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Air Canada Component of CUPE Educational Series - Your Pay Summary & Meal Expense Allowances
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Air Canada Component of CUPE Educational Series - Your Pay Summary & Meal Expense Allowances

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Clairification seminar on pay statements and expenses for Air Canada CUPE flight attendants

Clairification seminar on pay statements and expenses for Air Canada CUPE flight attendants

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  • SAME
  • Welcome to the Air Canada Component of CUPE Educational Series.
  • SAME
  • Today we will be talking about your pay summary and meal expense allowances.
  • Today we hope to find missing money! We will first demystify your pay summary, before going onto domestic meal expenses allowances. We will review when you are entitled to Canadian or US rates and then continue onto international meal expense allowances. We will discuss boarded meals, special meals and then review how to file a claim for missing allowances and, if necessary, how to file a grievance. At the end, we will direct you where to get information and how to access resources to assist you.
  • Your pay summary is divided into four parts (listed) At the end there is a miscellaneous section which gives the details of claims that have been approved, grievance payments and sometimes it will also include instructions to claim for other meals. The Company provides an detailed explanation of the pay summary on E pub under Administrative procedures.
  • This is an example of a pay summary, which is usually dropped off in your mail folder every month. Just over a years worth of pay summaries can be found online on ACAeronet under My HR. The top portion of the pay summary contains basic information such as the block month and block number, name and employee number, your classification and crew base. The first section of the report is entitled flight information, which gives information on flights that you operated and were originally scheduled to operate during the block month. Beginning on the far left, lets review what information each column contains. The first column is entitled Index and is a system of enumeration which is important to understand, because each index will carry down to the section below to the credits section. The next columns indicate the actual departure and arrival dates and times. The following column, entitled SKED DATE indicate the original scheduled day of the flight. Flight number indicates the Air Canada designated flight number. In the case of deadhead on other airlines or ground deadhead, such as limousine serivce, the flight number will appear as FNAL. This column also indicated the starting flight number used in the calculation of duty period or trip hour guarantees. END FLT indicates the last flight used in the calculation of duty period or trip hour guarantees. The next two column indicated the departure and arrival stations, followed by a column entitled FLT MIN. This indicates the actual minutes from brakes on to brakes off. EQU stands for equipment and indicates what aircraft type was operated. EMP STAT indicates the your status on the flight as either a flight attendant or purser, and the SVC CO indicate the serivce code, or pay level, you are at. There are currently 14 levels for flight attendants. The DESC column provides more information on the the flight, for example on this pay statement we can see that the employee was drafted to operated to Edmonton, pay protected for a London flight, released for union business and had vacation all in one month. The next column is entitled ACTN Code and is a little more complicated. This code is used to tag flights that the employee will not be paid for. In this example, on index line 2 and 3, we can see the employee operated a toronto – Edmonton turn as a draft. The employee was scheduled to operate a London flight, as seen on index lines 1 and 4. The Edmonton turn is tagged with this code to indicate that the employee will not be paid for this flight because she will be pay protected for the Toronto London pairing, which has higher credits. The next three columns indicate the pay minutes, divided into day, night and total minutes. It is important to note that these numbers indicate total minutes, not hours and minutes. So we see in index line 1, the four zero five stands for four hundred and five minutes NOT four hours and five minutes. At the bottom of this section you will see two calculations of total minutes. The total in the middle indicates actual flight minutes, while the total to the far right indicates total minutes for which you will receive credit.
  • You can find more information about the various codes and descriptions in our Collective agreement. For information on vacation, consult article 8. for more information on reassignment, consult article B6 and B10. Information on union releases can be found under article 20. Sickness means your booked off, so consult article 9 for further information. Pay sched, deadhead, duty period guarantee and trip hour guarantee credits can all be found under various sections of article 6.
