Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Designing the perfect private cloud
Designing the perfect private cloud
Designing the perfect private cloud
Designing the perfect private cloud
Designing the perfect private cloud
Designing the perfect private cloud
Designing the perfect private cloud
Designing the perfect private cloud
Designing the perfect private cloud
Designing the perfect private cloud
Designing the perfect private cloud
Designing the perfect private cloud
Designing the perfect private cloud
Designing the perfect private cloud
Designing the perfect private cloud
Designing the perfect private cloud
Designing the perfect private cloud
Designing the perfect private cloud
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Designing the perfect private cloud

440

Published on

Please join the editors of Develop in the Cloud and special guest Diane Mueller, blogger and cloud expert, as we discuss what goes into designing the perfect private cloud. Diane is ready to talk …

Please join the editors of Develop in the Cloud and special guest Diane Mueller, blogger and cloud expert, as we discuss what goes into designing the perfect private cloud. Diane is ready to talk about OpenStack, private platform-as-a-servce, ROI, and the economics of clouds. Bring your experience, questions, and concerns nd we'll see where the discussion goes from there.

Thursday November 15, 2012, at 1:00 pm Eastern, 10:00 am California time:

http://developinthecloud.drdobbs.com/messages.asp?piddl_msgthreadid=258633&piddl_invid=1060&piddl_inviteepuserid=372392

Hope to see you there!

