Safeguarding Against the Risks of  Improper Open Source Licensing Valuable Lessons for Software and Hardware Vendors   Apr...
Introductions Greg Olson, Senior Partner Manager, IP Management Practice Bart Copeland President & CEO
Agenda <ul><li>The legal, operational and market risks associated with open source </li></ul><ul><li>Common pitfalls with ...
Why Use Open Source Software? <ul><li>Best-in-class software in some areas is OSS </li></ul><ul><li>Your product must inte...
A Software Development Revolution 90% Custom Development Commercial Software Package Commercial Software Package Negotiate...
Poll: What are the biggest challenges you face around integrating open source packages?   0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 8...
Open Source Licenses <ul><li>Open source vs. Free software </li></ul><ul><li>Open source licensing principles </li></ul><u...
Legal Risk <ul><li>Copyright  infringement actions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Injunction against distribution </li></ul></ul><u...
Legal Risk Is Not Theoretical <ul><li>In the last year alone </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Software Freedom Law Center has sued Be...
The Indemnification Gap <ul><li>Most commercial vendors are expected to provide intellectual property indemnification to t...
Poll: What percentage of open source projects in your organization are currently indemnified? 62% 24% 4% 2% 8% Don't know ...
New Operational Issues <ul><li>Incorporating open source adds complexity to software projects </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Multip...
Open Source Management <ul><li>Goal:   Manage the complexity and risk inherent in the use of open source software without ...
Key Elements of OSS Management <ul><li>Acquisition management </li></ul><ul><li>Use management </li></ul><ul><li>Support m...
Acquisition Management <ul><li>This ‘gate’ is your first line of defense </li></ul><ul><li>Sourcing from external trusted ...
Use Management <ul><li>Appropriate use </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How used </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How combined with other s...
Support Management <ul><li>Define a support plan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Internal support </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>If ...
Tracking and Auditing <ul><li>OSS Repository </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Where externally-sourced OSS is archived </li></ul></ul...
Distribution Management <ul><li>Compliance Process </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Insures that license requirements of incorporated...
Managing OSS to Advantage <ul><li>Results </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Higher quality sourcing reduces costly problems down the r...
Commercial open source options for dynamic languages
#1 in Open Source Adoption: Dynamic Languages 57% of enterprises using  dynamic languages
Poll:  Which dynamic languages are you using in your enterprise development?
Drivers for Dynamic Languages Faster time to market Increase  staff productivity Uptime of customer applications Developme...
Challenges with Dynamic Languages <ul><li>Time-consuming to compile, test, maintain </li></ul><ul><li>Standardization & co...
Solutions for Dynamic Languages to Mitigate Risks <ul><li>Use commercial- or enterprise-grade dynamic language distributio...
Cost Savings <ul><li>Pricing in the table is averaged and is for example purposes </li></ul><ul><li>Refer to the True Cost...
ActiveState Solutions Confidential
Customers & Partners Software & Hardware Aerospace & Defense
About ActiveState <ul><li>Founded 1997 </li></ul><ul><li>2 million developers </li></ul><ul><li>97% of Fortune 1000 </li><...
Thank You! <ul><li>Contact Us: </li></ul><ul><li>Greg Olson </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>1- 650-493...
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Safeguarding Against the Risks of Improper Open Source Licensing - Valuable Lessons for Software and Hardware Vendors

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Greg Olson, Senior Partner at open source consulting firm Olliance Group and Bart Copeland, President and CEO of ActiveState, the dynamic languages company present an informative webinar to:

* Investigate legal, operational and market risks associated with open source
* Address common pitfalls with open source licensing
* Identify proven tips for creating an open source governance program
* Explore commercial open source options to mitigate open source legal and operational risks
* Share effective steps to protect your organization against costly infringements

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  • Good morning, good afternoon and good evening depending on where you are in the world and welcome to today’s webcast “Safeguarding against the risks of improper open source licensing – valuable lessons for software and hardware vendors brought to you by Olliance Group and ActiveState. I am Liliya Apostolova, today’s announcer and here are just a few housekeeping items before we begin. This webcast will be interactive between you and our presenters. This program contains audio polling. The polling questions will appear in the slide presentation window. Please complete the polls when they appear and click on the submit answer button right there on the polling slide window after you finish. Thanks in advance for your participation. And speaking of participation, you can participate in the Q&amp;A session. Just type a question into chat panel the webinar pane and click the submit button. We’ll try to answer as many of your questions during the Q&amp;A.
