Chapter 1
• Series of sentences
that are about one
central idea.
• May stand alone, or
part of a larger work.
• Series of paragraphs...
The Paragraph
• The topic sentence
introduces the subject of
the paragraph and the
writer’s attitude toward the
subject.
•...
PARAGRAPH
• Topic Sentence
• 3-4 Supporting Sentences
• Concluding Sentence
ESSAY
• Introduction (with thesis)
• Body (mul...
• Scenario: You’re given a blank page and a subject and
told to write. You think, “I don’t know what to write.”
• Explorin...
• How many words should I write?
• What is the due date/time for the assignment?
• Are there any special qualities that my...
• Step 1
• Think about your topic. Decide what to write about.
• Step 2
• Think about your audience. Consider your intende...
• What you are writing about
• Narrow the topic to find an area that interests you
• Example:
• Travel > Dangers of Travel...
• Intended reader
• Different classes have different audiences
• Instructor as Audience
• Writing for a limited period of time without stopping
• Purpose: Record first thoughts that come to mind
• “I don’t know...
• Create a list of ideas
• Don’t be concerned with spelling, grammar
• Jin’s Brainstorming – p. 9
• Jin’s Focused Brainsto...
• Ask yourself a series of questions and write resposnes to
them
• Help you define and narrow your topic
• Ask: who, what,...
• Drawing a word map
• Ideas are arranged in a visual image
• Write the topic in the middle. Draw lines to connect ideas
t...
• Before you write, you should think about your
topic, audience and purpose. What are each of these
things?
• Briefly defi...
Chapter 2
• Step 1
• Narrow your topic. Focus on an aspect that interests you.
• Step 2
• Express your main idea. Write a topic sent...
• Topic Sentence
• Introduces the idea of the paragraph
• Body Sentences
• Supports the topic sentence
• Concluding Senten...
• Narrow these topics:
• Cosmetic Surgery
• Music
• College Life
• Introduces the topic of the paragraph
• States the paragraph’s controlling idea
• Most general sentence in the paragraph...
• Music education is essential in public schools.
• There are three types of terrible bosses.
• My furnished room has ever...
• Incomplete
• Announcement
• Vague
• Invalid Point
• Too Broad
• Too Narrow
• I will write about negative political campaigns.
• History teaches us lessons.
• Deciding to go to college.
• Facts and examples that provide the reader with
interesting information about the subject matter
• Generate by using som...
• Transitional Expressions help guide your reader from one
idea to the next.
• Time Order
• The way in which things occurr...
• Brings the paragraph to a satisfactory close
• May…
• Restate the topic sentence in a new, refreshing way
• Make an inte...
• What is a topic sentence?
• True or False? A paragraph has more than one main
idea.
• True or False? A paragraph’s detai...
The Writing Process (Gaetz)
The Writing Process (Gaetz)
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The Writing Process (Gaetz)

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  • THE WRITER’S WORLD: Paragraphs & Essays, 3rd Edition.
  • Example – PG. 4
  • Practice #1 (19)What is the topic? What is the controlling idea?
  • Practice #3 (21-22)What is the problem with the statement? How do you fix it?
  • The Writing Process (Gaetz)

