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The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall
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The Chymical Wedding: An Illustrated Guide and Commentary - Paul Goodall

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An illustrated guide and commentary to this Rosicrucian allegory incorporating new thinking into the nature of the allegory and its principal character, Christian Rosenkreutz.

An illustrated guide and commentary to this Rosicrucian allegory incorporating new thinking into the nature of the allegory and its principal character, Christian Rosenkreutz.

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  • 1. The Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz A Presentation in Two Parts PART ONE Purifying the Outer Self PART TWO Toward Higher Initiation Being a Commentary and Practical Guide (with illustrations and diagrams) The Rosicrucian Order AMORC Greenwood Gate, Blackhill, Crowborough. TN6 1XE Tel: +44 (0)1892 653197 Fax:+44 (0)1982 667432 E-mail: membership@amorc.org.uk In H oc S igno Vinces by Paul Goodall
  • 2. Printed by EGL Greenwood Gate, Blackhill, Crowborough Copyright © Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC CONTENTS Part1 4 FirstDay 6 SecondDay 10 ThirdDay Part2 22 FourthDay 27 FifthDay 32 SixthDay 38 SeventhDay 41 WorkingwiththeAllegory 42 Bibliography
  • 3. Presentation Part One The Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz Purging the Outer Self
  • 4. The Chymical WeddingPart One Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC6 demonstrated in this allegory you might well ask at this point that if these were invitations to the Wedding, why are there so many individuals that are blatantly unsuitable as guests; indeed, why are they in the Castle at all? Firstlyinapproachingthisreasonablequestion,we mustkeepinmind thattheCastleoftheBridegroomin which the guests play a part is notional or imaginary in thesensethatitisastateofmindwithinwhichChristian Rosenkreutz is working. It follows then that all of the occurrences and scenes throughout the narrative are enacted within the mind (and directly upon the soul personality) of its principal character, Christian Rosenkreutz. The presence of those in the Castle that he already knows in the material world are a reflection of his own materiality with its spectrum of human behaviour. He hasn’tyetescapedfromthosepurelyhumanfolliesthat plague us all, and this is a crucial point to remember. Later in the presentation it is demonstrated that all of the guests are, in fact, the collective traits and behaviours of his Lower Self, the imperfections in the character of Christian Rosenkreutz being fairly obvious in the early part of the narrative. “On an evening before Easter-day, I sate at a table, and having in my humble prayer conversed with my Creator and considered many great mysteries (whereof the Father of Lights had shewn me not a few), and being now ready to prepare in my heart, together with my dear Paschal Lamb, a small, unleavened, undefiled cake, on a sudden ariseth so horrible a tempest, that I imagined no other but that, through its mighty force, the hill whereon my little house was founded would fly all in pieces.” The Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz, 1616 (The First Day) N TERMS OF SPIRITUAL growth and initiation TheChymicalWeddingofChristian Rosenkreutz forms a direct sequel to the allegorical narrative of the Fama Fraternitatis. In the FamathereaderaccompaniesChristianRosenkreutzon his personal voyage of self discovery culminating in his transitionandentombmentintheRosicrucianVault.It is clear that both Manifestos are allegorical documents charting the evolution of the soul personality of its maincharacter.Whilethefirstdealswiththeconscious effort and spiritual impulse that drives Christian Rosenkreutz on his journey or quest, the Chymical Wedding is focussed exclusively on the initiatic aspects of his inner life. Method of Approach In any work of fiction or otherwise the content ultimately has its sources in human experiences and behaviour. This is no less so in the Chymical Wedding and certainly within the first three days we find demonstrated the varying traits of human nature, from the corrupt to the humble. We read that there are such varying degrees of human behaviour --THE FIRST DAY-- N THE OPENING PARAGRAPH quoted at the top of the page we find Christian Rosenkreutz in an act of private communion with the Master Jesus. The whole tone of the text conveystothereaderthegreathumilityandspiritualnatureofthisperson and we are left in no doubt that this is already a man of considerable spiritual advancement. We then read of a sudden and unexpected “tempest” whipping up; something which we might take as being symbolic of the presence of the HolySpirit.Despitethishepersistsinhismeditationandalittlelater,after being touched on the shoulder, he is confronted by a divine messenger who, from a number of letters, places one upon the table in front of him and with a mighty blast on a trumpet, disappears. I I ©JohfraBosschart
  • 5. Purging the Outer Selfof Christian Rosenkreutz Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC 7 The King and Queen This letter is an invitation to the wedding of a King and Queen who live in a large castle. It is important to understandthenatureofthesetwometaphoricalfigures to begin to make sense of what the allegory is about. This King and Queen represent the symbolic male and female aspects of the inner consciousness of Christian Rosenkreutz;indeed,thealchemicalconceptofuniting the male or solar element of our being with that of its opposite, the female or lunar aspect is a central theme throughout the narrative. In modern Rosicrucian terms we might see this as the higher and lower aspects of the soul personality where in terms of the Chymical Wedding we must integrate these two in our aspiration to perfect our own soul personality. We can see this duality at work in the concept of the Law of the Triangle; a law whose application is universal. This law states that “a perfect manifestation cannot be produced without the union of two conditions of opposite polarity.” We can relate this concept to the inner condition of Christian Rosenkreutz; that is a balancing of the male with his presently repressed female aspect of his soul personality to produce a perfect and harmonious whole. These two aspects work in all of us, and the path of spiritual alchemy demands that we make a sincere effort to recognise these metaphorical figures and the various ways in which they manifest in our personalities and behaviour. This is the key to working with allegories such as this and the manner in which we engage with alchemical emblems. The Invitation Christian Rosenkreutz now inspects the invitation which is sealed with a “curious cross” accompanied by an inscription, the Latin words IN HOC SIGNO VINCES or “In this sign I conquer.” He is comforted bythisandwelearnthattheinvitationhehasreceivedis not entirely unexpected and has been earnestly desired and prayed for as a result of a vision experienced seven years before. Having broken the seal Rosenkreutz also finds that the letter bears John Dee’s Hieroglyphic Monad, a composite symbol. The arrival of this invitation fills him with a lack of confidence in his worthiness to accept it, but he is prompted toward self examination and in such a frame of mind he decides, after prayer, to get some sleep in the hope that through dreams, his inner self might instruct him on the course he should take. This day, today Is the Royal Wedding day. For this thou wast born And chosen of God for joy Thou mayest go to the mountain Whereon three temples stand, And see there this affair. Keep watch Inspect thyself And shouldst thou not bathe thoroughly The Wedding may work thy bane. Bane comes to him who faileth here Let him beware who is too light. Sponsus and Sponsa In H oc S igno Vinces The invitation is sealed with a cross and the words In Hoc Signo Vinces (“In this sign I conquer”) imprinted on it. Also accompanying the text is the symbol of the Monas Hieroglyphica of John Dee.
  • 6. The Chymical WeddingPart One Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC8 The First Dream He does indeed dream; he finds himself in a dungeon withmanymenfetteredwithchains.Atrumpetsounds from above and a cover is opened; from this a rope is loweredseventimes.Ourcharactermanagestograspit atthesixthloweringandthenhelpstopullitupduring the seventh, assisting those who were hanging onto it. After the cover is slammed shut Rosenkreutz displays emotion at the sound of those left behind. An “ancient matron” then writes the names of those redeemed in a golden-yellowbookandgivesthemeachapieceofgold bearingthesymboloftherisingsunandthelettersDLS, perhapsmeaning DeusLuxSolis(“God,thelightofthe Sun”).WemightseeRosenkreutz,intheactionsofthis dream, foreseeing his own spiritual advancement and higher initiation if he accepts this invitation. Another blast from a trumpet wakens our character and with the dream being so vivid, he still feels the wounds he received in it. The author of this allegory uses the act of dreaming several times throughout the narrative to illustrate the guiding actions of the inner self… The Journey Begins So, with his faith renewed, he prepares for the journey, donning a white linen coat, a red ribbon over his shoulder and in his hat, four red roses so that he will be recognised as a brother of the Rosy Cross. He also carries bread, salt and water, symbolic items that he must give up during his journey’s progress. Before he leaves, dressed in his “wedding garment,” he kneels down and vows in an act of humility that any knowledge he acquires will not be misused but put toward the service of his neighbour and the spreading of God’s name. --THE SECOND DAY-- T THE BEGINNING OF THE SECOND DAY ChristianRosenkreutzispresentedwithachoiceof fourpathswhichresonatewiththequalitiesofthefouralchemicalelements...Inrealitythereonlyappear to be three choices, but the path has already been allotted to Christian Rosenkreutz since the tablet he encounters states at the end that whichever one is entered, it is through the act of “immutable Fate”. The tablet ends with a warning: “if you know yourself to be obnoxious by the smallest fault to the laws of our King [the higher self] I beseech you, while it is still possible, to return swiftly to your house by the way you came.” 1. The first is the shortest but the most difficult and dangerous, leading the initiate through rocky places... 2. The second is longer but if you trust in God and look straight ahead without deviating through impatience or immaturity, this is a sure route to the Castle… (corresponding to WATER). 3. The third path is called the “Royal Way.” This is the road of the mature initiate, one who has, through diligent study, exercises and devotional practices, developed spiritually and conquered the material world through self mastery... 4. The fourth and final way does not apply since it is the path of error, illusion and self deceit, and reserved only for those who are utterly incorruptible… THE FOUR PATHS EARTH FIRE AIR WATER A
  • 7. Purging the Outer Selfof Christian Rosenkreutz Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC 9 Even so, Rosenkreutz sits down to reflect upon his position and begins eating his bread. As soon as he startstoeatasnow-whitedoveappearsandRosenkreutz immediately offers it a piece of bread. This is an innate act of kindness on his part reassuring us of his kind and loving nature. He tells us that the sight of this bird “refreshes” him a little and his state of mind is calmer. This is not surprising since this bird symbolises peace, pure wisdom and understanding love. Suddenly a black raven swoops down and wrestles with the dove for the bread causing the dove to take flight.Rosenkreutz,feelingincensedandgrievedforthe dove,giveschasetothewrestlingpairandinadvertently runs into one of the paths a considerable distance. We might see this mini drama of the two birds as a conflict between his higher self that is the dove and his lower material self represented by the raven. Rosenkreutz can’t make a decision on which path to take because his lower self interferes with his spiritual impulse, thereby holding him back. “Immutable fate,” as the tablet has stated, inevitably guides him onto the right path. We can also read this incident from an alchemical perspective: in this process the white dove being the albedo or pure white stage of the work succeeds the corruption of the nigredo or black matter represented by the raven. The author’s use of the dove symbol is further reinforced when we consider that this bird is alsoasymbolforthetransformingMercuriusbecause it reconciles and unites the opposite substances, male Raven Dove Mercury NIGREDO AGENT ALBEDO (that is Sol or Sun) and female (meaning Luna or Moon), a process at the very heart of this allegory. Getting back to our character; not realising that fate has already made its move, Christian Rosenkreutz attempts to retrace his steps believing he has made a mistake and also realising that he has left his bread behind him at the tree. This action turns out to be an impossible one because a wind, which we might see as his spiritual impulse, whips up and prevents him from returning;hisonlycourseofactionistomoveforward. In fact, as the narrative suggests, he has indeed taken the “Royal Way” and soon finds himself approaching the first of three portals he must pass before reaching the Castle of the Bridegroom. The First Portal HE ARRIVES AT THE FIRST PORTAL in good time to observe in daylight a decorative archway above which is inscribed the words: Procul hinc, procul ite profane meaning “keep away, you who are profane.” The Guardian of this portal in a sky- coloured habit immediately asks Rosenkreutz for his letter of invitation and, on receiving it, bids him enter and requests that he purchase a token. After describing himself as a Brother of the Red Rosy Cross, he receives in exchange for his water bottle a golden disk or token bearingthelettersSCmeaningSponsusCharis(Beloved of the Bridegroom). He is then given a sealed letter to present at the next portal. As the darkness now begins to fall Rosenkreutz observesabeaconbeinglitatthecastlegatestoprovide guidance to those who are seeking its entrance. He also observes a beautiful Virgin dressed in blue, lighting the lanterns on every third tree that illuminates the way to the Castle. The colour of her attire, being blue, also suggests the idea of the feminine; that is water, the female passive element. We might also interpret this scene in terms of the inner journey as a veiled reference to mystical insight; the spark of illumination which drives the soul personality forward. The Second Portal With the onset of night drawing near Rosenkreutz hastens on toward the second portal which is guarded by a lion. This portal is inscribed with the words Date et dabitur volis (“give, and it shall be given unto you”). The lion represents the human ego and, as the THE THREE PORTALS
  • 8. The Chymical WeddingPart One Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC10 inscription infers, the initiate is being instructed to give up his worldly preoccupations for that of the spiritual quest. Rosenkreutz now presents the letter given to him at the First Portal to this second Guardian. Being urged to purchase a token bearing the letters SM meaning Sponsus Mittendus (Emissary of the Bridegroom), he gives his little package of salt and then hastens on to reach the Castle gates before they are locked for the night. The Third Portal As Rosenkreutz approaches the Castle Gates the lights which he saw being lit a short while ago are in the process of being extinguished by the Virgin. In fact, he is barely able to squeeze through the closing gates before they catch part of his coat, which he is forced to leave behind. He observes that the gateway is decorated as the preceding portals and that this one is flanked by two pillars inscribed respectively Congratulator (to be congratulated) for those who make it within the gates and Condoleo (to feel grief or sorrow) for those who do not. Now his name is written in the Bridegroom’s little vellum book and he is presented with a new pair of shoesandasmalleryetheaviertokenbearingtheletters SPNmeaningSponsiPraesentandusNuptiis(Wedding Guest of the Bridegroom). He is then conducted by two pages to a small chamber where he is tonsured like a medieval monk by invisible barbers, after which he is ushered into a spacious hall. THE HALL Water = Token “Beloved of the Bridegroom” THE THREE PORTALS 1st Portal 2nd Portal 3rd Portal Salt = Token “Emmisary of the Bridegroom” Garment = Token “Wedding Guest of the Bridegroom” THE HALL IS FILLED WITH MANY GUESTS includingkings,princes,lordsandnoblesandthelowly Rosenkreutz is feeling uncomfortable among these dignitaries. He is beginning to think what a fool he has been taking this journey when he is surprised to see those of his own and some of which he knows well but had no great esteem for. He feels bitter about the fact that they are already here when he, with all his prayers and supplications, hardly made it to the gate in time. WE CAN SEE IN THESE three approaches to the Castle the early stages of the initiatory process where one has to bring certain elements which are given up before being allowed to proceed. Christian Rosenkreutz has given up five of the things he has brought with him so far: his bread, water, salt, outer garments and his hair (remember he was tonsured). COMMENTS There are also intentional parallels here with the mythology of the Underworld and we can see Rosenkreutz’s arrival at the third portal, particularly as night falls, as having a link to this. The mythology surroundingthegoddessIshtarofBabylon,forexample, supports this connection when we consider that her entry to the Underworld is concerned with her search for her spouse, Tammuz. Again we have the idea of separation of the male and female elements. In this narrative she is robed for her journey, as is Christian Rosenkreutz, and she has to give up parts of her attire while moving through seven gates or portals.
