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Family tree
Family tree
Family tree
Family tree
Family tree
Family tree
Family tree
Family tree
Family tree
Family tree
Family tree
Family tree
Family tree
Family tree
Family tree
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Family tree

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  • 1. Olga Irene Acebo’s Family Tree*Special Note: Audio in presentation. Adjust volume accordingly.
  • 2. Maternal Side Great-Grandmother Great-Grandfather Great-Grandmother Great-Grandfather (My Grandmother’s (My Grandmother’s (My Grandfather’s (My Grandfather’s Mother) Father) mom) father)Name: Maria Regla Name: Jose Manuel Name: Maria Eluteria Name: Salvador AceboAlfonso Garcia TolonBirthplace: Birthplace: Birthplace: Birthplace: LasMatanzas, Cuba Matanzas, Cuba Havana, Cuba Villas, CubaPicture unavailable Picture unavailable Picture unavailable Picture unavailable Leoncia Olga Veroncia Adelaida Garcia Jesus Acebo (My Mother’s Mother) (My Mother’s Father)
  • 3. My Grandparents My Mother’s Mother (My Grandmother) Name: Leoncia Olga Veronica Adelaida Garcia Born: 1/13/1922 Birthplace: Matanzas, Cuba Married: Jesus Acebo (Pictured Below)My Mother’s Father (My Grandfather)Name: Jesus AceboBorn: 1/04/1925Birthplace: Havana, CubaMarried: Leoncia Olga Veronica Adelaida Garcia (Pictured Above)
  • 4. My Mother Sandra Domitila Acebo Born: 5/07/1957 Birthplace: Havana, CubaShe is the only daughter of the marriageof Jesus Acebo and Leoncia Olga Veronica-Adelaida Garcia. She has half brothers and sistersfrom her mother’s side. All live in Cuba to this day.Sandra D. Acebo had children with Conrado Diaz.
  • 5. Paternal Side Great-Grandmother Great-Grandfather (My Grandmother’s (My Grandmother’s Father) Mother) Name: Conrado DuranName: Mercedes Enriquez Birthplace: Trinidad, CubaBirthplace: Trinidad, Cuba DOB: 03/01/1902DOB: 08/12/1906 Berta Duran (My Father’s Mother = My Grandmother)
  • 6. Paternal Side (cont.) Great-Grandmother Great-Grandfather(My Grandfather’s Mother) (My Grandfather’s Father)Name: Amelia Rodriguez No Photo Available Name: Carlos Pio DiazBirthplace: Moron, Cuba Birthplace: SpainDOB: 06/25/1908 DOB: 12/01/1906 Carlos Diaz (My father’s father = My Grandfather)
  • 7. My Grandparents Grandmother Grandfather (My Father’s Mother) (My Father’s Father) Name: Berta Diaz Name: Carlos DiazBirthplace: Trinidad, Cuba Birthplace: Moron, Cuba DOB: 10/20/1926 DOB: 05/01/1916 Conrado Clemente Diaz (My Father)
  • 8. My Father Conrado Clemente Diaz Born: 11/23/1952 Birthplace: Sancti Spiritus, Cuba My father Conrado is the middle child of five children. He left Cuba during the Mariel Boatlift in 1980 just like my mother, although they met in Miami, not Cuba. My father was a political prisoner in Cuba.
  • 9. My Parents My mother Sandra and my father Conrado both came during the Mariel boatlift of 1980. They did not know each in Cuba, however they met in Hialeah, Florida in 1981. My mom and dad always wanted my sister and I to never lose sense of our culture and were we came from, so they always made it a point for us to never lose Spanish as alanguage. We lived as a family for many years until about 1997 when my mother and my father split. From that point on my sister and I were raised alone by my mother and Maternal grandparents, although from time to time we saw our father. He later remarried.
  • 10. MeOlga Irene AceboBorn: April 17, 1986Birthplace: Miami, FloridaRaised in: Hialeah, FloridaFirst child of Conrado Diaz and Sandra Acebo
  • 11. My Sister Jessie Caridad Acebo Born: August 19, 1987 Birthplace: Miami, Florida Raised in: Hialeah, Florida My younger sister Jessie is the second and last child of Sandra Acebo and Conrado Diaz.