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
440
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
9
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Diane Mueller is Director, Cloud Evangelism at ActiveState, the dynamic language experts. She has been designing & implementing financial applications at Fortune 500 corporations for over 20 years.
  • Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) is the Missing Piece in most Cloud StrategiesPlatform-oriented approaches to cloud are distinguished by the higher level of abstractionthey provide as well as the supporting services they make available to the applicationsthat run on them. Salesforce.com’s Force.com or Google’s AppEngine both typifythe PaaS approach and the distinction between infrastructure-and platform-orientedcloud types. The AppEngine user is solely concerned about the application they arecreating to run on the platform. To deliver an application they simply package it anddeploy it to AppEngine. The deployment happens in a single step and the end-userdoesn’t know whether the application is being run on one virtual machine or 10 at anygiven point in time. In addition, the application can take advantage of special servicesprovided by the AppEngine platform, such as authentication or data access.The distinction between platform and infrastructure is a key consideration for organizationsexploring cloud computing. Platform- and infrastructure-oriented approachesto cloud computing measure up against the cloud characteristics listed above in verydifferent ways.For organizations seeking the simplest cloud computing experience and the fastesttime to market for applications, a cloud-based platform offers a distinct advantage. Inaddition to hosted PaaS offerings, stand-alone cloud application platforms are availablewhich run atop infrastructure-oriented cloud services (IaaS) as well as private cloudenvironments. These platforms allow enterprises to reap the benefits of a platformbasedapproach with several advantages over hosted PaaS offerings, particularly withregard to increased portability and standards support, reduced lock-in, increased visibilityand broader support for enterprise technologies such as Java and .NET.From Gartner: PaaS is a common reference to the layer of cloud technology architecture that contains all application infrastructure services, which are also known as "middleware" in other contexts. PaaS is the middle layer of the software stack "in the cloud.“Fastests Way to the Cloud: Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS)Platform-oriented approaches to cloud are distinguished by the higher level of abstractionthey provide as well as the supporting services they make available to the applicationsthat run on them. Salesforce.com’s Force.com or Google’s AppEngine both typifythe PaaS approach and the distinction between infrastructure-and platform-orientedcloud types. The AppEngine user is solely concerned about the application they arecreating to run on the platform. To deliver an application they simply package it anddeploy it to AppEngine. The deployment happens in a single step and the end-userdoesn’t know whether the application is being run on one virtual machine or 10 at anygiven point in time. In addition, the application can take advantage of special servicesprovided by the AppEngine platform, such as authentication or data access.The distinction between platform and infrastructure is a key consideration for organizationsexploring cloud computing. Platform- and infrastructure-oriented approachesto cloud computing measure up against the cloud characteristics listed above in verydifferent ways.For organizations seeking the simplest cloud computing experience and the fastesttime to market for applications, a cloud-based platform offers a distinct advantage. Inaddition to hosted PaaS offerings, stand-alone cloud application platforms are availablewhich run atop infrastructure-oriented cloud services (IaaS) as well as private cloudenvironments. These platforms allow enterprises to reap the benefits of a platformbasedapproach with several advantages over hosted PaaS offerings, particularly withregard to increased portability and standards support, reduced lock-in, increased visibilityand broader support for enterprise technologies such as Java and .NET.
  • IaaS has become a commodityDeveloper Expectations have been raised by Public PaaS providers such as GAE, Heroku, EngineyardEnd User expectations of instanteous response times and availability anywhere
  • 10 Practical Steps to Cloud MigrationMoving Applications and Processes to the Cloud is one of the key trends of 2010 and it is very likely to accelerate during 2011. Many vendors such as RunMyProcess have come up with interesting solutions to facilitate this task but many challenges have to be dealt with and it is very important to take into considerations all implications of such migration.In this post we have tried to summarize the 10 key steps you should follow. We have gathered this information from various posts and by attending industry events during the year. They represent the main aspects that anyone should be looking at before embarking into a migration of all (or part) of his applications portfolio and processes into the Cloud  (being public, private or hybrid)1) Applications readinessThe first questions to ask yourself is about the readiness of your current application.Is it already web-based ? Will it benefit from a multi-tenant architecture ? Can it scale out ? Does it really need elasticity ?Migrating legacy apps based on old technologies to a Cloud based infrastructure will not bring the right benefits and a more traditional managed hosting solution would be a better bet. First make an assessment to determine an application’s readiness for the Cloud. You  should evaluate the readiness of all your key applications in the portfolio using a multi-dimensional analysis of Cloud application characteristics. This will provide clear recommendations on suitable migration options – private or public – and migration paths – IaaS, SaaS or PaaS.2) Processes readiness Can they adapt with minimum changes to a Cloud delivery infrastructure ?This is certainly the right time to look at streamlining internal and external processes to boost productivity and lower costs (with or without the Cloud).3) Data ownership and accessThe application, the hardware, the operating system and everything else can be owned by the cloud provider. But the data is what your intellectual property is predicated upon and it has to be acknowledged that you can take that data away with you as you see fit. Your Cloud subscription gives you access to the functionality of the application or function that you use. If that access is removed, can you still access the data so that you can take it away with you?Make sure the contract allows for access to the back-end data, either directly or via the provider offering an export capability, even after the contract has finished.4) Data VolumesCloud is great for off-site elastic computing, where extra resources can be applied in the form of more compute power, or more storage. However, as that storage capability grows, so does a specific problem. Migrating 1GB of data across a wide-area network is pretty simple but how about 1TB? That migration can take a long time, and if you need to work against that data in real-time, you’ll have to plan for a degree of downtime while the data is pulled from the Cloud and reinstalled against a replacement application or function. Even if you can agree to set up a mirrored cloud or on-premise data topology, look out for clauses in the agreement that charge for data volumes.5) IntegrationApplications running in the Cloud will require integration with applications running on-premise and other applications in the Cloud. A robust integration platform needs to be available to facilitate this. SOA and BPM providers plays a critical role in minimizing integration challenges.6) Management and MonitoringDue to lack of control on the virtual infrastructure (especially in Platform as a Service, PaaS scenarios), application architecture itself should have provisions to