signals used to gauge student comprehension or have reached content overload<br />Body language<br />Blank stares <br />Lack/lots of questions<br />Information given verbally in class<br />Learning community<br />Where does it go?<br />
    14. 14.  <br />Online Communication<br />These same types of cues can be identified in online course <br />response to assignments, discussions, or the number of times a student accesses the course<br />Clear, timely and accurate communication<br />Be Consistent!<br />Set and keep weekly or bi-weekly deadlines (not daily for online course)<br />Post assignments on time (can use blackboard release features)<br />Learning community<br />Created through ice-breakers, ongoing discussions, groups, peer-review assignments, feedback<br />
    15. 15.  <br />Online Communication<br />Syllabus: Contract and Map – Use to set expectations, deadlines and policies.<br />Create a clear, explicit course schedule.<br />Email your students before class starts!<br />Hand-hold students through their first time in the course site and the first three weeks.<br />Keep consistent, student-centered design in Blackboard.<br />Encourage not only faculty to student communication, but also student to student communication. <br />Build time into your schedule to communicate<br />
    16. 16. <ul><li>Ice-breakers
    17. 17. Q & A
    18. 18. Feedback
    19. 19. Applications and interpretation questions
    20. 20. Problem questions/Case studies
    21. 21. Connective and causal effect questions
    22. 22. Comparative questions
    23. 23. Evaluative questions
    24. 24. Critical questions</li></ul>Interaction – Using Discussion Board & Groups<br />
    25. 25. GroupAreas<br /><ul><li>Peer Review
    26. 26. Group Projects
    27. 27. Journals</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>Feedback on assignments
    28. 28. Grade book entries
    29. 29. Emails
    30. 30. Chat area
    31. 31. Anonymous surveys</li></ul>Interaction – Feedback<br />
    32. 32. Quiz tool<br />Proctored exams<br />Project-based assessment<br />Participation online<br />Mind reading skills?<br />Assessment<br />
    33. 33. Sample Courses<br />
    34. 34.  <br />Course Design<br />
    35. 35.  <br />Chunking<br />Chunking allows the instructor to break the content up into more manageable units or modules<br />Chunking is good for recall, comprehension, focus and course planning<br />Chunking content helps students prioritize, organize, and identify core elements<br />Chunking presents the content in smaller manageable pieces to students <br />Before starting to chunk your course gather your syllabus, reading and supplemental materials and resources. <br />
    36. 36.  <br />Chunking - Example<br />Preparing Your Traditional Course for Online or Hybrid Delivery<br />Define online and hybrid learning and its unique attributes <br />Which parts go better online? <br />Match current teaching styles to methods of online teaching <br />Identify elements of quality online/hybrid courses using the Quality Matters Rubric <br />Write measurable module objectives using an alignment chart. <br />Organize and upload course content using the Blackboard Content Management System <br />Use e-Reserves and organizing content with collection <br />Determine appropriate learning activities using available resources and given available technology<br />Create a complete course module including module-level objectives, learning activities, and assessments based on the module worksheet <br />Use basic functions of the Bb Grading Center and Assignments <br />Evaluate the Digital Media Classroom and tools - as a resource for online/hybrid classes <br />
    37. 37.  <br />Chunking - Example<br />Session One - Designing your course<br />Define online and hybrid learning and its unique attributes <br />Which parts go better online? <br />Match current teaching styles to methods of online teaching <br />Identify elements of quality online/hybrid courses using the Quality Matters Rubric <br />Write measurable module objectives using an alignment chart. <br />Session Two - Organizing Course Materials<br />Organize and upload course content using the Blackboard Content Management System <br />Use e-Reserves and organizing content with collection <br />Determine appropriate learning activities using available resources and given available technology<br />Session Three - Supplementary Tools to Deliver and Assess Instructional Materials<br />Create a complete course module including module-level objectives, learning activities, and assessments based on the module worksheet <br />Use basic functions of the Bb Grading Center and Assignments <br />Evaluate the Digital Media Classroom and tools - as a resource for online/hybrid classes<br />
    38. 38.  <br />Chunking - Example<br />Session One - Designing your course<br />Define online and hybrid learning and its unique attributes <br />Defining TU Online and Hybrid Courses<br />Facilitator/Moderator<br />Communication<br />Support<br />Move the Course Forward (time management)<br />Chunking<br />
    39. 39.  <br />How do you Chunk?<br />Gather your documents and identify the needed modules<br />Write out everything on paper!<br />Reflect on the activities/assessment/assignments will they work in an online environment<br />For hybrid courses identify what content can be covered via online sessions <br />
    40. 40. ?<br />?<br />
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