  • 9. Purging the Outer Selfof Christian Rosenkreutz Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC 11 Thegueststhenseatthemselvesatthediningtable according to which position they believed they should take above the rest in the company. Rosenkreutz and a handful of others find themselves at the lowermost end of the table. For the next half-hour the company begin to brag among themselves of their abilities and knowledge, particularly the pseudo-philosophers; much to the irritation of Rosenkreutz. Suddenly the Virgin enters with a fanfare and accompanied by thousands of lighted tapers held by invisible hands. These are followed by the two pages we met earlier at the tonsuring who are lighting the path before the procession. She is seated on a self- movingthrone.Thewhite-and-gold-robedVirginnow stands and announces that to prevent the admission of unworthy persons to the mystical wedding a set of scales will be erected the following day upon which each guest will be weighed to determine his integrity. Thoseunwillingtoundergothisordeal,shesays,should remain in the hall. Then she withdraws, leaving the guests to each consider their position. ThisannouncementnowthrowsRosenkreutzinto a bit of a panic, feeling unworthy enough, as he does, to pass the test of the scales. Here again is a telling statement because Rosenkreutz, while displaying outward humility, commendable as it is, is not perfect enough to realise that he is indeed, up to the test. Yes, the rest of the company, except for another eight companions, were resolved to face the weighing, but this was through material motives, thinking to profit in some way that was less in line with their spiritual advancement. A few of them, while prepared to be weighed, actually anticipated failing the test and departing in peace after it. We might read this as a sign of their inability to recognise how important this occasion was for their evolving soul personality. The text goes on to tell us that nine, out of the whole company, now remain in the Hall choosing not to take the test while the rest are led away to their sleeping chambers. These nine are bound with ropes and left alone in darkness; this darkness is symbolic of ignorance before the light of illumination dawns and is a period of self-examination. We will come back to the significance of the number nine here after we look at the weighing scene because it is a crucial key to understanding the character of Christian Rosenkreutz in terms of the narrative. During this period of confinement Rosenkreutz eventually falls asleep after much anxiety for his personal safety and begins to dream again. This time he sees many people suspended over the earth by threads, and around and through these flies an aged man who, cutting a thread here and one there, causes many to fall to earth. It seems that those who, in their arrogance, have soared to lofty heights, accordingly fall a greater distance and sustain more serious injury than those of amorehumblenaturewho,fallingbutashortdistance, landgentlywithoutmishap.Consideringthisdreamto be a good omen, Rosenkreutz tells it to a companion, continuing in discourse with him until dawn. We will also come back to this point when we begin to analyse the nature of the nine companions. Nine are bound with ropes and left alone in darkness; this darkness is symbolic of ignorance before the light of illumination dawns and is a period of self-examination. ©JohfraBosschart
  • 10. The Chymical WeddingPart One Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC12 --THE THIRD DAY-- THE WEIGHING SCENE N THE MORNING THE COMPANY OF GUESTS return to the Hall and most upon seeing the nine who have spent the night bound in darkness reprove them for being so cowardly although, as the narrative says, some feel an emotion of sympathy for the position these nine have left themselves in. Once again we hear trumpets sounding and drums beating to herald the entry of the Virgin, now arrayed in red velvet, girded with a white sash and crowned with a laurel wreath, accompanied by two hundred men armouredinred-and-whitelivery.Sheintimatestotheninecompanionsthathavingrecognisedtheirimperfections they might fare better than the other self-satisfied guests. Then, turning to Rosenkreutz, she teases him that she thought he would have been among one of those “smug” people, and this brings tears to the eyes of our character. The Virgin then orders them to be unbound. GOLDEN SCALES ARE NOW HUNG UP in the middle of the hall and near them are placed seven weights. The text tells us they are one good-sized one, four small and two large weights. Given that this test is all about the development of the guests’ moral qualities it’s reasonable to speculate that each individual weight represents one of the Seven Virtues. So we have represented in the four smaller ones each of the moral virtues of Wisdom, Justice, Temperance and Fortitude, with the two larger ones being Faith and Hope, and the good sized weight as representing Love. However, we must also assign the seven Cardinal Sins of Lust, Gluttony, Greed, Sloth, Wrath, Envy and Pride against the Virtues within the weights, so we can tentatively set these as the follow diagram shows... LOVE FAITH HOPE JUSTICE WISDOM FORTITUDE TEMPERANCE THE WEIGHTS and their ATTRIBUTES LOVE LUST HOPE ENVY FAITH WRATH WISDOM PRIDE JUSTICE GREED TEMPERANCE GLUTTONY FORTITUDE SLOTH The nine companions, having been unbound, are placed in a position to watch the rest of the guests being weighed. The Virgin, meanwhile, has divided her armoured attendants into seven bands equating to the seven cardinal Sins each with a Captain. Each of the guests is now assigned to a particular band; an indication of which of the sins are most prevalent in their nature. These all ultimately fail the test, although oneholdsoutagainstsixweightsexceptforthefinalone of Love; this is an Emperor who is applauded and given agownofredvelvetandabranchoflaurel,symbolising victory and peace, by the Virgin. The weighing test being finished, one of the Captains begs the Virgin to permit the nine who had declared themselves unworthy also to be weighed, for the sake of “recreation” it says in the text. This, as we might expect, causes Rosenkreutz much anguish and fear. The first four fail, while the fifth passes and is rewarded. This is Rosenkreutz’s “companion,” we are told; We will come back to this character later. The I
  • 11. Purging the Outer Selfof Christian Rosenkreutz Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC 13 1. The Invitation: Shows courage 2. The Four Paths: Gives up bread 3. First Portal: Gives up water 4. Second Portal: Gives up salt 5. Third Portal: Gives up garments 6. The Hall: Test of humility 7. The Weighing: Passes and gives up roses The Seven Tests of Christian Rosenkreutzsixth, seventh and ninth also fail. However, when Rosenkreutz steps up as the eighth to be tested the narrative describes his success with great drama. Part of his reward is to release, at his choosing, one of the guests from punishment; he picks the first Emperor who was so close to passing. After the weighing the Virgin spots the four roses that Christian Rosenkreutz has brought with him to the Wedding. She sends a Page to graciously ask for them and Rosenkreutz accedes to her request. In this action he has now passed through seven tests listed in the table opposite. VIRGIN COMPANIONS (Virtues) GUESTS (Sins) 7 x CAPTAINS (one to each Band) THE WEIGHING SCENE TheVirgindividesherarmouredattendantsintosevenbands equatingtothesevencardinalSinseachwithaCaptain.Eachof theguestsisnowassignedtoaparticularband;anindicationof which of the sins are most prevalent in their nature. 1 - 4 986 - 75 The Weighing of the Nine Companions fail failpassfailpass Rosenkreutz’s “Companion” Christian Rosenkreutz Following the weighing of the Guests, one of the captains begs the Virgin to permit the Nine who had declared themselves unworthy to be weighed. ANALYSIS OF THE NINE COMPANIONS BEFORE WE STUDY the weighing scene I want to take us back to the previous evening, which is the end of the Second Day… We might ask here why the author has specifically included eight other companions, apart from Christian Rosenkreutz, who feels unworthy to be weighed? It is in this particular scene that we come to a crucial point and indeed one of the most important keys to understanding the characterofChristianRosenkreutz,notjustintermsof thenarrative,butconcerningthetransformativeprocess he is undergoing. Thereferencetothenumberninehereisdeliberate and full of meaning. I believe that there is, in fact, only one person who refrains from committing himself to the weighing test and that is Christian Rosenkreutz. Before I give a detailed explanation and make some identification of the other eight so called companions I firstly want us to look at these observations from the text that help to support this hypothesis… 1. The allegory is written in the first person; so the story is related strictly from the perspective of Christian Rosenkreutz. 2. The narrative is exclusively concerned with the transformationofitsprincipalcharacterandnot collectively with the other guests. 3. The meaning of the tokens received so far strongly suggest an intimate relationship between Rosenkreutz and the Bridegroom (King). 4. Rosenkreutzissingledoutforattention,initially by the Virgin on the third day in her teasing of him after the night in the Hall, and from this act and throughout the text there appears to be
