AVAILABILITY OF THE FIRST SET OF INDICATORS RECOMMENDED BY THE STATISTICAL COMMISSION
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AVAILABILITY OF THE FIRST SET OF INDICATORS RECOMMENDED BY THE STATISTICAL COMMISSION AVAILABILITY OF THE FIRST SET OF INDICATORS RECOMMENDED BY THE STATISTICAL COMMISSION Document Transcript

  • AVAILABILITY OF THE FIRST SET OF INDICATORS RECOMMENDED BY THE STATISTICAL COMMISSION11 Extract “Methodological Overview of Surveys on Violence against….” Meeting of the Friends of theChair of the United Nations Statistical Commission on Statistical Indicators on Violence against Women 9 -11 December 2009 Aguascalientes, Mexico; United Nations Statistical Commission ESA/STAT/AC.193/1UnitedNations Statistics Division Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía de México November 2009
  • 2. Indicators on Violence against Figure 1. Availability of statistics on physical Women violence against women in the last 12 months by indicator components 10021. These indicators have been presented in Tables 1 to 6, and 80 their description is elaborated in paragraphs below. 60 Percent2.1 Total and age-specific rate of 40women subjected to physical violencein the last 12 months by severity of 20violence, relationship to theperpetrator(s) and frequency 0 Total rate Age-specific Total rate by Total rate by Total rate by22. Availability of this indicator in nationally representative surveys is presented in Table 1 and Figure 1, as well as its disaggregation by severity, relationship to the perpetrator(s), and frequency.Total rate23. Total rate of women subjected to physical violence in last 12 months was available in ten surveys (17%). In one national survey, that figure encompassed total violence, not just physical, and therefore, it could be an overestimate, which has to be taken into account when rate severity relationship frequency comparing indicators themselves.Age-specific rate
  • 24. Further disaggregation for age groups was available for just three surveys, but in 10-year age groups. In one of them, age specific rate was not calculated for the total number of interviewed women in each age group; instead, it presents a simple breakdown of the total rate, by age groups. Presenting data in such a way limits comparisons with standard age-specific rates, coming from other surveys.25. However, standard age-specific rate was available in another fifteen surveys as well, although total rate was not presented. These rates were coming from WHO-VAW Multi-country surveys.Severity26. Disaggregation by severity of physical violence suffered by women in the past 12 months was available in less than half of the considered surveys (27 or 44%). Categories “moderate” and “severe” were provided in 24 surveys, while acquired injuries, as an indicator of severity of violence, were presented in four surveys.Relationship to the perpetrator27. Relationship to the perpetrator, distinguished for at least an intimate partner, was available in almost two thirds of the surveys (38 or 63%). Out of these 38, 30 mentioned just an intimate partner as a perpetrator, while the rest (eight) of the surveys considered other categories of perpetrators. If not indicated differently, total rate by the relationship to the intimate partner as a perpetrator is presented as a proportion of ever-partnered or ever-married women who experienced intimate partner violence during the last twelve months.Frequency28. The information on frequency of women subjected to physical violence in the last 12 months was available in just two surveys (3%), but disaggregated by either severity or age group, and therefore, their values have not been presented in Table 1.2.2 Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to physical violence during lifetime by severityof violence, relationship to the perpetrator(s) and frequency29. Availability of this indicator in nationally Figure 2. Availability of statistics on physical representative surveys is presented in violence against women during lifetime by indicator Table 2, as well as its disaggregation by components severity, relationship to the perpetrator(s), 100 and frequency. 80Total rate 60 Percent30. Total rate of women subjected to physical 40 violence during lifetime was retrieved from 30 surveys (50%). There is possible 20 overestimation of the total rate which comes from the one national survey, 0 since it presents both physical and sexual Total rate Age-specific Total rate by Total rate by Total rate by rate severity relationship frequency violence. The total rate from another 3
  • survey is also of the vague quality, since women were asked for experience with violence in their families, but not directly whether it happened to them.Age-specific rate31. Disaggregation of rates for age groups was available in 17 surveys (29%), although in seven of them, the total rate was not available; these were coming from WHO-VAW Multi-country surveys.Severity32. Disaggregation by severity of lifetime physical violence against women was available in two thirds of the considered surveys – in 39 surveys (66%). Both categories “moderate” and “severe” were considered in 28 surveys, while acquired injuries, as the single indicator of severity of violence, were presented in 5 surveys.Relationship to the perpetrator33. Statistics on relationship to the perpetrator(s), for at least one and the most common category - current or former intimate partner - was available in a significant majority the surveys, i.e. 49 surveys (83%). In general, total rate of women subjected to physical violence by the intimate partner as a perpetrator is presented as a proportion of ever-partnered or ever-married women who experienced physical intimate partner violence during their lifetime. In two surveys, this rate is a proportion of women who experienced physical violence starting from age 15; in one survey, it is a proportion of women who experienced moderate (and severe) abuse, while in another one, the rate referred to the last five years, not the lifetime.34. Six surveys recognized and separately measured intimate partner violence perpetuated by current partner and former partner. Further disaggregation by perpetrators other than intimate partner was available in fifteen surveys.Frequency35. Frequency of different acts of physical violence against women was available in just six surveys (10%). In two of them, data are disaggregated by either severity of violent acts, or age group, and, therefore, their values have not been presented in Table 2. In three surveys, data on frequency are available, but just among women who experienced violence by perpetrators other than intimate partners. In one survey, frequency statistics are available, although the question itself is unclear and imprecise; the indicator is noted in Table 2, under an assumption that women are the victims of the violent acts happening in their families. It could be implied that generating statistics on frequency in this manner refers primarily (or exclusively) to intimate partner violence, although that is not completely clear.36. This practically means that none of the surveys provided reliable data of frequency of physical violence against women during their lifetime, no matter of perpetrator. All six generated values have their own limitations and they are not mutually comparable.2.3 Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to sexual violence in the last 12 months byrelationship to the perpetrator(s) and frequency 4
