Alignment	
  of	
  Ontology	
  Design	
  
Pa2erns:	
  Class	
  As	
  Property	
  Value,	
  
Value	
  Par::on	
  and	
  Nor...
Outline	
  
•  Introduc:on	
  
•  Revisi:ng	
  the	
  Class	
  as	
  Property	
  Value	
  (CPV)	
  ODP	
  
•  Revisi:ng	
 ...
Introduc:on	
  
•  Ontology	
  Design	
  Pa2erns	
  (ODPs)	
  evolved	
  from	
  design	
  
pa2ern:	
  „archetypal	
  solu...
Revisi:ng	
  the	
  Class	
  as	
  Property	
  Value	
  (CPV)	
  ODP	
  	
  
(Noy,	
  2005)	
  
4	
  
Approach	
  5:	
  Us...
Approach	
  4:	
  Create	
  a	
  special	
  restric:on	
  in	
  lieu	
  of	
  using	
  a	
  specific	
  value	
  
5	
  B.	
...
Key	
  Characteris:cs	
  of	
  Approach	
  4	
  of	
  the	
  CPV	
  ODP	
  
6	
  
•  Compliance	
  to	
  OWL	
  1	
  DL	
 ...
Decoupling	
  the	
  Class	
  as	
  Property	
  Value	
  OPD	
  
7	
  
•  Implicit	
  modica:on	
  of	
  the	
  originally...
Approach	
  4:	
  Changing	
  the	
  Target	
  Domain	
  from	
  ``Book´´	
  to	
  ``Zoo´´	
  
8	
  
Animal
Book
About
Ani...
Approach	
  4:	
  Changing	
  the	
  Target	
  Domain	
  from	
  ``Book´´	
  to	
  ``Zoo´´	
  
9	
  
Animal
Lion
African
L...
Visual	
  Nota:on	
  for	
  ODPs	
  
10	
  B.	
  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,	
  M.	
  Ge,	
  M.	
  Hepp	
  
owl:Thing	
  
	
  	
  ...
Example	
  of	
  coarse-­‐	
  and	
  strict-­‐	
  CPV	
  ODP	
  
11	
  B.	
  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,	
  M.	
  Ge,	
  M.	
  Hep...
strict-­‐CPV	
  versus	
  coarse-­‐CPV	
  ODP	
  
12	
  
•  In	
  the	
  strict-­‐CPV,	
  the	
  natural	
  range	
  (rdfs...
Revisi:ng	
  the	
  Value	
  Par::on	
  (VP)	
  ODP	
  	
  
(Rector,	
  2005)	
  
13	
  
Pa2ern	
  1:	
  Values	
  as	
  s...
Pa2ern	
  2.	
  Representa:on	
  using	
  variant	
  2:	
  Placing	
  an	
  existen:al	
  
restric:on	
  on	
  the	
  indi...
Key	
  Characteris:cs	
  of	
  Pa2ern	
  2	
  –	
  Variant	
  2	
  of	
  the	
  VP	
  ODP	
  
15	
  
•  Compliance	
  to	
...
Revisi:ng	
  the	
  Normalisa:on	
  ODP	
  	
  
(Egana-­‐Aranguren,	
  2009)	
  
16	
  B.	
  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,	
  M.	
  ...
Normalisa:on	
  ODP	
  (Asserted)	
  
17	
  B.	
  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,	
  M.	
  Ge,	
  M.	
  Hepp	
  
•  the	
  exis:ng	
  ...
Normalisa:on	
  ODP	
  (Inferred)	
  
18	
  B.	
  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,	
  M.	
  Ge,	
  M.	
  Hepp	
  
Normalised	
  ontolog...
Key	
  Characteris:cs	
  of	
  the	
  Normalisa:on	
  ODP	
  
19	
  
•  Compliance	
  to	
  OWL	
  1	
  DL	
  profile	
  
•...
20	
  
Alignment	
  of	
  the	
  CPV,	
  VP	
  and	
  Normalisa:on	
  ODPs	
  
B.	
  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,	
  M.	
  Ge,	
  M...
Result:	
  Common	
  Func:onal	
  Groups	
  in	
  ODPs	
  