  • 12. The Chymical WeddingPart One Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC14 some predetermined plot at work on his behalf. 5. On the seventh day we find that the resurrected Bridegroom or King (the male aspect of the initiate) refers to Rosenkreutz as being “his father”. In spiritual terms this is true because we find out that it is only though the diligent work ofRosenkreutzthattheKingisabletobereborn. I want to refer you back now to the proposition given at the start of this presentation concerning the nature of the allegory. It was stated that all of the occurrences andscenesthroughoutthenarrativeareenactedwithin themind(andconsequentlyuponthesoulpersonality) of its principal character, Christian Rosenkreutz. This was in response to the question being raised regarding the many guests being portrayed as having reached the Castlebeforehim,andwhoclearlywerenotofthesame moralfibreasRosenkreutzhimself.Infact,Rosenkreutz is bitter about this when he tells us in the narrative that he is familiar with most of the guests in the Hall and does not value their characters or morals. From the foregoing we can make the statement that… All of the guests are the collective traits and behaviours of his Lower Self. This idea is strengthened when we consider that the guests are of varying moral quality and rank. The kings and lords and other dignitaries represent those parts of the lower self that are more expressive and forward, perhaps more arrogant, down to those of lower rank that represent those more repressed parts and base desires. This would provide an answer the question as to how all these guests arrived before Rosenkreutz; in fact, they didn’t, because they arrive at precisely the same time as he does; he has, in effect, brought them with him. So the one thing to keep in mind, and to be absolutely clear on this point as we read through the textofthesefirstthreedays,isthatallofthehappenings and drama concerning these guests are the actions of Christian Rosenkreutz’s lower self. In other words, through the medium of the guests the author of this allegory allows us to examine the inner thoughts and nature of its principal character. When we begin to read the text in this light certainpointsbecomealotclearer.Forexample,during his confinement in the Hall bound with eight other supposed guests because they believed they were also unworthytotaketheweighingtest,thenarrativetellsus that Rosenkreutz has a conversation with one of them, whichhereferstoashis“companion.”Thiscompanion jogs him into wakefulness, we are told, directly after a dream he has about the guests (remember what we have said about them) being suspended in the air with varying lengths of cord which are being cut by an old man with scissors. Expanding on this now, it seems quite clear that this is Rosenkreutz conversing with his Higher Self to understand the portent of the dream, something he is much practiced at over the last seven years. As we read onthroughthetextwheneverthereisamentionofthis companion we can see how this relates to the hidden MasterWithin.Nowwecansafelyinferthattheidentity of one of these nine companions, apart from himself, is his very own Higher Self. Toreinforcethesespeculationsrememberthenext morning when the rest of the guests, who have had a very comfortable night, come into the Hall and begin to reprove the nine for being so cowardly? In the light of our present knowledge we can now see that these are collectively the lower self of Christian Rosenkreutz The number Nine is the key to understanding the inner nature of Christian Rosenkreutz, the principal character in the allegory. THE NATURE OF THE GUESTS All the happenings and drama concerning the Guests are the actions of Christian Rosenkreutz’s Lower Self . Through the medium of the guests we can examine the inner thoughts and nature of its principal character. COMPANIONS
  • 13. Purging the Outer Selfof Christian Rosenkreutz Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC 15 talking. And it is interesting to read that part of the lower self is, in fact, in sympathy with the spiritual impulse that fuels our character because he tells us in thetext,“someofthemwhoseheartsstillsmotethemmade no loud cry of the business.” Identifying the Nine Companions We are left now with seven others out of the nine to identify. Going along with the premise that all the guests are, in fact, facets of Rosenkreutz’s Lower Self these other seven companions cannot be linked to any of these particular guests. They would also have to be of such moral fibre that they would not consider undergoingtheweighingtestbecauseoftheirperceived unworthiness. There can only be one answer and the solution is connected to the seven weights… The weights have already been recognised as synonymous with the Seven Virtues and it seems reasonable to identify the seven remaining companions with these as listed in the table above (top right). Now although we have named the nine companions we must remember as we read and meditate upon the narrative that these qualities are all part of the soul personality of Christian Rosenkreutz Identifying the Companion who Rosenkreutz converses with during his confinement in the Hall. Whenever there is mention of this Companion we can see how this relates to contact with the “Master Within.” MASTER WITHIN Rosenkreutz The Companion {Higher Self ANALYSIS OF THE WEIGHING SCENE 1 Higher Self (Master Within) 2 Christian Rosenkreutz (Lower Self) 3 LOVE 4 HOPE 5 FAITH 6 WISDOM 7 JUSTICE 8 TEMPERANCE 9 FORTITUDE TheIdentityoftheNineCompanions These are aspects andqualitiesofthe Soul Personality and that there is only one initiate involved in the allegory. Let’s turn our attention now to the weighing scene itself… IT IS INTERESTING THAT the narrator Rosenkreutz outlines in the text the total number of guests who each raised a certain number of weights as we can see in this table opposite. Why would the author of the allegory want us to know this unless it is meant to tell the reader something? We can note here that there appears to be a mathematical combination of the seven virtues or weights at work; study the first and second columns in the above table which shows the number of times that these groups of guests are divisible by the number seven, meaning by the number of weights or virtues. GUESTS WEIGHTS 1 x 7 = 7 raise 1 weight 3 x 7 = 21 raise 2 weights 5 x 7 = 35 raise 3 weights 5 x 7 = 35 raise 4 weights 3 x 7 = 21 raise 5 weights 1 x 7 = 7 raise 6 weights Analysis of the Weighing Scene 18 126 1 + 8 = 9 1 + 2 + 6 = 9
  • 14. The Chymical WeddingPart One Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC16 Still referring to the table on the previous page, an interesting feature concerns the addition of these numbers: If we add the number of guests that raised the weights we find this totals 126. By theosophical reductionweobtainthenumberninethatis1+2+6=9. If we now add together the number of times that these guests are divisible by the number seven this comes to 18. Again, by theosophical reduction we obtain the numbernine(1+8).Bothofthesesupporttheideathat it is only Rosenkreutz himself that is being weighed when we consider the significance of the number nine we have been discussing in relation to the companions. Another interesting numerical feature arises out of this: if we add the single figure of Christian RosenkreutzhimselftothetotalnumberofGueststhat were weighed, which is 126, we arrive at the number 127. Expanding on this now, if we take the individual digits that make up 127 we might, without being too fanciful, allocate them as in the table opposite. Unity is attained when these numbers are resolved to the number 10 by theosophical reduction (1+2+7) and ultimately, of course, to the number one (1+0). Kabalistic Considerations Thinking upon the number 10 we can go further if we remember that there are ten Spheres of Emanation in Kabala and against these is set the primal man, Adam Kadmon, incorporating these ten spheres as you can see here. The number ten is also related to the lowest sphereofMalkuth,therealmofthematerialandinthis sense and also numerically speaking it embraces the above and the below. And, bringing together what we have already learned about Christian Rosenkreutz we can assign the nine companions of his soul personality tothespheresofemanationdemonstratedinthefigure opposite. We now have a collective view of Christian Rosenkreutz the initiate. Other interesting correspondences that relate directly with the allegory and the inner being of Christian Rosenkreutz can now be assigned to certain individual spheres in line with the nature of those spheres. Firstly the Bride or Queen as the repressed femaleaspectisplacedintheearthlysphereofMalkuth (please refer to the figure on the opposite page as you read on). Next we assign the Son to Tiphareth because this is the sphere reflected not just from Kether the Crown but is also the manifested sphere from the dual qualities of the Mother and Father above but more Analysis of the Weighing Scene 1 Higher Self (Perfection) 2 Lower Self (Imperfection) 7 Virtues(QualitiestowardPerfection) 1 + 2 + 7 = 10 1 + 0 = 10 Unity The nine companions of his soul personality aligned with the SpheresofEmanationontheKabalistictreeindicatedbytheyellow disks. In this we can see a veritable ascent of the virtues beginning with Fortitude in the Sphere of Malkuth. Malkuth Yesod Hod Netzach Tiphareth Geburah Chesed Binah Chokmah Kether r q VU s t w d wj d b a z h f l y km u n p s xr c q t s t r g AC D B E G F J H I V U Q K L W ;
  • 15. Purging the Outer Selfof Christian Rosenkreutz Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC 17 importantlyforusTipharethistraditionallyassociated with the Master Jesus. And now a direct connection to the weighing scene becomes apparent. Remember that the fifth companion was the only one to pass the testofthescalesapartfromChristianRosenkreutz?As the fifth sphere up from Malkuth and representing the fifthcompanion,andwithitsassociationwithJesus,we can see in this context why the fifth companion passed the weighing test. Just to clarify things further, it is helpful if we can trace the inner journey of Christian Rosenkreutz upon this Kabalistic Tree. His spiritual path of return begins in Malkuth, the realm of the lower self. He then begins the ascent upward through the spheres until he reaches the level of Tiphareth; this is where we met him at the beginning of the allegory as a mature mystic. During the first three days of the Chymical Wedding he has ascendedfurtherviathepathoftheLoversandGemini; embracingthemaleandfemalespheresofGeburahand Chesed in this action. We find him now at the level of Binah the Mother. He is not yet finished since he has tocrossthepathofVenusanddaleth,theHebrewword for “door”, in order to complete his journey in terms of theallegory.Thisparticularsymbolismhasalreadybeen discussed in the previous presentation on the Fama Fraternitatis. We will leave it there but I’m sure the reader can appreciate from the foregoing that kabalistic speculations are not just a visual aid but also a constructive method in which to approach the allegory, providing you are familiar with Kabala. However, the numerical correspondences we have discussed in our analysis of the nine companions and the weighing scene are the best way to approach the narrative, even as a preliminary, before considering those kabalistic aspects. Malkuth Yesod Hod Netzach Tiphareth Geburah Chesed Binah Chokmah Kether r q VU s t w d wj d b a z h f l y km u n p s xr c q t s t r g AC D B E G F J H I V U Q K L W ; FATHERMOTHER CHRISTIAN ROSENKREUTZ MASTER JESUS BRIDE (QUEEN) SON Path of the Lovers and Gemini Path of Venus and Daleth { In his spiritual journey toward Tiphareth note that he has ascended through predominantly male signs in the lower half of the Kabalistic tree. In the upper half he has ascended through predominantly female signs passing finally along the path of Venus, the door of higher initiation. Although the yellow arrows indicating his progress follow a specific path in this model, in effect he embraces all the correspondences and qualities attributed to the central column of Equilibrium and those of the pillars of Mercy (Chokmah) and Severity (Binah), the ultimategoalbeingreintegration of the male and female aspects of his being.