provide better control to administrators on various management aspects.7) ComplianceOrganizations considering using Cloud services should perform a gap analysis between the specific requirements identified in relevant regulations and the set of controls provided by the Cloud service provider. Using Cloud computing services for data and applications subject to compliance regulations requires a high degree of transparency on the part of service providers. If you’re considering these services, you need to think through what use cases make sense, closely review contracts and service-level agreements and understand how the Cloud service meets your specific compliance requirements.8) Beware the vendor Lock-inAt this stage, there are no open standards that exist which will facilitate the migration from one Cloud provider to another. There are some encouraging industry initiatives trying to address this issue like the “Open Cloud Manifesto.”9) Cost AnalysisThe business case for Cloud application migration is never complete without taking the target Cloud platform into consideration. The migration and overhead costs vary widely based on the target Cloud platform and thus will skew the estimated cost savings. Cost analysis helps decide whether to go ahead with moving a particular application to the cloud or not from a TCO/ROI perspective. Cost should include capital expenditure, operational expenditure, and overhead costs involved with migration.10) Migration StrategyDefining a migration strategy involves understanding the various migration options available, establishing business priorities, and evolving a strategy that offers a fine balance between costs and meeting business priorities. Fundamentally, enterprises have the two following options with a cloud infrastructure – private or public. Against these, they have the following migration paths to consider – IaaS, SaaS or PaaS. The choice is driven by priorities such as elasticity, business model, go-to-market strategy and constrained by factors such as technical feasibility, security, migration costs, etc. It’s not uncommon for a large enterprise to leverage a hybrid approach in any of the above migration options and paths.If you think that you could benefit from a Cloud migration but need specialized support do not hesitate to contact us (info@getapp.com)  and we will put you in touch with an expert for a professional value migration assessment.
  • 10 key steps you should follow. They represent the main aspects that anyone should be looking at before embarking into a migration of all (or part) of his applications portfolio and processes into the Cloud  (being public, private or hybrid)1) Applications readinessThe first questions to ask yourself is about the readiness of your current application.Is it already web-based ? Will it benefit from a multi-tenant architecture ? Can it scale out ? Does it really need elasticity ?Migrating legacy apps based on old technologies to a Cloud based infrastructure will not bring the right benefits and a more traditional managed hosting solution would be a better bet. First make an assessment to determine an application’s readiness for the Cloud. You  should evaluate the readiness of all your key applications in the portfolio using a multi-dimensional analysis of Cloud application characteristics. This will provide clear recommendations on suitable migration options – private or public – and migration paths – IaaS, SaaS or PaaS.2) Processes readiness Can they adapt with minimum changes to a Cloud delivery infrastructure ?This is certainly the right time to look at streamlining internal and external processes to boost productivity and lower costs (with or without the Cloud).3) Data ownership and accessThe application, the hardware, the operating system and everything else can be owned by the cloud provider. But the data is what your intellectual property is predicated upon and it has to be acknowledged that you can take that data away with you as you see fit. Your Cloud subscription gives you access to the functionality of the application or function that you use. If that access is removed, can you still access the data so that you can take it away with you?Make sure the contract allows for access to the back-end data, either directly or via the provider offering an export capability, even after the contract has finished.4) Data VolumesCloud is great for off-site elastic computing, where extra resources can be applied in the form of more compute power, or more storage. However, as that storage capability grows, so does a specific problem. Migrating 1GB of data across a wide-area network is pretty simple but how about 1TB? That migration can take a long time, and if you need to work against that data in real-time, you’ll have to plan for a degree of downtime while the data is pulled from the Cloud and reinstalled against a replacement application or function. Even if you can agree to set up a mirrored cloud or on-premise data topology, look out for clauses in the agreement that charge for data volumes.5) IntegrationApplications running in the Cloud will require integration with applications running on-premise and other applications in the Cloud. A robust integration platform needs to be available to facilitate this. SOA and BPM providers plays a critical role in minimizing integration challenges.6) Management and MonitoringDue to lack of control on the virtual infrastructure (especially in Platform as a Service, PaaS scenarios), application architecture itself should have provisions to provide better control to administrators on various management aspects.7) ComplianceOrganizations considering using Cloud services should perform a gap analysis between the specific requirements identified in relevant regulations and the set of controls provided by the Cloud service provider. Using Cloud computing services for data and applications subject to compliance regulations requires a high degree of transparency on the part of service providers. If you’re considering these services, you need to think through what use cases make sense, closely review contracts and service-level agreements and understand how the Cloud service meets your specific compliance requirements.8) Beware the vendor Lock-inAt this stage, there are no open standards that exist which will facilitate the migration from one Cloud provider to another. There are some encouraging industry initiatives trying to address this issue like the “Open Cloud Manifesto.”9) Cost AnalysisThe business case for Cloud application migration is never complete without taking the target Cloud platform into consideration. The migration and overhead costs vary widely based on the target Cloud platform and thus will skew the estimated cost savings. Cost analysis helps decide whether to go ahead with moving a particular application to the cloud or not from a TCO/ROI perspective. Cost should include capital expenditure, operational expenditure, and overhead costs involved with migration.10) Migration StrategyDefining a migration strategy involves understanding the various migration options available, establishing business priorities, and evolving a strategy that offers a fine balance between costs and meeting business priorities. Fundamentally, enterprises have the two following options with a cloud infrastructure – private or public. Against these, they have the following migration paths to consider – IaaS, SaaS or PaaS. The choice is driven by priorities such as elasticity, business model, go-to-market strategy and constrained by factors such as technical feasibility, security, migration costs, etc. It’s not uncommon for a large enterprise to leverage a hybrid approach in any of the above migration options and paths.
  • first identify and understand the business and technical factors for the migration. Reducing costs and business agility are typical business factors for application migration to clouds. Cloud computing can provide significant cost savings because of the increased utilization resulting from the pooling of resources and the standardization and automation required for cloud services.
  • Highly Controlled vs. Highly Curated
  • Transcript