  • The collective agreement also provides more information on the codes. For information about overlaps, check out Letter of Understanding 16. The code DW stands for high water protect, which means you will be paid for the highest credit ever associated with the pairing. You will often see this when a pairing changes multiple times. More info on this can be found under Article 6. DT tags a pairing that was dropped due to training. More info on this can be found under article 6.04. DP stands for reassignment protections, which can be found under Article B6 and B10. DD and Draft assign tag pairings that involved draft, which is covered under article B9.
  • The second section of your pay statement is entitled flight duty credits and uses the same index system we see above in the flight information section. The index lines which attract pay credits are carried down into this section to calculate total dollars and cents earned each flight. You may notice that the information in the pay status and service code may be different than above. This occurs when you operate more than 25 hours in a higher classification, which, under Article 5.12.01 of the Collective Agreement, entitles you to be paid at the higher rate for the entire month. Lets go throu gh this section column by column. The first column is the index line number, followed by the status and pay service code, followed by the equipment code. The next column indicates the pay minutes from the flight information section, followed by a column entitled RATE. The rate – here listed as zero point eight zero four five zero – is your pay rate per minute. In this case the rate is just over eight cents per minute. This is multiplied by the flight time minutes to come up with the AMOUNT, which indicates in dollars and cents how much you earned per flight. The following colums indicate the premiums at a per minute rate, none of which currently apply in our current Collective Agreement.
  • This calculation continues all the way down for each index line which attracts payment, and all lines are totaled on the far right under flight duty credit total. The next section is entitled ground duty credits. This is quite simple to understand. On the far left we start with the date that the credit was earned, your employee status and service code on that flight followed by the equipment operated. The description column tells you what type of credit you earned, in this case, on Jan 2 the employee accrued draft premium. The PAY MIN column indicates the number of minutes accrued and the rate is listed in dollars and cents per minute. The column FACTOR indicates zero five zero, which stands for fifty percent, as draft and ground duty is paid at a rate of 50%. These three columns are multiplied to create the amount listed in the final column, which is indicated in dollars and cents. The ground duty credits are then totaled on the far right and added to the flight duty credit total above to arrive at your grand total pay. This is the amount that your taxes and deductions will be calculated on and is also the amount used in the calculation of your best 36 months for pension purposes
  • More information on ground duty credits can be found in the Collective Agreement in articles 5 and 6. Draft is contained in the block rules section under Article 9.
  • Sometimes under the flight duty credits section you will find a minimum guarantee adjustment section. Blockholders are entitled to a minimum of 65 hours while reserves get 70 hours. In the example above, the blockholder is entitled to 3900 minutes (65 hours) guarantee. The actual pay minutes earned – in this case 175 – is deducted from this amount to arrive at 3725 minutes. This is multiplied by the employees pay rate to arrive at the minimum guarantee adjustment. This amount is added to the flight duty creits earned to arrive at the grand total pay.
  • The next section of the pay statement is the crew cycle expenses. Again this is fairly easy to read. Starting at the far left, the date column indicates the date that the meal entitlement was accrued. Under the meal entitlement section we see B for breakfast, L for Lunch, D for dinner, s for midnight snack and N for night dinner. (please note that the N column is not currently used) CI CO stands for check in check out allowance, which you receive for every check in to a hotel for layover. The transportation column is not used as under the currrent collective agreement thee is no entitlement. The total indicates the daily total for expenses. A star – such as we see here on April 3 under the snack column- indicates a meal was boarded. The other numbers indicate the amount in dollars and cents that was attributed to each meal. The running total at the bottom of each column indicates the total for each meal type, while the total at the far left indicates the total for all expenses. Added to this is the dry cleaning allowance, currently set at $45 per month.
  • Before going on to allowance entitlements, it is useful to review a few basic principles. Expenses are not income, therefore they are not taxed and are not subject to any type of pay guarantee. While the Union does review the pairings, they may be published with incorrect or missing allowances or meals. Keep this in mind when bidding and report and discrepencies to your local office. Domestic meal period (which will be covered in a few minutes) are based on actual times, so early or late departures may change your entitlements. On aircraft with no ovens, an arbitrator has deemed that cold meals are an acceptable alternative. And finally, when deadheading you are only entitled to the meal if you deadhead through a meal period and no meal was provided to you. (more on that later!)