  • 16. The Chymical WeddingPart One Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC18 GETTING BACK TO THE NARRATIVE: a council is now set up, presided over by the Virgin, to judge the guests that have failed. We read that part of this council, as a result of their success in the weighing, is made up of Christian Rosenkreutz, his “companion” and the Emperor. Applying our knowledge of the method used so far in the allegory we can infer that the Companion and the Emperor represent respectively his Higher Self and the highest ideals of his Lower Self. Remember that the Emperor is the guest that succeeded in raising six out of the seven weights and was chosen by Rosenkreutz to be released from punishment. So as I said, given what we know of Rosenkreutz and the companions the text is really telling us that it is the single figure of Christian Rosenkreutz who is added to the Council of Judges. Taking the seven Captains (who were commissioned at the weighing scene) as the seven Virtues and adding the figure of Christian Rosenkreutz and the Virgin, we have a total of nine sitting in judgement (see figure below). But, knowing the significance of the number nine, we can infer that this judgement and punishment scene represents the purging of those human vices and faults of Rosenkreutz’s Lower Self. Through this inner work we are considering he is being brought closer to an integration of the male and female aspects of his soul personality. In other words, it is his collective self sitting in judgement. JUDGEMENT Christian Rosenkreutz The Emperor The “Companion” Higher Self Lower Self THE COUNCIL OF JUDGEMENT CHRISTIAN ROSENKREUTZ THE VIRGIN CAPTAINS KNIGHT OF THE GOLDEN FLEECE THE VIRGIN NOW ENTERS the Hall and presents a magnificent goblet to all the guests, stating that the King has requested all to share its contents. Following this Rosenkreutz and BUT BEFORE THIS ACT of purgation, dinner is set for everyone and it is interesting to note here thatRosenkreutzisplacedatthetopofthetableunlike that of the previous day. The rest of the “guests” who are now categorised as prisoners in the text are placed according to how they fared in the weighing test. We read that their behaviour is far more civil than it was the previous evening. We should view this table scene allegorically as an overview or map of the inner state that Rosenkreutz has attained so far and in this sense we are not speaking of a real banquet. During this scene Christian Rosenkreutz is presented with a Golden Fleece by two pages on the Bridegroom’s behalf and is elevated from a Brother of the Red Rosie Crosse to a Knight of the Golden Fleece. However, we read that Rosenkreutz still has some sympathy for these lower emotions when he wants to share food with the prisoners and is warned to guard againsthisbehavioursoasnottosullytheOrderhehas just entered. Rosenkreutz is so mortified at his actions that he scarcely moves in his seat. Clearly the author of this allegory wants to make it plain to the reader that Christian Rosenkreutz has not yet worked off all his lower emotions in his quest for spiritual attainment. PURGATION
  • 17. Purging the Outer Selfof Christian Rosenkreutz Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC 19 Masculine Ego Lower Self Female essence FOLLOWING A TOUR of the Castle in which many wondrous things are seen the Virgin then escorts Rosenkreutz to the table for supper. During the meal many riddles are propounded culminating in Rosenkreutz requesting the name of the Virgin. We havenowarrivedatanothercrucialpartoftheallegory. The author of the Chymical Wedding doesn’t simply reveal the Virgin’s name but sets the reader a puzzle. In answer to Rosenkreutz’s question the Virgin says: “My Name contains five and fifty, and yet has only eight letters; the third is the third part of the fifth, which added to the sixth will produce a number whose root shall exceed the third itself by just the first, and it is the half of the fourth. Now the fifth and the seventh are equal, the last and the fifth are also equal, and make with the second as much as the sixth, which contains just four more than the third tripled. Now tell me, my lord, what am I called?” After requesting a clue Rosenkreutz is successful in solving the name but does not disclose it to the reader. Twosolutionshavebeenputforwardtothisriddle, the first from the philosopher Leibnitz who works out the formula to spell the word ALCHIMIA. The second ingenioussolutionhasrecentlybeengivenbyTheodore THE NATURE OF THE VIRGIN his companions are taken out to the garden where scaffolding has been erected so that they can observe the various penalties suffered by those who failed the weighing. As we said a short while back this scene represents the purgation of Christian Rosenkreutz’s humanvicesandfaultsofhisLowerSelf.Beforeleaving theCastle,eachoftherejectedguestsisgivenadraught of forgetfulness, another sign that we are dealing only with Rosenkreutz himself. The Fountain Following the expulsion of the guests from the Castle (and we might see parallels here with the expulsion of Eve from the Garden of Eden) a beautiful scene is enacted, involving a Unicorn and Lion at the Fountain inthegarden.Thisisatypicallysymbolicdramathatwe find in alchemical emblems and in this case represents thepurgationofthelowerselfofChristianRosenkreutz and a coming together of the male and female aspects. Asnow-whiteUnicornwithagoldencollarcomes forward and bows down on its front legs to the Lion who is standing on top of the garden fountain and holding a sword. The Lion then breaks the sword in its pawsandthepiecesfallintothewatersofthefountain. The Lion roars and a Dove appears, bearing an olive branch, which the Lion then eats and is pacified. The Lion here symbolises the masculine ego guarding the lower self in the form of the fountain; the Dove, as the female essence, unites with the Lion by offering the olive branch of peace which causes the Lion to break the sword, being the act of purgation. The Unicorn is essentially a male symbol in alchemy but has now become fused with the female aspect of the soul personality. Rosenkreutz and his companions then purify themselves by washing head and hands in the waters of the fountain. ThisisasymboliccleansingoftheOuterSelfand signifies the end of the first part of his work.
  • 18. The Chymical WeddingPart One Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC20 WilliamsintheRoseCroixJournalof2006.Hecleverly works out the Virgin’s name as AVIDI VIA meaning “The path of a person of Desire.” We can connect both solutions: In the first alchemy is the path referred to, and in the second this path is taken by the initiate under spiritual impulse or desire. Remembering that this whole allegory is being enacted within the mind and consciousness and upon the soul personality of Christian Rosenkreutz we can be sure that the Virgin is part of that consciousness; so how might we perceive her given what we know of her role in the narrative? She first appeared on the second day when we saw her lighting the lanterns to illuminate the path to the castle. Here is an initial clue which, if we combine thatwithherguidingandorganisingrole,wecansafely infer that she represents Sophia or divine wisdom the agent of illumination. We might supplement this designationwiththatofConscience.Itisconsciencethat istheguidingaspectinmoralbehaviourandthisfigure is fulfilling that role in all her entrances and exits. So we might say that: Conscience and the divine Sophia combine in the figure of the Virgin to guide Christian Rosenkreutz in his spiritual quest. The Duchess Following this scene two youths and six virgins beautifullyrobed,followedbyaseventhvirginwearing a coronet, enter the dining hall. This Virgin (not to be confused with the Sophia Virgin we have been dealing with)iscalledtheDuchess,andisinitiallymistakenfor the Hermetic Bride because she is so grand. Singling out Christian Rosenkreutz for attention the Duchess tells Rosenkreutz that he has received more than the others, and should therefore make a greater return. Without going into detail this figure represents religious authority or “Theologia” in contrast to the figure of the Virgin “Alchymia” and is introduced by the author to make the contrast between religion and mysticism. Following the withdrawal of the Duchess and her virgins, Rosenkreutz is then conducted to his sleeping chamber where he dreams again; this time of a door which he cannot open, although when he finally does we are not informed of what he finds behind it... Leibnitz’s solution to the riddle of the Virgin: Despite a seeming discrepancy in the total (i.e. 56) compared to the number 55 in the riddle given by the Virgin to Christian Rosenkreutz, there is an answer to this problem... In the Latin alphabet there is no letter “J” since the letter “I” suffices for both, in other words they are not separate letters.This means that the letter “M” above will have the value of 12 (as indicated) and the total will equal that given by the Virgin, which is 55. A L C H I M I A 1 12 3 8 9 13 9 1 [12] = 56 = 55 The Third Dream THE NATURE OF THE VIRGIN SOPHIA CONSCIENCE { ALCHIMIA Alchemy AVIDI VIA “The Path of a Person of Desire” THE VIRGIN Two solutions have been put forward in answer to the Riddle of the Virgin. We can connect both solutions: In the first, (Alchimia), alchemy is the path referred to, and in the second, (Avidi Via), refers to thepathistakenbythe initiateunderspiritual impulse or desire.
  • 19. Purging the Outer Selfof Christian Rosenkreutz Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC 21 SUMMARY OF PART ONE: DAYS 1 - 3 WE HAVE SPENT SOME TIME on the first threedaysoftheallegoryandnotjustbecause thesetakeupnearlyhalfofthenarrative.Aswereadwe can see that they map the developing inner aspects of Christian Rosenkreutz from his initial invitation as a BrotheroftheRedRosieCrosseintheoutermundane world (the invitation being a veiled representation of his spiritual impulse), to his being inducted into the second Order as a Knight of the Golden Fleece in the CastleoftheBridegroomorKing.Thisactsymbolises an elevation of his spiritual development and close interaction with his higher self. The first half of the Chymical Wedding is the most instructional for us in terms of our own inner development and relating to our more immediate difficulties on the mystic path… We can relate to the emotionalupheavalthatweseeportrayedinthecaseof Christian Rosenkreutz in these first three days. There is lots of material to feed upon here in the context of our own introspection and self-examination and in the second part we pursue this aspect of our own inner work. Whenweexamineeachofthethreedayswehave covered so far we can see that a sevenfold structure appears to be working through each day. Although this is a modern construct the events lend themselves to this sevenfold format. THIRD DAY 1. The Weighing Test 2. Dinner in Hall 3. SentencespassedinGarden 4. Tour of Castle 5. Riddle of Virgin’s Name 6. Duchess and Hanging up of Weights 7. Dream SECOND DAY 1. The Four Paths 2. First Portal 3. Second Portal 4. Third Portal 5. Meeting Guests in Hall 6. Bound and left in Hall 7. Dreamy FIRST DAY 1. RosenkreutzinMeditation 2. Appearance of Messenger 3. Letter of Invitation 4. Feelings of inadequacy 5. Dreaming 6. Reassurance 7. Preparation for Journey Epictetus(c.55-c.135)-GreekStoicphilosopher The soul’s impurity consists in bad judgments, and purification consists in producing in it right judgments, and the pure soul is one which has right judgments. THE SOUL’S IMPURITY
  • 20. A depiction of the Sepulchre of Venus; useful as an object for visualisation and meditative work. “When the fruit of my tree shall be quite melted down then I shall awake and be the mother of a King.”
