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FirePro Monitors Product Overview

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A product overview of FirePro Monitors from Potter Roemer-FirePro, a member of Morris Group Internaitonal. Potter Roemer/ Fire Pro is the leading producer and supplier of firefighting and fire …

A product overview of FirePro Monitors from Potter Roemer-FirePro, a member of Morris Group Internaitonal. Potter Roemer/ Fire Pro is the leading producer and supplier of firefighting and fire protection equipment.

For more information, please visit www.firepromonitors.com

Published in: Education, Technology, Business

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Transcript

  • 1. FirePro Monitors Product Overview
  • 2. Topics
    • Monitors
      • Function
      • Monitor / Nozzle Applications
      • Manual Monitors
      • Motorized monitors
      • Elevated Monitors
    • Waterways
      • Single vs. Bifurcated
      • Single waterway geometry
    • Nozzles
      • Straight Bore
        • Advantages and disadvantages
        • Flow rate equation
        • Typical fixed orifice flow rates
        • Change in flow rate due to change in nozzle inlet pressure
      • Fog / Stream
        • Fixed Flow Rate
        • Adjustable
        • Constant Pressure
      • Reach
        • Keys to maximum reach
        • Straight bore vs. fog nozzle
        • Reach for a typical 750GPM monitor / Nozzle combination
      • Jet Reaction Force
  • 3. Monitors
    • Question: What is the primary function of a Fire monitor?
    • Answer:
      • To provide physical support for the nozzle.
      • To endure the jet reaction forces produced at the nozzle
      • To provide water supply to nozzle with minimal pressure losses
      • To provide either manual or motorized articulation up / down, left / right in order to direct the stream at the target
  • 4. Monitor / Nozzle Applications
    • Question: What are some example applications for monitor / nozzle combinations?
    • Answer:
    • Firefighting (Municipal, Industrial and Marine)
    • Tank Cooling (Refineries)
    • Tank Cleaning (refineries)
    • Sludge removal (Waste water plants)
    • Dredging (Excavation)
    • Dust Abatement (Waste management)
    • Crowd control
  • 5. Manual Monitors
    • Question: What are the different styles of manual monitors offered?
    • Answer: There are two basic styles of manual monitors that are offered by FirePro. They are:
    • Tiller bar: Monitor operated using a tiller bar mounted to the upper elbow weldment (Shown below on the left)
    • Hand Wheel: Monitor is operated by turning the hand wheels clockwise or counterclockwise to move monitor up, down, left or right. (Shown below on the right)
  • 6. Manual Monitors
    • Question: What are the advantages and disadvantages to manual tiller bar monitors vs. hand wheel monitors?
    • Answer:
    • Tiller Bar (Shown on the left):
      • Advantages
        • Inexpensive design
        • Reliable (few moving parts)
        • Simple construction
      • Disadvantages
        • Locking mechanism is inferior to hand wheel monitor (Worm driven)
        • Heavy nozzles require a counterweight
    • Hand Wheel (Shown on the right):
      • Advantages
        • No locking required to maintain position (Worm driven)
        • More precise positioning possible
        • Better support for heavy nozzles
      • Disadvantages
        • More expensive design
        • More moving parts
  • 7. Motorized Monitors
    • Question: What types of motor drive options are offered by FirePro on their motorized monitors?
    • Answer: All motorized monitors are worm gear driven. Drive type can by either hydraulic or 12/24VDC Electric. Firepro’s 12/24VDC Ultra-low electric monitor is shown below on the left. The hydraulic version is shown on the right. Monitor control box is available with controls for electric or hydraulic fog nozzle and/or water valve.
  • 8. Elevated Monitors
    • Question: What are the different types of elevated monitors offered by FirePro:
    • Answer: Elevated monitors can be broken down into two basic groups:
      • Supported (monitor requires reinforcement from a supporting structure) (Shown to the left). Heights up to 150’.
      • Freestanding (Monitor is mounted and supported by the base inlet flange only) (Shown to the right). Height up to 42’.
  • 9. Elevated Monitors (cont.)
    • Question: What are advantages and disadvantages to using a supported elevated monitor vs. a freestanding unit?
    • Answer:
      • Freestanding
        • Advantages
          • Simple flange mounting with no supporting structure needed
