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Dave Owens 2011 Home Birth Conference
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Dave Owens 2011 Home Birth Conference

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  • WE say “of course they are important.” But specifically? It’s obvious what mums do, how essential they are to the well-being and development of their child. Given that, how important are the men? Aren’t they really the ones who give mum a break, take the kids off to soccer or netball? Who brings in his pay packet and helps with the dishes? Or bastards who don’t do any of that stuff. Does it matter that men are not seen as maternity services clients or consumer? There has been research.
  • By engaging men - we improve the health of our children and support the mental health of his partner
  • By engaging men - we improve the health of our children and support the mental health of his partner
  • By engaging men - we improve the health of our children and support the mental health of his partner
  • I ask cbec men - is your partner going to breastfeed “ Yes” Have you talked about it, directly?” Half say “No” Women tend to assume men have a more negative attitude than they actually have WE need to help them discuss them openly between them
  • I ask cbec men - is your partner going to breastfeed “ Yes” Have you talked about it, directly?” Half say “No” Women tend to assume men have a more negative attitude than they actually have WE need to help them discuss them openly between them
  • I ask cbec men - is your partner going to breastfeed “ Yes” Have you talked about it, directly?” Half say “No” Women tend to assume men have a more negative attitude than they actually have WE need to help them discuss them openly between them
  • Burning calories
  • Not involving the man in her depression treatment not only compromises her well-being - but his as well. Where does that leave baby?
  • Not involving the man in her depression treatment not only compromises her well-being - but his as well. Where does that leave baby?
  • Not involving the man in her depression treatment not only compromises her well-being - but his as well. Where does that leave baby?
  • Not involving the man in her depression treatment not only compromises her well-being - but his as well. Where does that leave baby?
  • Not involving the man in her depression treatment not only compromises her well-being - but his as well. Where does that leave baby?
  • New research indicates this occurs for men who have early skin to skin contact with their baby and who are regularly doing things with their baby
  • Many men haven’t had role models to do this. There certainly aren’t support services for men like there are for women
  • Many men haven’t had role models to do this. There certainly aren’t support services for men like there are for women
  • Many men haven’t had role models to do this. There certainly aren’t support services for men like there are for women
  • The website is very important
  • A birth is an opportunity for a man It’s a time when men, a new father, is emotional open and receptive If we can hook them, make a man fall in love with his baby, it can align those two people for their entire life. If we miss that small window, we may lose the possibility of man loving his child.

Dave Owens 2011 Home Birth Conference Dave Owens 2011 Home Birth Conference Presentation Transcript

  • TURNING AOTEAROA INTO A LAND OF GREAT FATHERS
  •  
  • Is the dad important? What difference does a father make to the life of their child?
  • - develops better problem solving skills - 2009 National Parent Survey, Zero to Three (USA) A child who has an involved father …
  • - develops better problem solving skills - keeps on trying when faced with a new challenge - 2009 National Parent Survey, Zero to Three (USA) A child who has an involved father …
  • - develops better problem solving skills - keeps on trying when faced with a new challenge - copes better with everyday frustrations - 2009 National Parent Survey, Zero to Three (USA) A child who has an involved father …
  • - develops better problem solving skills - keeps on trying when faced with a new challenge - copes better with everyday frustrations - feels secure enough to actively explore the world around her - 2009 National Parent Survey, Zero to Three (USA) A child who has an involved father …
  • - develops better problem solving skills - keeps on trying when faced with a new challenge - copes better with everyday frustrations - feels secure enough to actively explore the world around her - has greater tolerance for stress - 2009 National Parent Survey, Zero to Three (USA) A child who has an involved father …
  • - develops better problem solving skills - keeps on trying when faced with a new challenge - copes better with everyday frustrations - feels secure enough to actively explore the world around her - has greater tolerance for stress - is better able to wait his turn for adults’ attention - 2009 National Parent Survey, Zero to Three (USA) A child who has an involved father …
  • - more likely to find stable employment after leaving school/do tertiary training - 2009 National Parent Survey, Zero to Three (USA) An adult who had an involved father …
  • - more likely to find stable employment after leaving school/do tertiary training - half as likely to have reoccurring lifetime experiences of depression - 2009 National Parent Survey, Zero to Three (USA) An adult who had an involved father …
  • - more likely to find stable employment after leaving school/do tertiary training - half as likely to have reoccurring lifetime experiences of depression - far less likely to have substance abuse problems - 2009 National Parent Survey, Zero to Three (USA) An adult who had an involved father …
  • - more likely to find stable employment after leaving school/do tertiary training - half as likely to have reoccurring lifetime experiences of depression - far less likely to have substance abuse problems - 75% less likely to have a teen pregnancy - 2009 National Parent Survey, Zero to Three (USA) An adult who had an involved father …
  • - more likely to find stable employment after leaving school/do tertiary training - half as likely to have reoccurring lifetime experiences of depression - far less likely to have substance abuse problems - 75% less likely to have a teen pregnancy - 80% less likely to spend time in jail - 2009 National Parent Survey, Zero to Three (USA) An adult who had an involved father …
  • - more likely to find stable employment after leaving school/do tertiary training - half as likely to have reoccurring lifetime experiences of depression - far less likely to have substance abuse problems - 75% less likely to have a teen pregnancy - 80% less likely to spend time in jail - far less likely to suicide - 2009 National Parent Survey, Zero to Three (USA) An adult who had an involved father …
  • Attachment and the brain
  • Bonding is a two-way street Attachment and the brain
  • What does a man DO with a baby?
