Action Guide Workshop Presentation Maui
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The powerpoints presented by the coordinators and guest speakers during the Making a Difference Action Guide Celebration & Workshop.

The powerpoints presented by the coordinators and guest speakers during the Making a Difference Action Guide Celebration & Workshop.

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  • Fish-Friendly Business Alliance; includes over 30 members statewide. Online business directory http://www.coral.org/fishfriendly Members comprised of commercial diving and snorkeling-related businesses . Collaborative effort between the State of Hawaii Division of Aquatic Resources, Project S.E.A.-Link, and the Coral Reef Alliance (CORAL). Outreach efforts focused on both the consumer and the supplier. Campaign began in fall 2006 Postcards that local residents and visitors fill out , writing to companies that promote fish-feeding. Boss Frog’s Dive and Surf on Maui first company to change its business practices and sign on to the campaign. “ Fish-Friendly Establishment” decal designed for companies who sign on to the company to raise customer awareness and publicly designate their responsible practices. Supported by the state of Hawaii’s Recreational Impacts to Reefs Local Action Strategy feeding fish can result in a decrease in natural grazing behavior, which in turn could promote a cascade of negative ecological effects upon marine communities. If these impacts to the reef were not enough to discourage snorkelers from fish feeding, this practice can also promote behavioral changes in local fishes. At the Honolua Bay education station coordinated by Project S.E.A.-Link, cases of fish bites continue to be documented, as snorkelers encounter aggressive and habituated fishes. Any business participating in this campaign will be added to the online director and receive a fish-friendly establishment decal and a CD of educational materials. For more information about the Take a Bite Out of Fish Feeding Campaign, FishFeedingAwareness@gmail.com
  • Fish-Friendly Business Alliance; includes over 30 members statewide. Online business directory http://www.coral.org/fishfriendly Members comprised of commercial diving and snorkeling-related businesses . Collaborative effort between the State of Hawaii Division of Aquatic Resources, Project S.E.A.-Link, and the Coral Reef Alliance (CORAL). Outreach efforts focused on both the consumer and the supplier. Campaign began in fall 2006 Postcards that local residents and visitors fill out , writing to companies that promote fish-feeding. Boss Frog’s Dive and Surf on Maui first company to change its business practices and sign on to the campaign. “ Fish-Friendly Establishment” decal designed for companies who sign on to the company to raise customer awareness and publicly designate their responsible practices. Supported by the state of Hawaii’s Recreational Impacts to Reefs Local Action Strategy feeding fish can result in a decrease in natural grazing behavior, which in turn could promote a cascade of negative ecological effects upon marine communities. If these impacts to the reef were not enough to discourage snorkelers from fish feeding, this practice can also promote behavioral changes in local fishes. At the Honolua Bay education station coordinated by Project S.E.A.-Link, cases of fish bites continue to be documented, as snorkelers encounter aggressive and habituated fishes. Any business participating in this campaign will be added to the online director and receive a fish-friendly establishment decal and a CD of educational materials. For more information about the Take a Bite Out of Fish Feeding Campaign, FishFeedingAwareness@gmail.com
  • The Federal Water Pollution Control Act as amended (1972) is commonly referred to as the Clean Water Act (CWA). Many of the provisions of the Clean Water Act have resulted in programs designed to manage water quality. Often people equate water quality to water chemistry. If we look at the objectives of the Clean Water Act, we see that there are many variables and factors in addition to water chemistry that must be considered to protect the integrity of the water resource. Water quality includes physical, biological, and chemical data.
  • The Clean Water Act came about because people were unhappy with the impacts of polluted water. Fisheries were dying, it was not safe to swim in many waterbodies and a river actually caught on fire. The main goal of the Clean Water Act is “fishable swimmable” waters.
  • How is pollution controlled? Clean Water Act goals are implemented through water quality management and planning, discharge permit conditions, nonpoint source pollution control..
