The History of Motion Pictures

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The History of Motion Pictures

  1. 1. By: Adam Coe
  2. 2. <ul><li>On December 28, 2005 Auguste and Louis Lumiere presented the world's first public film screening. </li></ul><ul><li>The world’s first film screening consisted of approximately ten short films. Altogether, the films only last twenty minutes. This screening was held in Paris, underneath the Grand Cafe on the Boulevard des Capucines. The screening was a demonstration of their new device called the Cinematograph. The Cinematograph functioned as camera, projector and printer all in one. -http://www.holonet.khm.de/visual_alchemy/lumiere.html </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>The assistant to Thomas Edison, William Dickson, developed an early motion picture camera called the kinetograph (Grant & Meadows, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>William Dickson also developed a motion picture viewing system known as the kinetoscope (Grant & Meadows, 2008). </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>Coin-fed kinetoscopes were offered to moviegoers at a New York movie house that opened in 1894 (Grant & Meadows, 2008). </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>The vitascope was invented by Thomas Edison and was first introduced to the public in 1896. The Vitascope made the length of films longer than those shown through the use of kinetoscopes. This device also allowed larger audiences to watch moving images at the same time. Also, during 1896, the first motion picture theater was started in France by Georges Melies (Grant & Meadows, 2008). </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>By 1900, short movies became immensely popular in American entertainment. Attendance at movie theaters reached forty million people by 1922. The yearly attendance for motion pictures would increased every year up until the Great Depression. Between 1934 and 1937, attendance increase, but then again decreased pre-WWII. During the war, attendance began to increase and continued to increase until the beginning of television. Between 1946 and 1949, the motion picture business saw its highest attendance ever, 90 million attendees weekly (Grant & Meadows, 2008). </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>During the 1950’s and 60’s, weekly attendance at movie theaters plummeted. This was due to popularity of television. Many of televisions Landmark TV shows made their appearance during this time, such as the “Dick Van Dyke Show” and “I Love Lucy.” </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>The motion picture business made a recovery in the early 1970’s which started a period of stability for box office sales until the 1990’s. The box office enjoy steady gains in ticket sales through the 1990’s with the exceptions of some minor dips By 1900, short movies became immensely popular in American entertainment. Attendance at movie theaters reached forty million people by 1922. The yearly attendance for motion pictures would increased every year up until the Great Depression. Between 1934 and 1937, attendance increase, but then again decreased pre-WWII. During the war, attendance began to increase and continued to increase until the beginning of television. Between 1946 and 1949, the motion picture business saw its highest attendance ever, 90 million attendees weekly (Grant & Meadows, 2008). </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>After 1991, the box office experienced an increase in revenues even when ticket sales were down. This was due to inflation of ticket prices. By 1900, short movies became immensely popular in American entertainment. Attendance at movie theaters reached forty million people by 1922. The yearly attendance for motion pictures would increased every year up until the Great Depression. Between 1934 and 1937, attendance increase, but then again decreased pre-WWII. During the war, attendance began to increase and continued to increase until the beginning of television. Between 1946 and 1949, the motion picture business saw its highest attendance ever, 90 million attendees weekly (Grant & Meadows, 2008). </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>According to the Internet Movie Database (IMBb,) the ten highest grossing movies at the box office within the U.S. are: </li></ul><ul><li>1. Titanic (1997) $600,779,824 </li></ul><ul><li>2. The Dark Knight (2008) $532,831,967 </li></ul><ul><li>3. Star Wars (1977) $460,935,665 </li></ul><ul><li>4. Shrek 2 (2004) $436,471,036 </li></ul><ul><li>5. E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial (1982) $434,949,459 </li></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>6. Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (1999) $431,065,444 </li></ul><ul><li>7. Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest (2006) $423,032,628 </li></ul><ul><li>8. Spider-Man (2002) $403,706,375 </li></ul><ul><li>9. Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith (2005) $380,262,555 </li></ul><ul><li>10. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003) $377,019,252 </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>Grant, A. E., & Meadows, J. H. (2008). Communication Technology Update and Fundamentals. Oxford, UK: Focal Press. </li></ul>

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