  • hold, cuddle eye contact make faces talk to wind change sing to read to
    • bathe
    • put to bed
    • dress
    • peek-a-boo
    • sooth
    • establish routines
    • just be there
  • What stops men from being involved?
  • What stops men from being involved? - cultural messages - his history - not wanting to look a fool - women’s competence
  • Involved dad: benefits for the woman …
    • - increases satisfaction in their partner relationship (for both of them)
  • Involved dad: benefits for the woman …
    • - increases satisfaction in their partner relationship (for both of them)
    • - is linked with mums being more bonded with their baby
  • Involved dad: benefits for the woman …
    • - increases satisfaction in their partner relationship (for both of them)
    • - is linked with mums being more bonded with their baby
    • - is linked with less stress and depression for mums
  • What is a positively involved father?
  • What is a positively involved father?
    • - a man - resident or not - who plays an active, intimate role in a child’s life
  • What is a positively involved father?
    • - a man - resident or not - who plays an active, intimate role in a child’s life
    • - who makes a child feel safe, secure, competent and loveable
  • Breast feeding How important is the woman’s partner?
  • Breast feeding - the man’s role
    • - there is strong evidence that fathers influence mothers’ decisions to initiate breastfeeding
  • Breast feeding - the man’s role
    • - there is strong evidence that fathers influence mothers’ decisions to initiate breastfeeding
    • - contribute to woman’s breastfeeding confidence
  • Breast feeding - the man’s role
    • - there is strong evidence that fathers influence mothers’ decisions to initiate breastfeeding
    • - contribute to woman’s breastfeeding confidence
    • - impact on decisions on duration and weaning
  • Breast feeding - the man’s role
    • - there is strong evidence that fathers influence mothers’ decisions to initiate breastfeeding
    • - contribute to woman’s breastfeeding confidence
    • - impact on decisions on duration and weaning
    • - without father’s support women are likely to breastfeed for shorter duration
    Engaging fathers to support breastfeeding: challenges and successes Bruce Maycock, Public Health, Curtin University
  • A single separate men’s teaching unit on breast feeding … support material to fathers …
    • increased breast feeding duration
  • A single separate men’s teaching unit on breast feeding … support material to fathers …
    • increased breast feeding duration
    • delayed introduction of solids
  • A single separate men’s teaching unit on breast feeding … support material to fathers …
    • increased breast feeding duration
    • delayed introduction of solids
    • decreased the woman’s anxiety and postnatal depression levels
    Engaging fathers to support breastfeeding: challenges and successes Bruce Maycock, Public Health, Curtin University
  • Breast feeding - attitudes
    • women’s perception of their partner’s attitudes about breast feeding are not necessarily accurate
    Maternal and infant health in the perinatal period: the father’s role literature review undertaken by: Adrienne Burgess
  • Breast feeding - attitudes
    • women’s perception of their partner’s attitudes about breast feeding are not necessarily accurate
    • men have more positive attitudes than his partner believes
    Maternal and infant health in the perinatal period: the father’s role literature review undertaken by: Adrienne Burgess
  • Breast feeding - attitudes
    • women’s perception of their partner’s attitudes about breast feeding are not necessarily accurate
    • men have more positive attitudes than his partner believes
    • we need to encourage communication
    Maternal and infant health in the perinatal period: the father’s role literature review undertaken by: Adrienne Burgess
  • What I tell men about breast feeding …
    • breastmilk has antibodies
    • cheaper than bottle feeding
    • more convenient
    • insures against childhood and adult health problems
    • health advantages for woman (reduced cancer risks)
    • helps woman get her figure back
  • Perinatal Depression - the man’s role
  • Perinatal Depression the man’s role in the woman’s recovery Maternal and infant health in the perinatal period: the father’s role literature review undertaken by: Adrienne Burgess
    • positive partner support is key
  • Perinatal Depression the man’s role in the woman’s recovery Maternal and infant health in the perinatal period: the father’s role literature review undertaken by: Adrienne Burgess
    • positive partner support is key
    • if the woman has “pyschoeducational visits” which includes her partner, her depressive symptoms decline
  • Perinatal Depression the man’s role in the woman’s recovery Maternal and infant health in the perinatal period: the father’s role literature review undertaken by: Adrienne Burgess
    • positive partner support is key
    • if the woman has “pyschoeducational visits” which includes her partner, her depressive symptoms decline
    • if men are not included in these visits, the man’s general health deteriorates
  • Perinatal Depression Maternal and infant health in the perinatal period: the father’s role literature review undertaken by: Adrienne Burgess The partner may contribute to it if they … - doesn’t want the baby - isn’t available emotionally - doesn’t give her enough practical support - doesn’t take interest or responsibility for caring for the baby - hold rigid gender role expectations - is critical, coercive, abusive or violent
  • Perinatal Depression what I tell men …
    • it is common and treatable
  • Perinatal Depression what I tell men …
    • it is common and treatable
    • that untreated depression is bad for mum and can be devastating for baby
  • Perinatal Depression what I tell men …