  • 37. Availability of this indicator from Figure 3. Availability of statistics on sexual violence nationally representative surveys is against women in the last 12 months by indicator presented in Table 3, as well as its components disaggregation by relationship to the 100 perpetrator(s) and frequency. 80Total rate 60 Percent38. Total rate was retrieved from just eight 40 surveys (13%). For one of them, it is not clear whether available rate presents 20 sexual violence by all perpetrators, or just by an intimate partner. 0 Total rate Age-specific rate Total rate by Total rate by relationship frequencyAge-specific rate39. Disaggregation by age groups was available in one third of the surveys – in 20 surveys (34%). Five years age groups, as proposed by the friends of the Chair, were available in 15 surveys, while at the other five, a combination of 5-year and 10-year intervals was presented.Relationship to the perpetrator40. Information on the relationship to the perpetrator was generated in 38 surveys (64%), for at least whether the violence was perpetrated by the intimate partner. For the other, non-partner perpetrators, out of these 38 surveys, data were available in just four of them. One survey made distinction between current and former intimate partners as perpetrators of violence. 5
  • Frequency41. Frequency of this act was available in just one survey, and it refers to a spouse (intimate partner) as a perpetrator.42. This practically means that frequency is largely missing for this indicator as well.2.4 Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to sexual violence during lifetime byrelationship to the perpetrator(s) and frequency43. Availability of this indicator in nationally representative surveys is presented in Figure 4. Availability of statistics on sexual violence Table 4, as well as its disaggregation by against women during lifetime by indicator relationship to the perpetrator(s) and components frequency. 100 80Total rate 6044. This indicator was retrieved from 20% of Percent the surveys (12 out of 59 surveys). 40Age-specific rate 2045. Age-specific rate was available for 18 0 Total rate Age-specific rate Total rate by Total rate by surveys (29%). Five years age groups, relationship frequency as proposed by the friends of the Chair, were available in 16 surveys. In four surveys (four), statistics by 5-year age groups were available only for violence perpetrated by the intimate partner.Relationship to the perpetrator46. Information on the relationship to the perpetrator was available for 42 surveys (71%), where at least an intimate partner was distinguished as a perpetrator. A few surveys distinguished violence perpetuated by current and former partners. In 28 surveys information on the relationship to the perpetrator, in addition to an intimate partner, includes data for other categories of perpetrators of sexual violence as well.Frequency47. Frequency of this act was available in just 4 surveys (6%). In three of them, frequency is broken down in just two groups (1-2 times, and three and more times), exclusively for non-intimate partner violence. Hence, this indicator is also largely missing.2.5 Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to sexual or physical violence by current orformer intimate partner in the last 12 months by frequency48. Availability of this indicator in nationally representative surveys is presented in Table 5, as well as its disaggregation by age and frequency. 6
  • Total rate49. In the process of developing this methodological overview it became apparent that the last two set of indicators – intimate partner violence – pose methodological challenges. The first one, also recognized in the report of the Figure 5. Availability of statistics on sexual or physical by current or former intimate partner in the Friends of the Chair, is that these two last 12 months and during lifetime by indicator indicators overlap with the first four, components since they are a subset of the former. 100 This may confuse the developers of 80 statistical instruments for measuring violence against women. 60 Percent 4050. In addition, the way these two indicators are defined - as either physical OR 20 sexual violence, performed by an 0 intimate partner – would imply that one Total rate Age- Total rate Total rate Age- Total rate form of violence excludes the other. For specific rate by frequency specific rate by frequency example, analysts and compilers of results might be unsure whether to add all the occurrences of both physical and sexual violence suffered by a woman or to focus on the one with most incidences. Physical violence by intimate partner is much more frequent than sexual violence; therefore applying the definition as it stands might underestimate occurrences of sexual violence. Sexual violence in many cases appears along with physical violence, i.e. overlap with it.51. Consequently, this indicator and the accompanying rate can be defined as physical AND/OR sexual violence, among ever-partnered women. Some national surveys considered this comprehensive indicator, which is the case when WHO-VAW method was applied. When indicator concerns just physical violence, it was indicated in footnotes to Table 5.52. Total rate of women subjected to intimate partner violence in the last 12 months was available from 62 surveys (63%). Four of them considered just physical violence, and therefore, such a figure could be underestimated because data for sexual violence are missing.Age-specific rate53. Further disaggregation by age groups of women suffering violence was available for less than half of surveys – 29 surveys (49%). Five years age groups, as proposed by the Friends of the Chair, were available in 23 surveys, while for the rest of them, different combinations of age intervals were presented.Frequency54. Frequency of this act was available in thirteen surveys, or 22%.2.6 Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to sexual or physical violence by current orformer intimate partner during lifetime by frequency55. Availability of this indicator in nationally representative surveys is presented in Table 6, as well as its disaggregation by age and frequency. 7