  • Now onto the presentation “Safeguarding against the risks of improper open source licensing – valuable lessons for software and hardware vendors”. Discussing today’s topic will be Greg Olson, Senior Partner and manager IP Management Practice at Olliance Group, an open source consulting . Greg has over 29 years of software industry experience in engineering, marketing and business development. As a senior executive at Olliance Group he has led engagements for major companies such as Microsoft, Palm and Barclays Global Investors, for commercial software companies initiating open source strategies such as Infobright, Adaptive Planning and Solid Information Systems and for open source start-ups such as EnterpriseDB, JasperSoft and Lucid Imagination. Also speaking today, we have Bart Copeland, President and CEO of ActiveState. Bart brings twenty years of leadership, management, finance, and business experience to his position as CEO and President of ActiveState. Before he joined ActiveState, Bart led several high-tech organizations in the capacity of President &amp;CEO, including Credo Interactive Inc, iMessaging Systems, Inc , Recombo, and PhotoChannel Networks Inc. Mr. Copeland has been instrumental in structuring these organizations in terms of company vision, strategic planning, corporate and legal affairs, marketing strategy, financing, business development and alliances, sales &amp; distribution channels, and administrative operations. So Welcome to Greg and to Bart.
  • Our agenda today includes the following: Discussing the legal, operational and market risks associated with open source Common pitfalls with open source licensing Tips for creating an open source governance program Effective steps to protect your organization against costly infringements Highlighting some Commercial open source options to mitigate risks We’ll complete the webcast with our Q&amp;A session. With that, I’d like to introduce you to our first presenter, Greg Olson. Hello Greg.
  • Our first poll question is: What are the biggest challenges you face around integrating open source packages? This is a multiple choice question so please select all answers that apply to you. a) Higher volume of code acquisition decisions b) Maintaining code and version consistency across the company c) Managing support for many open source elements d) Managing participation in public communities e) Ensure license compliance for elements at distribution time Once you have selected your answer, click on the submit button. I’d like to give everyone an opportunity to weigh in on this question so we’ll give them 10 more seconds. Let’s see what you selected as the biggest challenges you face around integrating open source packages. It seems most of you ( %) selected ….. Now, back to Greg’s presentation.
  • Second poll question on indemnification This is a single answer question so please select the answer that applies to you. What percentage of open source projects in your organization are currently indemnified? a) 0-25% b) 26-50% c) 51-75% d) 76-100% e) Don&apos;t know Once you have selected your answer, click on the submit button. I’d like to give everyone an opportunity to weigh in on this question What percentage of open source projects in your organization are currently indemnified? And the possible choices are a) 0-25% b) 26-50% c) 51-75% d) 76-100% e) Don&apos;t know Let’s see how many of your open source projects are currently indemnified. It seems most of you ( %) selected ….. Now, back to Greg’s presentation.
  • Policy What licenses are compatible with your company’s plans? What quality standards match your company’s uses? What level of support meet your company’s needs? Who makes the calls? Process Insure policy is applied reliably to all software incorporated Developed  Contracted Licensed  Acquired
  • Greg transitions There are many open source packages out there and open source dynamic languages are i) one such set of packages and ii) are pervasive in enterprise development. That’s why we’ll explore how ActiveState solves some the needs of software and hardware vendors who use dynamic languages to deliver their applications to market faster but want to mitigate open source legal and operational risks.
  • Dynamic languages are # 1 in open source adoption and an essential tool in developers’ toolkits. Easy to acquire, easy to learn Our final poll question for this program is: Which dynamic languages are you using in your enterprise development? This is a multiple choice question so please select all answers that apply to you. a) Perl b) Python c) Tcl d) PHP/Ruby/Javascript e) None Let’s which dynamic languages are the preferred for your enterprise development. It seems most of you ( %) selected ….. Thanks everyone for your active participation and now back to Bart for his next slide.