    • it is common and treatable
    • that untreated depression is bad for mum and can be devastating for baby
    • he is in the best position to recognise her depression and support her
  • Perinatal Depression what I tell men …
    • it is common and treatable
    • that untreated depression is bad for mum and can be devastating for baby
    • he is in the best position to recognise her depression and support her
    • she may be ashamed, or feel guilty or not want to admit
  • Perinatal Depression what I tell men they can do …
    • let her talk
  • Perinatal Depression what I tell men they can do …
    • let her talk
    • reassure her
  • Perinatal Depression what I tell men they can do …
    • let her talk
    • reassure her
    • take the pressure off
  • Perinatal Depression what I tell men they can do …
    • let her talk
    • reassure her
    • take the pressure off
    • talk therapy is usually enough
  • Perinatal Depression what I tell men they can do …
    • let her talk
    • reassure her
    • take the pressure off
    • talk therapy is usually enough
    • support from their midwife, Plunket and other parenting support services, GP > maternal mental health
  • Perinatal Depression - in fathers
    • 3% - 10% of men experience depression , often due to …
    • - unprepared for the birth (becoming a dad)
  • Perinatal Depression - in fathers
    • 3% - 10% of men experience depression , often due to …
    • - unprepared for the birth (becoming a dad)
    • - partner being depressed
  • Perinatal Depression - in fathers
    • 3% - 10% of men experience depression , often due to …
    • - unprepared for the birth (becoming a dad)
    • - partner being depressed
    • - change in partner relationship
  • Perinatal Depression - in fathers
    • 3% - 10% of men experience depression , often due to …
    • - unprepared for the birth (becoming a dad)
    • - partner being depressed
    • - change in partner relationship
    • - pressure (time, money, responsibility)
  • Engaging the father during the pregnancy reduces the midwife’s workload.
  • Engaging the father during the pregnancy reduces the midwife’s workload.
    • Yeah, right
  • A well informed, prepared father at the birth …
    • will be calmer and in better self control
  • A well informed, prepared father at the birth …
    • will be calmer and in better self control
    • eases the anxiety of his partner
  • A well informed, prepared father at the birth …
    • will be calmer and in better self control
    • eases the anxiety of his partner
    • can help the woman communicate
  • A well informed, prepared father at the birth …
    • will be calmer and in better self control
    • eases the anxiety of his partner
    • can help the woman communicate
    • a calm atmosphere results in shorter births
  • A well informed, prepared father at the birth …
    • will be calmer and in better self control
    • eases the anxiety of his partner
    • can help the woman communicate
    • a calm atmosphere results in shorter births
    • relaxed births use less analgesics
    • will be calmer and in better self control
    • eases the anxiety of his partner
    • can help the woman communicate
    • a calm atmosphere results in shorter births
    • relaxed births use less analgesics
    • can help the woman remember the birth
    A well informed, prepared father at the birth … Fathers and Family Health in the Perinatal Period, Adrienne Burgess, the Fatherhood Institute, 2010
  • Men who are highly involved in the birth produce …
    • Oxytocin - the cuddles chemical
    • Prolactin - bonding and attachment
    • Vasopressin - monogamy/protection
    • helps his child become a socially well adjusted person
    A father who is highly involved …
    • helps his child become a socially well adjusted person - strengthens the partner relationship
    A father who is highly involved …
    • helps his child become a socially well adjusted person - strengthens the partner relationship - strengthens the mother/child bond
    A father who is highly involved …
    • helps his child become a socially well adjusted person - strengthens the partner relationship - strengthens the mother/child bond - increases breast feeding rates
    A father who is highly involved …
    • helps his child become a socially well adjusted person - strengthens the partner relationship - strengthens the mother/child bond - increases breast feeding rates - is the 1st line against PND
    A father who is highly involved …
    • helps his child become a socially well adjusted person - strengthens the partner relationship - strengthens the mother/child bond - increases breast feeding rates - is the 1st line against PND - makes for a calmer birth
    A father who is highly involved …
    • helps his child become a socially well adjusted person - strengthens the partner relationship - strengthens the mother/child bond - increases breast feeding rates - is the 1st line against PND - makes for a calmer birth - is more likely to stay the course
    A father who is highly involved …
  • We can say many men aren’t stepping up as dads …
  • We can say many men aren’t stepping up as dads …
    • But what do we achieve by that?
  • We can say many men aren’t stepping up as dads …
    • But what do we achieve by that?
    • … and where does that leave his partner and child …?
  • Why am I talking to birth professionals about this?
  •  
  • 1) Either in your professional or personal capacity, what have you found works to engage the father to be present before, during and after the birth?
  • 2) If the father doesn’t present, what are ways you might reach to him?
  • 3) If you believed a highly involved dad provides important advantages to the woman and the child, what changes might you make to the way you support families?
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  • www.greatfathers.org.nz