  • 21. Presentation Part Two The Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz Toward Higher Initiation
  • 22. The Chymical WeddingPart Two Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC24 “Here lies buried Venus, that beauty which has undone many a great man both in fortune, honour, blessing and prosperity.” Inscription at the entrance of the King’s Treasury (The Fifth Day) FTER ALL THE EVENTS of the previous day Christian Rosenkreutz sleeps late and panics when he believes he has missed his meeting with the King or Bridegroom. He is assured by his Page that he merely missed breakfast. The Page continues to be his guide and if we have to assign this figure to a part of Rosenkreutz’s soul personality, we might call it his intuition, that guiding aspect of our consciousness close to Cosmic influence. The Page directs him out to the garden where he finds that the lion on the fountain of yesterday is now holding a tablet instead of a sword. On this tablet is inscribed in Latin the words: “Hermes the Prince. After so many wounds inflicted on humankind, here by God’s counsel and the helpoftheArtflowI,ahealingmedicine.Lethimdrink me who can: let him wash who will: let him trouble me who dare: drink, brethren and live.” Beneath this is inscribed a cryptogram which has beendecipheredbytheliterarycriticRichardKienastas thebirthdateofChristianRosenkreutz.Youcanseehis analysisheretotheright.TheadditionofRosenkreutz’s birth date lends more significance to the inclusion of the tablet in the narrative and reinforces the exclusive role that Christian Rosenkreutz plays. Looking at the inscription; this informs us that through the sincere application of Hermetic or Rosicrucianphilosophyourhumanvicesandfaultsare healedthroughthereintegrationofthemaleandfemale or higher and lower aspects of the soul personality. Havingattainedacertainlevelofspiritualitythereby,we maydrinkandwashfromthewatersofthisFountainof Purity.Significantlyitisaninnerpurificationcompared to that of the previous day which was an outer one. A PAGE INTUITION AFTER THIS CEREMONIAL washing Rosenkreutz follows the Virgin into the Hall and is presented with another Golden Fleece which is much grander than the one from yesterday. This is adorned with precious stones and upon it is hung a heavy medallion with an image of the sun and moon in opposition on one side and this inscription on the other: “The light of the Moon shall be as the light of the Sun,andthelightoftheSunshallbeseventimesbrighter than at present.” The first part envisions the uniting of opposites within theinitiate;thesevenfoldbrighteningofthesun,which THE SECOND GOLDEN FLEECE --THE FOURTH DAY--
  • 23. Toward Higher Initiationof Christian Rosenkreutz Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC 25 follows, refers to the completed work or full spiritual attainment. The number seven here signifies the seven steps in the alchemical process by which the impure is brought to purity. ASCENT OF THE ROYAL STAIRS FOLLOWING THIS CONFERRAL and elevation of status we are told that a door is unlocked in the Hall which Rosenkreutz had not noticedbefore.Heandhiscompanionsthenfollowthe Virgin up the 365 steps of the Royal Winding Stairs, an obvious reference to the solar year, accompanied by the playing of music. Having reached the summit they enter the royal room under a painted arch and are given wreaths of laurel. A curtain is raised and they find themselves in the presence of the King and Queen. Their Royal Majesties Rosenkreutz is awestruck by the glory of the throne roomandespeciallybythemagnificenceoftheQueen’s robes, which are so dazzling that he finds it difficult to gaze upon them. Each is presented to the King by one ofthevirginsthathaveaccompaniedthemandafterthis ceremonytheVirginmakesashortspeechinwhichshe recites the achievements of the companions and begs that each be questioned as to whether she has properly fulfilled her duty. Old Atlas then steps forward and in the name of their Royal Majesties, greets the intrepid band of philosophers, and assures the Virgin that she will receive a royal reward. It’s interesting that Rosenkreutz and his companions are not addressed directly by the King but rather through an intermediary. At this time Christian Rosenkreutz is the “Wise Initiate from the Outer World” whereas Old Atlas is the “Wise One of the Domain of the Castle.” This figure clearly belongs to a higher part of the consciousness of Christian Rosenkreutz. The Throne Room We learn from the text that the length of the throne roomisfivetimesitswidth.Tothewestisagreatporch in which stand three thrones, the central one elevated. On each throne sits two persons: on the bottom left an ancient white king with a young consort; on the bottom right a black king with a veiled matron beside him (reflecting the hidden female aspect) and on the central throne two young persons over whose heads hangs a large and costly crown, about which hovers a little Cupid who shoots his arrows first at the two lovers and then around the hall. There is also an altar positioned before this group that has a number of symbolic objects upon it. In this configuration of royal couples we see an overviewoftheprocessbeingundertakenintheallegory. The couples form a triangle with the male aspect at the lower left and the hidden female at the lower right. These are both represented with no balancing aspect between them. However, the uppermost part of this triangle features a king and queen portrayed as a young pair of lovers; this is why Cupid is hovering over them. In them we see the united male and female aspects of the soul personality. This is reinforced not just by their elevation above the other two couples but with the additionofthecrownabovetheirheads.Thissymbolic scene is meant to remind us, as many others in the narrative do, of the inner alchemical process at work in the figure of Christian Rosenkreutz. The Altar In the foreground on the altar is a book bound in black velvet..Besidethisobjectisaburningcandle,acelestial ©JohfraBosschart
  • 24. The Chymical WeddingPart Two Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC26 globe, a small striking-watch, a little crystal fountain from which runs a stream of clear blood-red liquor, and a skull with a white serpent crawling in and out of the orbits. These objects, apart from the book, share a common property in that they all have a self-sustaining inward driving force. For example, there is the ever-burning candle, the perpetually turning globe, the watch striking by itself, the ever-flowing fountain and the continually circling snake in the skull. Taken as a whole we can see these symbolic objects as being connected to the birth and death cycles as we progress through each incarnation. This altar reappears later on the sixth day in the Tower. Before they all begin to descend the Royal Stairs back down to the Hall Rosenkreutz sees moving images around the royal room accompanied by choral music. ONCE THEY ARE ALL BACK in the Hall an intriguing scene develops. This begins initially with a statement from the Virgin in response to a question from one of the other lesser virgins. She is asked: “I wonder, Sister, that you dare hazard yourself amongst so many people.” The Virgin replies with reference to Rosenkreutz that she is afraid of none so much as this man. This is an interesting statement but clearly refers to the principal role of Christian Rosenkreutz in the allegory. Remember that the Virginrepresentsanimportantarchetypalfigureofthe feminine self. If the alchemical marriage between the King and Queen fails, in other words if Rosenkreutz fails, then she remains in captivity to the male aspect. This separation of the male and female is demonstrated ingeniously by the author through the introduction of a “trick.” The virgins form the company into a ring and suggest that each seventh person, counting clockwise round the circle, shall pair up with each other. But cunningly they have so arranged themselves that it is only the virgins who become partnered with other virgins rather than male and female. THE VIRGIN’S TRICK The diagram you see here shows further evidence of the nature of Rosenkreutz in numerical and geometricalterms.Thereareninemalesandninevirgins with the principal Virgin making a tenth. Visually we canseethatthereisaseparationbetweenthetenthvirgin and the rest of the circle again inferring the separation of polarities we have been discussing. The black line traces between each seventh person who is paired together according to the rules of the game. FOLLOWING THIS THE VIRGIN ANNOUNCES that a comedy is to be performed for the benefit of the six royal guests in a building called the “House of the Sun”. Rosenkreutz and his companions form part of the royal procession which, after a considerable walk, arrives at the theatre where they sit at the right side of the kings to observe it. Thisplayinsevenactsreinforcesthecentralthrustofthenarrativebyfocussingontheneedfortheindividual orcollectivehumanity,tobringtogetherthemaleandfemaleaspectsofthesoulpersonality,thislastaspecthaving been repressed and lost. Briefly it uses the plot of a female princess (the albedo or white part of the process) being kidnappedbyaMoor(theblackornigredo)anddeprivedofherkingdom;theinferencebeingratherobvious.She is rescued and protected by an ancient king but subsequently recaptured by the Moor. Following this an ancient knight from the king gets her back again but she begins to rebel against the constricting patriarchal regime she is under and wants to become the equal of this male side. And so it goes on reflecting the underlying structure of the allegory. THE COMEDY PLAY
  • 25. Toward Higher Initiationof Christian Rosenkreutz Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC 27 ROSENKREUTZ AND HIS companions are then invited up to the King’s table for supper. The altarwehavealreadydiscussedisplacedcentrallyinthe roomandthelightsarelitfromtheeverburningcandle that sits upon it. During the meal Rosenkreutz notices that the young King often sends food to the white serpent in the skull on the altar. He does this because his future resurrectiondependsonthebloodofthisserpentonthe sixth day in the Tower of Olympus. The meal is a very sombre occasion and we are informed that although Cupid tries to cheer everyone up an element of dread seems to pervade the air; so much so that Rosenkreutz feels himself sweating. One is reminded of the Last Supper from the Passion Play of the Master Jesus and wecanbecertainthattheauthorhadthisinmindwhen creating this part of the allegory. The feast being over, the young King holds in his hand the black book and asks Rosenkreutz and his companions if they will all be true to him through prosperity and adversity meaning his imminent death andresurrection.RosenkreutzagreesandtheKingasks him to sign his name in the black book as proof of his fealty, which he does. The royal persons then drink from the little crystal fountain on the altar after which Rosenkreutz does likewise. This is the “Draught of Silence.”Theroyalpersonsthensadlyshakehandswith all present. This is a very moving part of the allegory, so much so that one can feel the emotion of the moment as one reads it. THE LAST SUPPER SUDDENLY A BELL SOUNDS andimmediately the kings and queens take off their white garments anddonblackones,theroomishunginsabledraperies andthetablesareremoved.Theeyesoftheroyalpersons are bound with six black taffeta scarves and six coffins are placed in the centre of the room with a small casket in the centre. An executioner, a Moor, robed in black and bearing an axe, enters; he beheads in turn each of the six royal persons. Their blood is caught in a golden goblet which is placed in the coffins with the bodies. The executioner is also decapitated by another Moor and his head placed in the small chest. A total of seven are dispatched in this way. The inclusion of the Moor’s head is important for the resurrection work in the Tower of Olympus on the sixth day. Death of Self What do we make of this rather gruesome scene? The beheading and death of the King and Queen are central to the transformative aspect of the allegory. Don’t forget that these two figures represent the two polarised aspects of Rosenkreutz’s inner being and it is crucial that we remain aware of this fact. The drama of the beheading then is a necessary spiritual alchemical process occurring within the soul personality of Christian Rosenkreutz; this explains his own deep sadness and emotion during the parting handshake. Viewing this scene in these terms we understand THE BEHEADING The rather gruesome beheading is a necessary part of the transformation process... that there must be a death of the old self with all the baggage that it carries. Spiritual purity cannot be furtherdevelopedwhilethereareelementsofimpurity. This active working with the soul forces is perfectly pictured in the alchemical image of the Pelican. This bird is shown stabbing its breast with its beak and nourishing its young with its own blood. The initiate must enter into a kind of sacrificial relationship with his inner being. Anyonewhohasmadetruespiritualdevelopment willknowthisexperience.One’simageofone’sselfmust be changed, transformed, sacrificed to the developing
  • 26. The Chymical WeddingPart Two Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC28 spiritualself.Thisisdeeplypainfulandtestsone’sinner resources; out of this process will eventually emerge the spiritual self, transformed through the Pelican experience. We must be aware, however, that the beheading is only the beginning of the death of the old self and that there is still much to accomplish, spiritually speaking. The Virgin on seeing the distress of Christian Rosenkreutz comforts him with these telling words: “The life of these now stands in your hands, and if you followme,thisdeathshallmakemanyalive.”Onecannot help being reminded of the words of the Master Jesus in John 8:12, “Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” The BEHEADING and DEATH of the king and queen are central to the allegory A spiritual and alchemical process occurring within the soul personality of Christian Rosenkreutz -- leading to and reflecting -- SHE THEN ORDERS THE PAGES to conduct themtotheirroomsforthenightwhilesheremains to watch over those who have undergone transition. Rosenkreutz finds it difficult to sleep with the images of the beheading still in his mind and about midnight he looks out of his window and sees seven ships sailing uponalake.Aboveeachhoversaflame;thesehebelieves to be the souls of the beheaded. When the ships reach the shore the Virgin meets them and on each of the six vessels is placed a covered coffin. As soon as the coffins have been thus disposed of the lights are extinguished and the flames pass back over the lake so that there remains but one light for a watch in each ship. After beholding this strange ceremony, Rosenkreutz returns to his bed and sleeps until morning. We note from the text that Christian Rosenkreutz is the only one of all the company to have this view over the lake. This again confirms the exclusivity of the narrative in terms of the development of the soul personality of Christian Rosenkreutz.Howcouldanyotherinitiatewitnessthis scene other than Rosenkreutz himself? THE SEVEN SHIPS Christian Rosenkreutz is the only one to witness the Seven Ships being loaded with the covered coffins. ON THE FOURTH DAY WE READ of the inclusion of others on the path in the narrative; the first three days having been taken up exclusively with the spiritual journey of Christian Rosenkreutz. This doesn’t really change except that the others are required in the allegory from day four in order for the reader to have some way of gauging the spiritual developmentofChristianRosenkreutzasthenarrative progresses. The sixth day is one example that we will come to, and which proves the point, where those with wingsgainaccesstothesecondleveloftheTowerbefore Rosenkreutz.Theirpresencenotonlyremindsusofhis spiritualimperfectionbutalsofunctionasatestforthe principal character… AFTERWORD ©JohfraBosschart