  • This diagram depicts the Water Quality Management (WQM) activities that the state conducts under the CWA programs, and how they are connected with each other. In the foreground, the lighter shaded areas identify the water quality management and planning process. The CWA requires a Continuing Planning Process (CPP) . Water Quality Standards (WQS) are the state’s goals for individual waterbodies and provide the basis for control decisions. Water Quality Monitoring activities provide the chemical , physical, and biological data needed to determine the quality of water and identify sources of pollutants. The primary assessment of water quality is the 305(b) report. This report and other assessments are used in the state’s WQM plans to identify priority water quality problems. The plans recommend control measures to attain the water quality goals. The control measures are implemented through issuing permits, funding of publicly-owned treatment works (POTW), instituting best management practices for nonpoint sources, and other means. This planning process is both reiterative and dynamic, in which requirements and emphasis can vary over time.
  • called designated uses , that stem from this goal. A designated use provides a way to cut through the complexity of all the factors and variables by getting to the bottom line question , “ Is the use supported? Can I fish or swim in these waters?”
  • IN 2002 CRTF identified six major threats to coral reefs and requested that each US jurisdiction develop LAS to address each of the priority threats. There are many threats to Hawaii’s reefs and we are focusing on 6 key threats with support from the US Coral Reef Task Force.
  • Large areas of reef Not enough scientists and managers

Action Guide Workshop Presentation Maui Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Making A Difference An Action Guide to Marine Conservation in Hawai ̒ i What to do and Who to Call Concerning Ocean Issues One Year Anniversary
  • 2. WHALES BREACHING FOR A CAUSE: GREEN MARKETING & MARINE TOURISM IN HAWAI‘I
    • Introduction/Welcoming Remarks 7:10 p.m.
    • Purpose & Guide Process 7:15 p.m.
    • Guide Importance & Applications 7:20 p.m.
    • Using the Guide & Where to Get Copies 7:25 p.m.
    • Overview of Fish Feeding Campaign 7:30 p.m.
    • Eco Tube Release Presentation 7:40 p.m.
    • Audience Q & A 7:50 p.m.
    • Presentation Closing Remarks 7:55 p.m.
    • Reception 8:00 – 9:00 p.m.
    Making A Difference
  • 3.
    • PURPOSE
    • The Making A Difference Action Guide has been designed as a community tool to provide key information, guidelines, and contact information for marine resource conservation. The goal is to empower Hawaii’s ocean users to take an active stewardship role in the preservation and protection of the marine environment. The guide:
    • outlines key rules and regulations
    • provides general ecological information
    • guidelines to follow such as actions to take, if any; what information to record; what
    • agency to contact; and where to go for more information and guidance.
  • 4.
    • Enforcement
    • Coral Reef Guidelines for Scuba Diving and Snorkeling
    • Sea Turtles
    • Hawaiian Monk Seals
    • Cetaceans
    • Aquatic Invasive Species
    • Land-based Pollution
    • Marine Debris
    • Fishing Regulations & Violations
    • Boating Resources and Safe Boating
    • Coral Health Threats
    • Marine Managed Areas
    • Other Ways To Help: Additional Resources
    • Blue Pages: Marine Enforcement Phone Book
    • Key Agencies & Institutions for Marine Resource
    • Management, Conservation and Research in Hawai ‘ i
    GUIDE TOPICS
  • 5. GUIDE PROCESS
    • 2002 - 2005
    • Original idea proposed; planning; first funding obtained (Hawaii CZM)
    • 2006
    • Initial project idea presented to the Rec.Impacts to Reefs Local Action Strategy
    • 2007
    • Development of guide topics and material
    • Funding obtained from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), CORAL, Tiffany and Company, Hawaii Tourism Authority, and Division of Aquatic Resources for guide implementation
    • Non-profit and agency invites to submit material, photos and topics
    • First round of agency and non-profit edits
    • 2008
    • Second round of agency and non-profit edits
    • Additional funding contributions for first draft print run
    • General distribution
    • Presentation and distribution at 2008 Hawaii Conservation Conference
    • 2009
    • Coastal Zone Management funds second print run
    • First guide workshop (Maui)
    • Second guide workshop (Oahu) NOVEMBER 18 th , 2009
  • 6. GUIDE APPLICATIONS
    • Themes:
    • Resource Management
    • Enforcement
    • Community Empowerment
    • Context:
    • Formal Education Settings
    • Informal Outreach Settings
    • Integration with community-based monitoring efforts
    What YOU Can Do! Resource Management Enforcement Community Empowerment
  • 7. USING THE GUIDE
  • 8. WHERE TO GET COPIES
    • ELECTRONIC COPIES
    • The guide is available to download from several websites:
    • CORAL Website: www.coral.org
    • Project S.E.A-Link Website: www.projectsealink.org
    • Recreation Impacts to Reefs Local Action Strategy (DAR) Website:
    • http://hawaii.gov/dlnr/dar/coral/coral_las_rir.html
    • HARD COPIES
    • Guides available for distribution while supplies last, contact:
    • Liz Foote, [email_address]
    • Emma Anders, [email_address]
    • BULK QUANTITIES
    • Bulk quantities may be available for distriubtion for education purposes.