    • 1. Designing the Perfect Private Cloud Diane Mueller Director, Cloud Evangelism ActiveState dianem@activestate.com
    • 2. About ActiveStateFounded 19972 million developers, 97% of Fortune 1000ActiveState empowers innovation from code to cloud smarter, safer,and fasterSome customers:
    • 3. Take an App Centric View of the Cloud Layer Cake
    • 4. “Code to Cloud” is a Process Micro Production Cloud Private Cloud POCs Test Staging Public Clouds
    • 5. It’s about delivering choices…
    • 6. ..avoiding Vendor Lock-in at IaaS layer… vSphere Your Private Cloud Micro Cloud
    • 7. and knowing your organization’s goals Set Realistic Goals Manage Expectations Involving Key Stakeholders
    • 8. to deliver the Holy Grail on-premise!  Elastic Scalability  Reliability & Fault Tolerance  Agility  Shared Secure Multi-tenancy  Service-oriented  Utility-based  Technical Support & SLAs
    • 9. 5 Key Considerations Security & Compliance Issues Applications readiness Processes readiness Vendor Lock-in Management and Monitoring
    • 10. Security: Complex Balance Act Maintain privacy & confidentiality Preserve intellectual property rights Potential intervention by foreign governments Manage operational & commercial risks Comply with regulatory requirements Both industry & jurisdictional
    • 11. Why migrate to the Cloud?  Technical Reasons Business Reasons  Reduce costs  Performance  Business Efficiency  Pooling resources  Manageability  Automation  Scalability  Standardization
    • 12. Know your thy application!  Re-Engineering Effort?  Performance Issues?  Bottlenecks?  Does it need to Scale?  Is it Service-Oriented?  Usage Based Billing?  Web Facing?
    • 13. Why Private PaaS?(Security + Privacy + Control) = Compliance Sits on top of cloud infrastructure to help deployment, management, monitoring of cloud applications
    • 14. PaaS Architecture
    • 15. Who is deploying Private Clouds with PaaS today? Large enterprise, ISVs/Systems Private government: Integrators: cloud/ManagedPrivate PaaS for large Self-manage, migrate Service Providers: # custom apps, and host SaaS Add private PaaS to security, compliance applications IaaS for clients
    • 16. Perfect Private Cloud Applications Layer Put a PaaS on it! The enterprise private PaaS IaaS/Infrastructure Layer + OTHERS
    • 17. Recap: Your Perfect Cloud Checklist Know thy applications! Review your security compliance regulations Deploy a PaaS layer Monitor performance Check for bottlenecks Sit back and enjoy the view from the cloud!
    • 18. Questions?Diane Mueller, ActiveState, dianem@activestate.com

    ×