Bugs, Fire, and Rainless Days - ACTrees Day 2012
 

Bugs, Fire, and Rainless Days - ACTrees Day 2012

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During the Alliance for Community Trees "ACTrees Day" Annual Meeting in Sacramento, CA, on November 13, 2012, moderator Scott Jamieson led a panel discussion on how local community tree leaders are ...

During the Alliance for Community Trees "ACTrees Day" Annual Meeting in Sacramento, CA, on November 13, 2012, moderator Scott Jamieson led a panel discussion on how local community tree leaders are handling disastrous threats to urban forests, including invasive species, fires, and drought. Speakers included Rob Davis of the City of Denver, Glenda Daniel of Openlands, and Barry Ward of Trees for Houston. Learn more about ACTrees Day at http://ACTrees.org/what-we-do/training-and-conferences/annual-meeting/

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Bugs, Fire, and Rainless Days - ACTrees Day 2012 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. “Bugs,  Fire  and  Rainless  Days”   Moderator  ScoE  Jamieson,  ACTrees  Vice  President,     Bartle-  Tree  Experts  Vice  President    •  Rob  Davis,  Denver  City  Forester,  Denver,  CO  •  Glenda  Daniel,  Associate  Director,  Openlands,  Chicago,  IL  •  Barry  Ward,  Execu*ve  Director,  Trees  for  Houston,  Houston,  TX  
  • 2. DENVER  1875  
  • 3. Colorado  Front  Range  
  • 4. Denver  Parks  and  Parkways  
  • 5. Denver  Mountain  Parks  
  • 6. 55  Miles  West  
  • 7. Evergreen  Colorado    9,000  people  and  3,500  homes  
  • 8. Fuel  Reduc*on    
  • 9. Stand  Thinning    
  • 10. Managing  Slash  
  • 11. The  Dangers  of  Controlled  Burns    
  • 12. Colorado  Springs  
  • 13. Waldo  Canyon  Fire  
  • 14. Mountain  Pine  Beetle  and  Fire  
  • 15. Post  Fire  
  • 16. Watershed  Protec*on  
  • 17. Erosion  Control  
  • 18. Restora*on  Efforts  
  • 19. Colorado  State  Forest  Service  Nursery  
  • 20. Natural  Regenera*on  
  • 21. THANKS  FROM  DENVER  
  • 22. Bugs  that  Bug  Trees:  What  Openlands  TreeKeepers  and   other  volunteers  can  do:       A  presenta?on  to     the  Alliance  for  Community  Trees   November  13,  2012        
  • 23. Not  all  insect  pests  are  equal:   fall  webworm  
  • 24. Public  Enemy  #1:       Emerald  Ash  Borer  1/3” to ½” long 1/8” wideMetallic green Black eyes
  • 25. Tools  in  Our  Toolbox  •  Learning  to  recognize  the  signs  of  infesta*on-­‐-­‐ gezng  training  from  experts  •  Tree  inventories  to  locate  ash  trees  in  areas  of   high  infesta*on-­‐-­‐to  help  public  agency  long-­‐ term  planning  •  Plan*ng  new  trees  where  ashes  are  likely  to   come  down  in  the  next  few  years.  
  • 26. Training  from  Experts:  APHIS  staff  presents  to   TreeKeepers    
  • 27. Recognizing  signs:     EAB  Life  Cycle  -­‐  Larvae  Three  different  stages  of  EAB  larvae.     Larval  EAB  feeding  on  an  ash  trees  vascular   S-­‐shaped  feeding  galleries  under  ash  bark.    (D.  Cappaert,  MSU) ?ssue.     (Ed  Czerwinski,  Ontario  Ministry  of  Natural  Resources) (J.  Ellis,  Purdue  University) •  Aqer  hatching,  larvae  bore  through  bark  to  feed  on  the  trees  vascular   *ssue.     •  Growing  larvae  zigzag  through  this  delicate  *ssue  as  they  feed,   forming  S-­‐shaped  tunnels  that  are  flat  and  wide.   •  Mature  larvae  are  about  1  inch  long;  they  are  creamy  white,  flat,  and   have  “bell”  shaped  segments.     •  Larvae  spend  the  winter  under  bark.  
  • 28. Recognizing  Signs:    Tracks  
  • 29. Visual  Survey  -­‐  Signs    •  Adult  beetles  •  Larvae  •  D-­‐shaped  emergence  holes  •  Bark  splits  with  loose  bark  sloughing   off  •  S-­‐shaped  or  serpen*ne  larval  galleries  
  • 30. Visible  signs:  the  "D"  hole  
  • 31. Cambium  damage  &  bark   splizng  
  • 32. Recognizing  Signs:     Crown  die-­‐back  
  • 33. Tool  #2:    Tree  Inventories  
  • 34. Tool  #  3:  Plan*ng  Trees   to  Replace  Ashes:  North  Park  Village  Nature  Center/Chicago  
  • 35. Tree  Plan*ng:  Lincoln  Park  by  Montrose  Harbor/Chicago  
  • 36. Aqer  Tree  Plan*ng:    Bobolink  Woods  Natural   Area/Jackson  Park  
  • 37. Other  pests:    Gypsy  Moth  
  • 38.  TreeKeepers  Collec*ng  Gypsy   Moth  Cadavers  
  • 39. TreeKeepers  support  Illinois   monitoring  effort     with  Gypsy  Moth  Traps  
  • 40. Asian  Long-­‐Horned  Beetle:  Gone  from  Chicago  but  could  return  
  • 41. Bag  Worms:     TreeKeepers    help  iden*fy  &  remove  
  • 42. Our  goal:      A  Healthy  Urban  Forest