• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
U.S. Medical - Disaster Training/Emergency Preparedness
 

U.S. Medical - Disaster Training/Emergency Preparedness

on

  • 557 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
557
Views on SlideShare
557
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    U.S. Medical - Disaster Training/Emergency Preparedness U.S. Medical - Disaster Training/Emergency Preparedness Presentation Transcript

    • Disaster Training Presentation created by: Ali Buschel Training verified by: Mariana C. Gaul, M.S., M.Ed Disaster Training
    • Emergency Response Protocol The following slides describe emergency procedures for certain potential emergency situations. These procedures are intended as a general guideline and are in no way intended to contradict first responder instructions. Additionally, although the following list of emergencies represents the most common types that may be faced, possible emergencies are not limited to those listed. Please make yourself familiar with these procedures so that when an actual emergency arises, you are ready to take action. The first priority in an emergency should always be to maintain life and safety. Disaster Training
    • Inclement Weather • Employees will be notified of the opening or closing of school through public service announcements on local radio and television stations. – If inclement weather conditions arise during the course of normal school hours and a General Emergency period is designated, employees will be notified through department channels or county communication. Disaster Training
    • Disaster Training
    • Disaster Training
    • Disaster Training
    • Disaster Training
    • Disaster Training
    • Medical Emergency Disaster Training
    • Flood Emergency Disaster Training
    • Shelter-In-Place • In certain emergency situations, it may be safer to shelter-in-place within the school building instead of evacuating. Shelter-in-place means that you would select a small, interior room, with few or no windows, and take refuge there. – Close the door to the classroom, bring all of the children into the room, and shut and lock the doors and windows. • Select interior rooms above the ground floor, with the fewest windows or vents. Avoid overcrowding by selecting several rooms, if necessary. • Avoid selecting a room with mechanical equipment because it may not be able to be sealed from the outdoors. – Write down the names of all students and employees in the room and call your principal with this information. – Keep listening to the radio or television, if available, until you are told that all is safe or that you should evacuate. – DO NOT use the elevators. The movement of elevators pumps significant amounts of air in and out of a building. Disaster Training
    • Individuals with Disabilities Non-ambulatory Personnel: • Non-ambulatory: Not able to walk about. • If no smoke or fire is on that floor, non- ambulatory clients should be assisted just outside a stairwell landing, also known as a rescue assistance area. Call 911 to alert them to your location and the reason you cannot evacuate and remain in this location for evacuation or further instructions by fire department personnel. It is important that you stay with the client that has the disability until the emergency is over. Disaster Training
    • Individuals with Disabilities „ Semi-Ambulatory: • TSS should be of assistance and/or accompany the client in descending the stairs in the event that additional help is needed, or the client may choose to wait in a stairwell for fire department personnel to assist them. In these instances, it is important to inform the fire department personnel of this decision, so call 911 to alert them to your location and the reason you cannot evacuate. Remain in this location. Disaster Training
    • Individuals with Disabilities Visual Impairment: • „A client with a visual impairment should let the TSS know if they feel they would need assistance in the event of an evacuation. Deaf or Hard of Hearing: • „Clients who are deaf or hard of hearing may be able to see a visual alarm, depending on its placement. If so, they should be able to evacuate with other students. If there is no visual alarm nearby, personal notification in the form of sign or hand gestures will be necessary. It is especially important to check in restrooms, copy rooms, and kitchens in case an alarm may not be seen from that area. Disaster Training
    • *Always ask the person with a disability if they need assistance and what the best way to assist might be* Disaster Training
    • Emergency Preparedness Kit Disaster Training
    • “Go-Kits” In case of an emergency evacuation, it is critical that every classroom maintains a “go kit,” a self-contained and portable stockpile of emergency supplies, often placed in a backpack and left in a readily accessible, but secure location so that it is ready to “go.” The contents of the go kits should reflect the safety team’s consideration of the school’s circumstances and resources. Some schools find it beneficial to have two major types of “go-kits”: 1) For administrators 2) For teachers in each individual classroom Examples of items to be included in each type of kit follow… Disaster Training
    • Disaster Training
    • Disaster Training
    • Disaster Training
    • Disaster Training
    • Disaster Training