  • Total rate56. This indicator was retrieved from more than three quarters of the surveys – 46 surveys (78%, Table 6). As mentioned above, indicator proposed in this way might be missing certain number of women who experienced both sexual and physical intimate partner violence during their lifetime, and therefore, in certain cases (indicated in the footnotes) this indicator is underestimated.Age-specific rate57. Further disaggregation for age groups was available for more than half of the surveys – 31 surveys (53%). Five years age groups, as proposed by the friends of the Chair, were available in 26 surveys, while for the rest of the surveys (five), different combinations of age groups were presented.Frequency58. Frequency of this act was available in just three surveys (5%).Concluding remarks59. Statistics for only one indicator – women experiencing physical violence during lifetime by relationship to the perpetrator - were generated by over 80% of the total number of surveys subjected to this analysis. And even for that indicator the list of relationship in most cases included current or former intimate partner, not the fully developed list of different relationships. Data for all the other indicators were generated by a fewer number of surveys. It is especially telling to note the very low number of surveys that were generating information on frequency of violence against women for all forms violence.60. The relationship to the perpetrator of violence against women was one of the major focuses of all the surveys. It is necessary to note that the classification of perpetrators in most cases stopped at the intimate partner (current or former) and in cases where it was extended, it differed significantly from one survey to the other.61. The relative lack of the availability of the total rate of women subjected to physical violence in the last 12 months and during lifetime (17% and 50%, respectively) and sexual violence in the last 12 months and during lifetime (14% and 20%, respectively) points to the need to further investigate the type of methodological obstacles that prevented such computations. Similarly, the availability of statistics on age-specific rates for both physical and sexual violence was available in about one-third of the surveys and this also calls for additional technical analysis on the computation of rates.62. It appears that the last two indicators of the interim set – physical or sexual violence by current of former immediate partner in the last 12 months and during lifetime – need to be revisited. The first conclusion is that they should be reformulated in the line of including the and/or qualifier, replacing just the or.63. More substantially, these two indicators differ from the first four only by the fact that both physical and sexual violence are added together and that the denominator for the rates refers to ever- partnered women only – not to the total number of women in 5-year age groups. The fact that they are essentially redundant with the first four appears to generate confusion in applying the interim set of indicators. This overview found that even for the first four indicators the denominator is more 8
  • often than not the total number of ever-partnered women when age-specific rates of women subjected to violence are calculated.64. Furthermore, given the ongoing discussion that the definition of the intimate partner should not be limited only to a partner in sexual intercourse, but could also be extended to a non-sexual relationship – boyfriend, for example – raises the questions how significant is the difference between the number of ever-partnered women and the total number of women in each age group. It can be expected that the differences might be somewhat significant in very early ages under consideration – 15 and 16; the broader definition of intimate partner would certainly decrease these differences to the minimum in older ages – implying that almost all women over 18 were in some kind of relationship that falls within the category of intimate.65. The variability of the capacities of surveys for measuring violence against women included in this overview to generate indicators as defined in the report of the Friends of the Chair points to the need to move beyond indicators and to define and develop a set of classifications of violence, severity of violence, definition and classification of relationship to the perpetrator, and frequency; the need to develop international guidelines that will provide a sound and comprehensive methodological package for instituting violence against women statistical surveys in national statistical systems; and the need to follow-up these activities with training and capacity-building. 9
  • ANNEX A. List of the countries and sourcesCountry SourceALBANIA Reproductive Health SurveyARMENIA WRC 2007 Domestic Violence and Abuse of Women in Armenia, May 2007AZERBAIJAN Demographic and Health Survey 2006, module on domestic violenceAUSTRALIA (1) Personal safety 2005. Australian Bureau of Statistics. International Violence Against Women Survey (IVAWS) - AustralianAUSTRALIA (2) component, 2003 WHO Multi-country Study on Womens Health and Domestic Violence against Women. Initial results in prevalence, health outcomes and womens responses.BANGLADESH – Garcia-Moreno C, Jansen HAFM, Ellsberg M, Heise L, Watts C. World Healthcity and province Organization, 2005 Instituto Nacional De Estadistica, Encuesta Nacional de Demografia y Salud,BOLIVIA 2003 WHO Multi-country Study on Womens Health and Domestic Violence against Women. Initial results in prevalence, health outcomes and womens responses.BRAZIL – Garcia-Moreno C, Jansen HAFM, Ellsberg M, Heise L, Watts C. World Healthcity and province Organization, 2005CAMBODIA (1) Violence against women. A baseline survey. Cambodia Final Report, 2005 Kishor, Sunita and Kiersten Johnson. Profiling Domestic Violence – A Multi-CAMBODIA (2) Country Study. Calverton, Maryland: ORC Macro, 2004CANADA (1) Measuring Violence Against Women: Statistical Trends, 2006 General Social Survey on Victimization - Violence Against Women module,CANADA (2) 2004 Kishor, Sunita and Kiersten Johnson. Profiling Domestic Violence – A Multi-COLOMBIA Country Study. Calverton, Maryland: ORC Macro, 2004 Mens violence against women. Extent, characteristics ad the measures against violence - 2007. English Summary. Minister for Gender Equality NationalDENMARK Institute of Public Health, Denmark, National Health Survey, 2000 Kishor, Sunita and Kiersten Johnson. Profiling Domestic Violence – A Multi-DOMINICAN REPUBLIC Country Study. Calverton, Maryland: ORC Macro, 2004 10