    • Please contact Liz Foote ( [email_address] ) or Emma Anders ( [email_address] )
    • for details.
  • 9.
    • Fish-Friendly Business Alliance
    • includes over 30 members statewide.
    • Online business directory http://www.coral.org/fishfriendly
    • Members comprised of commercial diving and snorkeling-related businesses
    • Boss Frog’s Dive and Surf on Maui first company to sign on to the campaign.
    • “ Fish-Friendly Establishment” decal to raise customer awareness
    • Supported by Hawaii’s Recreational Impacts to Reefs Local Action Strategy
    • Feeding fish can decrease natural grazing behavior, which could promote a negative ecological effects upon marine communities. Can also promote behavioral changes in local fishes.
    • Any business participating in this campaign will be added to the online director and receive a fish-friendly establishment decal and a CD of educational materials. For more information about the Take a Bite Out of Fish Feeding Campaign, [email_address]
    Take A Bite Out of Fish-Feeding Awareness Campaign
  • 10. Take A Bite Out of Fish-Feeding Awareness Campaign Fish Feeding Post Card Awareness Campaign
  • 11. HAWAI‘I ECOTUBE http://hawaiiecotube.blogspot.com & http://www.facebook.com/hawaiiecotube
  • 12. MAHALO Guidebook Design: Workshop Sponsors: Guidebook Funders: A special thank you to all our contributors and to all of you for your participation.
  • 13. Making A Difference An Action Guide to Marine Conservation in Hawai ̒ i What to do and Who to Call Concerning Ocean Issues One Year Anniversary
  • 14. WHALES BREACHING FOR A CAUSE: GREEN MARKETING & MARINE TOURISM IN HAWAI‘I
    • Introduction/Welcoming Remarks – Carlie Wiener 9:30 a.m.
    • Guide Overview & Applications – Liz Foote 9:35 a.m.
    • DOCARE Enforcement – Randy Awo 9:50 a.m.
    • Guideline for Scuba Diving & Snorkeling – 10:05 a.m.
    • Liz Foote & Donna Brown
    • Marine Mammal Regulation – Carlie Wiener 10:20 a.m.
    • Break 10:35 a.m.
    • Marine Debris – Carlie Wiener 10:50 a.m.
    • Responsible Fishing & Boating Safety 11:05 a.m.
    • Coral Health – Darla White 11:20 a.m.
    • Guide Applications:K-12 Classroom – Carlie Wiener 11:30 a.m.
    • Guide Applications: Informal Outreach – Liz Foote 11:50 a.m.
    • Where to Get Copies & Concluding Remarks 12:10 p.m.
    Making A Difference
  • 15.
    • PURPOSE
    • The Making A Difference Action Guide has been designed as a community tool to provide key information, guidelines, and contact information for marine resource conservation. The goal is to empower Hawaii’s ocean users to take an active stewardship role in the preservation and protection of the marine environment. The guide:
    • outlines key rules and regulations
    • provides general ecological information
    • guidelines to follow such as actions to take, if any; what information to record; what
    • agency to contact; and where to go for more information and guidance.
  • 16.