  • Domestic meal expense entitlements are outlined in Article 7 of the Collective Agreement, which reads…..
  • Article 7 continues on to say…. That’s all quite a mouthful, but what does it mean for you? Let’s find out!
  • The first thing to understand is the concept of the meal period. In order to be entitled to a meal you must be on duty prior to the beginning of the meal period and be operating a flight, deadheading or on a layover during the entire meal period. When you are starting your duty period at home base use the “departures” column and when terminating a duty period at home base use the arrivals column.
  • For greater clarity…..(read slide)
  • For greater clarity (read slide)
  • Lets look at an example, calgary pairing C8007. The pairing begins with a deadhead on Jazz to edmonton, arriving at 22:22. Because you spend the entire snack period on the ground in edmonton and do not depart for toronto until 1:10, you should be paid a domestic snack expense on day 1. Upon arrive in YYZ you spend almost a full 24 hours on layover, which is why you are entitled to BLDS on day 2. On day 3 you depart toronto at 7 am arriving in calgary at 9:18. In this case you are entitled to an additional breakfast allowance.
  • Lets take a look at another Calgary pairing C8003. Because you are on duty but not on a flight during the entire lunch period, you are paid the lunch as a domestic expense allowance.
  • Another issue which causes confusion is the question of “when are canandian or us rate applied?” Layover are always paid at the rate of the country where the layover occurs. Breakfast is always paid at the rate of the country of departure.
  • Read slide
  • Read slide
  • Read slide
  • Let’s look at an example. In this case the lunch is paid at the US rate because the departure is scheduled at 12:50. In this case is is reasonable that the employee would eat lunch in MCO prior to departure, rather than wait until arrival in YUL at 15:53.
  • How are layover rates adjusted? This is also covered under article 7 of the collective agreement which reads (read slide)
  • Article 7 also dictates how layover expenses at other locations are adjusted (read slide)
  • Every month the company publishes online and in the bid package a chart which outlines the expense allowances and any changes to rates. Should you ever find that the expenses for a particular location are not adequate, contact your union. Bring copies of menus or meal or grocery receipts as well.
  • Overseas meal expsenses were simplified in 2004 with the signing of the Overseas memorandum of agreement, which was subsequently ratified by the membership. This MOA can be found in its entirety on our website.
  • Overseas meal expenses depend on when you arrive on the layover and when you leave the layover station. If you arrive prior to 12:30 pm you will be entitled to breakfast, lunch, dinner and snack at the layover rate. If you arrive between 12:31 and 13:30 you will be entitled to lunch, dinner and snack. If you arrive any time after 13:31, you will be entitled to dinner and snack.
  • For each full calendar day on layover you will receive breakfast, lunch, dinner and snack. On the day of departure, if you depart between 7 am and 11:30 am you will be entitled to breakfast. If you depart between 11:31 and 16:59 you will be entitled to breakfast and lunch. If you depart between 17:00 and 21:59 you will be entitled to breakfast, lunch and dinner. If you depart between 22:00 and 01:00 you will be entitled to breakfast, lunch, dinner and snack. Lets look at a few examples
  • The principle of sched or better applies to overseas meal expenses, meaning that if you arrive or depart late, you will not have meal allowance deducted but you may have meal allowances added. In the example above, flight 890 is scheduled to arrive in Rome at 11:30, entitleing the crew to breakfast, lunch, dinner and snack at the FCO rate. Due to a late departure from Toronto, the flight does not arrive in Rome until 12:55. The crew continues to accrue the breakfast expense, even though the actual arrival is after 12:30 pm.
  • Here is another example. Flight 32 is scheduled to leave PEK at 14:40, meaning the crew is entitled to breakfast and lunch at the PEK rate. However, they depart late at 17:01, which means they are entitled to an extra dinner expense.