  • Kishor, Sunita and Kiersten Johnson. Profiling Domestic Violence – A Multi-EGYPT Country Study. Calverton, Maryland: ORC Macro, 2004EL SALVADOR Encuesta Nacional de salud Familiar, FESAL 2002/03 WHO Multi-country Study on Womens Health and Domestic Violence against Women. Initial results in prevalence, health outcomes and womens responses. Garcia-Moreno C, Jansen HAFM, Ellsberg M, Heise L, Watts C. World HealthETHIOPIA - province Organization, 2005 Available atECUADOR www.cepar.org.ec/endemain_04/nuevo06/violencia/violencia_m.htm Minna Piispa, Markku Heiskanen, summary Juha Kääriäinen & Reino Sirén National Research Institute of Legal Policy Publication No. 225 The European Institute for Crime Prevention and Publication Series No. 51. Control, affiliated with the United Nations (HEUNI) Helsinki 2006 VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN IN FINLAND, and also CAHRV project: Comparative reanalysis of prevalence of violence against women and health impact data in Europe – obstacles and possible solutions, December 2006 (the report was prepared within the Co-ordination Action on Human Rights Violations (CAHRV) and funded through the EuropeanFINLAND Commission, 6th Framework Programme, Project No. 506348) Dominique Fougeyrollas-Schwebel. Violence against women in France: the context, findings and impact of the Enveff survey? CNRS-IRIS-CREDEP Universit´e Paris Dauphine, France. Published in Statistical Journal of the United Nations ECE 22 (2005) 289–300 289 IOS Press, and also CAHRV project: Comparative reanalysis of prevalence of violence against women and health impact data in Europe – obstacles and possible solutions, December 2006 (the report was prepared within the Co-ordination Action on Human Rights Violations (CAHRV) and funded through the EuropeanFRANCE Commission, 6th Framework Programme, Project No. 506348) Health, Well-Being and Personal Safety of Women in Germany. A representative Study of Violence against Women in Germany, comissioned byGERMANY the Federal Ministry for Families, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth Kishor, Sunita and Kiersten Johnson. Profiling Domestic Violence – A Multi-HAITI Country Study. Calverton, Maryland: ORC Macro, 2004 Kishor, Sunita and Kiersten Johnson. Profiling Domestic Violence – A Multi-INDIA Country Study. Calverton, Maryland: ORC Macro, 2004 Domestic Abuse of Women and Men in Ireland Report on the National Study of Domestic Abuse From the National Crime Council in association with the Economic and Social Research Institute. © National Crime Council 2005.IRELAND Designed and Printed by First Impression July, 2005 11
  • Violence and abuses against women inside and outside family, ISTAT, 2006, also Measuring violence: indicators from the Italian violence against women surveys. Submittet by ISTAT, Ms Maria Giuseppina Muratore. Expert Group Meeting onITALY indicators to measure violence against women, Geneva, 8-10 October 2007 WHO Multi-country Study on Womens Health and Domestic Violence against Women. Initial results in prevalence, health outcomes and womens responses. Garcia-Moreno C, Jansen HAFM, Ellsberg M, Heise L, Watts C. World HealthJAPAN - city Organization, 2005 Kiribati family health and support study:KIRIBATI a study on violence against women and children, 2008 Violence against women in Koreaand its indicators. Invited paper, prepared by Whasoon Byun, Korean Women’s Development Institute. Expert Group MeetingKOREA on indicators to measure violence against women, Geneva, 8-10 October 2007 CAHRV project: Comparative reanalysis of prevalence of violence against women and health impact data in Europe – obstacles and possible solutions, December 2006. (the report was prepared within the Co-ordination Action on Human Rights Violations (CAHRV) and funded through the EuropeanLITHVANIA Commission, 6th Framework Programme, Project No. 506348. The Maldives Study on Womens Health and Life Experiences. Initial results on prevalence, health outcomes and womens responses to violence. Author: EmmaMALDIVES Fulu ENDIREH-2006’S achievements and limitations in determining indicators for measuring violence against women in Mexico. Invited paper. Submitted by Mexico, prepared by Eva Gisela Ramirez. Expert Group Meeting on indicators toMEXICO measure violence against women, Geneva, 8-10 October 2007MOLDOVA Demographic health survey (DHS), 2005 WHO Multi-country Study on Womens Health and Domestic Violence against Women. Initial results in prevalence, health outcomes and womens responses. Garcia-Moreno C, Jansen HAFM, Ellsberg M, Heise L, Watts C. World HealthNAMIBIA - city Organization, 2005 Kishor, Sunita and Kiersten Johnson. Profiling Domestic Violence – A Multi-NIKARAGUA Country Study. Calverton, Maryland: ORC Macro, 2004 Thomas Haaland, Sten-Erik Clausen and Berit Schei Couple Violence - different perspectives. Results from the first national surveyNORWAY in Norway. NIBR Report: 2005:3PARAGUAY Encuesta nacional de demografía y salud sexual y reproductiva endssr 2004 12
  • Kishor, Sunita and Kiersten Johnson. 2004. Profiling Domestic Violence – A Multi-Country Study.PERU Calverton, Maryland: ORC Macro. WHO Multi-country Study on Womens Health and Domestic Violence against Women. Initial results in prevalence, health outcomes and womens responses.PERU – Garcia-Moreno C, Jansen HAFM, Ellsberg M, Heise L, Watts C. World Healthcity and province Organization, 2005 Beata Gruszczyńska, Przemoc wobec kobiet w Polsce. Aspekty prawnokryminologiczne, Oficyna Wolters Kluwer, Warszawa 2007.POLAND Survey on Violence Against Women in Poland. Key Findings. VIOLENłA DOMESTICĂ ÎN ROMÂNIA. Ancheta Sociologica La NivelROMANIA National, Martie – Aprilie 2008RUSSIA Violence in family. Moscow, June - Decembre 2006 WHO Multi-country Study on Womens Health and Domestic Violence against Women. Initial results in prevalence, health outcomes and womens responses. Garcia-Moreno C, Jansen HAFM, Ellsberg M, Heise L, Watts C. World HealthSAMOA Organization, 2005 WHO Multi-country Study on Womens Health and Domestic Violence against Women. Initial results in prevalence, health outcomes and womens responses. Garcia-Moreno C, Jansen HAFM, Ellsberg M, Heise L, Watts C. World HealthSERBIA - city Organization, 2005 Representative Research on Prevalence and experience of Women with ViolenceSLOVAKIA against Women [VAW] in Slovakia. Bratislava, May 2008 Solomon Islands Family Health and Safety Study: A study on violence against women and children. Report prepared by the Secretariat of the PacificSOLOMON ISLANDS Community for Ministry of Women, Youth & Children’s Affairs, 2009 Macro-survey regarding violence against women http://www.migualdad.es/violencia-mujer/estadistica.html this link is broken,SPAIN data are not the part of the reportSWITZERLAND Delivery of the report pending CAHRV project: Comparative reanalysis of prevalence of violence against women and health impact data in Europe – obstacles and possible solutions, December 2006 (the report was prepared within the Co-ordination Action on Human Rights Violations (CAHRV) and funded through the EuropeanSWEDEN (1) Commission, 6th Framework Programme, Project No. 506348) 13