    • Enforcement
    • Coral Reef Guidelines for Scuba Diving and Snorkeling
    • Sea Turtles
    • Hawaiian Monk Seals
    • Cetaceans
    • Aquatic Invasive Species
    • Land-based Pollution
    • Marine Debris
    • Fishing Regulations & Violations
    • Boating Resources and Safe Boating
    • Coral Health Threats
    • Marine Managed Areas
    • Other Ways To Help: Additional Resources
    • Blue Pages: Marine Enforcement Phone Book
    • Key Agencies & Institutions for Marine Resource
    • Management, Conservation and Research in Hawai ‘ i
    GUIDE TOPICS
  • 17. GUIDE PROCESS
    • 2002 - 2005
    • Original idea proposed; planning; first funding obtained (Hawaii CZM)
    • 2006
    • Initial project idea presented to the Rec.Impacts to Reefs Local Action Strategy
    • 2007
    • Development of guide topics and material
    • Funding obtained from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), CORAL, Tiffany and Company, Hawaii Tourism Authority, and Division of Aquatic Resources for guide implementation
    • Non-profit and agency invites to submit material, photos and topics
    • First round of agency and non-profit edits
    • 2008
    • Second round of agency and non-profit edits
    • Additional funding contributions for first draft print run
    • General distribution
    • Presentation and distribution at 2008 Hawaii Conservation Conference
    • 2009
    • Coastal Zone Management funds second print run
    • First guide workshop (Maui)
    • Second guide workshop (Oahu) NOVEMBER 18 th , 2009
  • 18. GUIDE APPLICATIONS
    • Components of each Section:
    • Basic Background Information: Ecology & Rules/Regs
    • What to Do and what NOT to do
    • Information to record
    • Who to Call
    • Settings:
    • Formal Education
    • Community venues/Informal outreach
    • Integration with other outreach tools and monitoring programs
  • 19. USING THE GUIDE
  • 20. DOCARE ENFORCEMENT The Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE) is the state agency responsible for enforcement activities of the Hawai‘i Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR). The division, with full police powers, enforces all state laws and rules involving state lands, state parks, historical sites, forest reserves, aquatic life and wildlife areas, coastal zones, conservation districts, and state shores, as well as county ordinances involving county parks. Their mission is to promote the safe and responsible use of Hawai‘i’s natural resources. Division of Conservation & Resources Enforcement (DOCARE) Statewide Hotline (808) 643-DLNR (3567) O‘ahu (808) 587-0077 Maui (808) 873-3990 Hawai‘i Island Capt Cook: (808) 323-3141 Kona: (808) 327-4961 Hilo: (808) 974-6208 Kaua‘i (808) 274-3521 La-na‘i (808) 565-7916 Moloka‘i (808) 553-5190
  • 21. SCUBA DIVING & SNORKELING GUIDELINES
    • Before Entering the Water
    • Apply sunscreen 30 min, or use a rash guard.
    • • Test out all your equipment. Never stand on reef to adjust gear.
    • • Bring a floatation device.
    • While In the Water
    • Enter/Exit in a sandy area, watch for sharp rocks, corals and sea urchins.
    • Control your fins at all times; avoid kicking up sand.
    • • Never feed or touch marine life, including feeding fish.
    • • Never remove anything except marine debris.
    • • Respect native Hawaiian cultural sites, practices and sacred places.
    • • Divers should always tow a dive flag and practice good buoyancy control.
  • 22. SCUBA DIVING & SNORKELING GUIDELINES Holland and Meyer, 2009
  • 23. SCUBA DIVING & SNORKELING GUIDELINES
  • 24. SCUBA DIVING & SNORKELING GUIDELINES
  • 25. SCUBA DIVING & SNORKELING GUIDELINES
    • Best Practices for Marine Tourism Businesses
    • • Use moorings or anchor in the sand.
      • in-water visual guidance for anchor & chain placement
    • Present an effective and comprehensive environmental briefing
      • dive site features; techniques to avoid impact; guidelines, rules & regulations
    • Active supervision and management of clients; intervention when necessary
      • buoyancy assessment and adjustment
      • 3 strikes rule?