  • The overseas MOA also accounts for station stops before or after overseas flights. (read slide) This is quite a mouthful, so let’s look at an example to clarify the meaning.
  • In this case, on day 3, the crew departs Paris at 11:30 am, which means that they are entitled to a breakfast at the CDG rate. Lunch is boarded on the flight, which means the next meal the crew can be entitled to would be dinner. No extra lunch is payable upon arrival in YVR because the lunch was boarded on the preceeding flight. Dinner and snack are paid at the domestic rate and, the following day, a hot breakfast is boarded.
  • The overseas MOA also details what meals will be boarded based on the duration of the flight leg. Flights over 5 hours will have a hot meal, a snack and fruit boarded. On flights from 10 hours to 13h59 2 hot meals, a snack and fruit will be boarded. Flights between 14 hrs and 15h59 wi l have 2 hot meals, one cold meal and fruit boarded while flights over 16 hours will have 2 hot meals, one cold meal, one snack and fruit boarded. While there is no claim for missing fruit, it should be reported to the Company.
  • Lets look at a vancouver pairing, V5171. The flight is 15H30 minutes long so two hot meals and a cold breakfast are boarded. The fruit entitlement does not ever show up on the pairing.
  • Should a member require the accomodation of a special meal, the member must supply occupational health with a doctors note indicating a bona fide medical reason. A note from a religious leader may suffice for some special meals, such as Muslim or Kosher meals. Each month the employee must send a telex request to catering to request the meals bo boarded. Check with your local comm centre for the process in place at your base.
  • This is the form to be used. It can be found in the comm centre or online under My Forms.
  • When you are deadheading or operating and no meal is boarded for you, you must have the operating In Charge sign form A to verify that no meal was provided to you. Carry a few in your bag, you never know when you will need them!
  • This form can be found in the comm centre, online under My Forms and sometimes even in the flight satchel on board.
  • No paper forms are necessary to claim for missing expenses, everything can be submitted electronically via E Claim on AcAeronet. We strongly recommend however that you continue to use the FORM A MEALS NOT BOARDED and have the in charge sign it. Should your claim be denied and a grievance be filed, this form can be used as evidence. If you are missing a cold meal you should claim the lunch expense amount. Claims can be filed retroactivley for 12 months only.
  • To use E claim, log on to AcAeronet and find the E claim tab under the Globe Information System. You will also be albe tif ind a more detailed guide on how to use e Claim. Click on submit claim to start a new claim or click on status of claims to see if claims have been approved or denied.
  • You will be asked to choose the type of claim you would like to make. For pay credits click on pay adjustment, for ground duty or service to passengers click on ground duty. For missing expenses click or crew cycle expenses or, if you are submitting a form A, click on meals not boarded.
  • On e claim you will be asked to fill out more information including flight number, pairing number, date, meal type, etc. so make sure you have all information on hannd. After submitting the claim, check back in a few days to see if the claim as approved. If so, wait until your next pay check to verify that it was paid. If it was denied, print up the claim and denial and bring it to the union office to determine if it is appropriate to file a grievance.
  • Filing a grievance is a bit like filing a law suit and your union rep is your lawyer, so ensure that you bring all the evidence you have to us so we can advocate effectively on you behalf. The following documents, at a minimum, are need to start a grievance : your pay summary for the month the claim is made, a copy of the claim and denial, your original schedule and pairings as blocked by PBS, your actual schedule and pairings from Globe / Crewlink and any other documentation, such as FORM A, special meals request, etc.
  • There are lots of ways to get more information on the topics covered in this seminar. On AcAeronet you can find lots of information including a user guide to E Claim. Copies of all forms can be found under MY Forms. Under the scheduling section of Globe you can find your PBS and actual schedule. Under My HR > Self Service you can find previous flight pay summaries. Under administrative procedures on E Pub you can find an explanation of your pay summary. Information related to scheduling can be found in Globe. Finally the Collective Agreement and related documentation including component bulletings can be found on our website at www.accomponent.ca. You can also contact your local union office to speak to a representative.