  • SWEDEN (2) Partner violence against women and men. A summary of report 2009:12. WHO Multi-country Study on Womens Health and Domestic Violence against Women. Initial results in prevalence, health outcomes and womens responses.THAILAND – Garcia-Moreno C, Jansen HAFM, Ellsberg M, Heise L, Watts C. World Healthcity and province Organization, 2005 WHO Multi-country Study on Womens Health and Domestic Violence againstUNITED REPUBLIC OF Women. Initial results in prevalence, health outcomes and womens responses.TANZANIA – Garcia-Moreno C, Jansen HAFM, Ellsberg M, Heise L, Watts C. World Healthcity and province Organization, 2005 National Research on Domestic Violence Against Women in Turkey. Ankara,TURKEY January 2009 Homicides, Firearm Offences and Intimate Violence 2006/07, 3rd edition (Supplementary Volume 2 to Crime in England and Wales 2006/07) David Povey (Ed.), Kathryn Coleman, Peter Kaiza, Jacqueline Hoare and KristaUNITED KINDGDOM Jansson National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). U.S. Department of Justice.UNITED STATES OF Office of Justice Programs. Bureau of Justice Statistics. Intimate partner violenceAMERICA in the U.S., 2005 Kishor, Sunita and Kiersten Johnson. Profiling Domestic Violence – A Multi-ZAMBIA Country Study. Calverton, Maryland: ORC Macro, 2004 14
  • ANNEX B. Availability of indicators proposed by Friends of Chair (1-6)1. Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to physical violence in the last 12 months by severityof violence, relationship to the perpetrator(s) and frequency Availability / total number % of surveys1.1 Total rate 10/59 171.1.1. Age-specific rate 18/59 301.2. Total rate by severity 27/59 441.3. Total rate by relationship to perpetrator 38/59 631.4. Total rate by frequency 2/59 32. Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to physical violence during lifetime by severity ofviolence, relationship to the perpetrator(s) and frequency Availability / total number % of surveys2.1 Total rate 30/59 502.1.1. Age-specific rate 17/59 292.2. Total rate by severity 39/59 662.3. Total rate by relationship to perpetrator 49/59 832.4. Total rate by frequency 6/59 103. Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to sexual violence in the last 12 months by relationshipto the perpetrator(s) and frequency Availability / total number % of surveys3.1 Total rate 8/59 143.1.1. Age-specific rate 20/59 343.2. Total rate by relationship to perpetrator 38/59 643.3. Total rate by frequency 1/59 24. Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to sexual violence during lifetime by relationship to theperpetrator(s) and frequency Availability / total number % of surveys4.1 Total rate 12/59 204.1.1. Age-specific rate 18/59 304.2. Total rate by relationship to perpetrator 42/59 714.3. Total rate by frequency 4/59 75. Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to sexual or physical violence by current or formerintimate partner in the last 12 months by frequency Availability / total number % of surveys5.1 Total rate 38/59 635.1.1. Age-specific rate 29/59 495.2. Total rate by frequency 13/59 22 15
  • 6. Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to sexual or physical violence by current or formerintimate partner during lifetime by frequency Availability / total number % of surveys6.1 Total rate 46/59 786.1.1. Age-specific rate 31/59 526.2. Total rate by frequency 3/59 5 16
  • TABLES Table 1. Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to physical violence in the last 12 months by severity of violence, relationship to the perpetrator(s) and frequency Dominican R. Cambodia (1) Cambodia (2) Australia (1) Australia (2) Bangladesh Bangladesh Ethiopia pr. El Salvador Canada (1) Canada (2) Azerbaijan Japan city Brazil city Colombia # Germany Denmark Armenia Ecuador Albania Finland Kiribati Ireland Bolivia France Egypt India Haiti Italy city pr. 141.1 Total rate 4.5 8.0 4.7 8.0 3.7 11.6 2.7 15 16 171.1.1 Age-specific rate15-19 36.4 19.3 19.0 13,0 20.7 0.020-24 26.3 23.7 18.9 12.3 32.9 7.0 1.725-29 25.9 18.5 8.7 7.4 34.7 5.030-34 27.5 15.5 17.9 9.2 34.5 4.0 2.735-39 9.0 12.9 5.6 4.5 27.8 5.540-44 20.8 6.9 9.3 2.7 22.5 2.5 2.445-49 2.4 9.2 8.1 3.4 14.7 1.350-54 15.3 1.355-59 10.1 1.160-64 0.7 1.165-69 0.370-741.2 Total rate by severityacquired injuries 18 19(consequences) 39.7 4.0 14.0moderate (by type) 8.7 6.5 5.0 14.0 39.7 1.8 17.8 7.4 11.7 2.4severe (by type) 17.3 9.3 3.3 3.4 10.4 5.0 6.1 21.6 3.2 1.4 0.71.3 Total rate byrelationship to the 20perpetrator(s) yesintimate partner (current orformer) 30.5 3.0 19.0 15.8 8.3 15.4 2.0 2.5 11.0 12.5 7.0 29.0 10.0 6.3 21.0 10.3 1.7 3.1other than intimate partner: 4.0 1.3 1.1family member 36.8 0.2friends, neighbours 36.8 0.2work or school 20.5 0.1professional caregivers orhelpers 20.5casual acquaintances 20.5 0.3unknown person (stranger) 21.9 2.0 0.4 g 211.4 Total rate by frequency yes yesoncefew (2-10)many (>10) # Confidentiality of study is compromised since 16% of the interviews were conducted in a presence of someone else than woman 14 not just physical, but total violence last 12 months is given here, and therefore, perhaps overestimated figure 15 age-intervals are following: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, and >55, sum up 100% 16 age-intervals are given as following: 16-20, 21-30, 31-40, 41-50, and 51-60 17 age-intervals are given as following: 16-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, and 65-69 18 injuries ended in emergency room 19 severity of intimate partner violence, rate is given among ever-partnered women 20 available, but just segregated by severity (moderate/severe), and therefore, is not presented here 21 available, but just segregated by age-groups
  • Table 1. Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to physical violence in the last 12 months by severity of violence, relationship to the perpetrator(s) and frequency (cont’d) Tanzania city Thailand city Namibia city Tanzania pr. Solomon Is. Thailand pr. Sweden (1) Sweden (2) Serbia city Nicaragua Paraguay Lithuania Romania Maldives Peru city Moldova Slovakia Peru pr. Norway Zambia Mexico Poland Samoa Russia Turkey Korea Peru USA UK1.1 Total rate 16.7 4.4 4.71.1.1 Age-specific rate15-19 20.0 33.9 30.9 28.0 14.3 16.1 25.5 25.9 32.120-24 22.5 25.7 32.7 27.6 6.1 21.9 22.5 12.4 22.625-29 11.4 20.9 26.5 22.5 2.3 19.0 20.9 10.8 11.330-34 14.7 17.5 23.7 16.8 3.2 13.9 19.2 7.7 14.935-39 16.5 8.0 25.8 16.4 2.6 10.2 14.1 5.6 14.840-44 13.0 18.8 19.1 7.8 1.4 6.9 7.6 7.7 6.545-49 16.3 4.2 15.6 13.3 2.2 2.7 12.7 1.5 11.850-5455-5960-6465-6970-741.2 Total rate by severityacquired injuries(consequences) 38.5 22moderate (by type) 5.3 11.8 7.4 3.8 5.6 1.6 6.4 8.0 2.8 5.1 1.9 2.8 23severe (by type) 10.6 4.0 9.6 21.0 12.3 1.6 8.3 10.7 5.1 8.3 1.8 0.71.3 Total rate by relationship 24to the perpetrator(s)intimate partner (current orformer) 5.7 15.9 13.2 6,6 16.9 24.8 17.9 3.2 14.8 18.7 7.9 13.4 10.0 3.4 4.2 26.5other than intimate partner: 2.9family member 2.4 1.9 1.7friends, neighbours 7.0work or school 1.6professional caregivers orhelperscasual acquaintancesunknown person (stranger) 6.51.4 Total rate by frequencyoncefew (2-10)many (>10) 22 simple assault 23 aggravated assault 24 average annual rate per 1,000 persons (female) age 12 or older, by perpetrator 21