    • Accountability: Share best practices with clients
  • 26. MARINE MAMMAL REGULATIONS Marine Mammal Management in the Main Hawaiian Islands Ongoing Priorities:
    • Conservation
    • Preservation
    • Co-existence
    • Community involvement
    • Public education
  • 27. Definition: Stranded Marine Mammal (MMPA)
    • A marine mammal is dead and is-
    • (i) on a beach or shore of the United states; or
    • (ii) in waters under the jurisdiction of the United States (including any navigable waters); or
  • 28. Definition: Stranded Marine Mammal (MMPA)
    • (B) A marine mammal is alive and is-
    • (i) on a beach or shore of the United States and unable to return to the water
    • (ii) on a beach or shore of the united States and, although able to return to the water, is in apparent need of medical attention; or
    • (iii) in waters under the jurisdiction of the united States (including any navigable waters), but is unable to return to its natural habitat under its own power or without assistance
  • 29. HUMAN PETS MAY CARRY DISEASE
  • 30. Maintain a distance of at least 150 feet NOAA Fisheries 24-hour Marine Mammal Stranding Hotline: 1-888-256-9840 Nicole Davis: 808-292-2372 Include date, time, location, size, & any other information available
  • 31. 6th Semi-Annual Hawaiian Monk Seal Count, 2009 October 17 th 10 am to 1 pm
  • 32. MARINE DEBRIS
    • 100,000 marine mammals and sea turtles die each year globally from marine debris
    • Marine debris is everyone’s problem.
    • Marine debris comes in many forms, from cigarette butts to derelict fishing nets.
    • Marine debris is “any persistent solid material that is manufactured or processed and directly or indirectly, intentionally or unintentionally, disposed of or abandoned into the marine environment or the Great Lakes”.
  • 33. PLASTICS
    • Plastics are a subspecies of polymers, persistent organic pollutants (POPs) bind to plastic debris in the ocean and as a consequence micro-particles can enter the food chain.
    • Plastics are derived from petroleum, they have replaced other materials such as glass.
    • More than a hundred billion pounds of plastic were produced in 2000 and 500 billion to a trillion plastic bags are consumed worldwide each year.
    • Their increased use has lead to a greater need for oil, toxic chemicals released from their manufacture and use, and eventually leaching into the environment.
            • Plastic bags kill marine animals as they mistake the bags for food.
            • Production of water bottles
            • contributes 2, 500, 000 tons of carbon
            • dioxide annually.
  • 34. DERLICT FISHING GEAR
    • Derelict fishing gear includes nets, lines, crab and shrimp traps/pots, and other recreational or commercial harvest equipment that has been lost or abandoned in the marine environment.
    • Modern nets and fishing line made of synthetic materials have been in use since the 1940s. Derelict fishing gear is long-lasting marine debris that poses many problems to people and to marine animals, including:
    • Entangling divers and swimmers;
    • Trapping and wounding or killing fish, shellfish, birds and marine mammals;
    • Degrading marine ecosystems and sensitive habitats;
    • Damaging propellers and rudders of recreational boats, commercial and military vessels;
  • 35. WHAT YOU CAN DO
    • Think about the materials and packaging you make be taking to the beach. Reduce, reuse, recycle. Choose reusable items and use fewer disposable ones.
    • Keep streets, sidewalks, parking lots and storm drains free of trash - they can empty into our oceans and waterways.
    • At the beach, park or playground, dispose of all trash in the proper receptacles or take your trash home with you. Pick up any debris you see while out.
    • Serve as an example to others. Get involved in cleanups in your area and encourage others to help keep the beaches and oceans clean.
    • If you use a cloth bag, you can save 6 bags a week, 24 bags a month, 288 bags a year, and 22,176 bags in the average lifetime. If just 1 out of 5 people in our country did this we would save 1,330,560,000,000 bags over our life time
  • 36. LAND BASED POLLUTION & WATER QUALITY Robin Knox Water Quality Consulting, Inc. Aquanimity Now! UH Botany
  • 37. What is the Clean Water Act?