21	
  
•  Target	
  Domain	
  
•  Domain	
  Elements	
  
•  Dom...
22	
  
Result:	
  Example	
  of	
  Common	
  Func:onal	
  Groups	
  
Domain	
  
Elements	
  
Domain	
  
Defined	
  
Classes...
Similari:es	
  and	
  Differences	
  in	
  ODPs	
  Func:onal	
  Groups	
  
23	
  B.	
  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,	
  M.	
  Ge,	
  ...
Conclusions	
  
•  Approach	
  4	
  of	
  the	
  CPV	
  ODP	
  can	
  be	
  decoupled	
  into	
  two	
  
	
  
•  A	
  comp...
Future	
  Work	
  
	
  
•  Punning	
  meta-­‐modelling	
  capability	
  available	
  in	
  OWL	
  2	
  
•  Scale	
  -­‐	
 ...
THANK	
  YOU	
  
Bene	
  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,	
  Mouzhi	
  Ge,	
  Mar:n	
  Hepp,	
  Alignment	
  of	
  Ontology	
  Design	
...
Key	
  References	
  
1.  Noy,	
  N.F.:	
  Represen:ng	
  Classes	
  As	
  Property	
  Values	
  on	
  the	
  Seman:c	
  
...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Alignment of Ontology Design Patterns: Class As Property Value, Value Partition and Normalisation

806 views

Published on

This presentation revisits a specific version of three different Ontology Design Patterns (ODPs): Class as a Property Value (CPV), Value Partition (VP) and Normalisation. The review of the CPV identifies two distinct modelling problems being tangled that prompt to decouple the pattern into two variants: a strict and a coarse CPV pattern. The examination continues with a comparative analysis among the patterns that reveals key alignments and differences at the structural and semantic level. (Related full paper available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-33615-7_16)

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
806
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
21
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Alignment of Ontology Design Patterns: Class As Property Value, Value Partition and Normalisation

