Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Keeping Retrospectives Fresh
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Keeping Retrospectives Fresh

3,077
views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Sports

0 Comments
5 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,077
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
46
Comments
0
Likes
5
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Please do not add any extra slides.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Keeping Retrospectives FreshAlida Cheung
    • 2. During initial adoption, teams focus on… Learning the new game rules Changing their mindset Putting something which may seem counter-intuitive into practice
    • 3. As teams mature…  Their challenges evolve  They go deeper  Problems can become harder to solve  Retrospective becomes mundane and its effectiveness wanes  “What didn’t go well” may only identify the symptoms but not the cause
    • 4. Six ways to keep retrospectives fresh Picture This Timeline The Five Hows Adding Appreciation to the Mix Fish Bowl Weather Forecast
    • 5. Picture This Adopted from Collaboration Explained by Jean Tabaka
    • 6. Picture This How it works  Divide the team into groups of 3 or 4  Give the groups 5 minutes to show how they feel about the sprint in drawing  Take note as they explain their pictures. Facilitate the discussion to dive into the root cause if necessary. Find out what particularly drove any strong positive or negative images  Put up the pictures and ask the team to sum up the results
    • 7. Picture This Why it works  The new format vitalizes and Hard to reach energizes the retrospective goals  It provides people another way to look at a situation and a different medium to express it  It taps into our right brain, our Short of intuitive and insightful mind that hours see things more holistically, balancing out the judgment or even prejudice  It is easy to reference in the future (e.g. Remember that cookie jar?)
    • 8. Picture This When to use  You feel the retrospective has gone stale  The team is stuck at the mechanics of the retrospective Many open bugs but burndown chart looks good Support cases set everyone on fire We made progress on automation 
    • 9. TimelineAdopted from Diana and Esther’s Excellent Retrospective Adventures at Agile 2008
    • 10. Timeline How it works  Draw a line that represents the sprint  Ask the team to recall what happened over the course of the sprint – events, metrics, features, stories, meetings, surprises, and decisions, etc. – and put them on the timeline  Facilitate the identification of any correlation, cause- and-effect, or pattern, etc. and the discussion
    • 11. Timeline Why it works  Provides a holistic picture of the sprint  Visually reliving the sprint chronologically helps the team discover cause and effect, missed opportunities, and areas of improvement When to use  The sprint is particularly difficult, hectic, chaotic, and/or stressful
    • 12. The Five HowsAdopted from an exercise at the UX Retreat in 2010
    • 13. The Five Hows How it works  Similar to “The Five Whys” by Sakichi Toyada  Pick one issue or pain point  Keep exploring on how to solve the previous answer till actionable items are reached  For example,  Q - “How can we deliver reliably?”  A - “We need to complete our tasks consistently.”  Q - “How do we complete our tasks consistently?”  A - “We need to handle distractions effectively.”  Q - “How do we hand distractions effectively?”  …
    • 14. The Five Hows When to use  The team wants to deep dive into and fix one pain point (likely to be recurring)
    • 15. Add Appreciation to the MixAdopted from Diana and Esther’s Excellent Retrospective Adventures at Agile 2008
    • 16. Add Appreciation to the Mix How it works  It is a variation to the traditional three-question format  Instead of three, it has four feedback categories: • Team proud of • Team sorry about • Appreciation • New Ideas
    • 17. Add Appreciation to the Mix Why it works  “Team proud of” and “Team sorry about” encourage reflection as a team  “Appreciation” provides team members an opportunity to show their appreciation towards each other, building a stronger team  “New idea” allows the team to decide what improvements they want to work on When to use  Any time
    • 18. Fish Bowl
    • 19. Fish Bowl Fish Bowl is a form of dialog used frequently in participatory events like Open Space and Unconference It has been used successful in retrospectives with a team of as few as seven people
    • 20. Fish Bowl How it works  Pick one topic  Put four to five chairs in the front of the room  People in those chairs will carry out a discussion  One chair remains empty at all time  A member of the audience can come up and occupy the empty chair and join the conversation. At that point, one person leaves the discussion to empty his/her chair  Facilitate the discussion to a conclusion as appropriate
    • 21. Fish Bowl When to use  Fish Bowl introduces some structure into a discussion which may otherwise be heated or emotionally charged
    • 22. Weather forecastAdopted from Diana and Esther’s Excellent Retrospective Adventures at Agile 2008
    • 23. Weather Forecast How it works  At the beginning of the retrospective, ask each team member to describe how he/she feels about the sprint in terms of the weather  Conduct the retrospective  Base on the result of the retrospective, especially in areas the team choose to work on, ask each team member to predict the weather for the next sprint
    • 24. Weather Forecast Why it works  Many times you will see a range of weather report or forecast, from sunny to stormy, providing powerful insight in how different members react and respond to the same reality  Offers an opportunity to further explore specific issue or topic When to use  Any time  This is not a complete retrospective by itself but can add flavor and insight to one
    • 25. References Tabaka, J. (2006). Collaboration Explained: Facilitation Skills for Software Project Leaders. Addison-Wesley Professional. Derby, E. & Larsen, D. (2006). Agile Retrospectives: Making Good Team Great. Pragmatic Bookshelf.
    • 26. Alida Cheunghttp://www.linkedin.com/pub/alida-cheung/0/683/211 Twitter: AlidaCheung