  • Table 2. Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to physical violence during lifetime by severity of violence, relationship to the perpetrator(s) and frequency Dominican R. Cambodia (1) Cambodia (2) Australia (1) Australia (2) Bangladesh Bangladesh Ethiopia pr. El Salvador Canada (1) Canada (2) Azerbaijan Japan city Brazil city Colombia # Germany Brazil pr. Denmark Armenia Ecuador Albania Finland Kiribati Bolivia France Ireland Egypt India Haiti Italy city pr. 21.0 252.1 Total rate 8.2 13.3 48.0 23.4 41.0 23.9 35.0 43.5 37.0 35.2 18.8 26 272.1.1 Age-specific rate15-19 8.6 44.9 25.7 24.1 27.0 22.8 3.620-24 10.8 40.0 34.0 21.5 36.0 42.0 19.0 10.425-29 14.9 47.0 48.6 28.3 30.5 49.5 12.230-34 39.6 45.6 26.8 31.5 56.9 23.9 13.835-39 15.1 34.3 44.8 28.6 40.7 50.0 16.540-44 32.3 39.3 24.3 37.7 49.7 21.4 11.845-49 15.4 25.6 43.1 36.0 29.6 44.1 11.950-54 19.155-5960-64 14.065-69 9.6 28 29 30 f2.2 Total rate by severityacquired injuries 41.4 38.0 54.1 50.0 19.0 37.0 79.1 60.7 18.9 8.0 52.0moderate 27.0 21.0 22.3 37.3 11.7 13.7 15.9 51.0 39.7 17.8 13.3 16.6 9.2 14.4 29.7 31severe 12.0 18.7 19.4 14.9 15.5 20.0 3.9 49.0 10.4 6.1 35.4 4.2 1.4 3.8 45.62.3 Total rate by relationship tothe perpetrator(s) 83.9 50.7intimate partner (current or former) 32 33 31.0 39.7 41.7 52.3 27.2 33.8 22.5 16.4 7,0 34 44.1 22.3 34.4 24.0 48.7 31.0 22.8 28.8 18.9 12.0 12.9 60.0 i iIntimate partner – current 50.2 6.9 17.0 i iIntimate partner - former 18.5 44.1 44.7other than intimate partner: 27.0 17.4 10.7 20.9 13.0 4.9 12.0 0.5 9.8 4.7 11.0family member 84.2 71.3 75.5 75.0 72.5 0.3 1.7 68.8 h ifamily member male 2.5 32.6 19.1 ifamily member female 38.4 26.3 86.0father/stepfather 10.6i 35 29.4 imother/stepmother 23.8 isister/brother 9.2 0.5 h idaughter/son 1.1 0.1friends, neighbours 0.3 0.1 1.6 iwork or school 0.3 0.0 0.2 0.8 9.8professional caregivers or helpers 0.0casual acquaintances 17.9 29.9 20.0 8.3 16.1 0.1 2.6 26.6 hboyfriend 4.4 iunknown person (stranger) 14.9 13.0 0.4 0.0 8.6 6.3 0.1 2.0 0.2 3.6 18.8 13.4 h i 36mother in law 19 1.6 1.0 h ifather in law 7.0 0.0 11.5others 0.5 i 37 1.1 7.9 7.8 14.6 14.1 0.3 0.0 yes yes 38 39 402.4 Total rate by frequency 25 Sample includes only ever-married women 26 age intervals are in a five-year groups, except 30-39 and 40-49 age groups 27 age-intervals are given as following: 16-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, and 65-69 (Italy) 28 indicators of different types of each violent acts are available, but they are not presented as moderate or severe, and therefore, not typed into the matrix. 29 severity of violent acts among all women who experienced violence, summed up 100% 30 injuries in the most severe violent situation, the question were “Did your partner’s violence caused injuries to you?” 31 severity of violence is assessed by perpetrators (their perceptions), but also by acts of violence and by perpetrators, whereas total rate is not given 32 among women who experienced moderate physical abuse (rate is also available among women who experienced severe physical abuse) 33 among women who experienced physical violence as of age of 15 34 rate is given for the last five years, not a lifetime 35 Both mother and father (parents) 36 Both mother and father in law (parents in law) 37 category ”others” comprise the following: acquaintance or neighbour, counsellor or psychologist or psychiatrist, ex-boyfriend or girlfriend, doctor, teacher, minister or priest or clergy, prison officer and other known person. 22
  • oncefew (2-10) 54.6many (>10) 43.8 # Confidentiality of study is compromised since 16% of the interviews were conducted in a presence of someone else than woman 38 frequency is available but just when segregated by each violent act in the group of moderate/severe abuse 39 frequency (sometimes/often) is available but just when segregated by age-groups 40 among all women experienced non-IPV 23
  • Table 2. Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to physical violence during lifetime by severity of violence, relationship to the perpetrator(s) and frequency (cont’d) Tanzania city Thailand city Namibia city Tanzania pr. Solomon Is. Thailand pr. Sweden (1) Sweden (2) Serbia city Nicaragua Paraguay Lithuania Maldives Peru city Romania Moldova Slovakia Peru pr. Norway Zambia Mexico Poland Samoa Russia Turkey Korea Peru USA UK 28.4 21.0 41 422.1 Total rate 40.0 32.6 47.4 28.4 32.0 18.1 13.5 62.0 9.6 67.8 19.2 15.9 7.6 9.5 18.0 58.72.1.1 Age-specific rate15-19 31.3 46.4 41.2 36.0 20.0 21.8 29.2 29.6 39.320-24 30.0 46.7 56.5 41.7 18.9 29.0 39.3 23.7 36.925-29 27.0 52.4 58.1 34.9 16.7 36.4 46.6 24.2 31.630-34 29.3 46.7 60.3 42.4 24.9 37.4 52.9 23.9 30.335-39 31.8 51.1 63.6 42.8 22.6 36.0 52.1 22.1 37.240-44 31.2 52.1 64.5 39.8 24.6 32.1 51.3 20.2 33.345-49 41.3 43.0 72.1 44.2 27.3 30.9 60.6 22.1 32.850-5455-5960-6465-69 yes 432.2 Total rate by severityacquired injuries 35.5 23.8 29.5 24.0 14.6 44moderate 7.0 10.5 27.1 23.1 12.0 16.7 14.7 11.1 16.3 21.8 10.3 15.8 21.0 14.0severe 10.9 19.9 11.4 9.3 45 25.5 49.0 23.8 8.1 34.4 16.5 24.7 12.6 18.0 18.0 t2.3 Total rate by relationship tothe perpetrator(s)intimate partner (current or 21.1 46former) 32.7 18.0 19.2 24.1 30.6 30.2 26.8 19.3 42.4 48.6 61.0 15.1 40.5 22.8 45.5 20.5 32.9 46.7 22.9 33.8 39.0 48.4Intimate partner - current 23.4 21.2 8.6Intimate partner - former 41.9 27.9 31.8other than intimate partner: 18.4 8.6 19.2 20.6 18.0 9.1 18.0 vfamily member 50.0 84.5 79.0 92.4 59.0 30.4 33.9 47.0 65.3 7.4family member male 30.1 23.4family member female 38.7 25.0father/stepfather 23.3 59.0mother/stepmothersister/brotherdaughter/sonfriends, neighbourswork or school 17.8 6.7 17.5professional caregivers or helperscasual acquaintance 56.6 12.5 14.0 31.2 21.6 69.6 58.7 15.4 14.0boyfriend 12.6unknown person (stranger) 7.4 14.2 6.0 4.4 1.6 20.1 41.0 4.8 4.3 5.2 12.8 5.0mother in lawfather in lawothers 6.3 10.2 15.2 0.6 7.9 11.0 17.5 24.8 32.5 24.0 47 48 w2.4 Total rate by frequency 41 rate presents both physical and sexual violence, perpetuated by either IP or non-IP (might be overestimation of physical violence, because it consists of data on sexual violence only, as well) 42 total rate is presented here under an assumption of the author of this report that women are victims, although they have been asked whether certain violent acts have happened in their families, and how often. 43 different acts are available, but segregated by current and previous partner 44 severity is classified in minor and severe, for use of force by IPV 45 severe IPV is defined as: attempted strangulation, use of weapons, beating head against an object or wall 46 rate includes threats or force 47 among all women experienced non-IPV (in terms of 1-2 time, and >3 time, for Maldives and Solomon Islands) 48 total rate by frequency is presented here under an assumption of the author of this report that women are victims, although they have been asked whether certain violent acts have happened in their families, and how often.