  • 27. Toward Higher Initiationof Christian Rosenkreutz Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC 29 --THE FIFTH DAY-- R ISING AT DAYBREAK and finding that no one else is awake Rosenkreutz entreats his page to show him other treasures of the palace. He is conducted down many steps to a great iron door which bears a curious inscription in copper. The translation is as follows: “Here lies buried Venus, that beauty which has undone many a great man both in fortune, honour, blessing and prosperity.” A curious inscription that infers some kind of imprisonment,hereliesburiedVenus…Thematerialof the door being iron gives us a clue to what is happening here.Thismetalisthehard,masculine,Marselement, inferringthatthefemaleforcesofVenusarekeptsecure and repressed behind it. And to reinforce the point the letters of the inscription are in copper, the metal of Venus, surrounded, as they are, with the masculine power of the iron door. The Page opens the door and leads Rosenkreutz down a very dark passage until they come to another smaller door. We read that this had not been shut completely and the Page informs him that the coffins fromthedaybeforehadbeenstoreddownhereandthe door had been left ajar. On entering he finds himself in the King’s Treasury. Nowthisseeminglyinsignificantdetailoftheopen doordoesinformusfurtheronthestateofRosenkreutz’s THE BURIED VENUS The metal of the iron door (masculine element) metaphorically surrounds and imprisons the copper plate and inscription, being the feminine element. spiritual development. Also by mentioning the coffins, itislinkedtothepreviousday’sbeheading.Rosenkreutz has already advanced enough to be able to access the King’s Treasury, in other words, deeper into this male aspect of his soul personality and this is supported by theinclusionofthedarkpassagewayhehastogodown toreachit.Theauthorwantsthereadertobeawarethat there is a continuous change taking place within the soul personality of Christian Rosenkreutz as the narrative advances. The Sepulchre of Venus Situated in the middle of the King’s Treasuryheseesagoldensepulchre.This isformedfromatriangularcopperplate onthefloorandatitscentreatriangular vessel of polished copper. In this vessel standsanangel,whoholdsinhisarmsan unknown tree, which continually drops fruitintothevessel.Aseachofthefruits fall into the vessel they dissolve and turn into water and run out from this into three small golden vessels standing by. This little altar is supported by the cherubic figures of an eagle, an ox and a lion,allofwhichstandonthetriangular base. The Sepulchre of Venus is an importantsymbolicobjectandwemust givesomeconsiderationtoitifweareto FIRE EARTH WATER AIR uu Higher realm tt Earthly realm
  • 28. The Chymical WeddingPart Two Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC30 understand the nature of the Chamber of Venus that follows. This object would certainly make a usefulimageforvisualisationinordertomeditate upon our own transformation. Wecanmakealinkherebacktothefountain in the garden in that we again have a fountain of polarities. Referring to the illustration on the previous page, the tree symbolises the male polaritywhilethevesselofwaterbelowrepresents that of the female. Through its roots, fruits and branches there is a flow between the higher realm of the male and that of the female earthly world. The addition of the cherubim, the lion, the eagle and the bull, representing the elements or principles of fire, water and earth respectively, support this symbolism when we consider that the fourth cherub is the angel holding the tree representing the element of air. The whole object depicts the state of the undeveloped soul personality with the male aspect of the angel holding aloft a tree of polarity and thereby repressing the female aspect by burying an important side of its nature beneath the roots of the tree. Seen in this light we can say that in the action of the falling fruit, the tree will eventually wither followed by a reintegration of these two polarities. The Copper Door of Venus ThePagenowindicatestoRosenkreutztheexistenceof a copper door on the floor. Having entered the domain of the King through the iron door, Rosenkreutz is now tempted to confront the repressed realm of the Queen throughthecopperentrance.Wecomenowtoacrucial point in the narrative which will eventually have a bearing on the final outcome of the allegory. In the text we read that Rosenkreutz is “greatly terrified” and asks the page how he dared show him this door, to which the Page replies “As long as the Royal Persons are still at rest, we have nothing to fear.” Now this implies some kind of deceit on the part of the Page and in this we are reminded of the serpent in theGardenofEden.However,wemustrememberthat the Page is part of Rosenkreutz’s own consciousness as was discussed in Part One. Therefore, the deceit is on the part of Rosenkreutz himself and this is why he is terrified; probably at being found out. We might make the comparison here with the concept of the “Original Sin” in the Garden of Eden allegory of Genesis. Eve takes a bite of the apple and is then privy to knowledge previouslyunknowntoher.Thisillustrateswhatisgoing on in the consciousness of Christian Rosenkreutz as this particular scene develops and we should keep this in mind as we read this part of the narrative. In the Chamber of Venus Having entered the copper door, Rosenkreutz and the page find themselves standing before a handsome four-posterbedthatisveiledallaround.ThePagedraws one veil aside... This action of drawing aside the veil we can relate to the Mysteries and in this instance it is an unveiling of his inner self. Rosenkreutz gazes upon the sleeping Venus; she is altogether immovable, like a statue. After the curtain is closed he espies a tablet behind the bed on which is inscribed the following cryptogram: “When the fruit of my tree shall be quite melted down then I shall awake and be the mother of a King.” This is an obvious reference to the Sepulchre we have just discussed; the cryptogram tells us that once the tree of polarity has withered the Lady Venus will awakeandtherewillbeareintegrationoftheopposites. This is where the significance of the premature viewing of Venus on the part of Rosenkreutz has some bearing. Remember that the beheading ceremony is only the beginning of the next stage in Rosenkreutz’s spiritual development and in this context Rosenkreutz should haveremainedonthepathhewastravelling.Bymaking this detour he has deviated from the plan, as it were, The drama enacted in this part of the narrative with its underlying theme o f d e c e i t a n d temptationresonates with the Genesis allegory and the temptation of Eve.
  • 29. Toward Higher Initiationof Christian Rosenkreutz Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC 31 and stolen a look at what is to come. It is an action that has repercussions at the end of the narrative. They ascend again and Rosenkreutz notices that there are hundreds of tapers or candles fashioned from the fire-stone pyrite upon the walls of the King’s Treasury. This crystal-likemineralcreatessparkswhenstruck and has esoteric associations. The text tells us that the burning action of these pyrite tapers has the effect of eventually melting down the tree of polarity of the Sepulchre of Venus and wecanrelatethisinformationtotheinscription we saw in the Chamber. Significantly, pyrite is an iron mineral… At this moment they are disturbed by the entrance of Cupid who is surprised to find them here. Rosenkreutz compounds his deceit by telling him that theyhadlosttheirwayintheirtouroftheCastle.Cupid then informs them that had they been aware of this copperdoorandenteredithewouldhavebeeningreat trouble with the King; so he puts a strong lock on it. Comments Reading over this scene one has the feeling that there hasbeensomethingelsegoingonunderthesurfaceand that Rosenkreutz has been deliberately tempted in his actions in a kind of role reversal to that of Eve. WecancomparethesleepingVenuswiththefallen Eve because clearly the author has deliberately drawn on the biblical allegory to make us aware of what we have lost through our attachment to religious dogma which in turn has given rise to the ill repute of that part of ourselves we associate with Eve. Rather than remaining separated from this aspect, our work is to reintegrate these two polarities that exist within our soul personality to regain what has been lost. In doing so we become inwardly transformed and spiritually reborn. This process is carried out through knowledge and inner purification and we might see figuratively the fruit tree that dominates the Sepulchre of Venus as the agent representing that process as depicted in this diagram. “When the fruit of my tree shall be quite melted down then I shall awake and be the mother of a King.” Knowledge Rebirth Inner Purification HAVING RETURNED to the Hall,Rosenkreutzpretendsthat hehasjustarisenfromsleepatthesame hour as the others. The Virgin, now robedinblackvelvetandaccompanied by her virgins, then leads them out into the courtyard where six coffins are standing, each with eight pallbearers. Don’t forget that Rosenkreutz is the only one who suspects that the royal bodies are no longer in these coffins because he had the privileged view from his window at midnight of seeing coveredcoffinsbeingloadedontoships at the lake shore. THE MOCK BURIAL
  • 30. The Chymical WeddingPart Two Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC32 Thecoffinsareloweredintogravesandgreatstones placedoverthem.TheVirginthenmakesashortoration inwhichsheexhortseachtoassistinrestoringtheroyal persons to life, declaring that they should journey with hertotheTowerofOlympus,wherethealchemicalwork necessary for the resurrection of the six royal persons could alone be done. ROSENKREUTZ AND his companions follow the Virgin to the seashore, where all embark on seven ships; these passengers include forty virgins and twelve musicians. We read in the text that the fleet is disposed according to a certain arrangement as we can see here. As the ships sail across the lake and through a narrow channel into the open sea, they are attended by sirens, nymphs and sea goddesses, who present a great and beautiful pearl in honour of the Wedding. Once the Virgin receives this gift, the nymph presenting it begs that the passengers might be entertained by them. The V irg in then commandsthatthetwogreat ships stand in the middle, andtherestencompassthem inapentagonshape.Thenthe nymphs form their company into a ring around the ships and with a most delicate sweet voice begin to sing. Love In their song, which they direct specifically to the King whose body lies on board unsuspected by the others except for the Virgin and Rosenkreutz, they remind us that in the earthly realm it is the power of Love that allows us to live in harmony with our fellow human beings and make us as like to God as possible. It is also the power of Love that gives us life; that can transform two into one and that it is only through Love that the soul and body of the King and Queen THE SEVEN SHIPS AND SIRENS THE MOCK BURIAL can be reunited again. The singing of the Sirens has a profound emotional effect on Rosenkreutz and he becomes unsteady on his feet which again reinforces the exclusivity of the narrative in terms of the spiritual development of Christian Rosenkreutz himself. The author of the allegory has focused on the theme of Love both immediately before and after the wedding executions. Firstly with the Virgin’s trick played upon the men the previous day, suggesting that males and females might partner up that night, being a reference to physical love between the polarities in sexuality. And secondly, when Christian Rosenkreutz beholds the figure of Venus unveiled where he is struck by her outer physical beauty and the indwelling power that lies in Love itself. The Siren’s song centres upon this transformative attribute of Love, which is why they address their song specifically to the King for it is through the sexual chastenessoftheKingthathasbroughtabouttheritual wedding execution. It is only when he has balanced boththemasculineandfemininepolaritiesofhisinner being, through the esoteric power of Love, that he will be spiritually reborn. g fe d c a b a b c de f g LOVE The power of Love allows us to live in harmony with other human beings... DependingontheintensityofLoveinasoul personality, the closer to God one is... Love transforms Two into One
  • 31. Toward Higher Initiationof Christian Rosenkreutz Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC 33 WHEN THE SHIPS comeinsightoftheTower of Olympus, the Virgin orders the discharge of cannon to signal their approach. Immediately a white flag appears upon the tower and a small gilded boat, containing an ancient man, the Warden of the Tower, withhiswhite-cladguards,comesouttomeettheships. The Tower is situated on an island that is square and encompassed by a thick wall. On the inside of this wall is a verdant meadow with little gardens growing strange fruits. And then there is an inner wall surrounding the Tower. The Tower itself is formed fromsixroundtowersbuiltagainsteachotherwiththe seventh being in the middle of the six and somewhat higher. All these towers are connected at all levels. THE TOWER OF OLYMPUS ENTERING THE MAIN GATE, the group is led to the bottom of the Tower. Once inside Rosenkreutz realises that there is no entertainment here but only work. The Tower contains an excellent laboratory where the company have to beat and wash plants and precious stones; they also have to extract their juices and essence and bottle it up into glasses. Indeed the Virgin sets them to work so arduously that they feel they are mere labourers. We see in this scene arepresentationofthesheerhardworkthatisrequired on our part in the early stages of the spiritual path… Having completed the first level work each is assigned a mattress on the stone floor. FIRST LEVEL WORK BEING UNABLE TO SLEEP, Rosenkreutz wanders into the garden between the outer and inner wall to observe a forthcoming conjunction of planetsofwhichhehasbecomeaware.Chancingupon a flight of steps leading to the top of the outer wall, he climbs up and gazes out to sea for a better view. The seaisexceedinglycalm.Remaininghereforsometime, aboutmidnightheseessevenflameswhich,passingover the sea towards him, gather together on the top of the spire of the central Tower. These are the soul flames of thesevenbeheadedofthepreviousday.Simultaneously the wind gets stronger, the sea becomes tempestuous and the moon becomes covered with clouds. Feeling afraid now, Rosenkreutz runs down the stairs and quickly returns to the Tower and, lying down on his mattress, is lulled to sleep by the sound of a gently flowing fountain in the laboratory. SOUL FLAMES
  • 32. The Chymical WeddingPart Two Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC34 --THE SIXTH DAY-- SUMMARY OF DAYS 4- 5 FOURTH DAY 1. Inner cleansing at Fountain 2. Meets King and Queen 3. The Virgin’s Trick 4. The Comedy Play 5. Promise before the Altar 6. The Seven Beheadings 7. Sees Soul Flames over Ships FIFTH DAY 1. Sees Venus Unveiled 2. Mock Burial in Garden 3. Sails to Tower of Olympus 4. Sirens’ Song of Love 5. Arrives at Tower of Olympus 6. First Level Work 7. Sees Planetary Conjunction and Soul Flames OLLOWING THEIR awakening on the morning of the sixth day the aged Warden of the Tower, after examining the work performed by them in the laboratory and finding it satisfactory, causes ladders, ropes and large wings to be brought in; he tells the assembled company that each must bear one of these items throughout the day. Lots are cast, meaning there is no conscious choice here, and Rosenkreutz, much to his humiliation, is assigned a heavy ladder. Those who secure wings have them fastenedtotheirbackssocunninglythatit’simpossible to detect that they are artificial. Now the aged Warden locks the company in the lower room of the Tower, but in a short time a round hole is uncovered in the ceiling and the Virgin invites them all to ascend. Those with wings fly at once through the opening; those with ropes had many difficulties, while Rosenkreutz with his ladder makes reasonable speed. It’s important to see each of these objects as representing individual approaches to spiritual attainment each has been assigned. While those with the wings rise easily to spiritual heights, perhaps too hastily, those with the ropes have a more outward directed consciousness and require some assistance to ascend, spiritually speaking. Those who have been given ladders adopt a more balanced approach to the mysteries building a link between their lower and higher selves. The work undertaken in the Tower is obviously F THE ASCENT OF THE TOWER crucial to the whole process of transformation and resurrection. It involves an ascent of seven levels where thecompanyofadeptsparticipateinandexperiencethe great work of spiritual transformation through seven stages. In this sense, their rising onto another level of the Tower corresponds to their developing a higher spiritual insight.
