Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Sustainable Living; Sustainable Homes <ul><li>Transforming housing systems to tackle climate change and promote sustainabi...
Before we start… <ul><li>The challenge from Copenhagen: </li></ul><ul><li>( the International Scientific Congress on ‘Clim...
Promoting sustainable living through the housing sector. <ul><li>The key issues: </li></ul><ul><li>Homes as buildings </li...
The UK position <ul><li>26 million homes which emitted  41.7 million tonnes of carbon dioxide (MtCO2) in 2004, about 28% o...
1. Homes as buildings <ul><li>Two thirds of the homes likely to exist in 2050 already do </li></ul><ul><li>New buildings a...
The role of Regulation <ul><li>Improved legal standards are having an impact. </li></ul><ul><li>A new home is likely to be...
The UK also has <ul><li>A voluntary Code for Sustainable (new) Homes.  </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Warm Front’ – to tackle ‘fuel p...
Other ways forward <ul><li>Carbon Emissions Reduction Target (CERT). A £2.8 Bn programme (funded by energy suppliers) to s...
Whose homes? <ul><li>Private rented: 12% per cent of housing stock in England </li></ul><ul><li>Social rented housing: 18%...
Meanwhile in Germany… <ul><li>17.3 million residential buildings (cf 26 million in the UK, although higher population).  <...
2.  Homes as places where things happen <ul><li>Action is needed to reduce emissions that result from heating, lighting, w...
Microgeneration <ul><li>Much of this is tokenistic and not economic at present (esp. in urban areas) </li></ul><ul><li>Sol...
Into the future <ul><li>The potential is great  - estimated potential in 2050: (% of electricity demand) </li></ul><ul><ul...
Behaviour Change and basic improvements  <ul><li>Linked to many factors, notably trust, engagement with issues, costs, etc...
Full impact assessment <ul><li>Buildings impact the environment during construction, use and demolition.  </li></ul><ul><l...
The places where these homes are <ul><li>Decarbonising poses challenges for the places where we build our homes </li></ul>...
So what’s a sustainable home? <ul><li>Is this a sustainable home? </li></ul><ul><li>The Leicester Ecohome… </li></ul>
So what’s really sustainable? <ul><li>Is this? </li></ul>
So what’s really sustainable? <ul><li>An earth-sheltered home </li></ul>
So what’s really sustainable? <ul><li>Are these? </li></ul><ul><li>Refurbished tower blocks… </li></ul>
The challenge of densification <ul><li>High density homes… </li></ul><ul><li>Lower land take… </li></ul><ul><li>Support hi...
Delivering change: The role of NGOs and civil society <ul><li>Advocacy for higher standards </li></ul><ul><li>Encouraging ...
<ul><li>Delivering energy services </li></ul><ul><li>NGOs can play a critical role (learning from work on waste and food p...
In Albert Square… <ul><li>The ASSA Home Energy project – looking to tackle big old 19 th  Century homes… </li></ul><ul><li...
Making change happen: Who needs to act? <ul><li>The people who live in those 26 million homes </li></ul><ul><li>Landlords ...
What needs to happen <ul><li>Increased standards in every nation… </li></ul><ul><li>All new buildings are built to zero-em...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

WS2_Housing_SustainableLiving_Church

307

Published on

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
307
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "WS2_Housing_SustainableLiving_Church"