  • once 17.0 39.0few (2-10) 35.6 4.0 61.0many (>10) 64.4 25
  • Table 3. Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to sexual violence in the last 12 months by relationship to the perpetrator(s) and frequency Dominican R. Cambodia (1) Cambodia (2) Australia (1) Australia (2) Bangladesh Bangladesh Ethiopia pr. El Salvador Canada (1) Canada (2) Azerbaijan Japan city Brazil city Colombia Germany Brazil pr. Denmark Armenia Ecuador Albania Finland Kiribati Ireland Bolivia France Egypt India Haiti Italy city pr. 493.1 Total rate 1.5 1.6 4.0 3.0 4.7 3.5 50 51 523.1.1 Age-specific rate 53 5415-19 30.5 32.1 3.4 7.9 2.0 46.7 3,620-24 30.7 24.4 27.4 0.8 8.4 6.0 47.6 12.0 1.725-29 22.0 31.2 4.0 4.3 0.8 54.2 1.730-34 29.8 21.2 22.8 2.8 3.4 3.0 51.8 4.9 0.0 0.835-39 12.7 21.0 3.4 7.5 0.3 42.6 1.640-44 24.6 13.1 12.0 2.0 5.2 2.0 33.8 2.2 0.945-49 14.9 7.3 19.3 2.7 2.8 0.4 21.6 1.350-54 1.0 1.655-59 0.360-64 0.965-69 0.5 0.53.2 Total rate by relationshipto the perpetrator(s)intimate partner (current orformer) 2.0 1.0 30.2 24.2 2.8 5.6 3.2 3.0 3.0 1.2 4.2 3.0 44.4 4.0 1.1 14.8 1.0 2.6 12.7Intimate partner - current one 2.0Intimate partner - former one 1.6other than intimate partner: 2.8 2.6family member 0.0friends, neighbours 0.3work or school 0.2professional caregivers orhelperscasual acquaintances 0.5unknown person 1.0 1.7 553.3 Total rate by frequencyoncefew (2-10) 1.3many (>10) 0.6 49 it is not clear whether available rate presents physical violence by all, or just by an intimate partner 50 age-intervals are given as following: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, and >45, sum up 100% 51 age-intervals are given as following: 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, and 45-54 52 age-intervals are given as following: 16-20, 21-30, 31-40, 41-50, and 51-60 53 age-intervals are given as following: 16-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, and 65-69 54 first age group is 18-19 years 55 frequencies of current sexual violence are given just for spouse as a perpetrator 26
  • Table 3. Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to sexual violence in the last 12 months by relationship to the perpetrator(s) and frequency (cont’d) Tanzania city Thailand city Namibia city Tanzania pr. Solomon Is. Thailand pr. Sweden (1) Sweden (2) Serbia city Nicaragua Paraguay Lithuania Peru city Romania Maldives Moldova Slovakia Peru pr. Norway Zambia Mexico Poland Samoa Russia Turkey Korea Peru USA UK3.1 Total rate 0.9 0.53.1.1 Age-specific rate15-19 16.3 19.6 27.9 20.0 2.9 11.3 23.6 29.6 25.020-24 10.4 8.6 27.1 12.8 0.6 16.8 20.2 22.7 21.425-29 6.6 8.0 24.0 13.3 0.0 15.4 22.1 21.0 17.330-34 8.7 7.4 24.4 10.5 1.6 12.6 16.8 18.1 12.635-39 11.1 4.0 24.4 13.6 1.0 12.9 14.1 17.5 16.640-44 5.2 4.9 15.9 6.6 1.9 8.8 12.6 14.2 13.445-49 9.6 4.9 16.8 8.3 0.9 2.7 9.9 6.9 14.450-5455-5960-6465-693.2 Total rate by relationship tothe perpetrator(s)intimate partner (current or 56former) 2.0 9.1 3.9 2.6 7.1 22.9 11.5 1.1 0.7 12.8 18.3 17.1 15.6 7.0 0.4 3.9other than intimate partner: 2.9family memberfriends, neighbourswork or school 2.6professional caregivers or helperscasual acquaintancesunknown person3.3 Total rate by frequencyoncefew (2-10)many (>10) 56 rape/sexual assault 27
  • Table 4. Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to sexual violence during lifetime by relationship to the perpetrator(s) and frequency Dominican R. Australia (1) Australia (2) Bangladesh Bangladesh Ethiopia pr. El Salvador Canada (1) Canada (2) Azerbaijan Japan city Cambodia Cambodia Brazil city Colombia Germany Brazil pr. Denmark Armenia Ecuador Albania Finland Kiribati Ireland Bolivia France Egypt India Haiti Italy city pr.4.1 Total rate 2.9 4.0 34.0 9.6 4.3 13.0 23.7 57 a 584.1.1 Age-specific rate15-19 0.4 42.4 48.6 6.9 11.2 56.5 3.620-24 3.0 40.4 47.6 4.6 13.5 53.1 25.4 7.025-29 4.7 38.1 54.3 12.1 10.2 66.4 6.130-34 39.2 50.2 10.6 13.8 63.1 27.4 5.7 5935-39 5.1 30.7 47.1 11.2 18.6 57.7 5.540-44 38.5 45.3 10.1 22.1 55.2 26.3 4.7 6045-49 4.8 23.2 53.2 12.6 10.2 47.1 8.950-54 23.355-5960-64 20.365-69 15.14.2 Total rate by relationship 61to the perpetrator(s)intimate partner (current or 62former) 2.9 12.0 37.4 49.7 15.2 10.1 14.3 3.6 16,0 11.0 6.4 12.0 58.6 63.0 11.5 7.7 17.0 6.1 6.2 46.1intimate partner - current 5.0Intimate partner - former 17.6others than intimate partner: 7.6 0.5 6.8 4.6 0.3 19.0 49.3 20.4 3.5 10.0family member 8.2 13.8 13.2 10.1 0.5 2.1family member male 14.0 6.9family member female 3.4father/stepfather 5.0 2.3friends, neighbours 25.0 19.8 1.7work or school 11.8 2.1 20.7professional caregivers orhelpers 3.8casual acquaintances 15.6 48.8 54.4 22.3 4.3 45.8boyfriendunknown person (stranger) 11.0 78.7 28.8 17.6 13.0 14.5 13.4 60.4 34.5others 4.1 15.0 16.2 9.0 0.2 2.1 39,14.3 Total rate by frequencyonce 63few (2-10) 69.5 64many (>10) 29.9 57 segregation by age (10 years intervals) is given, but by intimate partner (current and/or former partner) 58 age-intervals are given as following: 16-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, and 65-69 59 age intervals 30-39 60 age interval 40-49 61 This rate is segregated for penetration, and other forms of sexual violence, by different perpetrators. Here are presented higher rates from either first or second subgroup of sexual violence. Therefore, percentages exceed 100 62 in a last 5 years, not lifetime 63 1-2 time, non-IPV (with >3 time, sum up 100% ) 64 >3 time, non-IPV (with previous 1-2 time, sum up 100%) 28
  • Tanzania city Thailand city Namibia city Tanzania pr. Solomon Is. Thailand pr. Sweden (1) Sweden (2) Serbia city Nicaragua Paraguay Lithuania Peru city Romania Maldives Moldova Slovakia Peru pr. Norway Zambia Mexico Poland Samoa Russia Turkey Korea Peru USA UK4.1 Total rate 43.7 4.6 2.5 6.0 10.6 a a4.1.1 Age-specific rate15-19 21.3 23.2 35.3 28.0 5.7 16.1 31.1 29.6 28.620-24 17.9 18.4 42.1 19.9 3.6 22.6 30.5 34.0 34.525-29 14.5 24.6 40.9 18.5 4.6 26.2 33.7 35.7 27.830-34 14.3 19.2 48.5 16.4 9.7 26.2 28.8 30.9 24.035-39 18.3 24.3 50.9 22.0 6.2 23.7 30.1 28.4 31.840-44 14.3 23.6 48.9 18.7 4.3 21.4 27.7 26.8 29.045-49 19.2 26.1 54.7 21.7 8.6 17.3 29.6 24.4 28.250-5455-5960-6465-694.2 Total rate byrelationship to theperpetrator(s) 0.1intimate partner (current orformer) 7.5 6.7 9.0 4.1 16.5 10.2 7.6 22.5 46.7 5.1 19.5 6.3 54.7 6.2 23.0 30.7 29.9 28.9 15.0 5.1intimate partner - current 2.9 1.4Intimate partner - former 12.4 11.1others than intimate partner: 17.3 6.2 16.6 6.4 24.8 10.3 11.3 3.9 18.0 13.4 11.5 9.4 6.1 2.6 3.0family member 6.3 15.2 9.7 0.8 10.3 3.6 11.5 4.4 2.1 12.1family member male 17.1 8.5family member female 1.7 0.0father/stepfather 4.3 0.0friends, neighbours 13.0 65 66work or school 49,6 1.8 2.6 24.1professional caregivers orhelperscasual acquaintances 66.7 40.0 47.3 7.4 58.6 41.1 48.8 45.2 31.9 36.4boyfriend 47.7unknown person (stranger) 35.0 24.0 29.7 26.1 5.1 24.1 42.9 26.8 24.9 25.9 46.8 18.2others 5.2 24.1 24.2 12.5 7.5 17.9 23.9 22.0 27.4 24.5 39.44.3 Total rate by frequencyonce g gfew (2-10) 38.5 4.0 43.0 h hmany (>10) 61.5 2.0 57.0 Table 4. Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to sexual violence during lifetime by relationship to the perpetrator(s) and frequency (cont’d) 65 This category embrace the following: teacher, friend of family, work colleague 66 Category summed up of the following perpetrators: teacher or professor (0.7%) and employer or the boss (1.9%) 29