    1. 1. Chapter 1
    2. 2. • Series of sentences that are about one central idea. • May stand alone, or part of a larger work. • Series of paragraphs that are about one central idea.
    3. 3. The Paragraph • The topic sentence introduces the subject of the paragraph and the writer’s attitude toward the subject. • The body of the paragraph contains details that support the topic sentence. • The paragraph ends with a concluding sentence. The Essay • The introduction engages the reader’s interest and contains the thesis statement. • The body paragraphs each support the main idea of the essay. • The conclusion reemphasizes the thesis and restates the main points of the essay. It brings the essay to a satisfactory close.
    4. 4. PARAGRAPH • Topic Sentence • 3-4 Supporting Sentences • Concluding Sentence ESSAY • Introduction (with thesis) • Body (multiple paragraphs with topic sentences) • Conclusion
    5. 5. • Scenario: You’re given a blank page and a subject and told to write. You think, “I don’t know what to write.” • Exploring helps you think about your subject before writing a paragraph or essay.
    6. 6. • How many words should I write? • What is the due date/time for the assignment? • Are there any special qualities that my writing should include?
    7. 7. • Step 1 • Think about your topic. Decide what to write about. • Step 2 • Think about your audience. Consider your intended readers and what interests them. • Step 3 • Think about your purpose. Ask yourself what you want to write. • Step 4 • Try exploring strategies. Experiment with different ways to generate ideas.
    8. 8. • What you are writing about • Narrow the topic to find an area that interests you • Example: • Travel > Dangers of Travel • Ask yourself… • What special knowledge do I have about the topic? • What subtopics are most relevant to me? • What aspect of the topic arouses my emotions?
    9. 9. • Intended reader • Different classes have different audiences • Instructor as Audience
    10. 10. • Writing for a limited period of time without stopping • Purpose: Record first thoughts that come to mind • “I don’t know what to write.” • Don’t worry about grammar, spelling, etc. • Sandra’s Freewriting – p. 9 • Sandra’s Focused Writing – p. 9
    11. 11. • Create a list of ideas • Don’t be concerned with spelling, grammar • Jin’s Brainstorming – p. 9 • Jin’s Focused Brainstorming – p. 10
    12. 12. • Ask yourself a series of questions and write resposnes to them • Help you define and narrow your topic • Ask: who, what, when, where, why, how? • Clayton’s Questioning – p. 10
    13. 13. • Drawing a word map • Ideas are arranged in a visual image • Write the topic in the middle. Draw lines to connect ideas to the main topic. • Mahan’s Clustering – p. 11 • Mahan’s Focused Clustering – p. 11
    14. 14. • Before you write, you should think about your topic, audience and purpose. What are each of these things? • Briefly define each of the following exploring strategies: • Freewriting • Brainstorming • Questioning • Clustering
    15. 15. Chapter 2
    16. 16. • Step 1 • Narrow your topic. Focus on an aspect that interests you. • Step 2 • Express your main idea. Write a topic sentence that expresses this idea. • Step 3 • Develop your supporting ideas. • Step 4 • Make a plan. Organize your thoughts into an outline. • Step 5 • Write your first draft.
    17. 17. • Topic Sentence • Introduces the idea of the paragraph • Body Sentences • Supports the topic sentence • Concluding Sentence • Ends the paragraph
    18. 18. • Narrow these topics: • Cosmetic Surgery • Music • College Life
    19. 19. • Introduces the topic of the paragraph • States the paragraph’s controlling idea • Most general sentence in the paragraph • Followed by other sentences that provide support (facts, examples) • A controlling idea makes the point about a topic and expresses the writer’s opinion, attitude, feeling.
    20. 20. • Music education is essential in public schools. • There are three types of terrible bosses. • My furnished room has everything a student could need.
    21. 21. • Incomplete • Announcement • Vague • Invalid Point • Too Broad • Too Narrow
    22. 22. • I will write about negative political campaigns. • History teaches us lessons. • Deciding to go to college.
    23. 23. • Facts and examples that provide the reader with interesting information about the subject matter • Generate by using some of the brainstorming activities.
    24. 24. • Transitional Expressions help guide your reader from one idea to the next. • Time Order • The way in which things occurred • First, Second, Last • Emphatic Order • Arrange in logical sequence • Most Important, Important, Least Important • Space Order • Where things are positioned • Top, Middle, Bottom
    25. 25. • Brings the paragraph to a satisfactory close • May… • Restate the topic sentence in a new, refreshing way • Make an interesting, final observation • End with a prediction, suggestion, quotation • In an essay, it will transition to the next paragraph’s idea
    26. 26. • What is a topic sentence? • True or False? A paragraph has more than one main idea. • True or False? A paragraph’s details support its topic sentence.

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