  1. 1. Sustainable Living; Sustainable Homes <ul><li>Transforming housing systems to tackle climate change and promote sustainability </li></ul><ul><li>Chris Church </li></ul><ul><li>Co-Chair ANPED </li></ul><ul><li>Director, CEA </li></ul><ul><li>Founder, Sustainable Tower Blocks Initiative </li></ul>
  2. 2. Before we start… <ul><li>The challenge from Copenhagen: </li></ul><ul><li>( the International Scientific Congress on ‘Climate Change: Global Risks, Challenges & Decisions </li></ul><ul><li>A few key phrases: </li></ul><ul><li>Recent observations confirm that the worst-case IPCC scenario trajectories (or even worse) are being realised. </li></ul><ul><li>Societies are highly vulnerable to even modest levels of climate change, with poor nations and communities particularly at risk. </li></ul><ul><li>We already have tools and approaches to deal effectively with the climate change challenge. </li></ul><ul><li>A wide range of benefits will flow from a concerted effort to alter our energy economy now. </li></ul><ul><li>There is no excuse for inaction. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Promoting sustainable living through the housing sector. <ul><li>The key issues: </li></ul><ul><li>Homes as buildings </li></ul><ul><li>Homes as places where things happen </li></ul><ul><li>The places where these homes are </li></ul><ul><li>The key audiences: </li></ul><ul><li>People who live in homes </li></ul><ul><li>People who own / manage groups of homes </li></ul><ul><li>People who design / build </li></ul><ul><li>It will be important to lead by example: transformation is needed across the housing sector </li></ul>
  4. 4. The UK position <ul><li>26 million homes which emitted 41.7 million tonnes of carbon dioxide (MtCO2) in 2004, about 28% of our CO2e emissions </li></ul><ul><li>The challenge is an 80% cut by 2050 (although this may not be enough) </li></ul><ul><li>How do we decarbonise housing? </li></ul>
  5. 5. 1. Homes as buildings <ul><li>Two thirds of the homes likely to exist in 2050 already do </li></ul><ul><li>New buildings are usually much more efficient than old. </li></ul><ul><li>The greatest savings will come from retro-fitting </li></ul><ul><li>Some agencies support increased replacement (demolition) of the oldest homes at a rate similar to that seen in the 1970s </li></ul>
  6. 6. The role of Regulation <ul><li>Improved legal standards are having an impact. </li></ul><ul><li>A new home is likely to be 40% more energy efficient than one built just ten years ago, and six times more efficient most 100 year old housing </li></ul><ul><li>27 per cent of buildings constructed before 1919 achieve ‘SAP rating’ of under 41 (out of 100) </li></ul><ul><li>Most homes built since 1990 achieve higher than 70 </li></ul><ul><li>But it’s not enough! </li></ul>
  7. 7. The UK also has <ul><li>A voluntary Code for Sustainable (new) Homes. </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Warm Front’ – to tackle ‘fuel poverty’ ( and save half a million tonnes of carbon each year until 2010.) Inadequate funding for each home means that full benefits not being delivered. </li></ul><ul><li>The ‘Decent Homes’ programme – tackling poorest homes (better bathrooms etc.) but also energy savings </li></ul><ul><li>How far do new regulations trigger technological spin-offs that can be used to retrofit existing homes? </li></ul>
  8. 8. Other ways forward <ul><li>Carbon Emissions Reduction Target (CERT). A £2.8 Bn programme (funded by energy suppliers) to see 2.9 million cavity walls filled, 2.7 million lofts insulated, 110 million energy-efficient light bulbs provided 90,000 homes switched to more efficient fuel systems </li></ul><ul><li>Energy performance certificates </li></ul><ul><li>A code for existing homes? minimum standards, leading to compulsory upgrading </li></ul>
  9. 9. Whose homes? <ul><li>Private rented: 12% per cent of housing stock in England </li></ul><ul><li>Social rented housing: 18% </li></ul><ul><li>70 % privately owned housing. </li></ul><ul><li>13000 private landlords (only 1,500 social providers). </li></ul><ul><li>Most landlords own only 1 or 2 properties – what incentives to invest? </li></ul>
  10. 10. Meanwhile in Germany… <ul><li>17.3 million residential buildings (cf 26 million in the UK, although higher population). </li></ul><ul><li>35% are owner-occupied (70% in the UK) </li></ul><ul><li>A more developed microtechnology market (higher levels of skills in its workforce, lower prices for many products ) </li></ul><ul><li>Solar panels are about half the price offered in the UK, </li></ul><ul><li>2006 German Government 20-year programme to bring all pre-1984 dwellings up to current new-build standards by 2025. Will cost an estimated 1 Bn euros. </li></ul><ul><li>More microgeneration due partly to “feed-in” tariffs (the sums paid above market value of the electricity produced) </li></ul>
  11. 11. 2. Homes as places where things happen <ul><li>Action is needed to reduce emissions that result from heating, lighting, water use and the way we manage our homes. Changes will come from: </li></ul><ul><li>Behaviour change (landlords etc. limited influence) </li></ul><ul><li>Quick / low-cost improvements— draught proofing, insulation </li></ul><ul><li>Newer technologies - micro-generation, CHP </li></ul>