          • Good overall flow characteristics
        • Disadvantages
          • Heights are limited to 42’
          • Maximum flow rates are limited
          • More Nozzle deflection than a supported unit
      • Supported
        • Advantages
          • Heights up to 150’
          • Higher flow rates supported
          • Nozzle deflection is minimized
        • Disadvantages
          • Supporting structure is required
          • Higher pressure losses at heights exceeding 42’ than a freestanding unit
  • 10. Waterways
    • Question: What are advantages and disadvantages to a single waterway vs. a dual (bifurcated) waterway?
    • Answer:
      • Single Waterway
        • Advantages
          • Constant velocity
          • Simpler construction
          • Good overall flow characteristics
        • Disadvantages
          • Bulkier shape and size.
      • Dual Waterway
        • Advantages
          • Compact construction
          • Symmetrical design
        • Disadvantages
          • Changing stream velocities and directions.
          • Loss of stream energy (through friction = heat loss)
          • More difficult construction (requires castings)
  • 11. Question: Why is a single waterway monitor shaped the way it is? Answer: A single waterway monitor is shaped the way it is so the centerline of the nozzle passes through the centerline of both swivels. The reason for this is to eliminate any resulting torque about either swivel that would be produced by the jet reaction force of the nozzle. For a torque to exist, there has to be a reaction force AND a moment arm. Ensuring that the nozzle centerline passes through the swivel centerlines eliminates the moment arm, thereby eliminating the resulting torque. If a moment arm did exist, the torque to turn the monitor would dramatically increase. Waterways (cont.)
  • 12. Question: Why is a single waterway monitor shaped the way it is? Answer: A single waterway monitor is shaped the way it is so the centerline of the nozzle passes through the centerline of both swivels. The reason for this is to eliminate any resulting torque about either swivel that would be produced by the jet reaction force of the nozzle. For a torque to exist, there has to be a reaction force AND a moment arm. Ensuring that the nozzle centerline passes through the swivel centerlines eliminates the moment arm, thereby eliminating the resulting torque. If a moment arm did exist, the torque to turn the monitor would dramatically increase. Waterways (cont.)
  • 13. Waterways (cont.)
    • The following is a simple illustration showing the torque calculation with and without an existing moment arm. Shown on the left would be a swivel with a existing moment arm. The torque in this situation is T = JL
    • Where:
    • J = Jet reaction force (lbs)
    • L = Length of the moment arm (inches)
    • T = Torque (in*lbs)
    • Shown on the right would be a swivel with no moment arm, i.e. L = 0. The torque in this case would be T = J*0 = 0 because the length of the moment arm is zero
    • -
  • 14. Straight bore nozzles
    • Question: What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of straight bore nozzles?
    • Answer:
    • Advantages:
      • Maximum reach
      • Best overall straight stream quality
      • Inexpensive
      • Reliable
    • Disadvantages:
      • Non-adjustable flow rate
      • Non-adjustable stream shape
      • If pressure changes, nozzle must be changed to maintain flow rate
      • Low pressure yields poor stream velocity and poor reach
  • 15. Flow rate equation for a fixed orifice
    • Q = 29.71Cd 2 √P
    • Where:
    • Q = Flow Rate (GPM)
    • C = Flow coefficient = .98 for a typical straight bore nozzle
    • d = Orifice diameter (in.)
    • P = Nozzle inlet pressure (PSI)
  • 16. Flow rate equation for a fixed orifice (cont.)
    • Example: Find the flow rate through a 1.5” fixed orifice nozzle with a nozzle inlet pressure 80PSI.
    • Answer:
    • Using the equation: Q = 29.71Cd 2 √P,
    • Q = 29.71(.98)(1.5 2 ) √80 = 586GPM
  • 17. Typical fixed orifice flow rates * Pressure at Nozzle Inlet Flow Rate (GPM) Orifice Size @75 PSI* @100 PSI* @125 PSI* --------------- ---------- ----------- ------------- .500” 63 73 81 .625” 98 114 127 .750” 142 164 183 1.000” 252 291 326 1.250” 394 455 509 1.500” 567 655 732 1.750” 772 892 997 2.000” 1009 1165 1302
  • 18. Fixed flow rate fog nozzles
    • Question: What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of fixed flow rate fog nozzles?
    • Answer:
    • Advantages:
      • Adjustable from straight stream to full fog pattern