  • 33. Toward Higher Initiationof Christian Rosenkreutz Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC 35 HAVINGGAINEDENTRANCEtothesecond level there is a ritual procession around a great fountain-like vessel holding the royal bodies. This involves 62 people: 40 virgins, 12 musicians, the 9 companions, who we’ve already spoken of, and the Virgin. If we add to this procession the Warder and Cupid, there are 64 in all. They come to a halt and arrange themselves in a certain configuration... Then the Virgin places the Moor’s head, who had been the executioner at the beheading, in a kettle-like receptacle in the upper part of the fountain and pours into the opening at the top the substances prepared on the previous day in the laboratory. The virgins place lamps beneath. These substances, after this process of boiling, pass out through holes in the sides of the kettle and, falling upon the bodies in the fountain below, dissolve them. We see in this action the hand of the Moorish executioner as the continuing agent of change. The six royal bodies having been reduced thus to a red liquid state, a tap is opened in the lower end of thefountainandtheredfluiddrainedintoanimmense golden globe which is brought to the vessel for this purpose. The globe is then taken up to the third level. SECOND LEVEL WORK The work in the Tower involves seven levels, each one corresponding to a developing spiritual insight. HERE THE GLOBE is suspended by a strong chain.Thewallsofthislevelhavemanywindows and mirrors so arranged that the sun’s rays are concentrated upon the central globe, thus causing it to become very hot. Later the Virgin commands the mirrors to be covered and the windows fastened to let the globe cool. After a meal the globe is cut open with adiamond,revealingthefruitoftheirwork,abeautiful white egg. Carrying this with her, the Virgin departs and a little while later another hole in the ceiling opens and the company ascend to the fourth level. THIRD LEVEL WORK
  • 34. The Chymical WeddingPart Two Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC36 HERE STANDS A SQUARE copper vessel filled with sand and warmed by a gentle fire. The great white egg is placed upon the warm sand to mature. In a short time it cracks and there emerges an ugly, ill-tempered bird, which is fed with the blood of the beheaded royal persons diluted with the prepared liquid from the previous level. This blood, you might recall, was collected at the beheading in a golden cup on the fourth day and as such is the combined male and female fluid. Asthisfeedingcontinuesitsfeatherschangecolour three times in line with the number of royal couples whose blood it is ingesting; from black they turn to white and finally become multicoloured. These are the alchemical stages of Nigredo, Albedo and Peacock. Rosenkreutz tells us that as this process continues the behaviour of the bird improves until it becomes quite tame. Dinner is then served, after which the Virgin departs with the bird. The alchemists then ascend to the fifth floor. FOURTH LEVEL WORK FIFTH LEVEL WORK HERE IS SITUATED A BATH coloured with fine white powder to make a milky liquid which the bird enjoys bathing in until the lamps placed beneath the bath cause the water to become uncomfortably warm. Eventually when the heat has removed all the bird’s feathers it is taken out, but the fire continues until nothing remains in the bath except thesedimentintheformofbluestone.Thisispounded up and made into a pigment and they use all of this to paint the bird except its head. The Virgin leaves with the blue bird and the company ascend to the sixth level in the same manner as before.
  • 35. Toward Higher Initiationof Christian Rosenkreutz Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC 37 HERE THEY FIND the same altar they saw in the King’s throne room on the fourthday.Uponitarethesixritualobjectsplus the bird, making seven in all. The bird drinks from the little crystal fountain and pecks at the white serpent that crawls through the openings intheskull.Theresultingbloodiscollectedinto a golden cup and fed to the bird. Following this the companions or alchemists dip the serpent’s head into the crystal fountain, which revives the creature, and it slithers back into the skull hidden from view. Thespherehasbeenrevolvingcontinuously all this time; when it makes the desired conjunction the clock strikes one. This cycle is repeated so that the clock strikes two and then three. Upon this final striking of the clock the bird,laysitsneckuponthebookandallowsitself tobedecapitatedbyoneoftheninecompanions; wearenottoldwhichonedoesthisact,onlythat the person is chosen by lot but given what we knowitisclearlyRosenkreutzwhodoesthis.The death of the bird is another emotional moment forthealchemists,itsdeathgoingtotheirhearts, we are told. This decapitation is a recapitulation on a higher level of the beheadings which occurred on the fourth day and the connection is maintained by the appearance of the altar. The altar is now moved away and with the Virgin’s help they kindle a fire with the burning candle that’s on the altar. The body of the bird is burned to ashes and these are then placed in a box of cypress wood. Following this another trick is played on Rosenkreutz; the Virgin tells him and three of his companions that they have been lazy and sluggish workers and would therefore be excluded from the seventh floor. Rosenkreutz is understandably disheartened by these words and in an emotional state. Musicians are sent for and with their cornets trumpet the four in ridicule out of the chamber. But just as soon as theyhavebeensounceremoniouslyejectedfrom the sixth level the musicians tell them to be of good cheer and lead them up a winding stair to an area under the roof of the seventh floor to which the others are not privy. SIXTH LEVEL WORK
  • 36. The Chymical WeddingPart Two Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC38 SEVENTH LEVEL WORK HERE IS THE ROOF STRUCTURE at the seventh level as described in the narrative.Takenoticeparticularlyoftheheptagonal formationanditscentralpoint;ifyouhaveseenthe previous presentation on the Fama Fraternitatis this should remind you of the Rosicrucian Vault. The four now find themselves before the old Warden of the Tower who is standing by a little round furnace. He welcomes them and gives his congratulations upon their being chosen by the Virgin for this greater work. The Virgin herself then enters, and after laughing at the perplexity of her guests, empties the ashes of the bird into another vessel, filling the cypress box with useless matter. She then goes down to the seventh floor, presumably to mislead those assembled there by setting them to work upon the false ashes in the box. Christian Rosenkreutz and his three companions now work moistening the bird’s ashes with specially prepared water until the mixture becomes of dough like consistency, after which it is heated and then poured into two human shaped moulds. Later these moulds are opened, disclosing two human images about four inches high; these are known as homunculi. One is male and the other female. These tiny forms are then laid upon satin cushions where the four alchemists gaze at them for a considerable time. In this action we can feel the emotional attachment and sense of identity goingonbetweenChristianRosenkreutzandthese figures that are destined to become united. Both homunculi are now fed drop by drop with the blood of the bird collected previously until they grow to human size and are of great beauty. This quality of beauty emphasised in the textreinforcestheideaofthembeingafitvesselfor thecomingresurrection.Indeed,Rosenkreutztells us that even the figure of Venus could not compare to them. The Warden orders that they are covered up to the breast with taffeta in case their so called “unspeakablebeauty”goesagainstthem.However, while the bodies have the consistency of flesh, they shownosignoflife,forthesoulisnotinthem.The bodies are next surrounded with torches and their faces covered with silk.
