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PGCAP LTHE week7: assessment and feedback
PGCAP LTHE week7: assessment and feedback
PGCAP LTHE week7: assessment and feedback
PGCAP LTHE week7: assessment and feedback
PGCAP LTHE week7: assessment and feedback
PGCAP LTHE week7: assessment and feedback
PGCAP LTHE week7: assessment and feedback
PGCAP LTHE week7: assessment and feedback
PGCAP LTHE week7: assessment and feedback
PGCAP LTHE week7: assessment and feedback
PGCAP LTHE week7: assessment and feedback
PGCAP LTHE week7: assessment and feedback
PGCAP LTHE week7: assessment and feedback
PGCAP LTHE week7: assessment and feedback
PGCAP LTHE week7: assessment and feedback
PGCAP LTHE week7: assessment and feedback
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PGCAP LTHE week7: assessment and feedback

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  • Half will work together to identify why we access, The other half of the class will go out and ask students use 2 different colour cards and markers
  • to print, also include the PBL model to be used!!! see Blackboard part 1 up to the break! However, if groups are making good progress let them continue with part 2 (differentiation strategy!)
  • Activity: everybody gets a piece of paper and is asked to draw somebody. Then they are asked to provide feedback (NOT say write/talk about the portrait) She if everybody provides verbal feedback. This is what usually happens. This way it is demonstrated that it is more natural to provide verbal feedback. Then link to digital if verbal not possible, the closest it gets. Verbal > digital
  • on sticky notes to collect
  • Transcript

    • 1. week 7, LTHE modulePGCAP, University of Salford Twitter @pgcap 1
    • 2. • to participate and collaborate in small group PBL with an assessment and feedback theme• to identify and critically analyse issues linked to the given PBL trigger• to present findings to another team and provide feedback 2
    • 3. 3
    • 4. grouping first: buddies (5-6) 4
    • 5. 5
    • 6. 6
    • 7. Step 1: FocusWhat do we see?How do we understand what we see?What do we need to find out more about?Specify learning issues/intended learning outcomes!Step 2: InvestigateHow and where are we/am I going to find answers?Who will do what and by when?What main findings and solutions do we/I propose?Step 3: ShareHow are we going to present our findings within the group?What do we want to share with the FDOL community?How can we provide feedback to another group?What reflections do I have about my learning and our group work? 7
    • 8. I facilitate team I record what is meetings/tutorials, said/agreed during stimulate debate meetings, make sure that everybody is record any issues participating and that summarise and the PBL process is used. synthesise I also co-ordinate learning and tasks (who does what and by when)I facilitate the PBL process and reflection, askopen questions. I need to I keep track of time remember to during step back and I share/read meetings/tutorials, not lecture! the problem scenario, remind team draw attention members how to key elements much time is left of the scenario 8
    • 9. (part 1) “Just finished marking 150 essays, the one and only assignment for this challenging module. Can’tunderstand why students don’t do well! Is one essay too much? I have been using this essay title for the last 10years – I love it! – and students just don’t seem to engage with it, not even the brighter ones, which is reallystrange!I have given the students an extensive reading list and during the lectures I always tell them that they can ask meif they don’t understand something. Not sure what I am doing wrong… Students have never complained aboutanything and the module evaluation is always positive.They had a whole month to write the essay… but I know that many just do it a few days before the handing indate. At least they hand it in I guess.(part 2) Writing feedback is hard work too! I don’t know these people. I see them 2h a week over 10 weeks andthere are 150 of them in the lecture theatre, well they are usually not all there. I find it really time consuming towrite feedback on their assignments. I tend to write loads and tell them what they did wrong. That should beuseful for them! But I am actually not sure if they read it. Most of them just see the mark and don’t bothercollecting the feedback. Am I wasting my time?”Please investigate the above carefully. Identify possible problems, then define your learning outcomes. Carry outresearch to resolve the issues identified. You will be asked to present your findings to another group and engagein a conversation about these.Please work together and apply the Mills 5-stage PBL model in your investigation. Please remember that you willbe working together. Co-ordinate team activities and assign roles, such as chair, reader, scribe and timekeeper.A PBL facilitator will help you to get started. Please also access the online PBL resources to familiarise yourselffurther with PBL. Ask your facilitator if you are unsure about something.You are welcome to use some of the resources made available and identify further ones for your research. 9
    • 10. • … a portrait of the person sitting next to you• Show portrait to the person you created• Person on the portrait to provide feedback to the artist 11
    • 11. “Solange arrives at her English university. She is a keen student and wants to dowell. After a few weeks, she is asked to write an assignment. When she sits at hercomputer, she finds that she can only think of the complex ideas she has grappledwith on the course in her mother tongue, which is not English. It is an enormousstrain to write these ideas and she cannot think directly in English. She has totranslate her thoughts one by one. When she gets the essay back, she is extremelydisappointed with her mark. She is used to excellent results. Some of the feedbackrelates to her use of English and is very discouraging. Her tutor has written:‘There are hints of some interesting ideas in this essay but they are often difficult tounderstand because you do not express them clearly. Please check your Englishcarefully before you hand in your work There are too many errors here.’” (Duhs,2010, 6)Discuss the feedback. Try to redraft it so that it feeds forwardand helps Solange to feel less apprehensive about her nextessay. 12
    • 12.  Access an e-portfolio Pick a reflection Use the assessment criteria and attainment descriptors (see the module guide) Provide feedback (insert your comments directly to the e-portfolio) 13
    • 13.  What are the 3 things you are taking away today? 14
    • 14. Biggs, J. (1999) Teaching for Quality Learning at University SRHE/OUPBloom, B.S. et al, Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: Cognitive Domain New York: McKayBloxham, S. & Boyd, P. (2007) Developing Effective Assessment in Higher Education, OpenUniversity Press: MaidenheadBoud (2010) Keynote, University of Salford Assessment and Feedback Good Practice event, 6 July2010Brown, S., Race, P. and Smith, B. (1996) 500 Tips on Assessment. London: Kogan PageButcher et al (2006) Designing Learning. From module outline to effective teaching, Oxon: RoutledgeDuhs, R. (2010) ‘Please, no exam”’ Assessment strategies for international students, in: SEDAEducational Developments, Issue 11.4, Dec, pp. 3-6Earl, L.M. (2003) Assessment as Learning, Thousand Oaks: Corwin Press.Gibbs, G. and Simpson, C. (2004) Conditions under which assessment supports students’ learning.Learning and Teaching in Higher Education, vol. 1. pp.1-31Irons, A. (2008) Enhancing Learning through formative assessment and feedback, Oxon: Routledge. 15
    • 15. Juwah, C. et.al (2004) Enhancing student learning througheffective formative feedback. HEA. Athttp://www.heacademy.ac.uk/assets/York/documents/resources/resoKnight, P. T. (2002) Summative assessment and highereducation: practices in disarray, in: Studies in Higher Education,27, 3, pp. 275-286.Price (2007) ‘Should we be giving less written feedback?’ inCentre for Biosciences Bulletin Autumn 2007, HEASchofield, M. (2010) “Taking the ‘ass’ out of assessment”[keynote], First level assessment project conference, 16th June2010, LeedsMet university 16

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