  • We you have found money! We have demystified your pay summary, addressed issues related to domestic, US and International meal expense allowances, boarded and special meals, and have walked you through the process of filing a claim and a grievance!
  • We hope you have found this seminar informative and thank you for taking part. If you have suggestions about this seminar or have an idea for any other education related project, feel free to email the Component at contact@accomponent.ca Thanks and stay tuned for more exciting projects brought to you by the Air Canada Component of CUPE!

Air Canada Component of CUPE Educational Series - Your Pay Summary & Meal Expense Allowances Air Canada Component of CUPE Educational Series - Your Pay Summary & Meal Expense Allowances Presentation Transcript

    • This presentation contains sound. Please set your speakers to the appropriate volume.
    06/14/10
  • Air Canada Component of CUPE Educational series
    • If there is any variance between the material presented here and the Air Canada CUPE Collective Agreement, the Collective Agreement shall be deemed to be correct.
    • All material presented here is without prejudice or precedent to any position the Union may take in the future and is the most accurate information available at the present time.
    06/14/10
  • Your Pay Summary & Meal Expense Allowances 06/14/10
  • Find missing Money !!
    • Your pay summary demystified
    • Domestic meal expense allowances
    • Canadian or US rates?
    • International meal expense allowances
    • Boarded Meals
    • Special meals
    • How to Claim & File a Grievance
    • Resources & where to get information
    06/14/10
  • Your Pay Summary Demystified!
    • Your Pay summary is divided into 4 parts:
    • Flight Summary (information on flights)
    • Flight Duty Credits (calculation of pay)
    • Ground Duty Credits
    • Crew Cycle Expenses
    • + A miscellaneous section (claims approved, grievances payments, instructions)
    • AC Aeronet >E pub > Administrative Procedures > Pay Summary
    06/14/10
  • 06/14/10
  • Description
    • VACATION - Article 8
    • REASSIGN – Article B6 & B10
    • UNION RELEASE – Article 20
    • SICKNESS – Article 9
    • PAY SCHED – Article 6.02.01
    • DEADHEAD – Article 6.03.04
    • DPG – Duty period guarantee -Article 6.03.02
    • THG – Trip hour guarantee -Article 6.03.03
    06/14/10
  • Codes
    • DO – pairing is an overlap LOU 16
    • DW – high water protect (pay protected at highest value ever associated with the pairing) – Article 6
    • DT – pairing during training Article 6.04
    • DP – reassignment protect B6 & B10
    • DD - draft protection – B9
    • DRAFT ASSIGN – B9
    06/14/10
  • 06/14/10
  • 06/14/10
  • Ground Duty Credits
    • Pre / Post - Article 5.08
    • Service to Pax – Article 5.09
    • Other ground duty – Article 5.10
    • Training Credits – Article 6.04
    • Draft – Article B9
    06/14/10
  • 06/14/10
  • 06/14/10
  • Basic Principles
    • Expenses are not income – therefore not taxed and not subject to guarantees
    • Pairings may be published with incorrect allowances – keep this in mind when bidding!
    • Domestic meal periods are based on actual times not scheduled times
    • An arbitrator deemed that cold meals are appropriate on aircraft with no ovens.
    • When deadheading you are only entitled to the expense if you did not receive a meal on board.
    06/14/10
  • Domestic Meal Expenses
    • Article 7 of the Collective Agreement
    • 7.02 MEAL ALLOWANCES -Meals will be provided or meal allowances paid only where an employee is on duty or on a legal layover during an entire recognized meal period.
    06/14/10
  • Article 7 continued
    • No meal or meal allowance will be provided for scheduled flight departures from Home Base and scheduled flight arrivals at Home Base when originating or terminating a duty period at Home Base.
    • No meals or meal allowances will be provided outside the recognized meal periods.