  • 37. Toward Higher Initiationof Christian Rosenkreutz Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC 39 TheVirginthenappearsbearingtwocuriouswhite garmentsandaccompaniedbymusicandothervirgins. These garments, we are told, have a soft and crystal-like appearance that Rosenkreutz finds hard to describe. Six more virgins enter, each of whom carries a large trumpet; these are adorned with green, glittering and burning material. The Warden takes one of these, and after he removessomeofthetorchesanduncoverstheirfaces,he placesoneofthetrumpetsuponthemouthofoneofthe bodies in such a way that the wider end of it is directed upward towards the central hole in the domed roof. The text tells us that while the three other companions are distracted by what is going on in front of them Rosenkreutz has his attention on the central hole of the ceiling. He observes this hole opening and a bright stream of fire appearing from it which passes down the tube of the trumpet and into the body. The three companions think that life is brought to the body through the action of the fire of the foliage surrounding the trumpet in the mouth. It is only Christian Rosenkreutz that sees how the operation is performed in reality. This process is repeated three times on each body. The two newly ensouled forms are then wrapped invelvetandremovedtoapreparedbirthingbedwhere they remain asleep where Rosenkreutz and his three companionswaitforthecoupletoawaken.Afterabout halfanhourCupidfliesinandtormentsthecoupleuntil theywakeup.MusicisplayedandsoonaftertheVirgin enters and presents them with the white garments. These they don and the company with profound reverence congratulate them and the King graciously returns thanks to everyone. THEN THEY ESCORT the royal couple down to the ship that is waiting for them upon which they embark with certain virgins and Cupid. The ship carries them away until they are quickly out of sight of the company. After this Rosenkreutz and his three privileged companions rejoin those who had been working at a lower level on the seventh floor making no mention of whattheyhadseen.Someofthesefiveweresympathetic to Rosenkreutz and his three other companions, believing that once the four had been driven out of the sixth floor they had failed. After supper the entire party were assigned handsome chambers for the night. Rosenkreutz falls asleep to the gentle sound of the sea and dreams from 11 o’clock until 8 o’clock the next morning. DEPARTURE OF ROYAL COUPLE
  • 38. The Chymical WeddingPart Two Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC40 --THE SEVENTH DAY-- FTERTHEYAWAKEtheVirginannounces that each of the wedding guests are to be installed as a “Knight of the Golden Stone.” She then gives them yellow robes and another Fleece, after which the Warden of the Tower presents them with a gold medal, bearing on one side the abbreviated Latin inscription: “At. Nat. Mi.” meaning Ars Naturae Ministra (Art is the Servant of Nature) and on the other “Tem. Na. F.” meaning Temporis natura Filia (Nature is the Daughter of Time). The entire company then return in twelve ships to the King’s palace. The flags on the vessels bare the signs of the zodiac and Rosenkreutz sits under that of Libra,thescales,reflectingtheharmonyhehasattained in his soul personality. After sailing for two hours many ships come out to meet them and the King and Queen,togetherwiththeirlords,ladiesandvirgins,sail forth on a golden barge to greet the returning guests accompanied by cannon fire, the sound of trumpets, shalms and kettle drums. Atlas then steps forward and gives a short oration on the King’s behalf welcoming the adepts, and asking fortheroyalpresents.Atthispoint,thenarrativetellsus, thefivecompanionswhohadbeenworkingonthefalse ashes of the bird at the seventh floor, are in amazement at seeing the King and Queen since they were not present at the resurrection ceremony. Rosenkreutz and the other three companions also pretend to be amazed in order to spare any upset. Now the aged Warden of the Tower delivers to Cupid, who is hovering over the royalcouple,asmallcurious-shapedcasket,thecontents of which remain secret. A KNIGHTS OF THE GOLDEN STONE Rosenkreutz is met by the Royal couple... AFTER A VOLLEY of cannon fire the flotilla sail to another part of the lake shore which just happenstobeinthevicinityoftheFirstPortalthrough which Rosenkreutz had entered the domain of the CastleoftheBridegroom.Heretheyalldisembarkand each one of the companions is distributed amongst the lords. Christian Rosenkreutz is assigned a special place of honour at which he feels unworthy to take but graciously rides alongside the King. Upon seeing the tokens that Rosenkreutz had fastened on his hat the King reveals that he is Rosenkreutz’s “father.” This is a tellingstatementthatreinforcesthewholethrustofthe allegory,namelythatitisexclusivelyaboutthespiritual progress and attainment of Christian Rosenkreutz and that all the others are incidental characters to the narrative. It’s interesting that we now have in the narrative a recapitulation of Rosenkreutz’s entry into the domain of the Castle; not as the person he was but as an advanced adept – an adept, however, that still has unresolved issues, as we find out next. RETURN TO THE FIRST PORTAL
  • 39. Toward Higher Initiationof Christian Rosenkreutz Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC 41 They arrive at the first gate where the Porter is standing clothed in blue, who, upon seeing Christian Rosenkreutz begs him to intercede with the King to release him from that post of servitude. Before Rosenkreutz can say anything in response the King replies that the Porter was a famous astrologer who was forced to keep the gate as a punishment for the crime of having gazed upon the sleeping Venus. The King further declares that the Porter could only be released when another is found who has committed the same crime. This is a particularly embarrassing moment for Christian Rosenkreutz who is mortified, for he realises himself to be that culprit. For the time being, however, he remains silent, leaving us, as the reader, feeling uncomfortable with this secret. The entourage continues on to the castle. The King reveals that he is Rosenkreutz’s “Father”. The Porter can only be released when another is found... IN THE CASTLE the King reads the letter given to him by the First Porter and then hands it to Christian Rosenkreutz who asks if there is some other way the Porter might be released from this punishment. The King replies no, because of some other “consideration.” There follows a ceremony in which the following articles are read by old Atlas: 1. That they would ascribe their Order only to God and His handmaid, Nature. 2. That they should abominate all uncleanness and vice. 3. That they should always be ready to assist the worthy and needy. 4. That they should not use their knowledge and power for the attainment of worldly dignity. 5. That they should not desire to live longer than God has decreed. The newly created Knights of the Golden Stone are obliged to subscribe to these five articles drawn up by the King. TheyarethendulyinstalledasKnightsandprocess to a little chapel where the ceremony is ratified. Here ChristianRosenkreutzhangsuphisGoldenFleeceand his hat for an eternal memorial, and writes in the book his inscription… “Is there some other way that the Porter might be released?” RETURN TO THE CASTLE Summa Scientia Nihil Scire Fr. Christianus Rosenkreutz Eques Aurei Lapidis Anno 1459 The highest wisdom is to know nothing Brother Christian Rosenkreutz Knight of the Golden Stone In the year 1459
  • 40. The Chymical WeddingPart Two Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC42 FOLLOWING THIS CEREMONY, Christian Rosenkreutz admits that he was the one who had beheld the hidden Venus and consequently must become the Guardian at the First Portal. The King embraces him fondly for this admission and he is assigned to a great room containing three beds, one for himself, one for the aged Warden of the Tower and the third for old Atlas. And thus ends the narrative except for a telling afterword; we read: [Hereabouttwoleavesinquartoaremissing,and he(theauthorofthis),whereasheimaginedhemust in the morning be doorkeeper, returned home.] THERE IS NO DOUBT THAT WE CAN SEE a clear emphasis in the second half of the narrative on the inneraspectsofChristianRosenkreutz…Wehavefollowedhimfromhisinitialinvitationandoutercleansing over the first three days through his higher initiation and purification of his soul personality in the second half. At the outset of Part One it was said that we must at all times keep in mind that these events are working within the mind and consciousness of the principal character… This is crucial to our understanding of the allegory and the only way in which we, as the readers, can identify with it from our own personal experiences. Although this allegory is not just for the advanced Rosicrucian student it will be found more comprehensible to those with the experience of working with the higher teachings of the Rosicrucian Order. The author has been very clever at constructing the narrative through his use of veiled language and it is hoped that this concise summary and commentary, such as it is, has revealed enough to make this particular Manifesto more appealing and readable to all who would peruse its pages. Remember that this whole allegory has been enacted within the consciousness of its principal character, Christian Rosenkreutz, and here is further reinforcement of that statement. It says that he returns home… We might understand this in two ways: the first is to assume that he has actually participated in all these eventsorinitiationsandinraisinghisconsciousnesshas gainedcompletemasteryofSelf,orsecondly,andmore likely, this has been achieved after he awakens from a dreamlike state that has provided him with insight and knowledgetoassisttheevolutionofhissoulpersonality. It does not matter which way we view this ending since we, as the reader, are all beneficiaries of the allegory and its import. AFTERWORD KNIGHT OF THE GOLDEN STONE They are duly installed as Knights of the Golden Stoneandprocesstoalittle chapel where the ceremony is ratified. Here Christian Rosenkreutz hangs up his Golden Fleece and his Hat for an “eternal memorial”. GUARDIAN AT THE FIRST PORTAL
  • 41. Toward Higher Initiationof Christian Rosenkreutz Copyright Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC 43 --WORKING WITH THE ALLEGORY-- ROM AN OBJECTIVE viewpoint the greatest obstacle to studying and working with the Chymical Wedding is its sheer size and scope; indeed it will seem quite daunting after reading completely through it for the first time. The two-partpresentationandthisaccompanyingbooklet, while not definitive, will serve as an introduction to thosewhoarepreparedtocommittimetotheallegory. Remember, the narrative is not just a story but in the true sense of its allegorical nature, an instructional treatise.Thismeansthateveryactionandcircumstance within it means something and requires us to pause or give time to reflect and ponder on its significance. This will be the basis of meditative exercises that you can devise yourself. Visualisationcombinedwithmeditationisthebest and appropriate means of experiencing the Chymical Wedding at a profound esoteric level and the presentation took us through a practical example using the Sepulchre of Venus. The discourse that supplements the presentation (“The Chymical Wedding and Us”) focusses on the Weighing Scene as a visualisation subjectwhichischieflyconcerned withself-examinationandprepares the Rosicrucian student for later work with the allegory. These visualisation and meditation exerciseswillonlybeasuniqueand valuable in proportion to the amount of preparatory groundwork done (i.e. reading and study of the text) and your own experience in these key techniques. On the objective level the first practical step is to initially read through the whole narrative to make yourself familiar with it. While doing so write down any thoughts and impressions that might come to you. Following this you might want to read the work of others to supplement your growing familiarity with theallegoryalthoughthisshouldbedonewithcaution as there are many who would have their own agenda or writefromaparticularstandpoint,especiallyareligious one.Thelessonhereistobediscerningandseparatethe wheat from the chaff. Mindful of this there is much to be gained from consulting other commentaries which will supplement and expand on your own work although the Rosicrucian student will always defer to the guidance of the master within. Consultation of the monographs for those at a higher level of instruction will, of course, be profitable. You will also find it productive to take some meaningful phrase from the textofthenarrativeandreflectandmeditateonit.This can be done during your normal Rosicrucian studies within your home sanctum. Following your work on the text of the narrative read through this booklet again to reinforce its main points, looking to create the mental imagery you will want to use during your visualisation work. The presentation and this booklet does not pretend to be definitive in providing this imagery but it will serve as a guide in your own unique work. The depiction of the Sepulchre of Venus on page 20 will be found useful in this regard and will give you a definite focus for your meditations. The scope of the allegory is such that it has not been possible to embrace totally the concept of theinitiatoryprocessthatisplayed out, especially when we consider the seven levels of the Tower of Olympus, which figuratively represents the highest attainment. Itis,therefore,mostimportanttounderstandthat you will need to create your own visualisation experiences and accompanying meditational practices, combined with uplifting and soul stirring music, in order to interact completely with this allegory. In this way you willnotjustappreciatewhatisgoingoninthenarrative at a profound level but be led to experiences that will move you inwardly. Accordingly, with discipline and dedication, the inner self or soul personality will be actively fed and benefit spiritually, assisting in its evolution toward a greater understanding of our relationship to God and the Cosmic. A PRACTICAL GUIDE F
  • 42. Text While much of the content including text and interpretation are original to the author the following sources were used and consulted (apart from the AMORC monographs) for both the presentation and this booklet, the most important work here being that of Adam McLean for which this commentary relied the most. • Adam McLean, A Commentary on the Chymical Wedding, Magnum Opus Hermetic Sourceworks, 1984. • Deidre Green Ph.D., “The Symbolism of the Rosicrucian Vault” in A Compendium on the Rosicrucian Vault, 1985 (that part pertaining to the Tower of Olympus and the Chamber of Venus). • Deidre Green Ph.D., “Light on the Castle Path” in The Hermetic Journal, Autumn, 1982, pp.5-11. • Lyndy Abaham, A Dictionary of Alchemical Imagery, Cambridge University Press, 1998. • Ishtar’s descent to the Underworld, http://www. inanna.virtualave.net/tammuz.html • Theodor Williams, “Five and Fifty: A Proposed Solution to ‘The Virgin’ Name Riddle in the Rosicrucian Document ‘The Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz’” in Rose Croix Journal, 2006, pp.129-138. • J W Montgomery, “The Chymische Hochzeit [sic] with Notes and Commentary” in Cross and Crucible, Vol. II, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, 1974. (with caution; religious bias, written from a Lutheran perspective). Other Reading • As a Renaissance source of Andreae’s allegory see Jocelyn Godwin (translator), Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, Thames & Hudson, 2005 in conjunction with... • Adam McLean, The Dream of Poliphilus (with introduction and commentary), Magnum Opus Hermetic Sourceworks, 1986. Also his short survey on the same subject in The Hermetic Journal, Winter, 1985, pp. 32-36. --BIBLIOGRAPHY AND AKNOWLEDGEMENTS-- Illustrations, Diagrams and Tables Allillustrations,diagramsandtablesinthisbookletare original except for the following: • As indicated on pages 4,9,23 and 26, by Johfra Bosschart, a Dutch modern artist (1919-1998) appearing as illustrations in The Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz, published by Lectorium Rosicrucianum in The Netherlands. • Page 24, the “Virgin’s Trick” diagram adapted from Adam McLean inA Commentary on the Chymical Wedding, Magnum Opus Sourceworks, 1984. • Page 28, Public Domain Image: Sündenfall, “The Fall of Man” often referred to as “Adam and Eve”), oil on canvas painting (1570) by the Italian painter Titian (http://public-domain-images. blogspot.com/2010/12/adam-and-eve-paintings-by- titian-and.html) • Page 31, Alchemical laboratory: Distillatio by Stradamus c.1550, http://www.flickr.com/ photos/85009674@N00/2916658478 (under creative commons license, http://creativecommons. org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en_GB) • Tables of “Seven Tests of Christian Rosenkreutz” (p.11) and “Day Summaries” (pp. 19, 32) from Adam McLean inA Commentary on the Chymical Wedding, Magnum Opus Sourceworks, 1984.
  • 43. The Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz A Presentation in Two Parts Part One Purifying the Outer Self Part Two Toward Higher Initiation Being a Commentary and Practical Guide (with illustrations and diagrams) The Rosicrucian Order AMORC Greenwood Gate, Blackhill, Crowborough. TN6 1XE Tel: +44 (0)1892 653197 Fax:+44 (0)1982 667432 E-mail: membership@amorc.org.uk In H oc S igno Vinces

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