  1. 1. Alignment  of  Ontology  Design   Pa2erns:  Class  As  Property  Value,   Value  Par::on  and  Normalisa:on   Bene  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  Mouzhi  Ge  and  Mar6n  Hepp   The  11th  Interna6onal  Conference  on  Ontologies,  DataBases,  and  Applica6ons   of  Seman6cs  (ODBASE)  2012  –  Rome  (Italy)  
  2. 2. Outline   •  Introduc:on   •  Revisi:ng  the  Class  as  Property  Value  (CPV)  ODP   •  Revisi:ng  the  Value  Par::on  (VP)  ODP   •  Revisi:ng  the  Normalisa:on  ODP   •  Alignment  of  the  CPV,  VP  and  Normalisa:on  ODPs   •  Conclusions     •  Future  Work   2  B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp  
  3. 3. Introduc:on   •  Ontology  Design  Pa2erns  (ODPs)  evolved  from  design   pa2ern:  „archetypal  solu.ons  to  design  problems  in  a   certain  context“     •  ODPs  are  receiving  significant  a2en:on  due  to  the  success   of  so0ware  DPs  in  soTware  engineering     •  Pa2erns  that  may  not  be  applied  consistently,  can  lead  to   interoperability  issues  among  the  ontology  models   involved     •  Ideally,  the  outcome  of  this  work  will  reduce  the   opportunity  for  unintended  inconsistencies.   3  B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp  
  4. 4. Revisi:ng  the  Class  as  Property  Value  (CPV)  ODP     (Noy,  2005)   4   Approach  5:  Use  classes  directly   as  annota:on  property  values  Approach  4:  Create  a  special  restric6on   in  lieu  of  using  a  specific  value   Approach  3:  Create  a  parallel  hierarchy   of  instances  as  property  values   Approach  2:  Create  special  instances  of   the  class  to  be  used  as  property  values   Approach  1:  Use  classes   directly  as  property  values   B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp  
  5. 5. Approach  4:  Create  a  special  restric:on  in  lieu  of  using  a  specific  value   5  B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp  
  6. 6. Key  Characteris:cs  of  Approach  4  of  the  CPV  ODP   6   •  Compliance  to  OWL  1  DL  profile.   •  Automa:c  classifica.on  of  books  based  on  subject  by  a   standard  OWL  DL  reasoner.   •  Use  of  anonymous  individuals  to  approximate  the  use   of  a  class  as  a  property  value.   B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp  
  7. 7. Decoupling  the  Class  as  Property  Value  OPD   7   •  Implicit  modica:on  of  the  originally  intended  seman:c  of  the  exis:ng  class   hierarchy  subsumed  by  :Animal   –  Any  instance  of  :Animal  represents  originally  an  actual    animal  in  the  real  world   •  the  original  seman:cs  of  the  classes  that  provide  the  values  (subsumed  by  :Animal)   –  When  an  instance  of  :Animal  is  used  as  the  value  of  the  property  dc:subject,  it  stands   for  an  anonymous  generic  animal  interpreted  as  the  subject    of  a  book   •  the  seman:cs  of  the  expected  range  of  dc:subject   •  Coupling  inadvertently  two  dis:nct  modelling  problems  into  one   –  The  problem  of  using  a  class  as  a  property  value  per  se  (strict-­‐CPV)   –  The  issue  of  not  only  using  a  class  as  a  property  value,  but  also,  the  possibility  of   altering  its  original  intended  meaning  in  the  process  as  a  result  (coarse-­‐CPV)   B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp  
  8. 8. Approach  4:  Changing  the  Target  Domain  from  ``Book´´  to  ``Zoo´´   8   Animal Book About Animals “Lions: Life in the Pride” Lion African Lion rdfs:subclassOf Unidentified Lion(s) Unidentified African Lion(s) “The African Lion” rdfs:subclassOf rdf:type rdf:type rdf:type rdf:type dc:subject dc:subject Book rdfs:subclassOf Zoo Zoo With Animals London Zoo Munich Zoo rdfs:subclassOf rdf:type rdf:type :hasAnimal :hasAnimal ``Book´´     Target  Domain   ``Zoo´´     Target  Domain   An  anonymous   instance  of  :Animal   does  not  represent  an   actual  animal  but  the   subject  of  a  book   B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp   2   1  
  9. 9. Approach  4:  Changing  the  Target  Domain  from  ``Book´´  to  ``Zoo´´   9   Animal Lion African Lion rdfs:subclassOf Unidentified Lion(s) Unidentified African Lion(s) rdfs:subclassOf rdf:type rdf:type Zoo Zoo With Animals London Zoo Munich Zoo rdfs:subclassOf rdf:type rdf:type :hasAnimal :hasAnimal An  anonymous   instance  of  :Animal   represents  an  actual   animal   B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp  