    06/14/10
  • Meal Periods
    • 7.02.01 Recognized meal period are as follows :
    • Departures Arrivals
    • Dinner 0300-0530 0300-0430
    • Breakfast 0800-0930 0800-0930
    • Lunch 1230-1330 1230-1330
    • Dinner 1800-1930 1700-1830
    • Snack 2300-0100 2300-0100
    06/14/10
  • When starting a duty period use the “departures” column
    • To receive a night dinner, you must depart before 0300 and be on duty from 300-530.
    • To receive a breakfast, you must depart before 0800 and be on duty from 0800-0930.
    • To receive a lunch, you must depart before 1230 and be on duty from 1230-1330.
    • To receive a dinner, you must depart before 1800 and be on duty from 1800-1930.
    • To receive a snack, you must depart before 2300 and be on duty from 2300-0100.
    06/14/10
  • When terminating a duty period use the ‘arrivals’ column :
    • To receive a night dinner, you must arrive after 0430 and be on duty from 0300 to 0430.
    • To receive a breakfast, you must arrive after 0930 and be on duty from 0800-0930.
    • To receive a lunch, you must arrive after 1330 and be on duty from 1230-1330.
    • To receive a dinner, you must arrive after 1830 and be on duty from 1700-1830.
    • To receive a snack, you must arrive after 0100 and be on duty from 2300-0100.
    06/14/10
  • C8007
    • An extra snack expense should be paid due time on ground in YEG
    • BLDS paid for L/O in YYZ
    • Additional Breakfast should be boarded on AC 107
    06/14/10
  • C8003
    • Lunch is paid as an expense because you are on the ground in YYZ during the entire meal period
    06/14/10
  • Canadian or US rate?
    • Layovers are always paid at the layover rate .
    • Breakfast is always paid at the rate of the country of departure.
    • CND : $12.87 US : $14.86
    06/14/10
  • Canadian or US? LUNCH
    • If the flight departs…
    • … prior to 12:00 the lunch is paid at the rate of the country of destination.
    • … after to 12:00 the lunch is paid at the rate of the country of departure.
    • CND: $14.58 US: $16.75
    06/14/10
  • Canadian or US ? DINNER
    • If the flight departs….
    • … prior to 17:30 the dinner is paid at the rate of the country of destination.
    • … after 17:30 the dinner is paid at the rate of the country departure.
    • CND : $28.88 US: $33.28
    06/14/10
  • Canadian or US? SNACK
    • If the flight departs…
    • … prior to 22:30 the snack is paid at the rate of the country of destination.
    • … after 22:30 the snack is paid at the rate of the country of departure.
    • CDN : $7.54 US : $8.60
    06/14/10
  • M8108
    • Lunch is paid at the US rate because the departure is after 12:00.
    06/14/10
  • Adjustments? 7.02.02
    • The United States meal allowance will be in U.S. funds and indicated in Canadian funds at the official rate of exchange in effect at the beginning of the preceding block month.
    06/14/10
  • Adjustments? 7.02.03
    • Other locations – The meal allowances for all other locations shall be established by the Company following consultation with the Union, to cover the reasonable cost of meals at those locations.
    • Meal allowances at these locations will be adjusted when there is a five (5) percent change on the basis of a six (6) month running average plus or minus. However, such meal allowances shall not be less that those provided for under Article 7.02.02.
    06/14/10
  • 06/14/10
  • Overseas Memorandum of Agreement – signed Dec. 21, 2004
    • Available on our website www.accomponent.ca
    • Agreement reached in 2004 to simplify overseas meal expense and reduce the number of claims
    • Part of our Collective Agreement
    06/14/10
  • Overseas Meal Expenses
    • Depend on the time of arrival at and time of departure from the layover station.
    • Day of Arrival : If you arrive…
    • … Prior to 12:30 -> B L D S
    • … 12:31-13:30 -> L D S
    • … After 13:31 -> D S
    06/14/10
  • Overseas Meal Expenses
    • For each full calendar day spent on layover you are entitled to B-L-D-S.