  • Table 5. Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to sexual or physical violence by current or former intimate partner in the last 12 months by frequency Dominican R. Australia (1) Australia (2) Bangladesh Bangladesh Ethiopia pr. El Salvador Canada (1) Canada (2) Azerbaijan Japan city Cambodia Cambodia Brazil city Colombia Germany Brazil pr. Denmark Armenia Ecuador Albania Finland Kiribati Ireland Bolivia France Egypt India Haiti Italy city pr. 67 a a a 68 695.1 Total rate 9.7 3.0 30.2 31.9 9.3 14.8 14.6 2.0 2.5 9.8 12.5 24.0 53.7 10.0 7.9 12.5 10.3 2.4 3.8 36.1 70 d d5.1.1 Age-specific rate15-19 47.5 41.3 19.0 20.2 4.0 15.4 21.0 50.0 15.0 25.4 10.4 3.620-24 36.7 34.0 12.3 24.7 12.2 16.7 18.8 59.6 15.0 14.6 3.9 6.9 31.4 11.4 2.625-29 36.3 40.2 9.8 14.5 19.1 13.4 14.1 63.9 10.0 19.4 12.3 6.130-34 28.4 32.7 10.6 12.3 16.8 11.3 12.9 62.4 11.0 9.0 2.5 4.1 26.2 11.5 3.135-39 19.3 25.7 6.7 12.6 16.8 9.6 12.6 52.0 10.0 22.4 9.9 5.940-44 16.2 18.7 4.1 13.6 10.9 5.4 8.2 41.5 6.0 6.9 2.5 2.8 13.0 7.8 2.845-49 9.8 25.7 9.0 5.6 18.1 5.5 4.5 27.9 7.0 12.5 5.9 2.250-5455-59 4.7 2.3 1.460-64 2.3 0.165-695.2 Total rate by 71 e 72frequency 1.0never 12.0 52.0 54.6 27.8 44.8once 44.5 47.2 50.3 73 g g 74 h h g gfew (2-10) 7.4 50.7 5.7 35.4 55.5 52.8 49.7 29.9 40.1 75 i i i imany (>10) 2.3 36.0 42.3 9.1 41.8 14.4 67 just for physical violence 68 total rate of women subjected to violence of just current partner (rate is available also for the former partner, and it is 42%) 69 total rate of women subjected to violence of just current partner (rate is available also for the former partner, and it is 6.1%) 70 age-intervals are as following: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-59, >60 71 frequency is presented just for current partners 72 frequency is given for both current and/or former partner 73 1-4 times 74 more than once 75 5 times and more 30
  • Table 5. Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to sexual or physical violence by current or former intimate partner in the last 12 months by frequency (cont’d) Tanzania city Thailand city Namibia city Tanzania pr. Solomon Is. Thailand pr. Sweden (1) Sweden (2) Serbia city Nicaragua Paraguay Lithuania Peru city Romania Maldives Moldova Slovakia Peru pr. Norway Zambia Mexico Poland Samoa Russia Turkey Korea Peru USA UK5.1 Total rate 6.4 19.5 11.9 6.6 19.2 34.2 2.4 3.7 12.2 41.8 1.2 21.5 29.1 21.3 22.9 5.9 4.2 26.5 b5.1.1 Age-specific rate 7615-19 27.5 18.2 41.1 48.5 36.0 14.3 22.6 36.8 44.4 39.3 21.0 6.3 33.320-24 25.8 15.7 27.6 43.9 33.3 6.1 4.7 30.3 32.1 29.9 31.0 11.3 35.325-29 14.9 13.9 22.5 35.5 26.1 2.3 25.6 34.0 27.4 22.6 16.0 29.730-34 18.5 13.8 19.7 33.6 20.6 4.3 4.4 20.0 28.8 21.6 21.1 8.1 24.235-39 20.0 10.9 9.7 34.6 21.6 3.1 19.4 21.5 19.6 26.5 13.0 19.840-44 14.9 11.5 19.4 25.8 12.0 2.4 4.6 13.2 17.6 19.1 17.7 16.6 7745-49 19.2 6.7 7.7 23.5 17.5 2.6 3.6 21.1 7.6 20.0 8.0 4.4 15.850-5455-59 4.7 7860-64 5.2 1.365-695.2 Total rate byfrequencynever 57.9 53.9once 63.6 38.0 g h 79 gfew (2-10) 10.8 36.4 39.0 41.8 i 80 imany (>10) 29.3 23.0 4.3 76 for age interval 16-19 years 77 for age interval 35-49 78 for age interval 50-64 79 2 - 5 times 80 6 times and more 31
  • Table 6. Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to sexual or physical violence by current or former intimate partner during lifetime by frequency Bangladesh city Bangladesh pr. Dominican R. Cambodia (1) Cambodia (2) Australia (1) Australia (2) Ethiopia pr. El Salvador Canada (1) Canada (2) Azerbaijan Japan city Brazil city Colombia Germany Brazil pr. Denmark Armenia Ecuador Albania Finland Kiribati Bolivia France Ireland Egypt India Haiti Italy6.1 Total 12.8 31.0 7.0 81 82 83rate 53.4 61.7 53.3 28.9 36.9 22.5 17.5 44.1 22.3 34.4 7.0 70.9 31 29.9 25.0 28.8 18.9 14.3 15.4 68.06.1.1 Age- 84 dspecific rate15-19 13.6 58.5 53.2 24.1 27.0 4.0 38.5 19.6 28.7 59.8 22.0 0.3 0.1 7.120-24 11.3 55.9 53.3 22.3 38.8 13.7 43.4 25.7 34.1 67.4 29.0 25.7 28.9 0.3 0.2 13.025-29 14.5 57.3 68.1 29.5 32.8 21.4 42.9 24.5 34.4 75.9 29.0 0.3 0.2 13.830-34 13.8 55.0 66.5 29.6 35.5 19.4 43.8 23.2 37.1 77.1 32.0 28.6 30.7 0.3 0.2 16.535-39 13.8 49.4 62.9 29.8 45.2 18.3 45.3 21.7 36.3 70.5 37.0 0.3 0.2 18.140-44 13.5 47.7 57.3 27.7 42.2 12.7 43.3 23.3 33.2 67.6 29.0 27.4 28.0 0.2 0.2 14.245-49 13.5 34.1 62.4 37.8 31.5 22.1 48.0 15.7 31.7 61.3 32.0 0.4 0.2 15.650-5455-59 27.7 25.460-64 14.3 13.165-696.2 Totalrate byfrequencyonce 32.4 31.0 67.6 85few (2-10) 36.0many (>10) 33.0 81 just for physical violence 82 total rate of women subjected to violence of just current partner 83 For the last five years. not a lifetime period 84 age-intervals are as following: 18-24. 25-34. 35-44. 45-59. >60 85 more than once 32
  • Table 6. Total and age-specific rate of women subjected to sexual or physical violence by current or former intimate partner during lifetime by frequency (cont’d) Tanzania city Thailand city Namibia city Tanzania pr. Solomon Is. Thailand pr. Sweden (1) Sweden (2) Serbia city Nicaragua Paraguay Lithuania Peru city Romania Maldives Moldova Slovakia Peru pr. Norway Zambia Mexico Poland Samoa Russia Turkey Korea Peru USA UK 866.1 Total rate 37.6 19.5 23.4 24.6 35.9 30.2 26.8 19.3 51.2 69.0 46.1 23.7 27.9 21.7 21.4 41.3 55.9 41.1 47.4 42.0 28.8 48.4 d d 876.1.1 Age-specific rate15-19 42.5 18.0 0.3 53.6 60.3 52.0 20.0 29.8 44.3 48.1 50.0 38.420-24 22.7 35.8 19.9 0.4 50.0 67.8 46.8 18.9 20.3 39.4 48.9 44.3 52.4 35.0 49.325-29 32.5 20.1 0.4 55.1 63.9 39.8 18.5 45.5 58.0 46.5 45.9 53.230-34 30.8 34.3 20.5 0.4 49.3 69.5 45.8 25.9 19.5 44.3 62.0 42.1 39.4 39.0 48.535-39 35.7 16.8 0.4 51.1 71.7 48.4 23.7 46.2 56.4 41.2 54.3 46.440-44 33.3 36.4 19.6 0.5 54.2 70.9 48.8 26.1 21.1 39.6 58.8 36.6 47.8 42.0 50.045-49 44.2 0.4 46.5 76.0 49.2 27.7 34.5 64.8 35.1 44.6 48.0 44.050-5455-59 44.5 20.860-64 29.6 17.165-696.2 Total rate byfrequencyonce 32.0few (2-10) 44.0many (>10) 24.086 includes non-physical abuse (emotional. financial). threats; force; sexual assault or stalking87 age intervals as following: 15-24. 25-34. 35-44. and 45-49 33