  10. 10. Visual  Nota:on  for  ODPs   10  B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp   owl:Thing      |-­‐-­‐  :Class1      |-­‐-­‐  :Class2      |-­‐-­‐  :Person          |-­‐-­‐  (=)  :Male_person              |-­‐-­‐  (v)  :John          |-­‐-­‐  (=)  :Female_person              |-­‐-­‐  (v)  :Mary      |-­‐-­‐  (P)  :Gender          |-­‐-­‐  :Male_gender          |-­‐-­‐  :Female_gender     owl:topObjectProperty      |-­‐-­‐  :has_health_status   (=)  denotes  a   defined  owl:Class   (v)  denotes  a   owl:NamedIndividual   (P)  denotes  a   class  par..on   |-­‐-­‐  denotes   rdfs:subClassOf   |-­‐-­‐  with  (v)   denotes  rdf:type   |-­‐-­‐  denotes   rdfs:subPropertyOf   Nodes  denote   an  owl:Class  by   default  
  11. 11. Example  of  coarse-­‐  and  strict-­‐  CPV  ODP   11  B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp   coarse-­‐CPV   ``Book´´  Target  Domain   strict-­‐CPV   ``Zoo´´  Target  Domain  
  12. 12. strict-­‐CPV  versus  coarse-­‐CPV  ODP   12   •  In  the  strict-­‐CPV,  the  natural  range  (rdfs:range)  of  the  property  :hasAnimal   does  align  with  what  the  class  :Animal  originally  represents   •  In  the  coarse-­‐CPV,  the  natural  range  of  the  property  dc:subject  in  the  context   of  Approach  4  of  the  CPV  ODP,  does  not  align  with  the  orignal  seman:c  of   the  class  :Animal   •  Syntac.cally,  the  implementa:on  of  the  coarse-­‐CPV  and  strict-­‐CPV  ODPs,  is   essen:ally  equivalent   –  Elements  placed  at  equivalent  posi:ons  on  the  ontological  structure  of  both  pa2erns,   perform  equivalent  func:ons  and  are  implemented  following  the  same  set  of  OWL   idioms   •  Seman.cally,  the  implica:ons  of  each  variant  can  be  par:cularly  different.   B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp  
  13. 13. Revisi:ng  the  Value  Par::on  (VP)  ODP     (Rector,  2005)   13   Pa2ern  1:  Values  as  sets  of  individuals   Pa2ern  2.  Representa:on  variant  1:   Using  a  fact  about  the  individual   PaQern  2.  Representa6on  using  variant  2:  Placing   an  existen6al  restric6on  on  the  individual   B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp  
  14. 14. Pa2ern  2.  Representa:on  using  variant  2:  Placing  an  existen:al   restric:on  on  the  individual   14  B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp   An  anonymous  instance   of  :Good_health_value   (e.g.,  :Johns_Health)   does  represent  an   actual  health  value  
  15. 15. Key  Characteris:cs  of  Pa2ern  2  –  Variant  2  of  the  VP  ODP   15   •  Compliance  to  OWL  1  DL  profile.   •  The  use  of  classes  instead  of  individuals  to  represent  the   feature  space  (good,  medium,  poor)  of  the  feature  class   (health)   –  Use  of  anonymous  individuals  to  represent  the  health  status  of  a   person  (e.g.,  :Johns_Health)   •  Automa:c  classifica.on  of  people  based  on  their  health   status  by  a  standard  OWL  DL  reasoner.   B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp  
  16. 16. Revisi:ng  the  Normalisa:on  ODP     (Egana-­‐Aranguren,  2009)   16  B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp   poly-­‐hierarchy   (tangled  ontology)   Non-­‐normalised  ontology:  the   subsump:on  rela:ons  that  create   the  poly-­‐hierarchies  are  manually   asserted  
  17. 17. Normalisa:on  ODP  (Asserted)   17  B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp   •  the  exis:ng  poly-­‐hierarchies  in  the   structure  of  the  normalized  asserted   ontology  model  are  removed     •  the  subsump:on  rela:ons  are   implemented  explicitly  as  restric:ons   single-­‐inheritance   (untangled  ontology)   Normalised  ontology  (asserted):     the  pa2ern  allows  exactly  one   unlabelled  flavour  of  is-­‐a  link,   which  translates  into  a  single-­‐ inheritance  structure  of  the   asserted  subsump:on  rela:ons.  
  18. 18. Normalisa:on  ODP  (Inferred)   18  B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp   Normalised  ontology  (inferred):     the  implementa:on  of  the   subsump:on  rela:ons  explicitly  as   restric.ons  enables  a  standard  DL   reasoner  to  automa.cally  maintain   the  original  poly-­‐hierarchies  in  the   inferred  ontology  model   poly-­‐hierarchy   (maintained  automa:cally   by  a  standard  DL  reasoner)  
