Ishihara

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Ishihara

  1. 1. Video in the Classroom Ishihara, N. & Chi, J. C. (2004). Authentic video in the beginning ESOL classroom: using a full-length feature film for listening and speaking strategy practice. English Teacher Forum 42 (1), 30-35.
  2. 2. Summary With the proper support and preparation, movies can become an excellent teaching tool in the language classroom. Movies are interesting, motivating, authentic sources of language input. Ishihara and Chi outline many reasons why movies are great tools in the classroom. Among their many attributes, they provide multi-sensory input in the form of language, visuals, contextual cues, and cultural information. Videos can be made manageable by cutting them up into different sections. While this breaks the continuity of the film, it allows the teacher to provide learning support and activities while at the same time diminishing the feeling of being overwhelmed by the language. Why movies?
  3. 3. Summary The authors identify three types of activities that can be used to teach with movies: <ul><li>Pre-Viewing Activities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>These activities serve to set a scene, activate student knowledge about the context of the scene, practice key vocabulary, and inform them of their expectations. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>While-Viewing Activities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>These activities focus students attention on visuals, specific language, general ideas, gist, and so on. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Post-Viewing Activities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>These activities have students answer comprehension questions, practice predictions, and focus on speaking through role plays and other activities. </li></ul></ul>The Activities
  4. 4. Summary <ul><li>What About Bob? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>very interesting story with universal humor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>no offensive language </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>good content for practicing and inferencing skills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>probably not previously viewed by the students in their native language. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Pre-Listening Activities included: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>reviewing key vocabulary, setting up the scene, and telling students to observe what happens. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>W hile-Listening Activities included: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>students sitting in pairs, with one student only watching, and one student only listening. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>students watching a scene with dialogue (a dinner conversation) reconstructed it with strips of paper with the dialogue printed on it. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Post-Viewing Activities included: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>role-plays were utilized to reconstruct the scene. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>As an added bonus, students can also choose the best performances of the class. </li></ul></ul>Sample Activities with What About Bob?
  5. 5. Summary <ul><li>Assessment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Informal Assessment – listening and observing students during activities and discussion </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Handouts – comprehension questions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tape Journal Assignment - students recorded, on cassette, answers to previously recorded, guided questions. Students had to: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>describe characters, describe an event, summarize the film, and give their opinion </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Problems and Solutions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Technical Problems – know how to use equipment and have a back- up plan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Overwhelming Language – students should focus on general ideas rather than specifics </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Previously Seen – students who have already seen the film can assist other students with comprehension or pay attention to more detail </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Waste of Time - The teacher can point out that these activities offer lots of speaking practice, introduce new words and language, and also presents new cultural information. </li></ul></ul>Assessment, Problems, and Solutions
  6. 6. Summary Ishihara and Chi’s article spelled out the why and how of movies in the classroom. They can serve as an interesting and authentic media – the source of rich cultural and linguistic input. With the proper support and preparation, they can be used to practice many different skills, and are especially good for speaking practice. While there may be some problems, if they are dealt with in advance, full-length movies become an excellent tool for English language instruction. Conclusion
  7. 7. Reflections Ishihara and Chi did a good job explaining why movies can and should be used in the classroom. They are interesting and motivating, they hold the students attention, they are rich in context, they are a source of excellent language exposure, and they are full of cultural information. I have used videos in the classroom, but only as clips. I was wary of overwhelming students with too much authentic language, but the authors gave me a sense that with the proper support and preparation, full-length movies can be used, and can provide more practice than just disconnected clips. I think that readers can gather a good sense of the material development process from this article. The authors watched the film, most likely several times, came up with objectives based on their students and what the movie offered, and then found specific scenes that contained the proper language. They then made activities to focus on specific scenes and their corresponding objectives. The simple categorization of pre-, while-, and post-viewing activities gives the teacher a general sense of how to organize their video activities. Benefits Benefits
  8. 8. Reflections There is a sidebar on the second page of this article that highlights an inherent problem with showing movies in class. Students commented: Drawbacks Drawbacks “ Don’t stop [the video] now. We want to see more!” “ I have an appointment on Wednesday so I can’t come to class. Am I going to miss [ What about Bob ]?” <ul><li>Breaking up movies into manageable segments is good for practice, but it also breaks the continuity of the film, as well as the student’s interest and attention. A movie is usually around 2 hours long. Breaking up a film and showing a few clips each class consumes a lot of time. It can turn a 2 hour movie into a multi-week unit. Although the students will be learning a lot, I feel a loss of interest and motivation is inevitable. </li></ul><ul><li>There are a few other drawbacks as well: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Preparation to teach a movie takes a lot of time and energy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Although these activities were designed for beginner levels, they were also made for adults. Younger age groups may require more (or less) structure. </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Application The following activity was developed for a low level EFL middle school class in South Korea. Classes have between 30-40 students, and meet once per week. Though the article was based on showing full-length movies, this activity utilizes a five minute clip from an episode of Mr. Bean. All activities, whether from TV shows or movies, are based around clips. The difference lies in the fact that teaching with a movie provides a greater degree of connectedness - between both scenes and themes - than TV shows and other random clips. For these reasons, and practical for purposes, only a clip is used. However, these activities can be extended, modified, and adapted for other video-based lessons.
  10. 10. Application The following activity was developed for a low level EFL middle school class in South Korea. Classes have between 30-40 students, and meet once per week. Though the article was based on showing full-length movies, this activity utilizes a five minute clip from an episode of Mr. Bean. All activities, whether from TV shows or movies, are based around clips. The difference lies in the fact that teaching with a movie provides a greater degree of connectedness - between both scenes and themes - than TV shows and other random clips. For these reasons, and practical for purposes, only a clip is used. However, these activities can be extended, modified, and adapted for other video-based lessons.
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  15. 15. Discussion List 2-3 discussion questions for the class. These questions will be the focus of the discussion for that reading in the weekly forums. Also copy these questions into a separate thread in the forum, so your classmates do not have to open the presentation each time they want to remember the questions .

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