  12. 12. Microgeneration <ul><li>Much of this is tokenistic and not economic at present (esp. in urban areas) </li></ul><ul><li>Solar water heaters offer good payback </li></ul><ul><li>Benefits will come from collective action </li></ul><ul><li>Need for new funding regime (cf Germany) – this is now promised </li></ul><ul><li>There are currently c. 100000 microgeneration installations in the UK, (cf 82000 in 2004); 80% are Solar Thermal </li></ul>
  13. 13. Into the future <ul><li>The potential is great - estimated potential in 2050: (% of electricity demand) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Photovoltaics: 3.8% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Small-scale wind 6.0% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Small scale CHP 6.4% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fuel cells 25%+ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(and solar thermal ) </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Behaviour Change and basic improvements <ul><li>Linked to many factors, notably trust, engagement with issues, costs, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Many programmes to support behaviour change, mostly from green organisations </li></ul><ul><li>Much uptake is still from ‘positive green’ sector of society </li></ul><ul><li>Large social landlords can play a key role </li></ul><ul><li>N.B. In 1970, the average UK house was heated to 12°C, by 2003 this had risen to 18°C. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Full impact assessment <ul><li>Buildings impact the environment during construction, use and demolition. </li></ul><ul><li>New low-carbon technologies needed </li></ul><ul><li>Much more reuse of post-demolition materials </li></ul><ul><li>A role for the third sector in stimulating this work </li></ul>
  16. 16. The places where these homes are <ul><li>Decarbonising poses challenges for the places where we build our homes </li></ul><ul><li>Higher density settlements save carbon but are not in line with many people’s aspirations </li></ul><ul><li>Links to public transport and other facilities will be critical to cut transport emission </li></ul><ul><li>Any assessment of sustainable homes needs to consider: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Land Use </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Transport </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Local infrastructure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Water supply </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. So what’s a sustainable home? <ul><li>Is this a sustainable home? </li></ul><ul><li>The Leicester Ecohome… </li></ul>
  18. 18. So what’s really sustainable? <ul><li>Is this? </li></ul>
  19. 19. So what’s really sustainable? <ul><li>An earth-sheltered home </li></ul>
  20. 20. So what’s really sustainable? <ul><li>Are these? </li></ul><ul><li>Refurbished tower blocks… </li></ul>
  21. 21. The challenge of densification <ul><li>High density homes… </li></ul><ul><li>Lower land take… </li></ul><ul><li>Support high quality public transport… </li></ul><ul><li>Energy efficiency… </li></ul><ul><li>Not just ‘micro’ generation… </li></ul><ul><li>Collective living… </li></ul>
  22. 22. Delivering change: The role of NGOs and civil society <ul><li>Advocacy for higher standards </li></ul><ul><li>Encouraging behaviour change </li></ul><ul><li>Developing pilot projects on renewables and efficiency </li></ul>
  23. 23. <ul><li>Delivering energy services </li></ul><ul><li>NGOs can play a critical role (learning from work on waste and food production) </li></ul><ul><li>A developing body of good practice </li></ul><ul><li>Community-managed E nergy Service Companies (ESCO) providing a range of energy solutions energy savings projects, energy infrastructure, and energy supply. </li></ul>
  24. 24. In Albert Square… <ul><li>The ASSA Home Energy project – looking to tackle big old 19 th Century homes… </li></ul><ul><li>Aim to develop a Low Emissions Energy Network (LEEN) to serve all members of the community: </li></ul><ul><li>1. educate residents and landlords about the economic and environmental benefits </li></ul><ul><li>2. make it easy and affordable to implement </li></ul><ul><li>3. provide an on-going support network to sustain the savings </li></ul><ul><li>A full suite of energy services including microgeneration – a community ‘Energy Supply Company ’ </li></ul>
  25. 25. Making change happen: Who needs to act? <ul><li>The people who live in those 26 million homes </li></ul><ul><li>Landlords and homeowners, </li></ul><ul><li>Local and central government, </li></ul><ul><li>Builders, engineers, installation experts and planning departments </li></ul><ul><li>Civil society needs to link work on improved standards to other aspects of work on climate change and consumption </li></ul>
  26. 26. What needs to happen <ul><li>Increased standards in every nation… </li></ul><ul><li>All new buildings are built to zero-emission and high environmental standards </li></ul><ul><li>A programme for existing homes </li></ul><ul><li>Large developments should generate renewable power on-site </li></ul><ul><li>Programmes to end fuel poverty and encourage energy efficiency through retrofit </li></ul><ul><li>Expansion of combined heat and power (CHP) </li></ul><ul><li>Change is needed from now (not in five years time…) </li></ul>
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×