    • Federal law with objective to: “…restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the nation’s waters”
  • 38. Clean Water Act
    • Goals include fishable swimmable waters
  • 39. Clean Water Act Goals Goals of Clean Water Act Eliminate discharges of pollution Financial assistance to POTW No toxic discharges Protect fish & wildlife, water recreation Area-wide treatment plans Research & development Control nonpoint source pollution NPDES Water quality standards Continuing Planning Process Polluted runoff control
  • 40. GROUNDWATER WATERSHED Land cover Natural processes Human activity Pollutant sources Transport Fate CONTINUING PLANNING PROCESS Water Quality Management Plans (Basin Plans, Areawide Plans, Facility Plans) WATER QUALITY ASSESSMENT Integrated report (2 yr) COMPREHENSIVE MONITORING STRATEGY CORE BEACH BIO TMDL PRC COMPLIANCE REGULATIONS WQS - Water Quality Standards (3 yr) Wastewater Discharge Regulations TMDL Polluted Runoff Control NPDES Permits (5 yr) Enforcement
  • 41. Water Quality Management
    • Monitor – ambient monitoring network (chemistry, microbiology, ecological)
    • Assess – statistically, visually
    • Report – Is water quality meeting standards? (List impaired waters)
    • Take Action – Pollution budgets (Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDL)), Permits, BMPs, watershed management
  • 42. What are water quality standards?
    • Standards are measurable goals for water quality
    • Three parts-
      • Designated use
      • Criteria (narrative or numeric)
      • Anti-degradation policy
    USE = recreational CRITERIA = enterococcus bacteria not to exceed geomean of 7 cfu/100ml
  • 43. Anti-degradation Policy
    • Antidegradation policy
      • Existing uses and level of water quality necessary to support existing uses shall be maintained and protected;
      • Lower water quality allowed if socio-economically justified but must still support use
  • 44. Maui’s Water Quality
  • 45. What Can YOU Do?
  • 46.
    • Advocacy
    • Educate yourself (check!)
    • Public Participation in rulemaking and permitting
    • Comments
    • Testimony
    • Letters and emails
    • Volunteer!
    • Whale Sanctuary Volunteer Water Quality
    • Monitoring
    • Mauka to Makai (Honolua Bay)
    • Southwest Maui Watershed Planning
    • Makai Watch
    • Stream Cleanups (Ala Wai canal)
    • Stand Up Paddle Clean Up Maunalua Bay
    • Aquatic Invasive Species Removal Maunalua Bay
    • Hanalei Watershed Hui
  • 47.
    • Personal Actions
    • reduce use of toxic chemicals
    • conserve water
    • care for the land
    • maintain vehicles and equipment
    • maintain waste disposal systems
    • minimize use of fertilizers
    • don't litter
    • be a participant in the public review process.
    Public Participation Participate in the management of water quality and prevention and control of pollution Department of Health Water Quality Standards Revisions http://hawaii.gov/health/environmental/env-planning/wqm/wqrev.htm Lahaina Injection Wells Hearings http://www.epa.gov/region09/water/groundwater/uic-permits.html#lahainahttp://dontinject.org/ EPA will hold a PUBLIC INFORMATIONAL MEETING AND PUBLIC HEARING ON MAUI - AUG 20th regarding the Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permits for the Lahaina Wastewater Reclamation Facility (LWRF). The public meeting and hearing will be held at: Lahaina Civic Center 
Social Hall Meeting Area
 1840 Honoapiilani Hwy,
Lahaina, Maui, HI 96761 Public Notices of Environmental Assessments, EIS, Pollution Control Permits,Water Quality Certifications and other Notices: http://hawaii.gov/health/environmental/oeqc/index.html/
  • 48. CORAL HEALTH Darla White Hawaii Division of Aquatic Resources
  • 49.  
  • 50.
    • Coral Bleaching
    • Coral Disease
    • Crown-of-Thorns Sea Stars
    • Marine Alien Invasive Species
    • Native Species Blooms
  • 51.
    • Hawaii’s reefs are vast
      • 410,000 acres, representing almost 85% of coral reefs under US protection
      • Over 5,000 species, almost 25% endemic
      • Culturally, economically, biologically critical
  • 52.
    • Aquatic Invasive Species
    • Climate Change and Marine Disease
    Address Hawaii’s need to maintain reef resources in the face of increasing human populations and changing climatic conditions
  • 53. Bleaching: loss of symbiotic algae within coral tissue leads to reduced growth, reproduction and sometimes death 1998 world-wide mass bleaching 16% of world’s reefs lost
  • 54. GBR- 3 major COTS outbreaks in the past 40 years
  • 55. Sept 1969-Nov 1970 Outbreak of COTS off Molokai 20,000 animals Branham et al. 1971. Science 172(3988):1155-1157
  • 56. Maui’s Kihei coast lost potential revenue $20 million Oahu Smothering corals
  • 57.