  • 12. My Family’s Story If you haven’t noticed by now my sister and I carry my mother’s maiden name instead of my father’s surname. I used to ask my parents about the choice to name me under my mother’s surname instead of my father’s, and each parent had their version of why it was. My mother and father had a very tumultuous relationship and it seems like they never got along. In retrospect I am happy that I am an Acebo, because it’s a rare Hispanic surname and it makes me feel unique to have it. I feel like I relate more to my maternal side of the family because that’s all I’ve ever known. I was raised mostly by my mother and maternal grandparents. My grandmother Leoncia has a very long name and we knew her as Olga, or as my sister and I call her “Mima”. In Cuba and other Latin countries it was customary to name a newborn baby by many names. The theories are that the child was named by all it’s relatives, another is that the baby was named after a Saint, particularly the Saint on who’s day the baby was born on and then a name given by the parents. My grandfather Jesus is younger than my grandma “Mima” by five years. He is my grandmother’s second husband. My sister and I always called my grandfather “Pichon” which translates into English as, “baby bird” or chick. There is a very funny family story as to why we called “Pichon” that name. According to family when my mother was a baby my grandfather called her “Pichona” (baby bird) and as she grew older she would call him “Pichon”.
  • 13. My Family’s Story / Culture My grandmother and grandfather were born in the twenties and raised in a time were dating was unheard of and not allowed, make-up on teenage girls was viewed negatively, and tattoos belonged to sailors and prostitutes. Growing up in the US I encountered many culture clashes. In school some of the girls in my class had sleep-overs and parties. My grandparents would never allow my mother to let my sister and I go sleep over a friend’s house. I was allowed to have friends over my home, except, they were never allowed to sleep over. I wouldn’t say that I was sheltered as a child, but rather, highly guarded. Growing up through middle school and high school I was never allowed to go to the movies alone with my friends, nor was I allowed to go to parties that my classmates held without supervision. My grandmother always said that in Cuba kids and teenagers would always be supervised by a chaperone when going to the movies, the beach, or anywhere. As a child I sometimes felt like my grandparents were living in a bomb shelter. They brought 1920’s Cuba into a liberal 1990’s US. I felt like I wasn’t like the other kids. They were allowed to date, have unsupervised parties, and go to the movies with other kids. I was allowed to date at age 17 and that was because I begged my mother. My grandparents of course frowned upon the idea.
  • 14. My Family’s Story / Culture (cont.) My maternal grandparents always placed family and education as a top priority in life. They taught my sister and I that hard work along with a good education could get us farther in life. My grandmother’s parents died of Pneumonia when she was 12, she and her siblings struggled as orphans in Cuba. They bounced from relatives homes that didn’t want the burden of more mouths to feed. They lived in extreme poverty for a few years but the siblings always had each other’s backs and stuck together like a family. My grandmother wed young at about 14 or 15 years of age. She always told me that she wed her first husband out of necessity and not of love. She said it was the sacrifice she made to give her siblings a home. My grandmother’s story always captivated me as a child, like a Hollywood movie it was a tear jerker. My grandmother was and is to this day the strongest woman I’ve ever known. She along with my grandfather have taught me valuable life lessons. Unlike her, she always told me to never depend on a man, to get a degree and be independent, to enjoy my twenties responsibly, and to not get caught up in vices like drugs or alcohol. I am almost done with school and am counting down the days till graduation, it’s funny how ironic life is, as a child I felt embarrassed by my grandparent’s customs, but now as an adult I thank them. Many of my current goals is to please them. People say that you should live your life the way you want; to make yourself happy. But what if your happiness comes from pleasing your family? My grandfather recently went into the hospital about three weeks ago and things aren’t looking to good. I hope that “Pichon” pulls through. He was my favorite grandparent, as a child he would take my sister and I to McDonald’s Park in Hialeah, he called the park, “el parque de los patos” (the park full of ducks). We would spend the day playing and feeding the ducks old Cuban bread. My grandparents are survivors and have seen two countries in almost a decade. I feel lucky to have heard first hand their opinions and views about both Countries and Cultures.
  • 15. The Newest Member Phoenix Ember Garcia DOB: 09/21/2011 Birthplace: Hialeah, Florida Parents: Jessie Acebo Adael Garcia This is the newest member of our family. She is the best thing that our family has received in the past few years. My niece Phoenix is spunky and mischievous, but also very sweet. My sister speaks to Phoenix in English and in Spanish so that she never loses sight of her Culture.

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