      • Good straight stream quality
      • Reliable (No moving parts)
      • Reasonably inexpensive
    • Disadvantages:
      • Non-adjustable flow rate
      • Less reach than a straight bore nozzle
      • If pressure changes, nozzle restriction must be changed to maintain flow rate
      • Low pressure yields poor stream velocity and poor reach
  • 19. Adjustable flow nozzles
    • Question: What types of adjustable nozzles does FirePro offer:
    • Answer: There are two types of nozzles that can be considered adjustable:
    • Stacked straight bore nozzle
      • Nozzle consists of a series of different orifices sizes that may be unscrewed and removed or replaced in order to achieve a range of flow rates. (Shown below on the left)
    • Selectable flow rate fog nozzle
      • Nozzle has a selectable flow rate feature that allows the user to choose a few different flow rates
  • 20. Constant pressure fog nozzles
    • Question: How does a constant pressure nozzle differ from a fixed flow nozzle?
    • Answer: A fixed flow fog nozzle has a fixed restriction that can only be changed manually. A constant pressure nozzle has a spring loaded poppet that effectively reduces or increases the flow rate automatically in order to maintain constant pressure.
  • 21. Constant pressure fog nozzles (cont.)
    • Question: What are some of the advantages and disadvantages to Constant pressure nozzles?
    • Answer:
    • Advantages:
      • Improved stream velocity at low pressures
      • Improved reach at low pressure
      • Nozzle automatically adjusts when system flow capacity changes
    • Disadvantages:
      • More moving parts
      • Less reliable that fixed flow nozzles
      • Any binding in poppet assembly results in poor performance
  • 22. Reach
    • Question: How is maximum reach achieved through any nozzle?
    • Answer: Maximum reach is achieved through the formation of tightly grouped, large slugs of water. Large slugs have less frontal surface area which reduces drag and loss of stream energy due to wind resistance.
  • 23. Reach (cont.)
    • Question: Why do straight bore nozzles typically reach farther than fog nozzles?
    • Answer: Straight bore nozzles do a much better job of forming large slugs of water. Because the water is forced around a poppet in a fog nozzle, some the water is broken up and atomized. Once the water is atomized, some of the stream energy is lost and frontal surface area of the slugs increases which reduces the effective reach.
  • 24. Reach (cont.)
    • Question: Can reach be calculated for any monitor / nozzle combination?
    • Answer: Yes, but it requires software or a nomogram and some tabular data that has to be found experimentally. Firepro’s Trajectory Plot program may be used for this purpose.
  • 25. Reach (cont.)
    • Question: What factors affect stream reach and trajectory:
    • Answer: Listed below are some of the factors that affect reach:
      • Crosswinds (Cause atomization as well as changes in stream trajectory and magnitude which reduces effective reach.)
      • Nozzle inlet pressure
        • Optimum nozzle inlet pressure is between 80-100PSI
        • Excessive pressure causes atomization which reduces reach.
        • Insufficient pressure causes poor stream velocity which reduces effective reach
      • Nozzle style and design
        • Straight bore nozzles form larger slugs of water with less atomization
        • Fog nozzles redirect the stream around a poppet causing atomization as well as loss of stream energy through heat (Energy lost due to friction = heat loss)
  • 26. Reach (cont.)
    • Question: What is the effective reach for a typical 750GPM monitor @ 100PSI using a straight bore nozzle vs. a fog nozzle?
    • Answer:
    • Typical reach at various nozzle angles for each combination is shown below:
  • 27. Jet Reaction Force
    • Question: What is jet reaction force and how is it calculated?
    • Answer: Jet reaction force is a force that is produced when the water in the waterway is accelerated through the nozzle. As the slugs of water leave the nozzle and enter the atmosphere, the force pushing the slugs of water out of the nozzle has an equal and opposite force that pushes back on the nozzle. The equation for jet reaction force is shown below:
    • J = .0529Q√P
    • Where:
    • J = Jet reaction force (LBS)
    • Q = Flow rate (GPM)
    • P = Nozzle Inlet pressure (PSI)
  • 28. Jet Reaction Force
    • Example: Find the jet reaction force for a straight bore nozzle flowing 500GPM@120PSI.
    • Answer:
    • Using the equation: J = .0529Q√P,
    • J = .0529(500)√120 = 290LBS