  • There are many drivers for the development team and business for why they select dynamic languages Dynamic languages enable faster delivery to market, doing more with the same staff and keeping applications up at maximum are key For the business, the drivers are around compliance with policies around open source dynamic languages, legal risks and ensuring distribution rights (According to Forrester, nearly four out of five developers use open source software for development or application deployment. That&apos;s much higher than the 40% of IT managers and executives who say their companies use open source software.) That means, developers may be brining in open source components without knowledge or approval of their managers which exposes the organization to risks)
  • One thing to keep in mind is that Open Source dynamic languages can be Time-consuming to compile, test, maintain Open source dynamic languages may originate from a download on the Internet ( say Perl.org), come pre-packaged with the their operating system or be commercial ready like ActivePerl. That’s why there could be lack Standardization &amp; compatibility across all systems Or pose problems with Database connectivity How do you know which modules to use? Or how they are licensed? Plus Reliance on open source community = risk to business systems What about Privacy? ( no enterprise wants to expose private dev issues on the forums) What about Wasted time &amp; resources? ( time spend with dynamic languages = less time on own application) What about Potential system downtime? ( how do you troubleshoot effectively and fast)
  • There is good news, when managed properly from a licensing and operational perspective dynamic languages can be fantastic for dealing with all the pressures and risks in businesses today: Enterprise-grade or commercial grade = stable, reliable Save development resources, time Focus developers on core competencies Leave building &amp; maintenance to experts Rely on experts for best practices guidance Save money Get peace of mind with guaranteed stability, security, reliability Ensure uptime of systems Turn-key redistribution rights means less time spend on legal and understanding licenses and more time spend on development and business improvement
  • Use the ROI whitepaper table to explain
  • Many software and hardware vendors trust our solutions. For example: Ca uses ActivePerl OEM to: Save time, effort, development costs ($) Reduced cost of product expansion Faster QA cycles Mitigate legal risks Satisfy customer demands for indemnification
  • Thanks to both Bart and Greg. Now it’s time for our Q&amp;A. Type your questions in the submit question button. We’ll try to get as many of these questions as possible. Our first question is from B Butler and he asks: - What are the pitfalls to releasing our code using LGPL? Greg, can you tackle this one? Our next question is from Chase Turner and Bart, I think this one is for you. Chase asks: How do I ensure third-party solutions I use are in compliance with their open source obligations? Our next question is from Steve Gremban and I think this one goes to Greg. Are there licensing pitfalls for using or embedding web API&apos;s such as Google map API? I think we have time to handle one more question here: This question is from Tomek Wardega and it reads: Could you please talk a little bit about legal requirements of using open source dynamic languages in the commercial products. I am about to start selling an application that uses open source libraries and need to know the legal aspects. Greg, can you tackle this one quickly? Thank you very much to both Greg and Bart. Thank you to our audience for your participation today. If your question was not answered during the Q&amp;A, an ActiveState representative will get back to you with the answers shortly. Shortly after this presentation, you’d be able to access the webcast on demand by receiving our follow up email with the on-demand link. All attendees will also be receiving their complimentary whitepaper “ License to Code” in their follow up email from us. On behalf of myself and our guests Bart Copeland and Greg Olson, have a fantastic rest of the day.
  • Safeguarding Against the Risks of Improper Open Source Licensing - Valuable Lessons for Software and Hardware Vendors

    1. 1. Safeguarding Against the Risks of Improper Open Source Licensing Valuable Lessons for Software and Hardware Vendors April 28, 2010
    2. 2. Introductions Greg Olson, Senior Partner Manager, IP Management Practice Bart Copeland President & CEO
    3. 3. Agenda <ul><li>The legal, operational and market risks associated with open source </li></ul><ul><li>Common pitfalls with open source licensing </li></ul><ul><li>Proven tips for creating an open source governance program </li></ul><ul><li>Effective steps to protect your organization against costly infringements </li></ul><ul><li>Commercial open source options to mitigate open source legal and operational risks </li></ul>
    4. 4. Why Use Open Source Software? <ul><li>Best-in-class software in some areas is OSS </li></ul><ul><li>Your product must interoperate with other OSS, e.g. Linux </li></ul><ul><li>Buyers favor or even require OSS </li></ul><ul><li>OSS came with a corporate acquisition </li></ul><ul><li>It is a lower cost alternative to traditional commercial packages </li></ul><ul><li>You will need to customize externally sourced software </li></ul><ul><li>Faster time to market by avoiding development and testing of new code </li></ul><ul><li>Lower development costs by using free, already de-bugged code </li></ul><ul><li>Lower code maintenance costs by taking advantage of community maintenance </li></ul><ul><li>Your code-base already contains significant OSS </li></ul>Adoption of open-source software (OSS) is becoming pervasive, with 85 percent of companies surveyed currently using OSS in their enterprises and the remaining 15 percent expecting to in the next 12 months… Gartner Group release, November 2008
    5. 5. A Software Development Revolution 90% Custom Development Commercial Software Package Commercial Software Package Negotiated Procurement 90% Integration OSS OSS OSS OSS OSS OSS OSS OSS OSS OSS OSS OSS OSS OSS OSS OSS OSS Download
    6. 6. Poll: What are the biggest challenges you face around integrating open source packages? 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 1 Challenge % of Respondents Ensure license compliance for elements at distribution time Maintaining code and version consistency across the company Managing support for many open source elements Higher volume of code acquisition decisions Managing participation in public communities