  19. 19. Key  Characteris:cs  of  the  Normalisa:on  ODP   19   •  Compliance  to  OWL  1  DL  profile   •  The  use  of  classes  (e.g.,  classes  subsumed  by  :Func:on)  to   represent  explicitly  a  principle  of  division  of  the  ontology   central  domain  concept  (e.g.,  :Cell)   –  Use  of  anonymous  individuals  (e.g.,  individuals  subsumed   by  :Func:on)  to  represent  the  func:on  performed  by  a  cell   •  Automa:c  classifica.on  and  maintainance  of  the  mul:ple   and  complex  subsump:on  rela:ons  by  a  standard  OWL  DL   reasoner   B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp  
  20. 20. 20   Alignment  of  the  CPV,  VP  and  Normalisa:on  ODPs   B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp  
  21. 21. Result:  Common  Func:onal  Groups  in  ODPs   21   •  Target  Domain   •  Domain  Elements   •  Domain  Defined  Classes   •  Core  Property   •  Range  Subsump:on  Class  Hierarchy   –  Range  Anonymous  Individuals         (For  a  defini:on  of  each  common  func:onal  group,  please  see  full  paper  available  at:   h2p://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-­‐3-­‐642-­‐33615-­‐7_16)     B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp  
  22. 22. 22   Result:  Example  of  Common  Func:onal  Groups   Domain   Elements   Domain   Defined   Classes   Range   Subsumpt.   Class  Hierar.   Target   Domain   Core   Property   B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp  
  23. 23. Similari:es  and  Differences  in  ODPs  Func:onal  Groups   23  B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp   ODP  Func6onal  Group   Similar  Func6onality   Different  Func6onality   Target  Domain   All   None   Domain  Elements   coarse-­‐CPV,     strict-­‐CPV,     Normalisa:on   VP(one-­‐to-­‐one  vs.  one-­‐to  many)   Domain  Defined  Classes   All   None   Core  Property   coarse-­‐CPV,     strict-­‐CPV,     Normalisa:on   VP(owl:Func:onalProperty)   Range  Subsump:on     Class  Hierarchy   coarse-­‐CPV,     strict-­‐CPV   Normalisa:on  (disjointness),     VP  (par::on)   Anonymous  Individuals   strict-­‐CPV,     Normalisa:on,     VP   coarse-­‐CPV  (altered  seman:cs)  
  24. 24. Conclusions   •  Approach  4  of  the  CPV  ODP  can  be  decoupled  into  two     •  A  comparison  of  all  ODPs,  shows  five  different  func.onal   groups  based  on  the  ontological  structure  of  the  pa2ern   and  the  syntac:c  and  seman:c  func:on  that  each  element   performs     •  Nested-­‐doll  effect  -­‐  All  instan:a:ons  of  the  Pa2ern  2  -­‐   Variant  2  of  the  VP  ODP  and  the  Normalisa:on  ODP,  use   implicitly  the  strict-­‐CPV  ODP     •  Three  different  modelling  scenarios  are  being  addressed  by   slight  modica:ons  over  the  same  set  of  OWL  idioms   24  B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp  
  25. 25. Future  Work     •  Punning  meta-­‐modelling  capability  available  in  OWL  2   •  Scale  -­‐  Increase  number  of  ODPs  that  par:cipate  in  the   compara:ve  analysis   •  Evalua:on  framework  extending  the  current  ODPs   evalua:on  and  documenta:on  templates   25  B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp  
  26. 26. THANK  YOU   Bene  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  Mouzhi  Ge,  Mar:n  Hepp,  Alignment  of  Ontology  Design  Pa2erns:  Class  As  Property  Value,  Value   Par::on  and  Normalisa:on,  in:  R.  Meersman,  H.  Pane2o,  T.  Dillon,  S.  Rinderle-­‐Ma,  P.  Dadam,  X.  Zhou,  S.  Pearson,  A.   Ferscha,  S.  Bergamaschi,  I.  Cruz  (Eds.),  On  the  Move  to  Meaningful  Internet  Systems:  OTM  2012,  Vol.  7566  of  Lecture   Notes  in  Computer  Science,  Springer  Berlin  Heidelberg,  2012,  pp.  682-­‐699.  doi:10.1007/978-­‐3-­‐642-­‐33615-­‐7_16.   Bene  Rodriguez-­‐Castro   beroca@gmail.com   hQp://purl.org/beroca       Reference:  
  27. 27. Key  References   1.  Noy,  N.F.:  Represen:ng  Classes  As  Property  Values  on  the  Seman:c   Web.  Technical  Report  Note  5,  W3C,  Seman:c  Web  Best  Prac:ces   and  Deployment  Working  Group  (2005),   h2p://www.w3.org/TR/swbp-­‐classes-­‐as-­‐values/   2.  Rector,  A.:  Represen:ng  Specied  Values  in  OWL:  „value  par::ons“   and  „value  sets“.  Technical  Report  Note  17,  W3C,  Seman:c  Web   Best  Prac:ces  and  Deployment  Working  Group  (May  2005),   h2p://www.w3.org/TR/swbp-­‐specified-­‐values   3.  Egana-­‐Aranguren,  M.:  Role  and  Applica:on  of  Ontology  Design   Pa2erns  in  Bio-­‐ontologies.  Ph.D.  thesis,  School  of  Computer  Science,   University  of  Manchester  (2009),   h2p://mikeleganaaranguren.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/ thesis.pdf   27  B.  Rodriguez-­‐Castro,  M.  Ge,  M.  Hepp  

×