    • Disease: Any impairment of vital body functions, systems, or organs.
    • Biotic
      • Causal agent a living organism
        • Pathogen,such as viruses or bacteria
        • Parasites
    • Abiotic
      • Causal agent an environmental stressor
        • Changes in salinity, temperature, light, etc.
        • Exposure to toxic chemicals
  • 58. Coral disease in Hawaii 17 disease states widespread low prevalence Montipora multi-focal TLS Montipora dark band Por trematodiasis Poc white-band disease Acrop white syndrome Acrop growth anomalies Porites growth anomalies
  • 59. Climate Change + increasing anthropogenic stressors Reefs at risk
  • 60. Are Hawaii’s reefs at risk? YES!
  • 61. What can we do about it?
  • 62.
    • Eyes of the Reef Network: Level I Involvement
        • All ocean users
        • Train to spot 5 dangers to reef health
        • Watch and report!
    • Activate a rapid response by management
    • Develop a database of changing reef conditions
  • 63.
    • You will know how to:
    • Classify coral types by shape and texture
    • Recognize and categorize coral diseases
    • Differentiate between coral bleaching, disease and biological interactions
    • Recognize the 5 most dangerous alien invasive algae
    • Recognize and assess native invasive blooms
    • Report reef threats to the Eyes of the Reef Network
    • YOU WILL BE THE “EYES” ON OUR HAWAIIAN REEFS
  • 64. K-12 CLASSROOM APPLICATIONS
    • Use as classroom text to teach marine conservation issues
    • Develop class curriculum for any age based on conservation topics expressed in guide
    • Pull themes from guide and expand into full class topics, projects or discussion
    • Use guide to expand one existing topics or curriculum
  • 65. K-12 CLASSROOM APPLICATIONS
    • Other Ways To Help: School Service/ Community Projects
    • Science Experiments: coral transects, water quality, marine debris
    • Conduct beach cleanups, invasive algae collections, recycling programs
    • Community Presentations
    • Visual Aids/ Outreach Materials (School & Community)
    • Work with elders
    • Student Advocacy (campaigns, letters, petitions)
    • Have students study how forests are connected to the reef and begin to plant native plants along the stream bank in order to control erosion. 
    • Be Creative & Have Fun !
  • 66. INFORMAL OUTREACH APPLICATIONS
    • Resource Management
    • Enforcement
    • Community Empowerment
    What YOU Can Do! Resource Management Enforcement Community Empowerment
  • 67. Contexts & Venues for Distribution?
    • Examples…
    • By your phone book!
    • Vehicle glove compartments
    • Onboard boats
    • Dive Shops & Hotels’ Beach Activity/Watersports Centers
    • Concierges & Activity Agencies
    • Libraries
    • where else?
  • 68. WEB PORTAL [email_address]
  • 69. HAWAI‘I ECOTUBE http://hawaiiecotube.blogspot.com & http://www.facebook.com/hawaiiecotube
  • 70. WHERE TO GET COPIES
    • ELECTRONIC COPIES
    • The guide is available to download from several websites:
    • CORAL Website: www.coral.org
    • Project S.E.A-Link Website: www.projectsealink.org
    • Recreation Impacts to Reefs Local Action Strategy (DAR) Website:
    • http://hawaii.gov/dlnr/dar/coral/coral_las_rir.html
    • HARD COPIES
    • Guides available for distribution while supplies last, contact:
    • Liz Foote, [email_address]
    • Emma Anders, [email_address]
    • BULK QUANTITIES
    • Bulk quantities may be available for distriubtion for education purposes.
    • Please contact Liz Foote ( [email_address] ) or Emma Anders ( [email_address] )
    • for details.
  • 71. FEEDBACK Your suggestions, revisions, additions and other edits are welcome! [email_address]
  • 72. MAHALO Guidebook Design: Workshop Sponsors: Guidebook Funders: A special thank you to all our contributors and to all of you for your participation.