    • Day of Departure : If you depart…
    • … 07:00-11:30 -> B
    • 11:31-16:59 -> B – L
    • 17:00-21:59 -> B – L – D
    • 22:00-01:00 -> B – L – D – S
    06/14/10
  • Sched or better for overseas expenses – late arrival 06/14/10
  • Sched or better for overseas expenses – late departure 06/14/10
  • Overseas MOA Dec. 2004
    • 12 – Station Stops
    • Where cabin personnel are on duty during the entire recognized meal period (exclusive of the added buffer referred to in paragraph 4) and have a station stop of 90 minutes or more, they will be paid the meal allowance applicable to the station stop provided no meal was boarded on the flight preceding the station stop for the meal period for which the meal allowance is claimed. In no event will anyone be paid more than four (4) meal allowances per day.
    06/14/10
  • T5189 Feb. 2010
    • No lunch is paid upon arrival in YVR because it was already boarded on flight AC 883.
    06/14/10
  • Boarded Meals
    • The number and type of meals depend on the length of the flight leg :
    • 5h-9h59 1 hot meal, 1 snack, fruit
    • 10h-13h59 2 hot meals, 1 snack, fruit
    • 14h-15h59 2 hot meals, 1 cold meal, fruit
    • 16h 2 hot meals, 1 cold meal,
            • 1 snack, 2 fruit
    06/14/10
  • V5171
    • 2 hot meals and a cold meal are boarded on each flight. Fruit boarded does not show on the pairing.
    06/14/10
  • Special Meals
    • Provide doctor’s note to Air Canada Occupational Health with a bona fide medical reason you require a special meal / accomodation. (A note from a religious leader may suffice for some special meals)
    • Telex special meals request to catering each month. Check at your local comm centre for the process at your base.
    06/14/10
  • 06/14/10
  • When a meal is not boarded….
    • Always have the operating In Charge sign FORM A – carry a few in your bag, you never know when you will need them!
    06/14/10
  • 06/14/10
  • How to Claim
    • Paper forms are no longer necessary – Use E Claim only
    • However, have the operating In charge still sign Form A and keep it for your records- if the denied claim goes to grievance this will be the evidence we need to support your claim.
    • Cold meal = lunch expense
    • Retroactive to 12 months
    06/14/10
  • E Claim
    • Log onto AC Aeronet > E Claim > log in again > Submit claim >
    06/14/10
  • E Claim
    • Choose the type of claim :
    06/14/10
  • E Claim
    • Fill in flight, date of flight, meal type etc.
    • Click “Submit”
    • Check back after a few days to see if the claim was approved
    • If approved, wait until next pay statement to see if it is included
    • If denied, print the claim and denial and bring to your local union office to determine if it is appropriate to file a grievance.
    06/14/10
  • How to file a grievance
    • Bring copies of the denied claim and the following documents to the union office :
    • □ Pay Summary
    • □ Copy of claim and denial
    • □ PBS schedule and pairings
    • □ Actual pairing from Globe / Crewlink
    • + Copies of any other related documentation (FORM A, Special meals request)
    06/14/10
  • Where to Get Information
    • ACAeronet – E-pub, E-claim, My Forms, and My HR > Flight pay summary
    • Epub > administrative procedures > flight pay summary
    • PBS Bid Package and schedule info can be found in Globe.
    • www.accomponent.ca or your local union office.
    06/14/10
  • Summary - Your Money Found!
    • Your pay summary demystified
    • Domestic & International meal expense allowances
    • Canadian or US rates?
    • Boarded Meals
    • Special meals
    • How to Claim & File a grievance
    06/14/10
  • THANKS!
    • If you have any suggestions about this seminar or have an idea for any other education related project, feel free to email the Component at :
        • [email_address]
    • Thanks and stop by again for more exciting projects brought to you by the Air Canada Component of CUPE!
    06/14/10
  • Thanks to Monsieur Z for the excellent graphics! 06/14/10