    7. 7. Open Source Licenses <ul><li>Open source vs. Free software </li></ul><ul><li>Open source licensing principles </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Non-exclusive license </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Source code included </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Source code is free (except for cost) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rights to modify and to redistribute </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>For full OSI definition see http://opensource.org/docs/osd </li></ul></ul><ul><li>OSI lists 65 licenses which it has approved as being “Open Source” </li></ul><ul><li>The leading code scanning companies have identified well over 500 additional licenses for downloadable source code </li></ul><ul><li>Some of these licenses are incompatible, such that code under them may not legally be combined </li></ul>
    8. 8. Legal Risk <ul><li>Copyright infringement actions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Injunction against distribution </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Order to comply by publishing your proprietary code as open source </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Negative publicity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>One of the strongest weapons available to the Open Source community is the Internet </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Possible monetary consequences </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Costly delays in product launch or a product recall </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Expensive redundant development efforts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Restricted commercialization and lost profit opportunities </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Potential enforcement rights for every contributor </li></ul><ul><li>GPLv2 (most common OSS license) automatically terminated </li></ul>Potential Consequences for Violation of an Open Source License
    9. 9. Legal Risk Is Not Theoretical <ul><li>In the last year alone </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Software Freedom Law Center has sued Best Buy, Samsung, JVC and eleven other consumer electronics companies for copyright infringement (GPL license) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>GPLviolations.org has pursued dozens of complaints against violators of the GPL license </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Jury ruled for Jacobson on its infringement suit against Katzer (Artistic License) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In France the Paris Court of Appeals decided last week that the company Edu4 violated the terms of the GPL license </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. The Indemnification Gap <ul><li>Most commercial vendors are expected to provide intellectual property indemnification to their customers </li></ul><ul><li>Open source software is free, but comes with no warranty and no indemnification </li></ul><ul><li>How much of an indemnification gap can your company afford to take on? </li></ul>
    11. 11. Poll: What percentage of open source projects in your organization are currently indemnified? 62% 24% 4% 2% 8% Don't know 0-25% 26-50% 51-75% 76-100%
    12. 12. New Operational Issues <ul><li>Incorporating open source adds complexity to software projects </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Multiple sources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Many different licenses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Compatibility requirements between elements </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Varying levels of quality and maturity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Self-service updating and maintenance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Project directions not necessarily tied your needs </li></ul></ul><ul><li>That complexity can eat you alive if you do not manage it well </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mistakes can seriously delay release schedules </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Keeping up with bug fixes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Security issues </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Chronic integration headaches </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Difficulties in resolving customer support issues </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cost of maintaining and supporting many different customer stacks </li></ul></ul>
    13. 13. Open Source Management <ul><li>Goal: Manage the complexity and risk inherent in the use of open source software without reducing its productivity advantages </li></ul><ul><li>What it takes to achieve this goal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Strategy and a clear understanding of objectives at the business level </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Policy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ongoing audit and tuning </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Open Source Management works best when it is a natural part of the software development process </li></ul>&quot;Companies must have a policy for procuring OSS, deciding which applications will be supported by OSS, and identifying the intellectual property risk or supportability risk associated with using OSS. Once a policy is in place, then there must be a governance process to enforce it.&quot; Laurie Wurster, research director at Gartner Group
    14. 14. Key Elements of OSS Management <ul><li>Acquisition management </li></ul><ul><li>Use management </li></ul><ul><li>Support management </li></ul><ul><li>Tracking and auditing </li></ul><ul><li>Distribution management </li></ul>
    15. 15. Acquisition Management <ul><li>This ‘gate’ is your first line of defense </li></ul><ul><li>Sourcing from external trusted sources increases your knowledge of the software and its predictability </li></ul><ul><li>Acquisition is the critical first control point at which risks can be mitigated </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Quality of code </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Availability and reliability of adequate support </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Availability of indemnification </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>License is compatible with intended use </li></ul></ul>
    16. 16. Use Management <ul><li>Appropriate use </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How used </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How combined with other software (particularly yours) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How packaged for distribution </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Modification </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When allowed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How managed </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Identify each component’s internal owner </li></ul><ul><li>Identify owner’s roles and responsibilities </li></ul>
    17. 17. Support Management <ul><li>Define a support plan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Internal support </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>If community support is weak or non-existant </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>An option only if sufficient expertise available in house </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Community support </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>If community support is strong </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“ Self-service” support by owner or team is acceptable </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>No SLA </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Purchase SLA support from commercial OSS vendor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Assured technical expertise </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Guaranteed response in guaranteed time frame </li></ul></ul></ul>
    18. 18. Tracking and Auditing <ul><li>OSS Repository </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Where externally-sourced OSS is archived </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Master copy for all internal use </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ownership and where-used tracking </li></ul><ul><li>Decision and approval tracking </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides audit trail when problems surface </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A basis for tuning policy and process over time </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Code scan auditing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>OSS sourced (other than commercially warranteed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>it is not all “clean” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Internally developed code </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>It may contain code from other places </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Especially important for outsourced code </li></ul></ul></ul>
    19. 19. Distribution Management <ul><li>Compliance Process </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Insures that license requirements of incorporated software are met </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Customer licenses </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Downstream licensing of all incorporated software </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Customer documentation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>As required for compliance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>As required for downstream use </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Commercially licensed OSS often simplifies </li></ul>
    20. 20. Managing OSS to Advantage <ul><li>Results </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Higher quality sourcing reduces costly problems down the road </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Managed code base reduces duplication and incompatibilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Well managed support heads off new problems and eliminates duplicated support activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>License compliance can be assured with minimal overhead </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Customer support and IP reporting become possible </li></ul></ul>
    21. 21. Commercial open source options for dynamic languages
    22. 22. #1 in Open Source Adoption: Dynamic Languages 57% of enterprises using dynamic languages
    23. 23. Poll: Which dynamic languages are you using in your enterprise development?
    24. 24. Drivers for Dynamic Languages Faster time to market Increase staff productivity Uptime of customer applications Development Compliance with commercial support Legal risk mitigation Distribution rights Business
    25. 25. Challenges with Dynamic Languages <ul><li>Time-consuming to compile, test, maintain </li></ul><ul><li>Standardization & compatibility across all systems </li></ul><ul><li>Database connectivity </li></ul><ul><li>Perl module usage (thousands to choose from) </li></ul><ul><li>Reliance on open source community = risk to business systems </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Privacy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wasted time & resources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Potential system downtime </li></ul></ul>Confidential
    26. 26. Solutions for Dynamic Languages to Mitigate Risks <ul><li>Use commercial- or enterprise-grade dynamic language distributions </li></ul><ul><li>Get a trusted expert in dynamic languages to provide best practices advice and how-to guidance </li></ul><ul><li>Opt in for turn-key dynamic languages licensing </li></ul><ul><li>Secure guaranteed redistribution rights </li></ul><ul><li>Enlist consulting services to help out with your unique deployments </li></ul>
    27. 27. Cost Savings <ul><li>Pricing in the table is averaged and is for example purposes </li></ul><ul><li>Refer to the True Cost of Open Source Software whitepaper by ActiveState for the full case study </li></ul>$ 147,950 $ 14,000 $ 25,000 $ 1,895 $ 90,000 (development accelerated with ActiveState support) $ 0 Enterprise Dynamic Language Solution 18% Plus licensing costs could explode by 200%+ with an IP lawsuit $ 17,000 + the cost of potential IP lawsuit fees Legal (Distribution Rights and Indemnification) $ 86,950 $ 234,900 Total 59 % $ 60,000 Maintenance and Support 50 % $ 3,790 Training Costs Open Source Dynamic Language Savings with ActiveState Acquisition Cost $0 None Development $ 120,000 25%
    28. 28. ActiveState Solutions Confidential
    29. 29. Customers & Partners Software & Hardware Aerospace & Defense
    30. 30. About ActiveState <ul><li>Founded 1997 </li></ul><ul><li>2 million developers </li></ul><ul><li>97% of Fortune 1000 </li></ul><ul><li>Core Languages: Perl, Python,Tcl </li></ul><ul><li>Secondary Languages: PHP, Ruby, Javascript </li></ul>
    31. 31. Thank You! <ul><li>Contact Us: </li></ul><ul><li>Greg Olson </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>1- 650-493-3800 x207 </li></ul><ul><li>www.olliancegroup.com </li></ul><ul><li>Bart Copeland </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter: @activestate </li></ul><ul><li>1-866-510-2914 </li></ul><ul><li>www.activestate.com </li></ul>

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